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L A CAN VAS The Gentleman’s Issue Shaun Ross • Thundercat • Charlie Roberts • Tasya Van Ree • Jonathan Gold TRIco • Claude VonStroke • Cyrcle • The Blue Room • Tin Vuong Eddie OBrand • LANY • The Normandie Club

l o s a ng e l e s


AVA I L A B L E AT: SPORTIE LA AND THE GLENDALE GALLERIA


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1.

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Editor-in-Chief

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Erin Dennison on the cover 1

Shaun Ross •

2

Charlie Roberts

cover photography, cover art featured 1

We Are The Rhoads •

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Charlie Roberts

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Table of Contents

L A CANVAS The Gentleman’s Issue ISSU E 30 � V˚5 ED.6

14 14

20

music

25 25

Bass Mentality

Nick Simmons

The bassist extraordinaire talks Kendrick Lamar, Flying Lotus, funk, and the future.

The designer/musician/writer has been in the kitchen. 34

The Young Gun

Branching Out

#TBT

23

Moving Pictures

24

60

32

76

64

The contemporary artist fuses iconography with social commentary.

food The Chef Will See You Now

The Devil’s in the Details

Liquid Diet

Food Scoops Protein shakes, smoothies, and pressed juice: not just for athletes anymore.

Visual Feast

Richard Heller Gallery The Santa Monica gallery remains a steadfast beacon during Bergamot Station’s period of transition. 31

Gallery Openings A roundup of art shows to catch this season.

65

The Storyteller Charlie Roberts

54 66

When East Meets West E.P. & L.P.

The West Hollywood hotspot showcases Southeast Asian and Pacific cuisine at the hands of award-winning Aussie chef Louis Tikaram.

food (cont.) A Casual Affair

The Normandie Club The Normandie Club joins K-Town’s growing list of impressive cocktail establishments. 68

Into The Blue

The Blue Room

The executive chef behind Butchers & Barbers combines unique ingredients for your new favorite dish.

The artist collective’s global takeover.

Calendar October

Luke Reyes

Finding Balance by Jumping Off a Cliff Cyrcle

74

Trend Matrix

Calendar

September

The executive chef and co-owner of Little Sister politely expands his empire.

Snaps from our favorite art around LA.

28

72

Tin Vuong

Filmmaker/photographer Eddie Obrand’s badass POV.

LA Street Art

The Challenger

24

Eddie Obrand

26

Scene + Heard Snaps from our recent parties.

A Happy Home

Retail therapy for every budget.

Claude VonStroke builds a nest in the music industry.

art

71

What were you doing when you were 22?

47

Claude VonStroke

23

A spotlight on local nonprofits.

Shaun Ross

From SXSW to Lollapalooza, the LA pop trio is here to stay.

Listen Up

LA CANVAS Cares Community Watch

The guys behind motorcycle emporium TRIco only care about one thing.

48

LANY

Noted

TRIco

Silver Lake’s latest hidden gem houses an outdoor movie theater, secret music venue, and impressive cocktail menu.

17

70

The Drop of a Hat The photographer/artist teams up with Stetson for the ultimate Americana collaboration.

38

Tenants of The Trees

misc

What to look out for this season.

Tasya van Ree

Dirtybird’s youngest DJ/producer scores our fall transition.

22

10 10

The Kids Are Alright

Thundercat

Justin Jay

18

style

Take a peak inside one of the city’s most exclusive bars.

69

The Belly of Los Angeles Jonathan Gold

A chat with the Pulitzer Prize-winning LA Times Food Critic.


Free general admission

221 S. Grand Avenue, Downtown Los Angeles. Reserve free tickets at thebroad.org.


The Gentleman’s Issue

A Note Men are like women, in that there are different kinds of them. Over the past two months of producing this issue, we’ve interacted with far more men than usual and can confidently confirm that the classification of what makes a man isn’t as fixed it used to be. While I’m not going to attempt to unpack the scope of masculinity here, it’s worth acknowledging its current state of schizophrenia. From the chopper enthusiasts behind TRIco (p. 36) and the recently unmasked LA Times food critic Jonathan Gold (p. 57) to beat impresario Thundercat (p. 14), contemporary realist Charlie Roberts (p. 64), and male supermodel Shaun Ross (p. 42), we’ve compiled a mixed bag for you—a curated slice of testosterone across the national conversation. Over the past several years, when it comes to defining what it means to be a man, there’s lack of consensus. Grow a sturdy

beard, be a sensitive boyfriend. Navy cashmere sweaters! Fix your own car. Butcher tattoos! Instagram models! Simmer a béarnaise. Even the most progressive dude can get dizzy trying to break from stereotypes while holding on to his gender identity. Ultimately, patriarchal dogma’s haziness is a good thing. Masculinity is as complex as womanhood. The difference is, we’ve been talking about feminism for a minute (third wave!). As a woman, I’m allowed to sing along to Migos and hate the skate bro who asked if I’d prefer to be called an “editress” (never change, Agenda.) I can participate in a Slut Walk and not want to get my hair wet at the beach. Gender orthodoxy is kinda like talking to your mom on the phone—only fun when you’re in the mood. Confusing, right? Welcome to the struggle, gentlemen. Oh, yeah, and menswear. Be sure to check out all the great jackets in this issue.

PS— Ladies, we didn’t forget about you. Stay tuned for next issue.

Erin Dennison Editor-In-Chief


Noted Finder's Keepers barkeepersilverlake.com

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ixology is hardly a new trend for Angelenos. Any postmodern gentleman worth their weight in fancy ice can appreciate a flawless Sazerac or Manhattan. But let’s be honest; spirit knowledge and cocktail execution can be pretty intimidating. Nonetheless, knowing your way around a proper bar cart is a life skill worth mastering, and Bar Keeper is here to help. The Silver Lake supply store specializes in classic,

vintage barware, boasts a wooden library of small batch liquors, and lays claim to the most diverse selection of bitters in town. Where do you start? Ask Joe, Bar Keeper’s friendly, knowledgeable owner, whose MO is to educate customers on the “ritual” behind a quality cocktail. And he would know. Joe moonlights as curator for the Museum of American Cocktail’s first permanent LA exhibit, hosted by LA’s whiskey authority, Seven Grand.

Stay Grounded

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Details, Details paperchasepress.com

thisisground.com

E

ver heard of a Cord Taco? How about a Cordito? Both are sleek, creative solutions to the universal dilemma of how-to-store-your-earbuds; they also happen to be where it all started for This Is Ground, the accessories line specializing in minimalist leather goods. These days, This Is Ground boasts a generous selection of laptop and tablets bags, wallets, versatile inserts, plug rolls, leatherback writers, and their latest release: the Tech Dopp Kit, a zip-up organizer to port all your tech cords, headphones, and adapters—all available in a gorgeous neutral color pallet of buttery leather. These guys are an ethical way (they’re all sourced, handmade, dyed, and engraved in Downtown LA) to add a touch of clever refinement to your everyday schlep.

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amily-owned design firm and print house Paper Chase Press has been a source for the culturally elite—think MOCA and Opening Ceremony— since their inception nearly 40 years ago. The Hollywoodbased operation specializes in everything print—from art books to bespoke stationery—and is run by a network of artisans with expertise in all aspects of the print process. Their in-house production allows them to focus on quality craftsmanship from start to finish, making them an ethical one-stop shop for their customers. Late last year, Paper Chase also spearheaded Paper Cuts, an on-going series of collaborations with like-minded creatives. Brands like LA-based design collective Commune have linked with the print house to produce custom Designer’s Notebooks, and Lizzie Garrett of Tomboy Style collabed with Paper Chase to give us retro-inspired luggage tags. Most recently, the print house joined forces with our pals at Downtown LA-based digital emporium The Dreslyn for a series of greeting cards featuring colorful cubist renditions of iconic LA scenes.

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Cutting Edge knivesoutsalon.com

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here’s a new kid on the block in the Arts District. Located on the corner of East 2nd and Vignes Street, Knives Out Salon is a quiet oasis of glossy strands and Arrojo waves. Inside the unassuming concrete exterior lies an elegant loft space with a mix of mid-century and rustic luxe décor, great lighting, an

excellent selection of magazines, and even better champagne. The salon is the brainchild of industry vet, Christine Choi, who pioneered the concept for the space with fellow stylists Claudia Saldana and Irene Legaspi. Knives Out offers a healthy arsenal of beauty services, like cuts, color, Brazilian blowouts, Liscio smoothing, Inphenom treatment, and has convenient hours and viable street parking. We left the salon a little tipsy, more knowledgeable, and really into our reflection.


Noted Point of View olloclip.com

Y

ou know your casual friend’s annoying Kickstarter page? Fund it, because sometimes it works out for everyone. Take olloclip, the revolutionary iPhone lens that changed the game when it was financed through the crowdfunding platform more than four years ago. Its flagship product, the 4-in-1 lens quickly received global distribution through Apple stores and has been featured in many of their iPhone 6 print ads. These days, olloclip continues to innovate with the Active Lens combo and the Macro Pro lens attachment, both for the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. The Active Lens’ Telephoto mimics a 35mm by narrowing the iPhone’s wide-angle field of view, generating a great detailed portrait without the subpar quality of a zoom. On the literal flipside, the ultra-wide gives your phone an “action camera” point-of-view, opening up the field of view for your next adventure or group shot. The Macro Pro? Detailed enough to capture a gecko’s eerily Jurassic pupil (trust us). Stay tuned for the olloclip Studio, an integrated photography system that allows users to capture the moment without the stress of figuring out a tripod or rig. The brand’s third successful Kickstarter project allows users to capture photo, video, and sound in a seamless, all-in-one accessories kit.

Sure Schott

C

schottnyc.com

ontemporary fashion and heritage have a long history of crosspollination; when it comes to the leather jacket, Schott NYC is the authority. These guys have been around since 1913, when founders Jack and Irving Schott made raincoats out of their Lower East Side basement. Twenty-five years later, the duo imagined and produced the world’s first leather motorcycle jacket. At the height of America’s fascination with the subculture, their iconic Perfecto style became a symbol of the biker’s love for adventure, freedom, and rebellion. Today, Schott NYC is still owned and operated by the third and fourth generations of the family, who continue to manufacture most of their clothing here in the US. So unless you plan on rocking your old drop-crotch joggers in five years, a leather jacket is probably the biggest and most solid investment you’ll make in your wardrobe. Oh, and these guys have a brick and mortar at Americana at Brand, in case you’re into touching things. See, we just did your homework for you.

Gentleman's Bet richerpoorer.com

I

t’s no secret that socks have been having a fashion moment, particularly in menswear. The sock market (lol) has been steadily rising for the past few years, making it a 5.6 billion dollar industry in 2014. The paisley, plaid, polka-dotted, and boldly patterned revolution has resurrected the dandy aesthetic—a trend dating back to the 18th century, where men began to use flair as a means to access an aristocratic lifestyle—and in doing so, has

Born With It soundcloud.com/bornsmusic

G

arrett Borns (aka BØRNS) has a lot of swagger for a white kid from Michigan. The electro-surf singer possesses the dreamy androgyny of a rock star and saunters around the stage with the showmanship of a veteran. Post college, the Grand Haven native packed his bags for NYC to pursue music, but rerouted to LA soon after, where he wrote (in a tree house) his four-track, psychedelic pop EP Candy. Interscope quickly snatched him up and released his debut single,

“10,000 Emerald Pools,” last November. This past January, Taylor Swift gave the singer a surprise shout-out, tweeting that “Electric Love,” his second single off Candy, was an “instant classic.” After a solid 2015 filled with unexpected cosigns and major festival appearances at Firefly and Lollapalooza, Borns is currently wrapping up his cross-country tour with Charlie XCX and Jack Antonoff just in time to put the finishing touches on his debut full-length album Dopamine, set to release October 16th.

invited a whole population of folks to dress a little smarter. While we’re not without options when it comes to the accessory-de-jour, finding a great print that’s ethically manufactured, functional, and priced reasonably can prove to be a bit of a challenge. Enter Richer Poorer, the Southern California label that produces over 50 styles for both men and women, all under 20 bucks a pair. And with collaborations with Poketo, The Hundreds, and The Black Keys already under their belts, Richer Poorer is doubling down on the significance of the dapper wardrobe staple. Hat tip, Oscar Wilde.


Dot Com LA’s cultural heartbeat

We curate our digital dashboard as much as we nurture our print publication—but in real time. Check out the latest in LA culture, events, fashion, music, art, food, and film on LACANVAS.com

Taste Test Broken Spanish LA

Music Exclusive Jonas Rathsman’s Globetrotting Playlist

Sartorial Swoon Crap Eyewear Guest Lens Series

Navigate LA’s world-renowned foodie scene with us. Head to LACANVAS.com to browse Los Angeles hot spots, classics favorites, pop-up kitchens, food trucks, and the latest restaurant openings like South Park’s Broken Spanish and their delectable Tepache Fizz cocktail.

Music exclusives are kind of our thing. For our curators’ series, we enlist our favorite DJ/ producers to choose customized selections coupled with notes on why each track resonates with them.

Peep the latest lookbooks and get the scoop on insider sample sales, mid-season drops, tastemaker collabs, and industry news. Like Crap Eyewear’s Guest Lens series, a photo story and product launch featuring some of our favorite LA creatives.

#foodporn

#musicEXCLUSIVE

#swoon

21 Questions Lisa Solberg

Art Hype Straight Outta Compton (Well, Hawthorne)

LA Events Calendar U.R. Art Festival 2015 Summer Series

Like 50, we’ve got some questions. For example, what were Abstract Expressionist painter Lisa Solberg’s last three Google searches? Head to LACANVAS.com for the inside track on LA’s most intriguing artists.

Our Art Hype series zeros in on the contemporary and street art scene in LA. Take Guild: the East LA creative agency conceptualized wallpaper patterns that personify LA’s vibrant street culture. The digitally hand-drawn graphics were inspired by the N.W.A biopic Straight Outta Compton.

Check out LACANVAS.com for our brand new events calendar. Art openings, sample sales, live concerts, film screenings—we’ve rounded them all up for comprehensive guide to LA’s latest happenings. Meet us at U.R. Art Festival’s September 13th closing party at Santa Monica’s Bergamot Station.

#emerging

#artHYPE

Dot Com

#LAevents

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The Gentleman’s Issue

Musician

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Thundercat

14


Los Angeles

Bass Mentality Stephen Bruner, aka Thundercat, Talks Kendrick Lamar, Flying Lotus, Cartoons, and the Future

Writer: Garth Trinidad Photography: Holly Gable

15

Critically acclaimed bassist Stephen Bruner (aka Thundercat) and his brothers—keyboardist Jameel and Grammy-winning drummer and producer Ronald Jr.—inherited their swagger and musical devotion from their father, Ronald Bruner Sr., an internationally renowned jazz drummer who played with Gladys Knight, Diana Ross, The Temptations, et al. Pops instilled in his sons a set of musical values early on. He tended to their ears, nurturing their curiosity, playing them music, pointing out subtleties, and decoding sacred rhythmic and harmonic knowledge. As a teenager, Stephen joined Ronald Jr. as a member of legendary LA thrash band Suicidal Tendencies, then toured with jazz legend Stanley Clarke in Japan while still in high school. But it wasn’t until his early collaborations with hip-hop outfit Sa-Ra that he was officially dubbed Thundercat. Stephen’s personal narrative plays like a storybook tale, replete with passion and adventure, joy and pain, romance and whimsy. Like a funkpossessed kid from the Lost Boys tribe of Neverland trying to navigate the real world, Stephen searches for harmony in work and life through the haze of being an in-demand musician, solo artist, performer, father, and friend. During a much-needed respite—post Kendrick Lamar and Kamasi Washington collaborations, between the new Flying Lotus co-produced mini-album titled The Beyond/Where The Giants Roam (Brainfeeder 2015) and the preparation of a new full-length album—Stephen shared jovial anecdotes from his life in music.

Thundercat


The Gentleman’s Issue

Musician

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“ ...Kanye would poke his head in and refer to me as Thundercat. And I remember clearly the moment Shafiq introduced me to Erykah as Thundercat. And she walked over to me and simply said nice to meet you, Thundercat. And it was like, ok that works for me.

Do you have any favorite places to play live, places where you felt good? Oh yeah, there’s definitely been times where I was blown away and felt totally fulfilled. Like there’s this spot called Le Bikini, I think it’s in the South of France. The guy that runs the place is this AMAZING chef. After the show, he would cut on Lou Reed and cook choice steak and this whole spread. He needed it to be perfect. He re-did the club, soundproofed the doors. It had to be right. That’s years with Suicidal [Tendencies]. Tons of great experiences. We just played in Oregon at Pickathon. It was a genuine festival. Thousands of people, but in the forest. It looked like the scene from Return of The Jedi where the Ewoks are gathering, and the Stormtroopers come flying through. The equipment wasn’t the best, but it was warm and centered, and it felt like all those people were right there with us so we were going for broke.

Do you feel you would be the same Thundercat without the 13 years you played with Suicidal Tendencies? Never. Not even remotely. It nurtured every last part of my character. Mike Muir gave me the boldness to be myself, to be here with everybody. I can’t thank him enough. That was my band. I still feel like they are. That was real life for me. From the Superbad years, full on Jonah-Hill-beginning-of-high-school, to having a child. It’s like WHOA you know? Skinnier and faster to fatter and slower, and slightly stupider [laughs].

What bass players do you love the most and why? Stanley Clarke is A-one since day one for me. I remember my dad bought me the Journey to Love CD. That album stuck to my ribs, man. From slapping bass for a melody to trying to take that further, plus you got George Duke on there. It was so concentrated for me. Then it was Jaco [Pastorias] in middle school. My dad woke me up at like 3 or 4 in the morning, so I could hear “Portrait of Tracy.” A friend of ours had a late-night radio show at the time. It was beautiful. Then my dad said it was one guy playing the bass. I was, like, no way. He bought the album and put it on the next day. Super Nintendo went off, I went into the bathroom with the CD player and started trying to learn how to play it. I learned it in increments over the years with help from various people. Learning it taught me the science of the bass, how much you can truly do with it. It was a turning point for me musically. Then Paul Jackson of the Headhunters, of

course. His tone was so important to me. It sounded like he was playing congas. He showed that percussive side of the bass. Ron Carter was one of the most recorded cats ever. Charles Mingus. Miroslav Vitous was a moment for me too.

When did you start calling yourself Thundercat? I never really called myself Thundercat. I actually feel awkward saying that to people. It was something my friends would call me because of my slightly obsessive attachment to the cartoon, always wearing a Thundercat shirt. For me, it was the best cartoon ever. Cats from space that use gold, the pyramid, the colors, the primaries, and different hues—red hair, yellow skin, wearing blue. And the sword that’s clearly a penis. I didn’t know that when I was a kid, but I was like YEAH!! I was going crazy! The first people that referred to me as Thundercat were Sy Smith, Taz Arnold, Shafiq Husayn, and Erykah [Badu]. I was playing at one of Sy’s shows when I met Taz. He told me I looked funky and invited me to the Sa-Ra production house. Taz completely looks like one of the Thundercats. So I went and started spending time at the house. It was Shafiq that would introduce me as Thundercat. And when the guys were signed to GOOD Music, Kanye would poke his head in and refer to me as Thundercat. And I remember clearly the moment Shafiq introduced me to Erykah as Thundercat. And she walked over to me and simply said nice to meet you, Thundercat. And it was like, ok that works for me.

So there’s an album on the way? I’m taking a breather at the moment, playing Playstation everyday. I feel like I’ve exuded a lot of energy in the last couple of years with Lotus and Kendrick. And I did stuff with Wiz Khalifa, Mac Miller, and hopefully those guys will put that stuff out, but everything has its time, you know. I’ve had to slow down after the Kendrick record and take my time, be more discerning about what I do, why I do it, and who I do it with. Puffy called me a while ago at 6 a.m. out of the blue and wanted me to come to the studio because he heard what I did on Kendrick’s album. Pharrell called at the crack of dawn too, but just to say he dug what I did. I linked up with St. Vincent recently and hope to work with her soon. And I would love to work with Tame Impala. But yeah, there’s definitely a buttload of music. It’s all fragmented at the moment. But when Lotus and I sit down next to each other, that’s when the magic happens. •

Thundercat

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Listen Up

Claude VonStroke

Dirtybird Records

Dirtybird Gets The Worm

LA CANVAS: We know what 10 years of Dirtybird Records look and sound like—hosting some of the biggest events with the most talented artists out there—all while keeping the spirit of the original Golden Gate parties alive. As you hit 10 years, what does the success actually feel like?

I feel a litt le bit wiser, older. I still make huge mistakes and I still have big wins, so nothing has changed on that front. I think a lot more people know us now so it’s not as much of a struggle to get a record heard. It feels good to me. Label work can be a real grind, but I enjoy the business part as much as the creative end. Hip Hop is a big part of the Dirtybird label and it carries a huge influence on its sound, yet, your artists are big names in the house + techno genre. What’s the deal?

It’s what I got started in. I am a huge fan and that’s the entire story. A few of the other guys are also huge fans. Mostly ’80s–’90s stuff really gets me. I’m doing some of it under my real name starting this year. Artists like Justin Martin, Kill Frenzy, Justin Jay, and J Phlip are making waves. What’s the A&R process like for you?

The process is so simple. I listen to all the demos. I pick out what I like and test it in the club. That’s it. Usually, I develop someone further if they look like a hard worker who fits into our fun family really well. We’re excited for the DirtyBird Campout this fall. We hear there will be activity badges and camp games to accompany the killer music roster. How did you conceptualize it?

Th is is going to be a really fun event. We aren’t just throwing in a tug of war—you will really be able to feel like it’s your summer camp from when you were a kid... plus techno! There are merit badges, fi shing, games, comedians, tons of awesome DJs, and more. It will be a really great experience for both the fans and us.

Barclay Crenshaw (aka Claude VonStroke) built a nest in the music industry

You partnered with The Do LaB, who put on Lightning In A Bottle every year. Score.

Writer Reneé George

It’s a big year for you personally. Tell us a bit about your EP, Barrump, and what its been like to remix for Rihanna and Chemical Brothers.

They’re so perfectly set up for this. LIB is one of my favorite festivals.

Photographer The DoLaB

A

s the original Motown diva of dance music Martha Reeves once said, “Detroit is full of talent.” Barclay Crenshaw, aka Claude VonStroke, will you please stand up? Introducing the man—a family man—behind progressive music label Dirtybird Records, who continues to influence, uplift , and innovate the underground dance scene, featuring funk, house, dirty-bass, and electronica genres. Th is bird has a knack for discovering new talent. As a dedicated A&R agent, he’s signed over 100 EPs so far. Simply put, VonStroke has an ear: Justin Martin, Kill Frenzy, Justin Jay (pg. 20), and J.Phlip are all hot tickets that have been hand-selected by Claude. He runs a tight ship with his hard-working team— a devoted crew of industry clairvoyants who also know how to party. The label’s national concert series, the Dirtybird BBQ , draws enthusiastic crowds in select cities across the country. Th is October, the Dirtybird Campout will make its fi rst pit stop here in LA. There’s a big-kid theme going on here, and it’s working.

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It’s crazy. I’ve been getting more music out than usual this year. I’m doing another huge artist’s remix at the moment as well. I also have a few other songs already done! Green Velvet and I will most likely be getting down to business on some music this fall for Get Real. For me, the music is the point, so I put as much time into the music part of it as possible. If you don’t have the music, you don’t have anything. It’s all just Facebook posts and fake marketing garbage without the tunes. What artist(s) do you want to work with that you haven’t tapped yet?

Nobody in house music really. I’m already working with the greatest, Green Velvet. As far as hip-hop and my Barclay Crenshaw music project, the list is more like the bible: long. What are some tracks you’re currently into?

Justin Jay, Hit it & Quit It; Billy Kenny, I Eat Beats (Ardalan Remix); Will Clarke, 808 Frenzy; Rod Fussy, Warm Up Voice. Favorite time during a production would be...

The moment I realize the track is going to work out. •

Claude VonStroke @vonstroke


The Gentleman’s Issue

Venue

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Branching Out The Silver Lake Hills Gets a Cocktail Locale, Secret Music Venue, and Outdoor Movie Theater in Tenants of The Trees Writer Megan Laber Photography Ryan Schude

S

ilver Lake needs a new haunt for the more upscale clientele the neighborhood has been att racting in recent years. Yes, Bar Stella and Black Cat are stellar, but these spots are a secret no more. Overcrowded barrooms warrant a move to more undiscovered surroundings for the small hope of plentiful seating and a lower decibel level conducive to conversation. Enter Tenants of The Trees. What used to be a dive-y gay bar named MJ’s is gearing up for its big open, presenting a completely renovated space that will house a cocktail bar, secret music venue, and outdoor movie theater. Founders Reza Fahim and Jason Lev gave us a peek at the interiors (and exteriors), and this bar is worth the hype. With Griffith’s forest landscape nearby, the physical location is nestled at the foot of a hill surrounding the Silver Lake reservoir. The neighborhood plays home to thousands looking for that ideal mix of urban life and natural surroundings, a combination that seems to be what Fahim and Lev have recreated in cocktail-friendly form. “Jonnie Houston [Harvard and Stone, Good Times at Davey Wayne’s] once told me that there’s no bad locations, only bad concepts,” said Fahim. “Tenants of The Trees reflects the neighborhood. A neighborhood bar should also have the DNA of a destination spot.” The Houston Brothers shout-out stems from Fahim’s history as a co-conspirator in the hospitality impresario’s projects. He earned his chops working alongside Mark and Jonnie, collaborating on the creative concepts behind some of their previous endeavors. But for Reza, nightlife was never the plan. A former fi lm school kid (UCSB and UCLA), he fell into hospitality after college. His experience working with the best in the business, coupled with his aesthetic instinct, made for a diverse perspective—a visual and logistical dexterity he called upon to conceptualize Tenants. Lev packs an equally notable resume. His background in real estate development, working alongside some of the most prominent

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architects in the city with his company Ground Up LA, proved to be instrumental in navigating the meticulous development process. Together, Reza and Jason spent hundreds of hours debating and discussing the project’s execution. Months later, the two got it right. “I decided to plant the entire backyard with trees. When the slope fi lls out in about a year, we will have our own litt le forest, and the name will make a lot more sense for people scratching their heads. We planted about 100 trees, plants, and buffalo grass for the entire backyard,” said Fahim. Out of Order, their music venue, will be invite-only, showcasing both up-and-comers and big names alike. The covert VIP area is tucked away to the right, a space sanctioned for acoustics and privacy. “I made a life of collecting records,” Lev said. “A type of micro performance space was really the only thing I insisted on. My favorite residencies I ever had as a DJ were in rooms the exact size that we built as a performance space.” And if sound quality and intimacy wasn’t enough to have you vying for whatever secret password gets you into this joint, their pet-peeve policy will have genuine live-music lovers enthralled. “In this room, there’s a no cell phone or camera policy, which we have built lockers for if you can’t resist,” Lev said. Fahim and Lev are true purists. Their dream crowd for the space will happen when the listicle hype is no longer present. “People tend to want to go to hot spots,” Fahim said. “I still want to go to places when they’re long cooled off . There are bars that I still frequent, and they’ve been open for years. The genetic code evolves over time once the window shoppers have disappeared and you get to see the bar’s real identity. The regulars. My goal is to have regulars by staying true to the original vision.” Cheers to a new Cheers-type bar that we selfi shly hope can stay quiet as long as possible. Wait, why are we writing this again? •

2810 Hyperion Ave. Silver Lake, Los Angeles, CA Tenantsofthetrees.com @tenantsofthetrees ◆ @outofordersilverlake


The Young Gun Selections By Justin Jay

Justin Jay spent his freshman year at USC held up in his dorm room, making demos. The social sacrifice paid off; at 18, he signed to Claude VonStroke’s label Dirtybird Records. Throughout the last four years, Justin juggled prerequisites with releasing records, playing international DJ sets, and earning a cult following in the underground house scene. These days, the DJ/producer (and recent grad) is on the road for Dirtybird’s 10th annual, five-city BBQ party tour—and with good company. The show’s world-renowned lineup includes a host of critically acclaimed headliners: Claude himself, Justin Martin, Christian Martin, and J. Philip to name a few. From motorcycle dudes and Pulitzer Prize-winning food critics, to male supermodels and Hollywood chefs, Justin Jay seemed like the perfect addition to our eclectic roster of gentlemen profiled in this issue. So in the spirit of refinement, we commissioned the beat maestro for a groovy, soulful score to help usher us into sweater weather.

Harvey Sutherland

HNNY

Rick Wade

“Bermuda”

“You Feeling Alright”

“Can’t You See”

Jack J

West Noorwood Cassette Library

Axel Boman

“Thirstin”

“What’s That Sound”

“Not So Much”

Tame Impala

Olav Brekke Mathisen

Claude VonStroke

“‘Cause I’m A Man”

“Take To The Sky”

“Aundy”

OCT. 21, 2015 - FEB. 15, 2016 WWW.GRAMMYMUSEUM.ORG

People Under The Stairs

Gil Scott-Heron

Session Victim

K en V eeder /© C a p i t o l P h o t o Ar c h i v e s

“Empty Bottles of Water”

“Home is Where the Hatred is”

“We Want To Thank All Our Friends”

Stream the full Spotify playlist • lacanvas.com


Los Angeles

Los Angeles Tastemakers THE GENTLEM A N’S ISSUE

Issue 30�Spotlights | 'tast,mak r | noun a person who decides or influences what is or will become fashionable.

LANY � Music Eddie Obrand � Art Tin Vuong � Food Nick Simmons � Fashion Writer Kacy Emmett


The Gentleman’s Issue

Spotlights

IS S U E 3 0

#TBT LANY thisislany.com @thisislany

Most things that are a year old can’t eat without drooling all over themselves. LANY (a combo of LA + NY pronounced laynee), is a band born in 2014, and is way past the drool phase. Unless you count their fans. The pop trio is equal parts friends, roommates, and collaborators, and their sound blends all of your favorite elements of ’80s pop and R&B mood. They mix most of their songs on an old computer, and if you can make a Dell sound this good, you’re more magician than musician. The magicians behind the music are Jake Goss, Paul Klein, and Leslie (Les) Priest—best buddies joined at the synth. It all started in Nashville where great bourbon and music are born, usually in that order. After only a few days of jamming, the LANY boys had recorded their first two tracks, “Hot Lights” and “Walk Away.” There’s enough dream pop to make you an addict, enough of something familiar that you can’t help but love. Now, after recording their EP I Loved You and blowing up at SXSW and Lollapalooza, LANY is here to stay. That’s cool with us, since their track “ILYSB” has a welcome timeshare in our heads. While Goss, Klein, and Priest continue to tear it up with their throwback system, we’ll patiently await a full-length album. Despite what one of their most popular tracks says, LANY is anything but bad, bad, bad. •

Music Tastemaker


Los Angeles

Almost Famous

Eddie Obrand edgarobrand.com @eddie_obrand

Eddie Obrand is the kind of dude you want to hang out with. A Laguna Beach native, Obrand is a filmmaker and photographer you’re going to see a lot more of. He got his start with LEAF, a collective he and a few friends formed to explore art and music. Together, they made videos and even worked with Urban Outfitters—the group was powerfully formative in the way only a young gang of creators can be. Still fresh on the scene, Obrand’s wasting no time, filling his repertoire with work from LEVI’s, Stone Cold Fox, and BB Dakota. One of his first opportunities came from Monster Children and our pals over at D’Blanc, when he directed the series Everybody In, following bands on tour: from swag machine Curtis Harding to the French, punky La Femme. Obrand’s work with La Femme earned him a Vimeo Staff Pick and is pure passion with a badass POV. Other musical mugs he’s captured include Benjamin Booker and Kurt Vile, all shot in Obrand’s light—chaotic, quiet, real. He makes for an ideal fly on the tour bus wall, as much a fan as he is there to work. His portraits are nostalgic and strong, a harsh contrast to the light and envy-inducing waves he’s making in the commercial world. Obrand disguises his commercial work for cinematic art, favoring storytelling to selling. If anything, Eddie’s reel is brand-less. His short film for Vissla, Palmera Express, started as a spot for a surfwear company, but he gave context to surf culture with a kind-of-revitalized Endless Summer narrative. “I didn’t want anyone to feel excluded,” he says, “I wanted to speak ‘surfing’ to people who don’t—I wanted the film to be accessible for everyone.” Gnarly. With a style that captures an age and feeling we cling to so desperately, Obrand’s just at his beginning. •

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Art Tastemaker


The Gentleman’s Issue IS S U E 3 0

Tin Vuong Photography Lanewood Studio

blackhousehm.com @tin_vuong @littlesistermb

The Chef Will See You Now Chefs are scary. Tin Vuong, executive chef and co-owner of Little Sister, isn’t one of those chefs. For a dude running a handful of restaurants, including Abigaile, Wildcraft, Dia de Campo, and Steak & Whisky, Vuong couldn’t be chiller. What’s the secret sauce? Probably the ongoing success of his co-founded restaurant group, Blackhouse. Vuong didn’t get his start from divine intervention or family legacy— he went to culinary school as a sort of afterthought and happened to be really, really good at it. Now, Vuong heads Blackhouse with business partner, Jed Sanford. They’re like the Batman and Robin Hood of LA’s food scene, minus the spandex. Together they run six (soon to be seven) shops, each one serving up global favorites. There are no “undertones” or “essences.” There is only good food. The core of Vuong’s philosophy is simple: comfort is king. Abigaile, Vuong’s first restaurant, started as a free-for-all place for self-expression and experimentation. Now his flagship knows no niche, just a big-ass spice rack. Riding off of Abigaile’s success, Little Sister in Manhattan Beach lives up to its name, the cool little sibling whose lineup is inspired by the European colonization of Southeast Asia. Vuong wanted to do Asian food that was authentic and true, cooked the way it should be cooked without omitting key elements. If you need a hug, Vuong recommends the seafood hot pot with expert assurance: “It’s the shit.” We’re looking forward to Little Sister’s second location coming to DTLA very soon. According to Vuong, the menu is about 80 percent reinvented—but who’s counting? Where Wildcraft is all about sourdough pizza, and Dia de Campo meets Mexico, there’s no shortage of love to go around. (If you do find yourself at Dia, do yourself a favor and order the Big Ass Carnitas.) Vuong’s kitchens pay homage to a melting pot of flavors gleaned from friends and strangers and lays claim all over the culinary map. Vuong’s insatiable energy is on the rise, and in this case, we recommend feeding off it. •

Food Tastemaker

24


Los Angeles

The Kids Are Alright

Nick Simmons Photography Sven Dreesbach

@nicktypeswords

Towering at 6 feet 7 inches, Nick Simmons is not my first choice for hide-and-seek, but he’s one of the busiest tastemakers out there: a musician, designer, and writer all before lunch. Simmons moves with expert humility, treading honestly and lightly. He’s unabashedly forthright in his opinions and well versed in more industries than most of us knew existed. So, where do we start? You haven’t heard much from the songwriter…yet. He’s in the process of making the baby, working closely with longtime friend and musical counterpart, Vinnie Ferra, to release their inaugural EP. A product of a genre-less generation where Hozier and The Black Keys all live on the same playlist, don’t expect their sound to fit into a box. We can look forward to “a lot of blues, soul, and whatever the hell James Blake is.” Outside the makeshift studio, Simmons has been busy writing. “It’s my day job,” he jokes. But seriously, with a refreshing POV on sexual liberty, Simmons’ bylines at HuffPo and Vice are bookmark worthy. He’s a regular Matt Lauer, comfortable letting A-listers talk about what they want, spotlighting the shadows of their lives that rarely see light. He’s also making his way on the fashion front. His approach, like the rest of his endeavors, has a philosophical footnote: “People listen with their eyes.” For his past collab with Style Club + Christian Benner, A Place Where Dreamers Go, Simmons cut threads with a conscience, donating proceeds to his sister’s organization, Sophie’s Place. His design suggests an alternative to trends, so be on the lookout for timeless silhouettes and leather—lots of it. In whatever discipline Simmons explores, he’s a natural. Guess it runs in the family. •

25

Fashion Tastemaker


Syntek E 5th St. / Colyton St.

Curated by W W W.C HI C K EN S P E A K .C O M

@chickenspeak

Gregor y Sif f Rothdell Trail / Laurel Canyon Blvd.

Madsteez S Hill St. / W 30th St.

 Cruise through the city to find the latest murals.

Case Maclaim W Olympic Blvd. / S Flower St.


Nychos

Asylm

S La Cienega Blvd. / Smiley Dr.

E 4th St. / Colyton St.

Hans Haveron

Annie Preece

N Western Ave. / Council St.

Melrose Ave. / N Detroit St.

Kent Twitchell

Royal

S Hope St. / W 12th St.

S Central Ave. / E 16th St.

Tewsr

Ador & Semor

Melrose Ave. / N Laurel Ave.

Beverly Blvd. / S Vendome St.


The Gentleman’s Issue

Artist

Nothing Exists! • Indoor • Montreal, CA

is s u e 3 0

Finding Balance by Jumping Off a Cliff La Arts Collective Cyrcle Plans Expansion Writer: Chris Pedler Photography: Tyler Allen

Cyrcle

28


✽ Los Angeles

“ The more we change, the more we grow. It’s just remembering the risks we took to get here and not being afraid to keep taking them.

Between the streets and the gallery, art and life, darkness and light, Cyrcle seeks balance between opposites. But before hitting some sweet middle, they know you’ve got to go jump off a cliff. A two-person arts collective based in Hollywood, Cyrcle integrates painting and design through multiple media—big outdoor murals, sculpture, photography, and video, to name a few. The group has new expansion plans, but keeping the risk-taking edge they started with is key. Davey Detail and Rabī formed Cyrcle after meeting at a rooftop party in Echo Park. Both originally painters, they came out of graffiti and skate culture, a still-visible influence in their current work. While each has developed new skills— Davey gravitated toward design, Rabī learned photography—their work always expresses similar ideas about duality, collectivity, and, well, circularity. Pointing to our “fluid, ever-circulating existence,” Rabī says their name uses “the ambiguous ‘y’ instead of an ‘i’ because it’s about you. There are many of us. It’s not an ‘I’ thing.” Similarly in their work, Rabī says, “The concept drives the aesthetic,” meaning they land on the form of a piece after drilling down to one core idea. Notes cover various surfaces in their studio (where they also live), providing evidence of a brainstorming process that continues until “a word sticks, and that word is so powerful it dictates an entire concept,” Davey says. Nothing Exists! is the show Cyrcle opened in Montreal in June. The idea came out of an article Davey had read about how a big black hole grows heavier with everything it consumes until the impenetrable center gives birth to a new universe. “That helped me come to this revelation that everything is breathing,” Davey says. Even on a galactic level, “It’s just a breath in, inhale an entire solar system, exhale.” The show featured paintings composed of text, surreal historical figures, otherworldly landscapes, and sculpture with glow-inthe-dark elements. Having traveled all over in recent years, Cyrcle has forged links with artists around the globe, from LA to

29

Cyrcle

Miami to Hong Kong. Bonding over shared interests and attitudes, a culture has grown among the people they know—summed up by their hashtag #DougLyfe. “‘Doug’ is a term of endearment for someone who’s trying to make it in life,” Rabī says. They began calling each other Doug, then calling others Doug. “People picked it up. It became this fun personal thing for the people who knew us, something stupid within our crew,” Rabī says. “It’s become our culture.” Cyrcle plans to expand this culture to a website with original content, zines, and even toys based on tattoo art. This is one of two projects conceived around the duo’s individual interests. In September, the guys are heading to Aalborg, Denmark for an installation for WE AArt. After that, they’ll make their way to NYC for a collaboration with the nonprofit Journalism is not a Crime. Though the present is busy and bright, Cyrcle is “nowhere near where we want to be,” Rabī says. While Rabī leads on Doug Lyfe, Davey, a former clothing designer, spearheads Black Cyrcle, a product division offering limited-edition fashion, furniture, and decor, set to launch in September. He imagines pop-up shops and collaborations with, for example, a 350-year-old porcelain company in Japan. “We’re going to continue to work hard to make just fucking epic shit,” Rabī says, “just to satisfy that weird longing craving empty weirdness that is not making something. The more we change, the more we grow. It’s just remembering the risks we took to get here and not being afraid to keep taking them.” These risks are in service of a desire to inspire. For a reminder about how to jump off a cliff, Cyrcle’s manifesto reads: “We left our families. We abandoned our homes. We worked for nothing. We slept on floors. We partied hard. We lost our minds. We danced with the devil. We faced our fears. We swallowed our pride. We gave our hearts. We tried and failed. We followed our dreams. We are Cyrcle. We never die!” This text hangs in their studio window on Hollywood, where it serves as a reminder to the rest of us, too. •


Artist

Cyrcle


Gallery Openings By Rachel Many

Raymond Saunders | “Recent Work”

Lora Schelsinger Gallery | September 5th – October 17th Opening Reception: Saturday, September 12th, 5–7 pm

“ We’re going to continue to work hard to make just fucking epic shit,” Rabi says, “just to satisfy that weird longing craving empty weirdness that is not making something. The more we change, the more we grow. It’s just remembering the risks we took to get here and not being afraid to keep taking them.”

Frequently compared to Cy Twombly, Robert Rauschenberg and Jean-Michel Basquiat, Raymond Saunders’ voice has remained unique in its expression. The exhibition will display a variety of mediums, combining energetic and dissonant mixtures of drawing, collage, assemblage, and gestural bursts of paint in order to dismantle cultural hierarchies associated with high and low art.

loraschlesinger.com Frank Gehry

LACMA | September 13th – March 20th, 2016

Frank Gehry presents a comprehensive examination of the architect’s extraordinary body of work from the early 1960s to the present, featuring more than 200 drawings, many of which have never been seen publicly, and 65 models that illuminate the evolution of Gehry’s thinking. Tracing the arc of his career, the exhibition focuses on two main themes: urbanism and the development of new systems of digital design. This retrospective offers an opportunity to reflect on the development of Gehry’s work and to understand the processes of one of the great architectural minds.

lacma.org Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle | Well 34°01’03“N -118°29’12”W

Christopher Grimes Gallery | September 12th – October 24th Opening Reception: Saturday, September 12th, 6 pm

As part of SITE Santa Fe’s 2014 Biennial, Manglano-Ovalle installed a permanent work of land art in the community of the Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. This vertical sculpture penetrated the ground to reach the aquifer below, on top of which was installed a hand pump to manually extract water for public consumption. For this forthcoming exhibition, 500 gallons of water from this well will be transported to Santa Monica, where visitors can access this resource and gift of P’oe, courtesy of Santa Clara Pueblo.

cgrimes.com Ryan Schneider

Richard Heller Gallery | September 17th – October 24th Opening Reception: Saturday, September 17th, 6 pm Brooklyn-based artist Ryan Schneider experiments with painting as an expression of personal narrative. His latest works are dreamy and richly colored, often featuring a spiritually charged, even shamanic quality. Schneider’s work is an exercise in personal theater—an exploration into the way in which experience and the expression of it can diverge.

richardhellergallery.com Magdalena Fernández

MOCA-Pacific Design Center | October 3rd – January 3rd, 2016

In the artist’s first major museum exhibition in the United States, Fernández’s multidisciplinary work incorporates light, movement, and sound and is deeply connected to the natural world—especially the tropical fauna and flora of Caracas—as well as to formal modernist sensibilities. Her extensive background in graphic design has greatly influenced the visual, sensorial, and experiential aspects that distinguish her work.

moca.org Richard Hawkins

Richard Telles Fine Art | October 24th – December 12th Opening Reception: Saturday, October 24th, 5 pm Offering alternate histories through the juxtaposition of decidedly unlike elements, Hawkins’ work is, at its core, about the pleasure of intense looking. Bolstered by alternative historical precedents or influences and infused each time with new ways of seeing, he takes his subject well beyond personal indulgence into the realm of a deeply engaged rethinking of representation. Critical pairings are primal matter, making collage not simply a medium for Hawkins but a methodology that defines his art.

tellesfineart.com Frances Stark | UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015

Hammer Museum | October 11th – January 24th, 2016

Featuring around 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, this exhibition will be the most comprehensive midcareer survey of Stark’s work to date. As a key figure in the Los Angeles art community, she has been making poetic and poignant compositions combining text and imagery and exploring a wide variety of subjects, including beauty, motherhood, and communication. The retrospective will track her 25-year career from early carbon drawings to intricate collages and mixed-media paintings that she employs to create provocative and self-reflexive works that pose universal questions.

hammer.ucla.edu

More of LA’s best openings • lacanvas.com


The Gentleman’s Issue

Gallery

is s u e 3 0

Visual Feast Richard Heller Gallery Remains a Steadfast Beacon During Bergamot Station’s Period of Transition Writer Rachel Many

Dustin Yellin Untitled, figure #66, 2015 glass, acrylic, and collage 35 x 17.75 x 7.75 in.

F

or over two decades, Bergamot Station, a sprawling 7.5-acre, industrial arts complex in the heart of Santa Monica, has played home to one of the city’s most unique public spaces. With more than 30 galleries and a myriad of public programming for the masses, it’s no wonder the campus is heralded as a primary cultural destination on the Westside. Where else can you get a dose of culture, enjoy some eats, and relish in the ample amount of free parking? Yes, free. (If the artwork doesn’t appeal to your tastes, the parking surely will.) Among the cluster of worthwhile sights lies Richard Heller Gallery, a captivating creative space that presents a bold program of international contemporary artists—top-notch talent featuring the likes of Devin Troy Strother, Dustin Yellin, Michelle Grabner, Vanessa Prager, Corey Arnold, Zak Smith, Amy Bennett , and David Jien. Heller, himself, is quite the veteran of the complex, opening his gallery in 1996 in the burgeoning fi rst years of Bergamot Station. He has seen his fair share of change and growth within the complex, more so now than ever before. Los Angeles’ Expo Line— the city’s fi rst public rail line to connect downtown to Santa Monica— will stop alongside Bergamot Station beginning in 2016, changing the pace and growth of the treasured arts complex. With the arrival of so much new activity, we just had to pick Heller’s brain. After all, who better to discuss the complex’s continuing evolution and the progress of the gallery than one of the space’s most steadfast and venerable gallerists?

You’re located in Bergamot Station. How do you like being a part of such a large community of galleries? How has the arts complex changed over the years?

When I moved to Bergamot in 1996, it was one of the true art centers—great shows were done here. My early shows with Marcel Dzama, Charles Gaines, Michelle Grabner, and, more recently, Devin Troy Strother, were all here. Sigmar Polke and Charles Ray at Burnett Miller. Mike Kelley and Glenn Brown at Patrick Painter. Anselm Kiefer and Yoko Ono at Shoshana Wayne. It’s still likely the only destination where you have at least 100 people walking in every day, even on weekdays, and you can still see some important shows here. I think my program makes more sense in the city, but I was born in Santa Monica, and Dogtown feels like home. How long have you been in LA?

I opened my fi rst gallery in 1986 with Bennett Roberts on La Brea Avenue. I was 25 years old. We gave Raymond Pett ibon, Kim Dingle, and other masters of the universe some of their fi rst solo shows at that space.

How do you select your artists?

I’ve been in the business for almost 30 years, so artists come to me in various ways. Often, it’s recommendations from artists that are already with the gallery. But I look everywhere. It just has to feel somehow new and right and original to me. I think that the importance of originality has somehow lost its luster in much of what is currently being shown today, but it’s still the most important thing to me. If you hear David Bowie’s voice, it could only be Bowie. When you look at a Glenn Brown painting, only Brown could have made it. That’s the vibe it takes to hook me. How do you feel about the new Expo Line station being built alongside Bergamot Station? Are there any general concerns among the current gallery tenants and yourself?

It’s going to be so exciting to be able to park at work and take a train downtown or to Culver City. The train stops right here so it will really open up the ease of access for Bergamot, especially for out-oftown visitors. Any LA-based (or non) artists we should be keeping our eye on for the future?

I’m super-excited about Devin Troy Strother and Vanessa Prager here in LA. In New York, Amy Bennett , Dustin Yellin, Ryan Schneider, Matt Mignanelli, and Trudy Benson. In Portland, Corey Arnold. In Canada, Sasha Pierce and Neil Farber. And from all points of the world, Charlie Roberts. Any art trends you’re witnessing in the LA art scene?

I think that young artists, not just in LA, are under tremendous pressure to make it quickly. They don’t feel they have the luxury of time that it took previous generations to develop their ideas and get on the map. Everything is accelerated. It’s exciting... but I don’t think it’s sustainable. What are you most excited about for the future of the gallery?

Having the pleasure to watch the whole art world evolve and grow and die and resurrect itself with a certain amount of detachment and, at the same time, curious wonder. I’m also excited about having an additional space or doing some pop-ups in town, giving people more access to the gallery. Let’s face it, driving on the 10 freeway is just fucked. But the train is coming.... •

2525 Michigan Ave, Santa Monica, CA Richardhellergallery.com

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The Gentleman’s Issue

Designer

is s u e 3 0

Tasya van Ree The Drop of a Hat

@tasyavanree

Photographer/Artist Tasya van Ree Joins Forces with Stetson for the ultimate Americana collaboration

Writer: Erin Dennison Photography: Josie Simonet

Tasya van Ree is captivating. If you’ve ever had the pleasure of sitting across from her, you know what we mean. She’s an artist, photographer, and noted clotheshorse whose multimedia body of work resonates with even the casual observer. She’s fueled by her emotional proximity to both life and death, thoughtfully analyzing the fluid relationship between the two. Throughout every medium, her muse is the human experience.

Tasya van Ree

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Los Angeles

G

rowing up in Hawaii, Tasya landed stateside in 1994. She picked up a camera and has cultivated an idyllic life v. art balance ever since. These days, it’s a film camera: Hasselblad to be exact—she finds it much more powerful. Her contrast-y, intimate portraits echo the greats—think Helmut Newton, Herb Ritts, and Ellen von Unwerth—and have garnered her praise from prestigious outlets like Interview Magazine, Elle, Bullett, and The Coveteur. With such legitimate industry cosigns, Tasya has become a compelling figure in the fashion and art communities. Iconic Americana brand Stetson took note. This fall, the two will release a reissue and redesign of her favorite vintage Stetson hat for the masses.

With regard to aesthetic, what is it about the American West that resonates with you? Its freedom.

You’re known to mix high-end designers like Rick Owens and Nicolas Kirkwood with iconic vintage accessories—most notably, Stetson hats. Can you tell us a bit about your affi nity for the Americana brand? I’m really drawn to the principles and authenticity of this brand. It is timeless and iconic, and at the same time strong with a hint of elegance. Anything that can stand the test of time (150 years) with such beauty and grace, I respect.

How did the collaboration with Stetson come to fruition?

We caught up with Tasya at her Laurel Canyon bungalow to take a peek at the collaboration. The “wooden spaceship” as she calls it, is dripping with natural light, and is one of the many spots she’s called home since moving to LA. The bright, yet cozy wood paneled structure serves as the perfect backdrop for her magical existence.

Q+A with Designer, Tasya van Ree: How did you get into photography? How do you feel your work has evolved since? The human body and mind can deliver quite the theatrical performance, which can leave a significant, but invisible, imprint on someone who is captured by all of its movement. I got into photography because I wanted to document this descriptive narrative and the impression that it left upon me in a visual and tangible way. I really wanted to translate the psychological and physical effect that it had on me through art. Photography was the medium that could transform what I was seeing and feeling into something I could share with others. I am fine-tuning my own existence here in time and space, expanding every day. And as a result, the expansion of my perspective through art is also becoming endless and profound in a completely different way. It’s the natural process of evolution of an artist/human being I suppose.

It was actually the hat that brought us together. My favorite hat that I always wear is a vintage Stetson and somehow, through the wonders of social media, we began a dialog, and later, a collaboration.

Can you walk us through your collaborative process? It was such an amazing process. I visited the factory in Garland, Texas and got to meet all of the wonderful people who work there. It’s exactly what you think the Stetson factory would be like: hats everywhere and everything being done by hand. It was so interesting seeing these artists creating sculptural pieces of art, one by one. I got to really go in and be a part of the Stetson world. That experience really inspired and guided me into the design of this hat, which I named “The Signature.” I modeled it around the vintage Stetson hat that I own/love, that brought us together, and added a few extra design elements—making it that much more special. It’s really a beautiful hat with so much meaning and character.

So what’s this we hear about horses? I’ve started a new series on horses and nature that I’ll be showing in Paris in the beginning of November. It is based on the interaction between the two and how their sacred worlds exist in a melodically sequenced sense of reality, all based on the idea of order and mystery. I’ve also begun to play polo this summer, which opened up another outlet for expression. I’m documenting the behindthe-scenes aspect of it—largely focused on the horses—and putting together a photography book of this imperial sport.

Since this is the Gentleman’s Issue, can you tell us a litt le bit about your relationship to gender with regard to your work, as well as your personal style? How are they alike? How are they dissimilar?

Sometimes you see things in black and white, and other times you see them in color. I was in a colorful state of mind.

I feel like we are shifting into a space where the idea of gender is becoming obsolete, and the acceptance of that sentiment is becoming more and more recognized. I’ve always explored this concept within my work, within my personal life. Everything is alike, and everything is different at the same time. We are all just moments of time locked into the expression of self—living life as best we can. Everyone is everything… I truly believe this. •

We’ve been seeing a lot of textural photos of desert landscapes, cacti, and horses on your Instagram feed lately. What do you have up your sleeve?

The Tasya van Ree x Stetson collaboration will be available Oct. 1 on Stetson.com.

You’ve become known for inky, B+W portraