__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

The Taste Issue issUe 28

Taste Issue Issue 28 Steve Aoki — HUF — Pizzaslime — Scott Hove Antonio Diaz — Stephanie Gonot — Break Room 86 — Odys + Penelope Golden Box — Mier Gallery — The Art of Plating — Amy Pham

L A C A N VA S


AVA I L A B L E AT: SPORTIE LA AND THE GLENDALE GALLERIA


VA ST MINOR IT Y NOA DE A N E


MASTHEAD

Publisher

Dante Colombatti Associate Publisher

Mali Mochow

Editor-In-Chief

Events Director/Accounts Manager

Erin Dennison

Janessa Molina

Online Editor

Events & Projects Manager

on the cover Steve Aoki

RenĂŠe George

Jade Daniels

cover photography by Rickett & Sones | Stephanie Gonot

Sr. Editor

Finance Director

Lauren Westerfield

Cole Westerholm

Production Director

Videographer

Joevanno Diaz

Mitchel Dumlao

Sr. Designer

Online Contributors

Theresa Liu

Angela Gleason Annie Monroe Charles Smith Faith Ann Young Jeremy Ely Jesy Odio Kimmy Mcatee Noah Briscoe Patrick Cain Sanni Youboty Vija Hodosy

C O N TA C T 17 7 8 N . M a i n S t . L o s A n g e l e s , C A 9 0 0 31 (3 2 3) 3 5 2 - 3 2 5 0 • P R@ L A C A N VA S .C O M Wa n n a c o n t r ib u t e? S e n d al l e di t o r i al s ub m i s s i o n s t o s ub m i t @ L A C A N VA S .c o m

Photography SUBSCRIPTIONS $ 6.0 0 an issue, $25 a year v i s i t L A C A N VA S . c o m t o s i g n up

Stephanie Gonot Rickett + Sones Josie Simonet Henrik Purienne Pizzaslimeirl Signe Birck Josh Telles Joe Perri Dylan + Jeni Steven Meiers Derrick Santini Jackie Russo John Pascha Mark Wales Captain Contributors

Garth Trinidad Kacy Emmett Vi Nguyen Rachel Many Kristel Kovner Megan Hughes Subscriptions Supervisor

Oliver

Copyright 2015 by LA CANVAS. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission in writing from LA CANVAS. LA CANVAS makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but is not responsible for unsolicited or contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork, or advertisements. LA CANVAS is not held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions.

Events Assistants

Veda Houngviengkham Nikki Kingman Design Assistant

Lauren Pilgreen Online Editorial Assistants

Justin Duong Nicole Frederick Noor Gill Social Media Assistant

Katherine Lai


SHOPKOSHKA.COM


of

ta Bl e

music n˚ 12

Musician •

contents

STE VE AOKI

the dj and dim mak founder speaks on his new album and science fiction

Playlist •

PIZ Z ASLIME

a tracklist straight from the meta gods themselves

Venue •

GOLDE N BOX

the hollywood retro disco from nightlife impresario jeremy fall

Music Spotlight •

ANDR A DAY

this talented youtube singer just landed a major record deal

art n˚ 21

Art Spotlight •

THE ART OF PL ATING

gastronomic fine art L A STRE E T ART

snaps from our favorite art around l.a.

Artist •

SCOT T HOVE

the man who put fake cakes on the map

Gallery •

MIE R GALLE RY

west hollywood’s latest contemporary gallery GALLE RY OPE NINGS

a roundup of which art shows to catch this season

style n˚ 20

Fashion Spotlight •

AMY PHAM

the it girl dj, host, and model who’s taking over the city—one platform at a time

Designer •

LE Z ARD

the california duo behind your favorite swimsuit

Store •

HUF

living legend keith hufnagel talks sneakers and skate culture

Trend •

TRE ND MATRIX

retail therapy for every budget

16 17 19

21 26 28 30 33

20 34 38 41

Editorial •

THE GARDE N OF E DE N

42

Wildcard •

PIZ Z ASLIME

50

pizzaslime talks social media, celebrity collabs, and an earnest affinity for drake

food n˚ 22

12

Food Spotlight •

ANTONIO DIA Z

22

the man behind the food industry’s next big thing

Food Editorial •

THE GOLDE N R ATIO

photography by the art of plating

Food Scoops •

TAKE A LU NCH

46 60

budget-friendly meals worth your time

Restaurant •

ODYS

+

PE NE LOPE

la brea corridor’s latest foodie addition

Bar •

FESTIVAL SE ASON

save room and mark your calendars

misc n˚ 8

61 62

Drink • B RE AK ROOM 8 6 made in the ‘80s: the line hotel and the houston brothers join forces

64

NOTE D

8

what to look out for this season

Neighborhood Watch •

SOUTHPARK

five reasons to revisit the burgeoning urban hub

24

SCE NE & HE ARD take a peek at our most recent parties, and find out how to stay in the loop

66

Calendar •

MAY

70

Calendar •

J U NE

72

Last Look •

STE PHANIE GONOT

74

Events •

we can’t leave this woman’s tumblr alone


a note

A M AT TE R O F TASTE When it comes to matters of taste, everyone’s an expert. While putting

the man, the DJ, and the Dim Mak founder was preordained to

together the Taste Issue, I certainly heard my fair share of opinions—solicited

teach us how to party. After all, that’s the reason you paid to park,

and otherwise—and it wasn’t until the final days of the book’s production

right? What’s more, he’s a gentleman: he even brought cold pressed

that I understood its overarching theme. Working backward, taste became

juice to set.

a metaphor for persuasion. Taste, as it pertains to this conversation, is the pixie-dust that we think about when we imagine the recipe behind our

While we’re on the topic of polite visionaries, I should mention that this

own identities. The ingredient that makes each of us, you know, *special.*

issue’s full of them. If you’ve ever had the pleasure of an IRL Amy Pham interaction, you know what I’m talking about. Antonio Diaz, Editor-in-

These days, folks are pretty protective of their personal brands, as well as

Chief and founder of Life and Thyme Magazine, is poised to reframe foodie

the affiliations used to define them. Speaking of other people’s feelings,

conversation, and happens to be as delightful as he is talented. The duo

let’s talk about Steve Aoki. Perhaps you’re wondering why we chose the

behind Pizzaslime outline their earnest fanboy-dom for Drake and discuss

father of EDM to grace our cover this issue? Love him or hate him, you

their casual social media dominance. And as for the streetwear gods over

probably have an opinion.

at HUF? Well, they took generous time out of their busy schedules to detail their unwavering allegiance to skate culture, and give insight into

I happen to think he’s the shit. We’re talking about the guy who gave us

the formula that drives their multi-billion dollar market—all during their

a reason to party at Cinespace all those years ago. We’re talking about the

lunch break.

guy who introduced us to Bloc Party. The guy who’s besties with Mayor Garcetti. The guy who shaped the culture of the largest music movement

From artistically plated beef tongue stew, pizza, and spray painted French

in decades. Aoki’s territory is wilding out, and whether he’s spinning

fries, to cake, swimwear, craft beer, and EDM, we’ve got something

Screamo or Biggie—or mashing them together—the former punk rock

in this issue for every persuasion. If I do say so myself, this one’s in

kid is now electronic music’s ultimate showman. With a legendary and

pretty good taste.

flamboyant businessman for a father (yeah, the Benihana dude), Aoki

erin dennison Editor-In-Chief


The Taste Issue |

Noted

8

Noted 32 Flavors

there, she quit her day job in wealth management

gelateriauli.com

Gelateria Uli’s seasonal selections that have our

+ then some

U

and, together with her husband, opened up shop. While their staple flavors are always solid, it’s taste buds tingling. Past creations have included

li Nasibova’s Gelateria Uli churns out

flavors like Mulled Apple sorbet, Coconut

fresh gelatos and sorbets made daily in

Lemongrass, and Saffron. Recently, Uli’s teamed

her Historic Core kitchen. A little over

up with their next-door neighbors, the taco legends

a year ago, Uli discovered a passion for feeding the

at Guisado’s, for horchata and Jamaica-mint flavor

sweet tooth of her fellow Downtowners. From

collaborations. Mind blown.

▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒

Festival Junkie lightninginabottle.org

Butter Up solsticecanyon.com

S

tep up your PB&Js with LA-based Solstice Canyon’s small-batch, gourmet almond butters, whipped up by former food industry

co-workers Rachael Sheridan and Jessie Litow. Each creation is USDA organic, vegan, raw, non-GMO,

C

oachella may be over; but if you’ve still got festival fever, we encourage you to check out Lightning in a Bottle. Take the

impressively curated selection of performers at Coachella’s Do LaB stage, add the venue’s vibrant

unpasteurized, and gluten-free; and with variations like Aztec Chocolate and Cardamom & Clove, these ladies’ almond butters are yummy (and healthy) enough to eat by the spoonful. Go ‘head, we won’t tell anyone.

approach to production, and now imagine the whole thing on a grander scale. That, more or less, is Lightning in a Bottle.

Accompanied by a bountiful roundup of mindexpanding activities and workshops, Lightning in

Save the Date

a Bottle offers a transformational experience often referred to as a “mini Burning Man.” This year’s event includes acts like Flume, SBTRKT, Odesza, Tycho, and John Digweed, and will be held over Memorial Day Weekend (May 21-25, 2015) in Bradley, CA.

▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒

makemusicpasadena.org

F

gathering to watch 150 acts performing on five main stages and in over 30 venues, it’s easy to see why this annual concert series continues

ree music festivals your bag? Might want to

to be a local favorite. For this year’s eighth

start the group text now (if you haven’t

anniversary festival, you can expect a noteworthy

already). On June 6, Old Pasadena hosts the

lineup with bands like Dark Waves, Nick

West Coast’s largest music festival, Make Music

Waterhouse, and How to Dress Well. Grab your

Pasadena. With a projected 50,000 attendees

SPF and make a day of it.


Noted

9

Noted

All That Jazz jagajazzist.com

S

ometimes it takes an outside perspective to appreciate the spatial uniqueness of LA’s sprawl. Hailing from Norway, Jaga Jazzist is an eight-piece jazz band whose main

A Lesson in Mixology cocktailacademyla.com

A deft arrangement encompassing everything from curiously

B

interstellar tones to warmer, more earthbound vibes, the EP is an

up in the libation community. With combined

appropriate synthesis of our city’s contrarian—yet captivating—

experience from places like Hinoki & The

composition. Jaga Jazzist’s Starfire EP is out June 2 on independent

Bird, Comme Ça, and 41 Ocean, they’ll school

label, Ninja Tune.

you in everything needed to make drinks like

songwriter, Lars Horntveth, moved to LA in late 2012. Taking inspiration from our city’s nocturnal glow and wide-open skies, Horntveth began composing the octet’s forthcoming EP, Starfire.

"Sometimes it takes an outside perspective to appreciate the spatial uniqueness of LA's sprawl."

randyn Tepper, Matt Landes, and Analisa Moskus are Cocktail Academy LA, a renegade crew of seasoned

hospitality and cocktail experts shaking things

the pros, offering lessons in bartending, spirits history, bar tools, cocktail families, recipe

impress the homies by having Cocktail

development, and more—all hosted in the

Academy LA cater your next event with custom

quirky, garden-like Arts District establishment

concoctions like the McQueen Old Fashioned,

known as Apartment A. Not quite ready to

made with Bulleit Bourbon, Demerara sugar,

put your idle bar cart to use? You can still

and coffee-tobacco bitters.

A Tight Shyp

shyp.com

W

ell, damn. While we’re over here still trying to wrap our heads around the concept of digital stamps, the folks at Shyp—the year-old San Francisco start-up set to launch in LA in mid-May—are planning to make our lives even easier. Thanks to the ethically

questionable efficiency czars over at Amazon Prime, we’ve been conditioned to expect next-day everything—leaving a considerable chasm between the worlds of shipping and receiving for anyone still trucking to the post office. But now, Shyp aims to close that gap. The app’s premise is simple: ship anything, anywhere, for just $5—right from wherever you’re sitting. Open Shyp, press a button, and a dispatcher will be at your door in less than 20 minutes. No post offices or scrambling to find a suitable box. Or something resembling a suitable box that you can maybe tape. If you can find the tape.


The Taste Issue |

11

DOT COM

@orianakoren

@haydengrosser

@yeskelsey

@culinaryinspo

@sundays_forever

@xxlittlebirdxx

@betheplebeian

@melmonifi

#LACANVASFOODIE

#LACANVASFOODIE

@eugenekykim

AS THE LOCALS DO We love Los Angeles. From palm tree-lined landscapes and iconic diners to local food porn and golden-hour cityscapes—we can’t get enough decadent LA imagery. Last month, we asked Angelenos to tag #LACANVASFOODIE in their favorite gastronomic snaps from eateries around the city. And boy, does our hometown look good.

@LACANVAS

/LACANVAS

@LACANVAS

LACANVAS

LACANVAS.COM


The Taste Issue |

Steve Aoki

12

MUsician

Steve Aoki

Let Them Eat Cake text by Garth Trinidad | photo by Rickett & Sones styling by Justin Lynn | grooming by Daniela Grasso

Leather Vest Ashton Michael — Eyewear Dim Mak

Special thanks to MSO PR


Steve Aoki

Steve Aoki draws inspiration from the cosmos while dominating EDM culture.

to get respect in straight edge hardcore culture, you had to be productive. I learned how to put on shows, I started a zine, and I was in a band. I was so passionately involved that I picked up a guitar, I stole copies from Kinkos to make the zines, I found a community center to do shows for free. The same principles apply to every business decision I’ve made since, ‘cuz it’s all about spreading the word and preserving the community. DJing didn’t start until I came to LA and needed to build Dim Mak. That’s when I started promoting

Steve Aoki is a nascent futurist. Beyond the veil of superstar DJ and EDM

and opening up for friends at bars.

mogul is a man driven by the promise of his Technicolor, sci-fi dreams. On his latest releases, Neon Future l and ll (Dim Mak / Ultra), we hear abbreviated,

How did you and DJ AM end up throwing parties together?

serene prophecies of a glorious, space-age destiny, gently folded into ambient intros and interludes betwixt customary throbbing basslines, torrid synths,

It was around 2004. We were the epicenter of this new, burgeoning, hybrid

and starry guest vocals from the likes of Linkin Park and Snoop Lion. Author

electro scene—Vice, Urb, BPM. The Dim Mak parties were a niche, and AM

and futurist Ray Kurzweil, theoretical physicist Kip Thorne, and Hollywood

at the time was the king of nightclub culture. He was a pioneer in that he

heavy J.J. Abrams all lend voice and perspective to the Neon Future records.

was always seeking out the next thing. I was so impressed and inspired by

With childlike awe, Steve enthusiastically shares the theories and rhetoric

how he built his career, ‘cuz he did it in an underground way but was loved

he digs, and explains how the futuristic concepts have influenced his work

by pop culture, mixing hip-hop with mainstream. He was a charmer, very

and aesthetic.

eloquent and convincing. He introduced me to all kinds of habits that I got stuck with...like poker. Outside of music, we always found ways to bond. I

Now approaching his late 30s, Steve demonstrates no signs of slowing down.

looked up to him like a big brother. We decided to throw this party in 2006

Sharp and graceful, the astute businessman tours 300 days out of the year

(Banana Split Sundaes). It was our way of giving back to the community, a

with a portable studio in tow. Between the launch of a new high-fashion Dim

free party strictly for the music lovers that knew the DJs. It became a special

Mak apparel line in Tokyo and his obligations surrounding the release of Neon

moment in LA history. AM is one of the most influential human beings I’ve

Future ll, I was able to steal a few moments with him in a sunny Downtown

ever met. He was so generous, so caring, always available to his friends.

LA loft. We spoke about his dad, deep house, DJ AM, community, and the future. After responding to a text from LA Mayor Eric Garcetti, Steve

There’s been lots of criticism when word spread of your supposed foray into

settles in...

deep house. What’s happening there?

I started a residency in Ibiza last year. I was going to Richie Hawtin’s party, Jamie Jones’ party…I was out. I was a sponge. I was so inspired by the sounds I was hearing. So [then] I’m in London at a meeting, and Mixmag is sitting next to me (though at the time I don’t know this). Someone asks what’s going on with Ibiza and I’m talking about how I’ve been inspired to start doing all kinds of different beats—some techno, some deep house. Next thing you know, [there are] headlines everywhere about me doing deep house. I hate reacting to criticism and usually don’t; but this time I did, creating this alterego to produce some of this stuff. I put out a couple of records under the radar on SoundCloud. I don’t have time to promote it because of Neon Future. But I go back to Ibiza this summer, and I’m gonna finish those tracks and slowly put them out. It’s just another way for me to be able to express myself. I actually do deep house sets at my residency at Cafe Mambo—most incredible sunsets in the world. After all, we are DJs: we don’t just have to T-Shirt Cesar Arellanes

play our own music, and it’s great to have a forum to play all kinds of stuff and just have fun.

Was your family supportive of you being a DJ, pursuing music? You have guys like Kip Thorne and J.J. Abrams on Neon Future commenting

My father never gave me a single dime. It was just his way of saying, “You

on things like astrophysics, space travel, and transcendence—the possible

need to figure shit out on your own.” Even though he was a wealthy, flamboyant

future of mankind. Is that the premise of Neon Future?

businessman and entrepreneur, he was smart in not spoiling his children with the wrong spoils. My father was an adventure seeker. I was lucky to be spoiled

Yes. Since it’s such a big part of my identity, I brought it into my music. We

by traveling with him growing up, going to all these places around the world

companionized the album with the Neon Future Sessions for Wired Magazine

and returning refreshed and inspired. There’s no doubt my success is derived

where so far we have Ray Kurzweil and Stan Lee talking about the future, but

from watching him do his thing.

there are 10 other interviews waiting to be published. I flew my whole team to Oxford so we could talk to Richard Dawkins about the future of atheism,

What was the catalyst for realizing you needed to do more than just be a DJ

evolution, and religion. It’s not just about science and tech, but different

in order to transcend regional boundaries?

perspectives that have opened my mind to a whole new way of thinking. I

The original catalyst was being this lost kid and finding a community that

and tech, life extension, brain science, nanotechnology. Neon Future ll is

supports me for who I am, and me wanting to be productive in that community.

meta, going outwards into space, connecting with other life forms. When I

The community at that time was straight edge hardcore. When I was growing

was at UCSB in 1999, I snuck in to see Stephen Hawking speak. I’ve always

up in Newport Beach, it was middle and upper class white suburbia. In order

been obsessed with science, but now more than ever.

wanted to intellectualize Neon Future. The first album is about current science

13


The Taste Issue | MUsician

Steve Aoki

14


Steve Aoki

15


THE GRAMMY MUSEUM® PRESENTS PI ZZA T I ME W IT H P IZ Z A SL IM E If you’re one of the over 90,0 0 0 folks who follow Pizzaslime on Instagram or Twit ter, you might already know about the poignant Drake T-shir t they released with our pals over at the dFm. Or perhaps you’re hip to their Tumblr, which features exclusive content of a farting Fat Jewish, screaming Tyler the Creator, jolly Diplo, and inebriated Pharrell. These guys seem to be every where, so we were hyped when they started answering our text messages. While we had their attention, we asked Pizzaslime to score our Taste Issue Playlist— and they obliged. Nex t time, we’ll be asking for the Rick Ross T-shir t, too.

Selections By

F AT H E R

“Everybody in the Club Gettin’ Shot”

Pizzaslime

B E TA / M A I “Never Enough”

MIKE SKINNER

“You Better Be”

EXTENDED THROUGH JANUARY 10, 2016 LANEY JONES

POST MALONE

P R E L OW

“Work It Out”

“White Iverson”

“For The Team”

DORSAL FINS

SNOH AALEGRA

HARRIET

“Mind Renovation”

“Emotional”

“Irish Margaritas”

Q UA RT E R B A C K S

WAT E R B E D

P H O E B E RYA N

“Center”

“Sweet n Sour”

“Mine”

S T R E A M OU R F U L L SPOT I F Y PL AY L IS T ON L AC A N VA S.COM

WWW.GRAMMYMUSEUM.ORG


The Taste Issue |

Golden Box

A DASH OF DECADENCE LA Nightlife impresario Jeremy Fall talks NYC ‘80s nostalgia, little worlds, and drunk food.

1 Golden Box / goldenboxla.com 6685 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA text by Reneé George | photo by Joe Perri

What has five shimmering disco balls, Interview Magazine tear sheets plastered to the floor, and neon pink signage that reads, “Eat My Golden Box?” Golden Box, that’s what. A rare find in the heart of Hollywood, this nightspot comes without the usual $20 cover, artisanal cocktail program, or mixology madness. In fact, the drinks are straightforward spirits: reasonably priced beers and wines (who knew that was even a thing anymore?), served from a bar that takes a back seat to music, live acts, and letting loose on the dance floor. In other words, this is the place for folks who just want to get down. Who knows? You might just leave with gold confetti in your hair.   Heavily inspired by the vibe of 1980’s Downtown Manhattan, Golden Box opened its doors back in November at the hands of nightlife impresario Jeremy Fall. The venue followed on the heels of Fall’s first pop-up club, Genesis. Golden Box sits on the corner of Hollywood and Las Palmas, in the heart of the infamous club corridor. The small-ish space consists mostly of a dance floor, anchored by a caged-in DJ booth and sparsely peppered with lounge tables. Fall’s desire to open Golden Box after the success of Genesis required an in-depth timeline of research. “While building Golden Box, I went through about 100 names which were all really mediocre. The project was about creating an ‘80’s-inspired venue that felt like it could have actually existed during that era. I think a lot of people nowadays go for gimmick over authenticity, and design projects that are strictly pulling from the highlights of that specific era.” For instance? “If someone were to build a venue about the decade we’re in right now in 30 years, they would make it over the top with Facebook logos, 2 Chainz on repeat, and footage of Justin Bieber getting arrested. It wouldn’t actually feel like what we’re living right now, but would just highlight an aerial view of it. I wanted to have people that actually experienced that decade of nightlife to walk in and immediately feel that nostalgia.”     Fall’s old soul and authenticity-driven ideals didn’t exactly fit with the stereotypical LA nightlife scene: a succession of bloated spaces with long lines, electronic beats, and overpriced bottle service. Then again, his

success suggests that maybe Angelenos are ready for a change. Last year, Fall debuted Genesis in a tiny space perched atop Sassafras on Vine. With its worn-in, wood-heavy aesthetic and array of antiques, taxidermy, and lopsided paintings, the pop-up looked more like a haunted attic than a VIP hangout. And yet, it proved a winning formula. Opening at the end of May, Genesis is a clear example of Fall’s sense of direction. “Genesis is in the former Cinespace and Paul & Andre. I used to go to Cinespace twice a week when I was under age and working in Hollywood— some of my best nightlife memories are actually from there. It’s the absolute perfect space for what I want to do with Genesis post pop-up. I’m recreating a dance party playing what I like to call ‘guilty pleasure music,’ which means all sorts of recognizable hits that you actually want to hear when you go out but never get to.” And that’s not all he’s got on his plate—literally. Fall is also dabbling in his first foodie endeavor, Nomad Kitchen. Gist? A better take on drunk food. “I brought chef Chris Oh into the project to create a menu of different types of quick and affordable [food] styles that can be put into a sandwich or topped over fries, like a poutine. We also have sides and other surprises on the way,” he explains. “I’m currently working on two locations for Nomad, with more in the works: one debuting as a modern day concession stand at the Chinese Theatre, and a mini version with a smaller menu inside of Genesis (for those who want to take a quick break and eat between vodka sodas).”   Whether you’re already a regular at Golden Box, or are simply looking for your next hangout this summer, Fall’s on the case. “No matter what project I do in the hospitality world, I want people to always feel like what they experienced was unexpected. In my job, I get to create these “little worlds” that make people forget about bills and breakups and actually live in the present. Honestly, it’s fucking awesome. I can’t deny that. We get paid to make people have fun while having fun ourselves. It’s a huge luxury that we can never complain about.”   See you on the dance floor.

venue

17


The Taste Issue |

Intro

special spotlights

| SPECIAL SPOTLIGHTS

Andra Day music, Amy Pham fashion, Art of Plating art, & Antonio Diaz food

tastemakers—

| ʹtāst͵mākər | noun

persons who decide or influence what is or will become fashionable

t a s t e m a k e r s of l o s a ng e l e s

18


19

Doo-Wop You Want Andra Day • @andraday

text by Kacey Emmett | photo by Derrick Santini

If you haven’t heard A ndra Day’s Coolin’ in the Streets, hijack the Pandora and do ever yone a favor. Like, right now. Got it? Good. Day’s self-proclaimed retro-pop-soul st yle has already taken YouTube by storm, and is set to stir up the music industr y in a major way. It doesn’t hurt that the songstress has her signature blend of 50’s charm and urban edge down to a science, rock ing hoops and headscar ves with effortless f lair. Rooted in a strong allegiance to jazz, Day’s musical musings also draw upon soul, rock, doo-wop, and a little reggae to top it off. Perhaps you heard about Day’s Sundance tribute to Nina Simone? To put it simply, she brought down the house; and from that moment on, it was clear that Miss Day had arrived. Her passion and dedication haven’t gone unnoticed; and with the help of Stevie Wonder, Day soon hooked up with renowned producer Adrian Gur vitz, who carries the gravitas of Buddy Miles and W hitney Houston in his wheelhouse. The t wo have been working hard gearing up for the release of Day’s f irst a lbum— a highly anticipated debut that promises to deliver.    Day is firm in her faith and unwavering in her community involvement, which includes contributions to Unlikely Heroes (an organization that rehabilitates victims of human traff ick ing) and the Urban A rts Partnership. If you needed another reason to swoon, just keep on looping Day’s YouTube covers— and be sure to check out the debut a lbum this June, a project she describes as a “beautiful experiment.” 

m u s ic t a s t e m a k e r


The Taste Issue |

20

special spotlights

Pham Page Amy Pham • @amypham

text by Kacey Emmett | photo by Jackie Russo

A my Pha m eats slashes for brea k fast. A nd we’ll confess: the DJ/model/host/st ylist/accountant (?!) unfailingly pitches a tent in our cuffed sweats. At 23, Pham has a lready proven herself a digita l wizard, spinning by night and dazzling YouTube viewers by day. Best described as an “approachable goof ball,” she keeps it fresh by tempering casual charm with a sharp eye for fashion. If you recognize her, it’s probably because she’s ever y where —most recently tearing it up at SXSW. Pham’s career began when her older brother brought home a turntable. Fast for ward a few years, and now she’s bouncing from coast to coast, playing events a longside headliners like Igg y A za lea and will.i.am. Girl can spin—in fur—without brea k ing a sweat. Her modeling portfolio isn’t too shabby, either, including spreads for the likes of Nylon, Reebok, and Nike. Outside of crushing it in music and modeling, Pham is the host for Ma ker Studios’ The Fashion Statement, where she showcases her persona l st yle in week ly YouTube episodes. She even ma kes a strong case for Ebay, proving there’s no shame in thrifting — a ll from the comfort of your ver y own couch. With more agents than K imye, Pham is clearly just getting started. W hether she’s part y-pleasing, st yling, or hustling via social media, she’s perpetually on the move. At this point, we’re prett y much just waiting for her to announce her 2016 bid for off ice.

fa s h ion t a s t e m a k e r


21

Portion Control Maria Nguyen • @theartofplating

text by Kacey Emmett | photo by Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony

Warning: If it’s 11A M and you’re a lready think ing about Foodler, you might want to sk ip this. Maria Nguyen k nows those hunger pangs bellowing deep in your soul better than anyone else. As editor-in-chief at The Art of Plating, Nguyen’s job is to capture moments of culinary perfection, from conception to completion. To ca ll TAOP a food blog would be simplistic at best: the interactive site is a creative endeavor of epic proportions. Under Nguyen’s watch, the videos, photography, and editoria ls play to our senses, stok ing our insatiable appetite for food porn. TAOP embraces the technolog y surrounding gastronomy today (case in point: a 3D food printer), but a lso pays homage to chefs who capture the essence of tradition. From a delicate cucumber dish to a heart y beef tongue stew, TAOP will deconstruct even the most intricate recipes. It’s a behind-the-swinging-doors look at food as an art form—k ind of like watching Bob Ross paint happy trees, only this time you can eat them. A nd when we say “art,” we mean it (in other words, think t wice before sending in a snap of those macaroons you tried to recreate from Pinterest). TAOP features the greatest world-renowned chefs and their masterpieces, from Massimo Bottura’s nosta lgic layering technique to Nik i Na kayama’s painsta k ing kaisek i. Inspired by a passion for the innovation behind haute cuisine, Nguyen and her team have created a platform to showcase contemporar y masterminds at their best—and to make even novice foodies yearn to get creative in the k itchen.

a rt tastem a k er


The Taste Issue |

22

special spotlights

All Consuming Antonio Diaz • @lifeandthyme

text by Kacey Emmett | photo by Josh Telles

W hether you’re the guy caramelizing the crème brûlée or the one washing the dish after wards, you’ve probably got a culinar y stor y to tell—and A ntonio Diaz is here to help. Diaz is the creator and editor-in-chief of Life & Thyme, a food media platform that showcases culinar y ta lent and ta les. In addition, Diaz and his team just launched the f irst issue of Life & Thyme Magazine. Not bad for a project that began as little more than a creative outlet for a few hungr y friends. These days, Life & Thyme is a communit y-driven platform that marries the creative process and a ll things edible, bringing untold stories to the table.   Diaz’s technique is simple: he’s out to match passionate souls in the k itchen with their creative counterparts through f ilm, text, photography, and visual art. In a world trending toward impulsive criticism, Diaz’s philosophy is one of celebration. Life & Thyme isn’t a review; it’s an appreciation. Born and raised in Southern Ca lifornia, Diaz’s background is in design and development—f ields that have helped him bring his drea m to life. Five yea rs ago, in the midst of L A’s culina r y renaissance, Dia z set out to capture the action with a loca l team that has since expanded to include contributors from a ll over the world. His touch is undeniably cinematic: features for Life & Thyme include short f ilms, photo essays, and chef portraits created by a crew of likeminded artists. Ultimately, Life & Thyme recognizes our collective hunger for food culture, and ser ves up a heart y share — a lways with an inventive aesthetic t wist. 

f o od t a s t e m a k e r


" ONE OF THE HOTTEST NEW JAPANESE SPOTS IN LA! "

" A TRENDY IZAKAYA/SUSHI

-ZAGAT

-LA WEEKLY

RESTAURANT"

" MANHATTAN BEACH’S WINNING DINING SCENE SCORES ANOTHER SPOT " -WHERE LA

SUSHI AKATORA

IZAKAYA AKATORA

302 ROSECRANS AVE MANHATTAN BEACH, CA 90266 (310) 802-1131

115 W. MAIN ST. ALHAMBRA, CA 91891 (626) 943-7872

@AKATORAMB

WWW.AKATORALA.COM

AKATORALA


The Taste Issue |

Southpark

24

n e i g h B o r h o o d Wat c h

One is Silver & the Other’s Gold

Downtown LA’s Southpark neighborhood has lived several lifetimes. Once a maze of unregulated parking lots, the burgeoning corridor has become a multifaceted district home to both commercial businesses and indie gems alike. Thanks to the Staples Center opening its massive glass doors 15 years ago, the area has undergone a supreme renaissance; and today, the formerly haphazard ghost town is a bustling micro-city. With no fewer than 28 colossal development projects on deck, Southpark is on the verge of becoming a bona fide urban hub. While the decadent skyscrapers and luxury lofts are indubitable signs of progress, we can’t help but embrace our retro darlings. But as responsible urbanites, we’ve vowed to maintain an open mind about what’s to come. So, in the spirit of the Taste Issue, we’ve rounded up of a list of our favorite Southpark destinations—new and old.

|4

la

fil

m festiv

al

Best Spot for an Intimate Drink

Adam Fleischman of Umami Burger recently teamed up with Hollywood pals Keith Previte and Sean Robbins for ChocoChicken, a strange and ambitious concept eatery. Now, before you balk, hear us out. Although the wacky restaurant ser ves up traces of cocoa in nearly everything on the menu (think chocolate ketchup and Choco seasoning to accompany the duck fat fries), the sweet undertones in each dish are surprisingly subtle. And while drinks like the Angry Cock or housemade biscuits are definitely worth your consideration, its ChocoChicken’s namesake entree that steals the show. Made with organic Jidori chicken soaked in a 36-hour brine, then coated with a mixture of 20 spices, this elevated take on comfort food is complex and delicious. Since ChocoChicken’s controversial opening last spring , we’ve gone from eyebrow-raising skeptics to enthusiastic regulars.

2|

5

p∙

Wildcard 403 W. 12th St, 90015

4 f igu e r tel oa o h

ho

1|

a

3 cof f e i n ’s es dd

2

∙a l

1

Locals Only •

The Southpark Edition

Best Full-Service Mexican 514 W. 7th St, 90014

Ready for your new favorite Mexican spot ? Bold statement, we know ; but it’s THAT good. Tucked between Neihule Salon and Soi 7 on 7th, B.S. Taqueria (short for “Broken Spanish”) is the neighborhood’s latest gem. Formerly Mo -Chica, the taqueria fuses traditional Mexican sensibilities with a casual Chicano vibe. Ray Garcia, the man behind the approachable concept, has a penchant for market-fresh ingredients, and proves it with dishes like Lemon-Pepper Chicken Chicharrones and Campechana Verde. The new spot is colorful and bright, with wooden accents and vivid hues throug hout—a far cr y from its dimly lit predecessor. If you can escape the grind for a long lunch once a week, this is your spot.

Best Source for Emerging Talent

3|

Best Home Cooked Meal 1150 S. Hope Street, 90015

Looking for an affordable, home-cooked meal in the heart of Downtown? It exists. Located on the northeast corner of 12th and Hope, Aladdin’s Coffee Shop serves up much more than the name suggests. The traditional Lebanese eatery has been a local staple for over 30 years, with a considerable army of loyal regulars who’ve braved ever y socioeconomic wave of the neig hborhood. Aladdin’s menu offers two distinctive entrée options: an à la carte meal with DIY additions like chorizo, salsa, guacamole, rice, beans, and cilantro ; or a buffet that includes a rotating selection of main courses. Carnivores, vegetarians, and vegans, rejoice: this place has got all of you covered (and boasts the Yelp reviews to prove it). Oh, and if you’re a fan of great ser vice, make sure to ask for Cindy.

|5

939 S. Figueroa Street, 90015 + Various Locations

June 10 -18, 2015

The intersection of Olympic and Fig ueroa may not immediately conjure up images of glowing lanterns and ornate architecture. Nevertheless, it plays home to Downtown’s best-kept secret. The Hotel Figueroa is tucked away within Southpark’s corporate corridor, and boasts an unexpected wellspring of vintage SoCal charm. The Spanish Mediterranean hotel, complete with a pool and lounge, embraces the old-school glamour of LA while remaining completely unpretentious—with a consistently pertinent soundtrack as a noted bonus. Thirsty for mezcal on a Saturday night, but unwilling to brave a sea of bros? Make your way through the exotic lobby and settle in poolside for a cozy tête-à-tête against ivy covered walls.

A few years back, Film Independent—one of the nation’s premier film organizations—gave the LA Film Festival something of a makeover, garnering our hometown event the necessary clout to become a contender alongside highbrow competitors like Sundance, Toronto, Tribeca, and AFI. Recently, the LAFF moved its roster of showings over to the Eastside, with four out of the five featured venues located in and around pedestrianfriendly Southpark (including Regal Cinemas, L.A. Live, The GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live, FIGat7th, and Union Station). The festival’s roundup consists of competitive sections for independent, feature-length U.S. fiction films; a diverse selection of documentaries; and a smaller round up of exceptional international

films. New this year is a category called Nightfall, which includes genre pieces as well as a section exclusively dedicated to discovering emerging voices in indie filmmaking. We don’t have to explain the importance of supporting local creative talent, do we?

Powered by


The Taste Issue |

26

str eet a rt

N. VENDOME ST / COUNCIL ST.

Phobik

W. JEFFERSON BLVD / VILLAGE DR.

Cyrcle

Curated By

www.chickenspeak.com

N. FAIRFAX / WILLOUGHBY AVE.

Esao Andrews

Cruise through the city to find the latest murals.

N. FAIRFAX / WILLOUGHBY AVE.

Dan Quintana


27

CAMERON LN / S. FLOWER ST.

N. VENDOME ST / COUNCIL ST.

Christina Angelina, Ease One, Stephen V. Williams

Z _la

N. FAIRFAX / WILLOUGHBY AVE.

SUNSET BLVD / N. ALTA VISTA BLVD.

Miss Van

Tristan Eaton

SANTA MONICA BLVD / N. LAS PALMAS AVE.

N. VENDOME ST / COUNCIL ST.

Dourone

Stormie Mills

SANTA MONICA BLVD / N. LAS PALMAS AVE.

S. GRAND AVE. / 7 TH ST.

Bumblebee Loves You

Sideshow


The Taste Issue |

Scott Hove

28

a rtist

text by Lauren Westerfield

scot t hov e

cakeland

Scott Hove explores beauty, violence, and spectacle in the form of elaborate cake sculptures and provocative installations.

When it comes to tracking down LA’s most promising new artists, we’ll confess:

It began, Hove says, with a hamburger. “When I was a kid, I used to collect fake

South Central isn’t our usual stomping ground. Far from the mural-clad walls of the

food. There was a place on Union Street in San Francisco, and I would go in there

Arts District, Scott Hove’s newly adopted neighborhood lies adjacent to the

with my parents and beg…” The wax hamburger was his most prized item. “I’d look

University of Southern California amidst a sprawl of run-down warehouses. To be

at it and know it was fake, but it still stimulated me…it had this weird, ironic

honest, if I hadn’t arranged to meet him here, I never would have thought to

absurdity that I loved.” Fast forward to 2004, when the self-taught artist made his

wonder what creative alchemy might be happening behind these blocks of red brick.

first fake cake out of cardboard. “I wanted to see…if I could make an object that would have this feeling, this absurdity that I was kind of obsessed with,” he says,

But that’s the beauty of discovery, isn’t it? A renewed commitment to suspending

“and it was pretty easy.” Hove began exhibiting his cake sculptures soon thereafter,

one’s disbelief, to entertaining the possibility that nothing is quite what it seems.

noting, “Until then, I’d been doing art that was just very dark and very challenging for people.” With the cake pieces, however, viewers got “a positive charge,” and he

Hove greets me with his dog, Kona, and a warning to “watch out for the rabbit.”

realized cake was “a medium that had potential for really getting people to open up”

Looking around his live/work studio, it’s immediately apparent that this is no poseur’s

by creating a unique “emotional state.”

“art loft.” It’s too messy for that—in a good way. To our right stands a mirrored installation chamber; to our left, a massive worktable topped with half-finished,

Hove is driven by this last idea—the artist’s ability to alter viewers’ emotional

stiletto-topped cake sculptures and a gleaming pair of switchblades. Directly in front

environment. As he puts it, “you’re able to control the attraction and repulsion…

of us is The Slayer, a coin-operated carnival ride in the form of a stud-and-

you’re able to create a story for people.” Citing influences ranging from Disneyland

leather-clad lion. And behind it, I make out Cake Vault, a lush grotto of pink and

rides to the Los Angeles Theater, Hove connects his love of opulence and theatrics

white confections.

to his frustration with the hypocrisies and atrocities being enacted “against people and the world heritage” alike.

At this point, it might be helpful to explain that Scott Hove is known among his peers as “the cake guy:” a mixed-media artist creating fake cakes out of cardboard,

“Those things just drive me completely insane,” he says, citing the rise of ISIS as a

acrylic, and silicone, and combining them with found items like fangs, blades, high-

current example, “so I work on a lot of these issues in my art as a way to…digest it

heels, and other artifacts as a means by which to explore the juxtaposition of beauty

myself.” From past projects like the “Master of Rapacity” exhibit, to the current

and comfort with the darker themes—oligarchy, violence, and hypocrisy—that

collection for “Pussy Jihad,” Hove is constantly grappling with the evil forces at

pervade his work.

work in the world. Still, he maintains, “you can’t end on a dark note.” Walking me through the mirror chamber, he explains his vision: first, a jungle scene, then a fiery

Between brief interruptions from Kona and the occasional need to coax his rabbit

hell pit, and at last, an infinity chamber made entirely of cake. “I want people to

away from the fake cakes (“he really, really loves the frosting,” Hove says), the Bay

have their beauty experience,” he says. “I’m plenty cynical; but, it’s good to be able

Area native explains his reasons for relocating from Oakland to Los Angeles in August

to rise above that and do something constructive, try to heal the world with art in

of last year. “I was ambitious, and I wanted to work with people who were working

a positive way.”

on a really high level,” he says, noting that he’d been “blown away” by the LA art scene after several visits. To his mind, LA artists were “way more aggressive and more

Of course, when it comes to cake, all that sweetness and light has an underbelly of

serious on a grander scale” than those he had encountered in the Bay. Hove chuckles

its own. Spend too long in an installation like Cake Vault, and the decadence begins

and tells me that he used to say to himself, “If I were really ballsy, I’d go to LA...”

to feel almost toxic. As Hove says, too much cake—in any form—“can make your

But fate intervened when Hove’s landlord announced plans to renovate the Oakland

stomach upset.” At this point, I can’t help but ask if Hove is himself a baker. “No,

studio where he lived; and all of a sudden, “the cake guy” found himself headed

I don’t have a sweet tooth,” he replies, grinning. “And I don’t really like sugar. It

southward for good, putting down roots near his beloved Downtown movie palaces.

just makes me feel crappy.” Perhaps it’s this detachment from something so ingrained in our culture, something so iconic in its association with happiness and comfort,

“Almost immediately after coming down here, people were like, ‘Oh hey, you’re in

which allows him to utilize every nuance of his chosen medium. Much like the

LA? I’ve got this great opportunity and we’re going to do this giant installation in

warehouses flanking his new address on South Broadway, Hove’s cakes may seem

a warehouse,’” Hove explains, “and I’m like, ‘Yup, that’s why I came here. Let’s do

simple enough; but upon closer examination, they remind us to look deeper—to

it.’” At the time of our interview, he’s putting the finishing touches on his latest

continually question a culture obsessed with the surface of things. •

project: a show entitled “Pussy Jihad,” which opened at La Luz De Jesus Gallery on April 3rd. Currently, he’s prepping for a large-scale installation going up at the Think Tank gallery in September. Both shows will feature his cake sculptures; and as he walks me through the pieces he’s preparing for display, I can’t help but ask the obvious question: why cake?


Scott Hove

29


The Taste Issue |

Mier Gallery

BIG THINGS. SMALL PACKAGES. Nino Mier introduces his latest L A of fering in the form of Mier Ga ller y.

1 Mier / miergallery.com 1107 Greenacre Ave., West Hollywood, CA text by & photo by Rachel Many

Tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac, just north of Santa Monica Boulevard in the heart of West Hollywood, lies a bright, welcoming, and relatively inconspicuous storefront. This is the Mier Gallery; and at first glance, one might not expect such a small space to pack much punch. But don’t be fooled—this little one is a big contender. The Mier Gallery opened its doors this past February, and hails a roster of impressive new talent curated by longtime art aficionado and collector Nino Mier. If that name rings a bell, perhaps it’s because you’re familiar with Mier’s equally charming foodie haven, FOODLAB, or the selection of deliciously eclectic pieces he selects for the housewares boutique Max & Moritz. And with burgeoning talent like Eve Fowler, Odessa Straub, and Jana Schroeder set to take center stage in the gallery’s new program, it would seem that Nino Mier is once again in his element. After all, he’s already proven a knack for presenting big things in small packages. While we peruse the quaint gallery space, soaking up sun from the gallery’s generous front window and enthusing over the large-scale canvases by Jan-Ole Schiemann, Nino fills us in on his reasons for opening the space, and the trajectory of his unconventional career path. “I had always wanted to open a gallery, but I wanted it to be well done and thoughtful,” Nino tells us. “My experience as a private dealer has taught me some things. I’ve been lucky to form relationships with some great dealers who have been generous with advice and support. It made it much less daunting.”

to have served him well. Mier spent years working his way through the conservative hierarchy of today’s art market before finally making the leap to seek out and curate talent on his own terms. But in the meantime, he cultivated more than a few successful side-ventures. “I went from painter, to co-owner of FOODLAB, to collector, to private dealer, to gallerist,” laughs Mier. “Finally, I just went for it. The program will speak for itself. My name is on the door, but it’s the program that’s important.” And oh does the program speak. With Jan-Ole Schiemann’s sold-out opening exhibition to kick things off, and an imposing list of new artists set to line the gallery’s walls in the coming months, Mier Gallery is already asserting itself in the LA scene. “The first opening was a bit nerve-wracking,” explains Nino. “I wanted everything to be perfect. For the first 30 minutes no one came; and by 7PM we had over 150 people in the space. It was a very proud moment for Jan-Ole, as well as [for] me.” Up next, Eve Fowler will set up shop in the gallery from late May through June, dazzling viewers with an expansive exhibition. “She is brilliant, and I am honored to have the opportunity to share her mind and ideas with the world,” Mier says. Even with the influx of so many small gallery operations in Los Angeles, Mier Gallery is clearly capable of holding its own. Like we said: big things, small packages.

A painter-turned-restaurateur-turned collector, Nino acknowledges the nomadic nature of his professional experience. Then again, it appears

gallery

30


GALLE R Y O P EN IN G S text by

Rachel Many

PARIS PHOTO LOS ANGELES Paramount Studios | May 1 – May 3 The annual Paris Photo festival hits Los Angeles this spring, exhibiting photography and moving image work by 20th and 21st century artists. Exhibitors will present historical and contemporary bodies of work against the backdrop of Paramount Pictures’ legendary soundstages. Meanwhile, public programming will include the Sound & Vision series of conversations and screenings, and UNEDITED!, which exposes little-known or never-before-seen photographic material. parisphoto.com/losangeles MARK GROTJAHN Blum & Poe | May 2 – June 20 Opening Reception: Friday, May 1, 5 – 7 pm This exhibition features Grotjahn’s traditional, large-scale paintings that draw from both modernist abstraction and pop culture. Reinterpreting perspective as skewed logic, Grotjahn’s canvases often incorporate two vanishing points in close proximity, creating a deception of space. Applied in thick impasto, Grotjahn’s use of texture and traces of under-painting create subtly shifting tones for an effect at once elusive and concrete. blumandpoe.com EVE FOWLER Mier Gallery | May 22 – July 3 Opening Reception: Friday, May 22, 6 – 8 pm Fowler’s work is varied, encompassing everything from letterpress posters and large-scale public billboard messages to intimate portraits that investigate gender, identity, and lesbian subculture. Unadorned and unfettered by compositional conformity, Fowler’s work demands attention, encouraging the viewer to pause and contemplate space, existence, and destiny. miergallery.com ELIZABETH NEEL Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects | May 30 – July 11 Opening Reception: Saturday, May 30, 6 pm Neel layers gestural and sometimes violent brushstrokes in an abstract fashion as she explores the implications of decomposition and decay. Often utilizing found material for her paintings, Neel draws inspiration from a wide range of sources, prompting viewers to delve deep into her dark, multi-faceted pieces. vielmetter.com

MARTIN BASHER Anat Egbi | June 13 – July 11 Opening Reception: Saturday, June 13, 7 pm Basher’s large-scale canvases boast bold stripes and gradients, elements that produce complex optical illusions and transform a tour of the gallery space into an intriguing, somewhat mindbending experience. His slick, bright, geometrically inclined works dissolve the boundary between art and artifice, investigating today’s culture of consumerism and its effect on our environment. anatebgi.com

JOHANNA BREIDING | EPITAPH TO FAMILY Human Resources LA | June 20 – July 19 Opening Reception: Saturday, June 20, 7 pm Breiding’s practice deals with issues of identity, loss, crossculturalism, and environmental change. Her new exhibition, Epitaph to Family, is an ongoing project that addresses memory, entropy, and the death of analog photography via the historical and environmental significance of small town Keeler, California. Breiding’s photographs recall the past while simultaneously creating a fantastical archive of the present. The result is a visual tribute to places that have already been forgotten. humanresourcesla.com

DRAWING IN LA: THE 1960S AND 70S LACMA | May 10 – August 2 Culled from LACMA’s permanent collection and select local holdings, Drawing in LA: The 1960s and ‘70s features work by nearly 50 artists working in a wide variety of styles and media. The drawings range in technique from charcoal and ink to collage and xerography, and encompass realism, conceptual drawing, and abstraction. The exhibition provides a unique opportunity to see the broad scope of work being made in Los Angeles during an exciting time in the city’s artistic history. lacma.org

G E T MOR E OF L A’S BE S T OPE N I NG S AT L AC A N VA S.COM


The Taste Issue |

In the Swim of Things

designer

In the Swim of Things text by Erin Dennison

model Alyssa Smith @ NEXT Model Management

In the Swim of Things

34


In the Swim of Things

35

“For me, there’s an emphasis on each individual piece as being part of a whole. I like to work backwards.” Meet Lezard Swim, the women behind your new favorite bathing suit.

• “Oh my God. This has to be of f the record, though.” A lyssa Smith leans in as I tap the red button and put my phone away, and then proceeds to enchant me with ta les of her teenage exploits growing up in Newport, the sma ll coasta l town adjacent to Laguna Beach. For those of us who grew up far away from Southern Ca lifornia, the butter y, cinematic world of MT V ’s (sorta) rea lit y show Laguna Beach constituted a menta l mood board for a ll of Ora nge Count y. E xceptiona lly attractive, sun-k issed high schoolers chatting and gossiping with the elongated vowels of a Southern Ca lifornia drawl helped def ine the idyllic region; and as I sit across from Smith, herself an OC native, swimsuit model, and the marketing arm of L ezard Swim, I can’t help but notice that she certainly look s the part.


The Taste Issue |

In the Swim of Things

36

designer

Perched on a lu x leather couch anchoring the Mack Sennett Studios lounge area,

L ezard ’s inaugura l collection draws most of its inspiration from a late 1960’s

Smith is golden haired, witt y, and magnetic: an evolved version of the California

France —think, you guessed it, Jane Birk in. The garments span a cohesive color

trope that def ined the region a lmost a decade ago. A s she recounts the stor y of

pa lette rich in neutra ls and punctuated by yellow hues and vivid sea-tones. The

how she met L ea h Shlaer —the company’s swimwear designer and Smith ’s duly

fabrics are lu xurious, the patterns intricate, and the separates eerily sea mless.

fair-haired counterpart— both women become visibly coy, their manners suffused

Lea h explains, “W hen I’m designing a collection, I stop and envision ever y single

with mutua l admiration. This is to be expected. A f ter a ll, their partnership is

piece hanging together and how it’s going to f low…what pieces should go together.

new-ish, having begun just a few years back when Smith modeled for Shlaer’s

For me, there’s an emphasis on each individua l piece as being part of a whole. I

former eponymous line. A lyssa describes L ea h a s having designed t he most

like to work back wards.”

beautif ul suits she’d ever worn, and L ea h explains how A lyssa, with years of modeling experience under her belt, just “got it.” A f ter months of reciproca l

Because of her strong back ground in da nce, L ea h ha s a lways understood the

social media aff irmation, the t wo women eventually reconnected IR L and decided

importance of both f it and movement. A nd a f ter spending years in the fashion

to join forces.

industr y honing her technica l sk ill in production, she not only k new what she wanted, but how to execute it properly. “I’ve been designing for over 10 years,

The na me L ezard (French for “ lizard ”) is inspired by a f ictiona l woman, one

[and] I got into swimwear in 2008. It’s more just that I have a vision in my mind

who slides ef fortlessly in and out of various settings while a lways maintaining

that I wish I could f ind, or that I k now people would want to buy. Sometimes

a strong identit y. A “Lezard girl ” is socia lly dexterous and captivating — spirited,

I’ ll f ind a fabric and it will completely inspire something —it has to feel good

wit h cla ssic sa rtoria l sensibilities. She’s at hletic a nd curious, aut hentic a nd

on the body. I used to be a da ncer, so that inf luence is certa inly in there a s

f unny. In short, she is a chic, cool, well-traveled woman. The brand personif ies

well—you k now, when you leave class and just throw something on over your

its ima gina r y muse by inf using notions of whimsy a nd wa nderlust into its

leotard for the rest of the day.”

classica lly f lattering silhouettes.


In the Swim of Things

37

On the heels of its f irst birthday, L ezard has a lready captured the attention of leading glossies, editors, bloggers, and It Girls. With an excellent showing at Mia mi Swim Week and collections available in over t went y doors, the line is expa nding quicker t ha n eit her of t he women had imagined. A s it turns out, e xper t sk i l l a nd ye a rs of i ndu st r y e xperienc e ma ke for a potent one-t wo punch. With their second collection currently in production, the Ca lifornia duo promises more effortlessly cool pieces and f lawless campaign imager y just around the corner.

Oh, and it was a good story.

•

Photos By Henrik Purienne


The Taste Issue |

HUF

store

FtW

hUF

dBc

HUF—

Real Recognize Real HUF’s journey from oversized tees to skate culture royalty.

text by Erin Dennison

As befits his former pro skater status, HUF founder Keith Hufnagel moves between the worlds of lifestyle branding, manufacturing, and skateboarding with impressive agility. In terms of branding, he occupies a unique space with a streetwear line that is as influential as it is distinctive. When Hufnagel started skating in the 1980’s, the culture was far from thriving in his hometown of NYC. In those days, the notion that skate trends would permeate high fashion was ridiculous. But that’s not what fueled him. Today, the company that started as a humble boutique on San Francisco’s Sutter Street is currently home to numerous collaborations, a full line of apparel and footwear, a skate team, a wholesale distribution arm, a host of celebrity cosigns, and a cult-like following that positions HUF next to industry heavyweights like Nike and Vans. If it seems as though @hufworldwide is planning on global dominance—well, it’s because that’s sort of the deal. Upon entering HUF’s LA headquarters, I’m greeted by a kid who looks all of eight years old. Skateboard in hand, he leads me through a meandering corridor in search of HUF’s creative team. After a few narrow turns, the office explodes into a massive, open floor plan. Clothing racks haphazardly punctuate the rows of desks, which are stacked with shoeboxes, lined with mood boards, and invariably occupied by coollooking people. Between snippets of intersecting conversation about everything from moving offices to the logistics of a creative campaign, it quickly becomes apparent that these guys are pretty fucking busy. Finally, we make our way into the glass conference room, where Keith and Scott Tepper (HUF’s Creative Director and a long-time friend of Hufnagel’s) greet us with a degree of attention and politeness which, given their roles at the helm of an internationally distributed, multimillion dollar company, come as a refreshing surprise. There weren’t always this many moving parts in the HUF arena. Keith grew up a skate kid in Manhattan during the 1980’s—a time and place where the alt sport was

38


HUF

39

• Photographer Josie Simonet | Styling Marissa Peden | Stylist Assistant Sini Mattila | Grooming Barbara Yniguez | Model Gabriel @ Photogenics

known more for slackers than for burgeoning trends. After obliging his folks and

As hype for HUF apparel grew, the wholesale arm of the company was struggling.

enrolling in a four-year college in San Francisco, Keith quickly opted out of a liberal

Without the infrastructure necessary to evolve on par with demand, and with zero

arts education in favor of a professional skating contract with Real in 1992. Once

credit available at the time, Keith found himself caught in an impossible game of

he went pro, he started to observe a change in the climate: a merging of the skate

catch-up. “We hired a showroom to sell [the line], and right when we did that, it

and streetwear industries that promised to evolve into something even bigger. “I

just blew up, and we had all these orders to fill. At that point, it was kind of when

saw all these stores opening,” he explains. “I watched Supreme happen, I watched

[the] recession hit. 2008, 2009, 2010…it was during that three-year period we started

Union happen, I watched all these things starting to happen in streetwear. The

seeing a decrease of sales inside retail. And all we’re doing is putting money into the

culture was brewing.”

wholesale business and trying to do that and maintain that. Eventually, we started seeing bills coming in from our vendors and we were just like, this fucking sucks. So

Eventually, in 2002, Keith decided to open up a retail shop to marry the streetwear

we started closing some of the retail doors to kind of offset [the cost]. And it worked

and sneaker scenes with which he had become so familiar. “We had all these special

for a while. But then, the manufacturing bills got bigger and bigger… and then, I

Nikes, and we bought a bunch of NY brands like Supreme and Annex. There were

had the bright idea of doing footwear.”

a lot of brands we had access to in NY. I don’t know how kids found out, but they did, and we had the demand before [the store] even opened. The day we opened, we

The guys were already intimately familiar with the entire scope of footwear. From

pretty much sold out of everything.” Dubbed HUF after Hufnagel’s tag and nickname,

street trends and skate function to manufacturing and retail, shoes had been a passion

the shop became a go-to for hats and tees; and before they knew it, Keith and his

of Keith’s even before he launched HUF’s original Sutter Street spot. Their initial

team had an entire clothing line on their hands.

foray into sneakers consisted of collaborations with footwear titans like Nike. “We were partners in the retail store, so Nike was allowing us to do collaborations to

“We had such demand and we were in a small store, so we just kind of started opening

hype up their brand, and sort of using us as an outlet, which was very good for the

up a door a year.” Soon, Keith had opened four stores in SF and one in LA. Each

brand—I mean, it helped us a lot. At that point, though, we were a Nike-pusher.

carried the HUF brand, as well as a solid selection of other streetwear lines and

They were helping us and we were helping them.”

big-brand collaborations. But once they started producing their own footwear, HUF suddenly became the “We had no background in manufacturing, so we basically just found places in San

competition. The team found themselves at a crossroads; and in the end, they chose

Francisco and Jersey—we were doing everything inside the US. None of us went to

to go all in. “In the long run, we actually wanted to be our own manufacturer. And

business school or anything,” he explains. “Let’s say we bought something for $50,

have control over how much we buy, what we put on it,” Keith says. “When you

we were just turning around and selling it for $100. So there was actually no wholesale

have those big companies, they tell you how much you get. They dictate it all under

margin. So we kinda knew that we were just putting ourselves in this hole.”

their reign, which is their business—they’re good at it.”


The Taste Issue |

HUF

40

store

“...and then, I had the bright idea of doing footwear.” As it turns out, redirecting its efforts into footwear manufacturing was the ideal restructuring step for Hufnagel’s lifestyle company. Having gained considerable momentum in the wake of their successful launch of the sneaker line, HUF is currently preparing to re-open a retail location in the Fairfax district of LA this summer. Coming full circle, the newest HUF store will be a space where people can experience the full brand story—while also serving as an opportunity for HUF to reconnect with their retailers. According to Forbes, skateboarding is now a multibillion-dollar industry, with nearly half of the top ten action sports stars being skaters. Despite the culture’s growth, Hufnagel stays true to his roots. He actively invests back into his first love by supporting a team of professionals that includes Dylan Rieder, Craig Anderson, Austyn Gillette, and over a half dozen more. He also still rides professionally himself. And although there is a considerable big-brand presence in the business—Nike and Adidas own most of the industry these days—no massive corporation can contend with the authenticity of a skateboarder-owned brand. Through the ebbs and flows of the retail climate, Keith’s never lost sight of the bigger picture. Trends, by definition, come and go. But having taken the time—and made the sacrifices—to invest in HUF’s foundation by pursuing independent manufacturing, Hufnagel is actively securing a spot for the sport. The brand’s goal is to protect the culture for those who make it, even when the footwear and apparel giants leave and take their programs and sponsorship deals with them. Whether he’s ollieing over park benches, designing footwear, or directing his multi-million dollar business, Keith Hufnagel has more than earned his rep as a skate and streetwear legend. •

• Photo By Natalie O’Moore


Trend Matrix

Trend Matrix

Haerfest

This Is Ground

Band of Outsiders

Miansai

Modernist Cuisine

$295

$300

$325

$495

$508

Mini Capsule Backpack

Mod Tablet 2

Raglan T-Shir t w/ Contrast Welt Pocket

M12 Swiss Bronze on Leather Strap

TOMS

Daniel Wellington

Frost River

Krammer-Stoudt

ace&jig

$161

$180

$180

$220

Classy Glasgow 3 4MM

Arrowhead Trail Roll Top Pack

Conner y Dress Shir t

Sailor Shor t

Jack Spade

No Name

Riuda Vets

Mokuyobi Threads

TOMS

$98

$106

$110

$120

$139

Plato Sneaker

Coast Bag

Bellini Tor toise Cr ystal Fade

Old Faithful Shop

Pointer Brand

Outclass

Workaday Handmade

Triangl

$70

$74

$79

$86

$89

Needles $153

Outback Hat

Onassis Clothing $98

Pour- Over Ket tle

Pocket Apron Duck

Contrast Slub T-Shir t

Tor toise Shell Open Bowl

Poppy - Flamingo Fling

S/S Wave Print Shir t

Company of Parrots

Tavik

Ultraolive

OutSANDing

Wonderland Honolulu

Ganni

$52

$54

$55

It ’s Nice That Annual 2014

Belmont Boardshor t

$60

Taped Seam Dr y Bag

OutSANDing Mats

$63

L a’akea Shor ts

Esperos

US Apothecary

Wary Meyers

Miansai

Faribault

$28

$35

$38

$38

$39

Tablet Case

Juniper & Geranium Hand Soap

Ouur

We Heart Sunglasses

Rastaclat

$5

$10

$10

Round Wood Scoop

Round Vintage Glasses

Honey Cocobolo Candle

Shoelace Bracelet

Opinel Garden Knife

$67

Valeir y L ace Bra

HLZBLZ $44

Dot Heather Silver Scar f

Ball Player

Voy Voy

Adeline’s Soap Co.

The New Order

$10

$11

Gingham Handkerchief

Sage, Lemongrass, & Spearmint Soap

$12

Volume 12

e xorbit a nt

Floral Grannis Swim Trunks

$248

Cognac Leather Canvas Caravan Backpack

ef f icie nt

Avarcas Sandal

$875

Vintage Motorcycle Leather Jacket

$160

Circle Cut ting Board

Schott NYC

The Ar t & Science of Cooking

Luke Bartels

41


The Taste Issue | editorial

THE GARDE N OF E DE N photography by Conan Thai

The Garden of Eden

42


The Garden of Eden

top SACHIN + BABI | rings WANDERLUST + CO

model Polina @ PhotogenicsLA stylist Juliet Vo photo assistant Diane Jong hair Castillo @TMG LA using Joic make-up Jeffrey Baum @ Atelier Management

43


The Taste Issue | editorial

top SACHIN + BABI | skirt DONNA KARAN | boots STUART WEITZMAN

The Garden of Eden

44


The Garden of Eden

top ELLERY

45


The Taste Issue |

The Golden Ratio

Food editorial

The Golden Ratio The Art of Plating

Photography by Signe Birck

46


The Golden Ratio

• Photo By Signe Birck — Chef Diego Muñoz | Native Potatoes & Beef Tongue Stew

47


The Taste Issue |

The Golden Ratio

Food editorial

• Photo By Signe Birck — Chef Daniel Burns of Luksus | Warm squid with purple potato dulse and roast ed potato chip

48


The Golden Ratio

• Photo By Signe Birck — Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony | Golden tile fish, black truffles, and fumet blanc

49


The Taste Issue |

Party Time, Excellent

Wildcard

by

Pizzaslime

50


Party Time, Excellent

Party Time, Excellent • interview by Reneé George

The duo behind Pizzaslime speaks on social media, celebrity collaborations, and an earnest affinity for Drake

If you’re like us, you might be following @Pizzaslime on Instagram and still be unclear as to who and what they are. We caught up with the guys behind the meta brand to get down to brass tacks. Let’s figure this out together, shall we? Tell us about your photographic adventure, Pizzaslimeirl.com. What is Pizzaslime? 

We just take pictures of our friends and random shit. Our photography ranges Everyone asks that, and it’s hard to answer. We look at it as a creative project

from a picture of a churro to a super rare picture of Kanye West. We don’t

and outlet for doing whatever the fuck we want to do. It’s turned into an

know shit about lighting or photography, though. It’s just a creative outlet

apparel brand and a consulting business where we do marketing, creative

that’s turned out to be rad, and people fuck with it.

direction, and a bunch of other things for companies like Paramount Studios and artists like Diplo, Dillon Francis, Flosstradamus, and many others. We

You collaborate with a ton of folks like Diplo, The Fat Jew, and Dillon Francis.

also do photography and make art. People really fuck with our Instagram,

Who else is on your radar?

which is 99% original content. Miley Cyrus and the Kardashians and other famous people also wear our clothes, too, and that’s tight. Our site also hosts

We actually don’t collab that often. We dislike most people and brands. Except

rare music and videos.

for BARF (@thisisbarf ). They’re FUTURE as FUCK. I think the Fat Jew and Diplo and Dillon Francis are the only ones in terms of apparel. We made a

Our goal, in general, is to expose people to dope shit in interesting and

video with Pharrell and SpongeBob SquarePants, and that was tight. We

unconventional ways and then let them form an opinion. But we hate [to

also made a video for the Ninja Turtles brand, but we don’t like to talk about

hear] opinions, so we don’t like to give ours. If we post it, than there is a

the future.

reason—try to figure it out. If you don’t like it, then just move the fuck on. The best moment / accomplishment of Pizzaslime has been: 

We also really love Drake—not in a funny way, but like in a real-ass, like, we fuck with Drake on the real type of way. Fuck! See why that question is hard

When we were starting up, we did a drop and had hundreds of orders flood

to answer? We probably missed some stuff, but yeah, we are a lot of things

in at once. We sold out almost instantly—10 minutes, tops. At that time, we

and we are doing a lot of things.

were shipping everything on our own. All of our orders come in a custom pizza box and with cool shit, like autographed pictures of Eminem. We pay

How did you two come together to formulate this culture?

a lot of attention to the details of the Pizzaslime purchase experience. Anyway, after days of packing fucking shirts and stickers into pizza boxes we looked

We were friends for a long time—since we were both in college. We both

around at Matthew’s crib and we couldn’t even see over the pizza boxes. There

knew that we would end up working together at some point and Pizzaslime

were like a billion pizza boxes. That was a moment when we were like, “Oh

became that project for us. There was no huge planning involved; we kind

shit. This shit is real.” Working with Pharrell on a SpongeBob Squarepants

of just did it.

music video was super rad and surreal, too, ‘cause we grew up idolizing him, Chad, and The Neptunes.

What’s your motto? Why do you do this? 

Yolo. That’s the motto and we ‘bout it every day, every day, every day. Shout out to Drake.

Money and Girls and Free Shit. •

51


The Taste Issue | Wildcard

Party Time, Excellent

52


Party Time, Excellent 53


The Taste Issue | Wildcard

Party Time, Excellent

54


Party Time, Excellent

55


The Taste Issue | Wildcard

Party Time, Excellent

56


Party Time, Excellent

57


The Taste Issue | Wildcard

Party Time, Excellent

58


Party Time, Excellent

59


TAKE A L U N CH These days, there are at least half a dozen Tumblrs dedicated to revamping the pathetic state of af fairs that is the of fice lunch. So in the name of our collective sanit y, let ’s tr y and make it out of the building at least a couple times a week, shall we? In an ef for t to make things a lit tle easier, L AC rounded up our favorite spots to get a real meal for a steal— and to revive this of ten overlooked food hour du jour. The criteria? Convenient, siestaproof, and affordable (under $20), so you can lunch like a boss every week.

Text By

SANTA MONICA | BaY cities LU N C H B UZ Z :

T he Godmot her

Synonymous with sinful, this locale is the epicenter of Italian in America (or, if we’re being geographically accurate, at least o f L A’s We s t si de). Cre amy bur r at a, upscale meats, and can we talk about this fresh bread? Bay Cities is deli done right. If you’re luck y enough to b e a regular at this joint, revel in your good for tune. As for the rest of us, it ’s wor th taking the af ternoon of f to make the trek. So get in your car and get it done…then roll up your sleeves and savor.

Angela Gleason

LOS FELIZ | Y Uca’ s

LU N C H B UZ Z :

Carne Asada Burrito

Any L A native will tell you not to me s s around when it comes to Mexican food. Thank fully, in a cit y dot ted with t aco spots, it ’s hard go wrong. But if there’s one spot you can only go right, it’s Yuca’s. Their signature burrito says “food coma” all over the wrapper…but it ’s oh so wor th it. So plan ahead, skip breakfast, and hit Yuca’s on a Friday. With ingredients and ser vice this good, it ’s no wonder that Yuca’s is a cit y staple.

yucasla.com

baycitiesitaliandeli.com

HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 3pm-7pm $2 House-made Empanada $4 Glass of Wine $3 Beer

3 COURSE SUPPER $16 Sundays in Downtown Mondays in Pasadena

SILVERLAKE | gingergr ass

LU N C H B UZ Z :

Coconut Curr y Cod

K-TOWN | Kogi

LU N C H B UZ Z :

A l l t h i ngs “taco”

The name says it all (destination + dish). No fluf f. Let ’s be honest: pho fans and curry critics are hard to impress. But this spicy nuoc cham paired with rice noodles and a lunch-friendly line is wor th tr ying, even for the most fastidious foodies. Go ahead and top it of f with the Bia Hoi to ring in at a wallet-friendly $19.

A s i f a s t r e e t t a c o i n L A w a s n’ t scrumptious enough, the folks at Kogi had to up the ante with a totally addictive K o re an t w is t . Fro m o n e - m an s t an d to renowne d brick and mor t ar, Ko gi h a s e v o l v e d i n t o a K -To w n m u s t . E x tend that 2PM by 30 to engage with this hotness under 20.

gingergrass.com

kogibbq.com

G E T T H E SCOOP ON L A’S L AT E S T A N D GR E AT E S T E ATS AT L AC A N VA S.COM

Downtown 105 W. 9th St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 p. 213/623-1810

Pasadena 121 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 p. 626/795.5658

1810restaurant.com twitter: @1810Restaurant


The Taste Issue |

Odys + Penelope

AN EPIC AFFAIR Karen and Quinn Hatfield embark on a new chapter of their culinary odyssey with Odys + Penelope.

1 Odys + Penelope / odysandpenelope.com 127 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, CA photo by Dylan + Jeni

Whether you were forced to read The Odyssey in high school, or simply opted to squeeze in the Cliffs Notes version before finals, you’re no doubt familiar with the famed couple at the heart of that epic tale: Odysseus and his wife Penelope, the warrior and the weaver. As co-owners and chefs at a new restaurant named for Homer’s legendary lovers, perhaps Karen and Quinn Hatfield aspire to similar fame. Or maybe they simply liked the sound of it—Odys + Penelope—emblazoned across the entrance to a space at once contemporary and yet outfitted with classical columns. One could even argue that the name reflects the Mediterranean bent apparent alongside Californian and Brazilian influences on the menu. But enough about the name: as fans of the Hatfields’ previous projects are no doubt thinking, it’s really all about the food. Culinary power couple Karen and Quinn Hatfield first made a name for themselves (quite literally) with the eponymous Hatfield’s, a sleek, fine dining establishment that opened on Melrose back in 2006. It may not seem like all that long ago, but in terms of the Los Angeles food scene, it was an utterly different era: one in which celebrity hotspots were de rigueur, and diners seemed to care more about who they saw then what actually appeared on their plates. Amidst this see-and-be-seen culture, the Hatfields flouted popular convention and managed to earn a Michelin star with their commitment to innovation, craft, and an unabashedly chef-driven menu. In the end, their talent and dedication didn’t save their restaurant, which shuttered last year; but it did pave the way for the couple’s subsequent ventures, and a paring back of fine dining pomp to reveal a more authentic, accessible approach—all without compromising either quality or the creative spark that put them on the map. The Hatfields began their move away from fine dining with Sycamore Kitchen, a pastry-heavy and überpopular bakery on La Brea offering a home-style approach to breakfast fare. And now, just a few doors down, Karen and Quinn have extended that concept to the dinner table with Odys + Penelope, a rustic-modern take on the neighborhood bar and grille. Distinguished by a live-fire grill, a churrasco, and a smoker, the

space is at once massive and pleasantly intimate, it’s expanse bordered by a sprawling bar on one side and an open kitchen in the front room. When we arrive, the standing-room-only situation at the former bodes well for the fruit-forward cocktail program, complemented by a wine and liquor selection designed to pair with the variety of “contemporary, casual churrasco” shared plates featured on the menu. So what does that mean, exactly? In terms of starters and sides, there are the usual suspects, albeit with the Hatfields’ unique twist: Brussels sprouts, shaved and served with roasted almond, capers, and dried apricot salad; a “Caeser” salad with celery root, red endive, cabbage, apple and parmesan. Main dishes are more meat-centric, with grilled steak, fish, dry rubbed ribs, and selections from the smoker. And for the veggie lovers among us, the menu features everything from fried wild mushrooms to maple-miso eggplant to creamy cauliflower with walnut pesto (a stand-out favorite during our visit, warm and light with just the right amount of texture and savory deliciousness). Overall, the dishes are recognizable—meaning it’s no challenge to find something to please any palate. And yet, most come with that same commitment to innovation that helped put Hatfield’s on the map. Ensconced in the clean, warm, wide-open dining room, and equipped with strong drinks and ideally sized dishes (big enough to share, small enough to finish), we’re happy to give the slightly bumpy service a pass on this first go-around. Somehow, we imagine that Karen and Quinn Hatfield will hit their stride here, with this appealing reinvention of their fine-dining success. After all, it is 2015: and in the wake of whitetablecloth mainstays and celebrity sightseeing, Los Angeles has settled in to a cozier, more casual approach to restaurant culture. At Odys + Penelope, one gets all the comfort of a neighborhood date spot and the warmth of hearth fires—but also, a taste of something new from two of the city’s renowned chefs. So here’s to grabbing a booth, settling in, and seeing where the Hatfields’ story takes us.

r e s t au r a n t

61


The Taste Issue |

Bar

62

FESTIVAL SEASON CONTINUES Hey foodies, why not exercise a little neighborhood pride? text by Vi Nguyen

It’s easy to lose track of the seasons here in Los Angeles. Blessed with warm weather practically all year-round, our seasons are more like loosely-bound social calendars centered around the music, food, and booze offerings of the coming months. Chances are, you’ve filled your music quota twice over thanks to Coachella; but if you’re still looking for an excuse to wine and dine, scope out our spring picks for maximum indulgence.

LA WINE FEST MAY 30 + 31, 2015

So: you’ve graduated from tallboys, and now find yourself with a penchant for the grape? Allow us to suggest attending the 10th Annual LA Wine Fest, featuring wine vendors from Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino, and Anderson Valley, not to mention a few exotic imports from Korea and Israel. In fact, hundreds of wines, brews, and spirits are up for unlimited samplings. It’s like an educational and totally classy open bar. Tickets start at $85 and designated drivers can attend with a heavily discounted admission. And boy, does our hometown look good. lawinefest.com

TASTE OF EASTSIDE MAY 31, 2015

If you’re an Eastside snob who trembles at the thought of schlepping across the 10, show some neighborhood pride by attending the Taste of the Eastside. This mini food and drink festival aims at showcasing the diverse culinary scene of neighborhoods like Silver Lake, Echo Park, Eagle Rock, Los Feliz, Highland Park, Atwater and more. Unlike most other fests, this one is staffed entirely by volunteers, and all proceeds will go to a designated local non-profit. This year’s event will take place at the LA River Center and Gardens in Cypress Park and include vendors like Xoia Vietnamese eats, Knuckle & Claw, El Condor, Pazzo Gelato, L & E Oyster Bar, Little Dom’s, and many more. Pre-sales start at $50 and include unlimited tastings. tasteoftheeastside.com

CALABASAS MALIBU FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL JUNE 26+27, 2015

Calabasas may be best known as home to celebs like the Kardashians and the Biebs himself; but this summer, there’s yet another draw to coax locals and tourists alike up the coast. Consider venturing out to this “cradle of reality TV culture” for the Calabasas Malibu Food & Wine Festival’s Grand Tasting. This fest has sold out for the last nine years in a row, so it must be doing something right. Guest exhibitors include STK, Bagatelle, Marcopolo Chocolate, Warren’s Blackboard, Patina Restaurant Group, and many more alongside a broad array of esteemed chefs, restaurants, wineries, and breweries. The ideal destination for indecisive foodies and celeb-stalkers alike, tickets begin at $75 and a portion of proceeds will go to the Chill Foundation. malibufoodandwinefestival.com


63

Escala: Spanish for “Stopover” or “Layover”. A unique stop in the heart of L.A.’s Koreatown Renaissance. Inspired by owner OG Chino’s uncommon roots, Chef Chris Oh mixes classic Colombian recipes with Korean flavors & a love for communal eating & drinking. Urban Art & Music by our marquee family of World Class Artists & DJs. Stopover for the food, stay for the experience.

3451 W 6th Street

Open Daily 11:30am - 2am LUNCH + DINNER

Los Angeles, CA 90020

SUNDAY BRUNCH

In The Historic Chapman Market

HAPPY HOUR + NAPPY HOUR Events / Birthdays / Large Parties

Koreano • Colombiano • Angelino

213-387-1113

@escalaktown

escalaktown.com

#escalaktown


The Taste Issue | Wildcard

Party Time, Excellent

56


Party Time, Excellent

57


The Taste Issue |

Bar

62

FESTIVAL SEASON CONTINUES Hey foodies, why not exercise a little neighborhood pride? text by Vi Nguyen

It’s easy to lose track of the seasons here in Los Angeles. Blessed with warm weather practically all year-round, our seasons are more like loosely-bound social calendars centered around the music, food, and booze offerings of the coming months. Chances are, you’ve filled your music quota twice over thanks to Coachella; but if you’re still looking for an excuse to wine and dine, scope out our spring picks for maximum indulgence.

LA WINE FEST MAY 30 + 31, 2015

So: you’ve graduated from tallboys, and now find yourself with a penchant for the grape? Allow us to suggest attending the 10th Annual LA Wine Fest, featuring wine vendors from Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino, and Anderson Valley, not to mention a few exotic imports from Korea and Israel. In fact, hundreds of wines, brews, and spirits are up for unlimited samplings. It’s like an educational and totally classy open bar. Tickets start at $85 and designated drivers can attend with a heavily discounted admission. And boy, does our hometown look good. lawinefest.com

TASTE OF EASTSIDE MAY 31, 2015

If you’re an Eastside snob who trembles at the thought of schlepping across the 10, show some neighborhood pride by attending the Taste of the Eastside. This mini food and drink festival aims at showcasing the diverse culinary scene of neighborhoods like Silver Lake, Echo Park, Eagle Rock, Los Feliz, Highland Park, Atwater and more. Unlike most other fests, this one is staffed entirely by volunteers, and all proceeds will go to a designated local non-profit. This year’s event will take place at the LA River Center and Gardens in Cypress Park and include vendors like Xoia Vietnamese eats, Knuckle & Claw, El Condor, Pazzo Gelato, L & E Oyster Bar, Little Dom’s, and many more. Pre-sales start at $50 and include unlimited tastings. tasteoftheeastside.com

CALABASAS MALIBU FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL JUNE 26+27, 2015

Calabasas may be best known as home to celebs like the Kardashians and the Biebs himself; but this summer, there’s yet another draw to coax locals and tourists alike up the coast. Consider venturing out to this “cradle of reality TV culture” for the Calabasas Malibu Food & Wine Festival’s Grand Tasting. This fest has sold out for the last nine years in a row, so it must be doing something right. Guest exhibitors include STK, Bagatelle, Marcopolo Chocolate, Warren’s Blackboard, Patina Restaurant Group, and many more alongside a broad array of esteemed chefs, restaurants, wineries, and breweries. The ideal destination for indecisive foodies and celeb-stalkers alike, tickets begin at $75 and a portion of proceeds will go to the Chill Foundation. malibufoodandwinefestival.com


63

Escala: Spanish for “Stopover” or “Layover”. A unique stop in the heart of L.A.’s Koreatown Renaissance. Inspired by owner OG Chino’s uncommon roots, Chef Chris Oh mixes classic Colombian recipes with Korean flavors & a love for communal eating & drinking. Urban Art & Music by our marquee family of World Class Artists & DJs. Stopover for the food, stay for the experience.

3451 W 6th Street

Open Daily 11:30am - 2am LUNCH + DINNER

Los Angeles, CA 90020

SUNDAY BRUNCH

In The Historic Chapman Market

HAPPY HOUR + NAPPY HOUR Events / Birthdays / Large Parties

Koreano • Colombiano • Angelino

213-387-1113

@escalaktown

escalaktown.com

#escalaktown


The Taste Issue |

Break Room 86

LIQUID NOSTALGIA The Houston Brothers’ Break Room 86 serves up a dose of the ‘80s—and a curated trip down memory lane.

1 Break Room 86 / Houst onhospitalityla.com 630 S. Ardmore Ave., Los Angeles, CA text by Vi Nguyen | photo by Dylan + Jeni

For all its hipster connotations, nostalgia is a powerful thing. Memory and its fickle ways have always been crucibles of the human condition. Perhaps Mad Men’s Don Draper said it best with his famous “Carousel” speech to Kodak executives in Season One, in which he pitches nostalgia as the “twinge in your heart” elicited by a trip down memory lane. These days, that twinge is being crafted and sold to consumers who eat up all things “vintage”—even if those things recall a time and place they themselves have never experienced. Talk about a powerful pitch: in the 21st century, nostalgia is more than a carousel—it’s a time machine. The Houston brothers, Mark and Jonnie, have made a name for themselves crafting powerful experiences for their guests with a highly successful string of themed Hollywood nightlife establishments. Mark and Jonnie Houston are the entrepreneurial gentlemen behind such LA mainstays as No Vacancy, La Descarga, Dirty Laundry, and Pour Vous; and this time, they’re dishing out a journey to the ‘80s with their latest venture, Break Room 86. The brothers’ first bar outside of Hollywood, Break Room 86 is one of the newest additions to K-town’s ultra-trendy Line Hotel. With boom box-lined walls, looped videos of ‘80s TV shows, arcade games, microphone chandeliers, and a host of other pop paraphernalia, the bar’s quirky-bordering-kitschy interior is certainly a feat; and yet, for the Houston brothers, such distinction is the status quo. Dedication to theme and a curated ambiance distinguish each and every one of their venues, and whether it’s the Cuban-inspired La Descarga or the ‘70s-themed Good Times at Davey Wayne’s, the Houston brothers know how to take a concept and work the hell out of it. From the moment they walk into a Houston establishment, patrons are treated to an experience; and LA’s legions are lapping it up. Still, none of their venues

would be so esteemed were it not for a well-constructed cocktail menu—a crucial piece of the Houston success model. Joseph Swifka is Houston Hospitality’s beverage director, and he takes responsibility for overseeing each destination’s menu in partnership with the resident bar manager. Joe and Christine (86’s bar managers) tell us their menu was inspired by memories of growing up during the ‘80s: “Each cocktail is based on a primary fruit flavor or color, then fleshed out with fine spirits and house-made syrups and juices.” Accordingly, each of the drinks is named after classic ‘80s jams or pop culture icons. On my visit, I start off trying the much-hyped Rock-It Pop, a vibrantly hued vodka cocktail made with Absolut Elyx (a higher-end, single-estate vodka) and laced with black tea raspberry syrup and lemon juice. The top two-thirds of the cocktail are lent a vivid hue with blue curacao that stands in stark contrast to the crimson-tinged bottom third. It’s sweet, straightforward, and both looks and tastes just like the ubiquitous rocket-shaped, blue-and-red popsicles of your childhood. Though it has its merits (and is perhaps worth trying simply for the jolt of youthful nostalgia), allow me to redirect you toward my favorite cocktail at 86: the Ecto Cooler. Based on the Ghostbusters-borne Hi-C drink, the Ecto Cooler, while also green in color, has a completely different flavor profile. An elegant mélange of flavors, the tequila concoction tastes of fresh cucumbers and lime, anchored with a subtle herbal note thanks to sage-infused vermouth. While some cocktails falter with competing flavors, the Ecto Cooler’s layers of cooling cucumber, effervescent citrus, and savory smoke meld brilliantly with the herbal, earthy touches of vermouth and celery bitters. If this drink had ever made an appearance in the lunchboxes of my youth, I’d definitely have traded in my Fruit Roll-Ups for a sip.

dr i n k

64


High Rise Koreatown Unparalleled Style Spectacular Views A World of Options Luxury Urban Oasis Thoughtfully Designed Expertly Finished.

T H E V E R M O N T. N E T

—

2 13 - 3 8 8 - 3 15 0

315 0 W I L S H I R E B LV D , L O S A N G E L E S , C A 9 0 010


The Taste Issue | scene

&

heard

Members Only —Scene and Heard

Are You a Member Yet? memberships available on LACANVAS.COM/SHOP Become a member of our Culture Club to receive gifts, access to digital contests and giveaways, invites to intimate members-only occasions, and exclusive bonus content.

LAC Events

66


LAC Events

HTC One M9 Launch Party

Hotel Roosevelt Penthouse | 4.07.2015 photography by Captain

Consider us green text message converts. Last month, LA CANVAS joined forces with HTC for the launch of their latest phone, the HTC ONE M9. The interactive VIP event took place at the Hotel Roosevelt Penthouse + Rooftop, where guests experienced the innovative features of this third-generation, award-winning smartphone alongside savory bites, specialty cocktails, and a live performance by Jarell Perry. With the help of LA CANVAS experts—photographer Max Barsness, DJ Whitney Fierce, and Stephanie Elhayani from Seed Floral—guests got familiar with the device’s signature features like HTC Connect, the Zoe app, and the HTC Boom Sound Experience.

scene & hear d

67


The Taste Issue | scene

&

LAC Events

heard

4th Annual LA CANVAS Carnivale

LA River | 3.21.2015 photography by Mark Wales

Last season, we teamed up with the LA Circus, Bowtie Project, Jack Daniels Whiskey, and Golden Road Brewing for our 4th annual Carnivale. Guests enjoyed tunes by Jonni Hipp, Marion Hodges, DJ HAPA, and our favorite It-girl, DJ Amy Pham. Our pals at Ezekiel Clothing, Ludlow’s Cocktail Co., Paradise City, Third & Army, Stella Rosa, Jarritos, Luxe Valet, Eventbrite, TOMS, Tavik, G-Star, Neff, DOPE, and the LA River Corp set up shop to host vintage carnival games along the historic LA River. Special thanks to Wini McKay from LA CIRCUS & Larry Fulmer from State Parks

scene & hear d

68


LAC Events

Vestal Village

Thermal, CA | Weekend 1 photography by John Pascha

As predicted, Coachella 2015 left us sunburned, sore, and dehydrated yet again. But as everyone knows, you don’t have to go to Coachella to “go to Coachella”—so with this in mind, we linked up with our favorite collaborative music app, weeSPIN, our pals at TOMS, and the Sunnylife crew to pitch a tent at the annual VIP camping site, Vestal Village. Bands like Beach Party and DJs like Mystery Skulls set the score for the ultimate daytime kickback alongside an open bar and generous gifting suites. We came, we saw, we charged your phones…and gave you massive swan floaties.

scene & hear d

69


ART OPENING

1

Purity Ring @ The Fonda Theatre

CONCERT

EVENT

9

9

EVENT

Echo Park Craft Fair @ Mack Sennett Studios

9

FOOD

West Coast BBQ Classic @ The Queen Mary

Hollywood Club LA On Tap Crawl @ St. Felix @ Pomona Fairplex

PARTY

THEATRE

8

EVENT

2

Ok Go Pancakes & @ The Wiltern Booze Art Show @ Lot 613

CONCERT

2

Desert Daze @ Sunset Ranch Oacis

9

Bat Boy @ Ralph Freud Playhouse

S

FESTIVAL

2

8

First Fridays @ Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

EVENT

1

Dan Deacon @ Paris Photo LA @ Echoplex Paramount Studios

CONCERT

1

F

May

EVENT

3

Timber Timbre @ The Observatory

CONCERT

ART OPENING

Monday Social @ Playhouse Nightclub

PARTY

11

Monday Night Blues @ House of Blues-Los Angeles

MUSIC

4

11

Drawing In LA: The 1960s and 70s @ LACMA

M

The Films of Hou Hsiao-Hsien @ Redcat

FILM

4

10

Beer Bazaar @ Angel City Brewery

EVENT

10

Look Together: How To Make A Book About Art @ Hammer Museum

ART

3

Grand ‘ol Echo Gentlemen’s Club @ Los Globos @ The Echo

MUSIC

3

S

YH 2 Buck Tuesdays @ Flappers Comedy Club

COMEDY

12

Alex’s Bar Karaoke @ Alex’s Bar

HAPPY HOUR

12

Kodaline “Ones To Watch @ The Wiltern

CONCERT

5

Cinco De Mayo On Cinco De Mayo @ Eastside Luv

BAR

5

T

EVENT

Heal the Bay Gala @ Jonathan Beach Club

EVENT

“Wine After Work” Class @ Patina Restaurant

14

I Am Armenian: The River Ran Red @ Hammer Museum

13

FILM

Sobriety Test Bar Trivia @ The Scarlett Lady Saloon

14

Apparitions: Frottages and Rubbings From 1860 to Now @ Hammer Musieum

ART

7

Soko @ Bootleg

CONCERT

7

TH

BAR

13

Lunch A La Park @ Grand Park

FOOD

6

Mika @ The Belasco Theater

CONCERT

6

W

70


Art & Other Tactics @ Craft and Folk Art Museum

31

HAPPY HOUR

Liquid Brunch @ Micky’s

30

ART OPENING

Elizabeth Neel @ Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

29

CONCERT

The Knocks @ Echoplex

ART OPENING

FILM

ART OPENING

Eve Fowler @ Mier Gallery

Almost Famous @ The Autry

24

23

Weekend Brunch @ Franklin & Company Tavern

FOOD

22

GIVE SIGHT

LED LA W/ Headhunterz @ Shrine Auditorium & Expo Hall

MUSIC

Enjoy tacos and beers

4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Saturday, May 16

at TOMS Headquarters

Gothic Tropic @ The Echo

FILM

24

23Jason Bentley

Purchase a pair of TRAVELER by TOMS at American Rag Cie and receive two free passes to see

22

Hona Costello @ The Viper Room

CONCERT

25

Topanga Days @ Topanga Canyon

FESTIVAL

Migos @ Club Nokia

CONCERT

27

After Nations @ The Silverlake Lounge

CONCERT

20

FOR MOR E E V E N TS I N R E A L T I M E , V ISI T L AC A N VA S.COM

$3 Margaritas @ Pink Taco-Century City

HAPPY HOUR

26

U2 Innocence + Experience Tour @ The Forum

CONCERT

26

$4 Beer Specials @ Sevend Grand DTLA

Lana Del Rey @ Hollywood Bowl

Kyle @ The Roxy Theatre

Traveler by TOMS Launch Party @ TOMS Headquarters

25

HAPPY HOUR

CONCERT

PARTY

PARTY

Joshua Tree 2015 Paris at Bagatelle @ Joshua Tree @ Bagetelle National Park

FESTIVAL

19

18

15

15

16

LAOKI @ Downtown Los Angeles

First Fridays! DJ-Art-Craft Beer @ Bar One: A Craft Beer Bar

Nola’s Down Home Blues Session @ Nola’s Taste of New Orleans

19

MUSIC

18

$1 Mini Tacos @ Kayndaves

MUSIC

17

FOOD

CONCERT

EVENT

Launch Party

16

15

ART

Mess Projectiosn: A Poetry Reading with Douglas Kearney @ MOCA

28

CONCERT

Com Truise @ The Observatory

28

Lightning In A Bottle 21st-25th @ San Antonio Recreation Area

FESTIVAL

21

May 71


CONCERT

Seinabo Sey @ El Rey Theatre

FOOD

Monday Night Supper @ Little Doms

8

F

LA Pride @ West Hollywood

EVENT

FESTIVAL

ART

THEATRE

Downtown Art La Film Walk Festival @ The Last @ L.A. Live Bookstore

12

11

11

10

Phantom of The Opera @ Pantages Theatre

Ink-n-Iron Festival @ Queen Mary

FESTIVAL

Thursday Night Music @ Zona Rosa Cafe

MUSIC

FILM

Pyscho @ Million Dollar Theater

12

Eifman Ballet of St. Petersburg, Up and Down @ Segerstrom Center for The Arts

THEATRE

5

Agent Orange @ Whisky A Go Go

CONCERT

5

11

Pretty Funny Women @ Flapper Comedy Club

COMEDY

4

Pop Noir Dj Set @ Love Song Bar-The Regent Theater

CONCERT

4

TH

10

Prolong Twilight Cruise @ Pomona Fairplex

The Kids In The Hall @ The Theatre At Ace Hotel

Starsailor @ House of Blues

9

EVENT

COMEDY

CONCERT

1

3

The Mountain Goats @ Mayan Night Club

$8 Tuesdays @ Regal LA Live Stadium

2

CONCERT

FILM

3

W

Laibach @ The Roxy Theatre

2

T

CONCERT

1

M

June

Martin Basher @ Anat Egbi

ART OPENING

13

Playboy Jazz Festival @ The Hollywood Bowl

CONCERT

13

Make Music Pasadena @ Old Pasadena

EVENT

6

Great Horror Campout @ Griffith Park Old Abandoned Zoo

EVENT

6

S

Taste of The Nation @ Media Park Culver City

FOOD

7

Kahlil Joseph: Double Conscience @ Moca

FILM

14

Shakespeare @ Grand Park

THEATRE

14

Catcon LA @ LA Mart

EVENT

7

Love The Ones You’re With @ Theatre Asylum

THEATRE

7

S

72


HAPPY HOUR

Tuesday Wine Tasting Special @ Urban Radish

30

FILM

Back To The Future 30th Anniversary @ The Hollywood Bowl

CONCERT

Until The Ribbon Breaks @ The Roxy Theatre

29

CONCERT

Jacco Gardner @ The Wayfarer

Bizbash Live: The Expo @ Los Angeles Convention Center

EVENT

24

23

CONCERT

Ed Sheeran @ The Hollywood Bowl

PARTY

Absolut White @ The Black Rose Tavern

Belasco Fridays @ The Belasco

The Roots @ Club Nokia

CONCERT

27

LA’s Wine,Spirits,Beer & Food Festival @ Pomona Fairplex

EVENT

27

Forever Hollywood Tour @ Egyptian Theatre

FOR MOR E E V E N TS I N R E A L T I M E , V ISI T L AC A N VA S.COM

26

25

25

PARTY

Arts District Flea Market @ Arts District LA

EVENT

The BET Experience w/ Kevin Hart @ Staples Center

COMEDY

FOOD

THEATRE

Farmer’s Market @ Pershing Square

26

25

24

23

22

Motown The Musical @ Segerstrom Center For The Arts

Surfer Blood @ Troubadour

$6 Large Hot Sake @ Bao Dim Sum

Bob Schneider @ Largo

Record Club @ El Prado Bar

EVENT

20

18

CONCERT

Johanna Breiding @ Human Resources LA

HAPPY HOUR

ART OPENING

20

Little Big Town @ Greek Theatre

19

CONCERT

18

$5 Food Menu @ Engince Co. No. 28

COMEDY

17

15

MUSIC

Dub Club @ Echoplex

HAPPY HOUR

PARTY

17

Ho Tub w/ Kurt & Kristen @ The Virgil

16

COMEDY

15

Veranda Sunday Brunch @ Hotel Figueroa

FOOD

28

Afro Funké @ Levitt Pavillion Pasadena

CONCERT

21

June 73


The Taste Issue |

PLAY WITH YOUR FOOD

Last Look

We just can’t leave Stephanie Gonot’s Tumblr alone.

text by Kristel Kovner

For artist Stephanie Gonot, what began as an innate fascination with the interplay of shapes, colors, and textures evolved into a fully-fledged career in food photography. We caught up with Stephanie while she unloaded props at her studio to discuss her love affair with still life, the merits of working with others, and where to get great ramen in Los Angeles.

What’s your favorite food? (as in, to eat)

I’m very into ramen right now. I go to Silverlake Ramen. It’s really, really good. I was just in Japan for the first time and I tried ramen there. Silverlake Ramen holds up. Will you be photographing ramen anytime soon?

Are you an LA native? I’m originally from Sacramento. I’ve lived in Los Angeles for five years, in Echo Park, and this is home now. So you’ve found your neighborhood. Yeah. I lived in LA once before. I was in Brentwood and that was not working for me. So, I left for a couple of years. I eventually moved back, came over to Echo Park, and was like “OK, I get it now. This is where I’m supposed to be.” Did you study photography?

I went to UC Davis and I got degrees in both Political Science and Studio Art. I mostly did painting; photography came later. After graduating, I worked at the State Capitol as a legislative aid to a senator. My job was to write letters to the senator’s constituents as him, and then he would sign them. It was my first job out of school and soon I was like… eh, I don’t know about this. So, I found an internship at a commercial and music video production company in Santa Monica doing whatever they needed me to do. One of my tasks was helping directors put treatments together. The directors would come to me and ask me to find pictures for their treatments. There was a photo library at the office, so I would go through photo books and scan a bunch of pictures. Sometimes they would have me go to Vidiots and pick up films so I could take stills from them. I was looking at a lot of still pictures at the time.

I would love to. Do you cook?

[Laughs] I’m not a very good cook. You just like to play with your food.

I guess so. When I was mostly shooting food, I couldn’t do my personal grocery shopping and my prop shopping at the same time. It got way too overwhelming. I couldn’t think about food both of those ways. Personal projects vs. commercial projects?

I think people come to me because I can add something to the art direction in addition to taking the photos. Clients often ask me to do things similar to my personal work. It’s cool, because most everything that I’m asked to do looks like stuff I already do. So I don’t separate my work on my website between fine art projects and commercial. I don’t have to be two different people. Any recent favorites?

I do a lot of work totally on my own in the studio. But some of my favorite jobs are ones where I have a team. It’s nice to collaborate with people who are on the same page with you. Those have been some of my favorite jobs—working with a creative team that really gets what you’re doing. Do you prefer photographing objects over people?

When did you first photograph food?

It was when I first moved to Echo Park. I started working at Coolhaus, and I was working with ice cream a lot. I had the idea to have my friend hold ice cream cones against her boobs. We did that shot, I put it online, and people went crazy for it. So, I was inspired to look for food nearby and photograph it. I was just using stuff I could find in my house, at the grocery store, or at restaurants in the neighborhood. Then, I did a series called Fad Diets. I was putting stuff up on the Internet and, after awhile, I got requests to shoot for magazines.

In the past few years doing still life, I’ve learned a lot about lighting; and I’m now applying that to portraiture. I started off doing black and white photography, and now I’m doing portraits that are in the same style as my brightly colored food photography. It feels totally different photographing people now. I can really see how the light falls and it makes more sense to me. It’s fun figuring out what colors and lighting goes with each person’s face. It’s funny; I guess I’m looking at faces as objects now.

l a s t l o ok

74


75


SPECIAL THANKS

@CH A M PIO N USA

Profile for LA CANVAS

LA CANVAS - THE TASTE ISSUE (MAY/JUNE 2015)  

LA CANVAS - THE TASTE ISSUE (MAY/JUN 2015): STEVE AOKI, HUF, PIZZASLIME, STEPHANIE GONOT, THE ART OF PLATING, AMY PHAM, SCOTT HOVE, LEZARD,...

LA CANVAS - THE TASTE ISSUE (MAY/JUNE 2015)  

LA CANVAS - THE TASTE ISSUE (MAY/JUN 2015): STEVE AOKI, HUF, PIZZASLIME, STEPHANIE GONOT, THE ART OF PLATING, AMY PHAM, SCOTT HOVE, LEZARD,...

Profile for lacanvas
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded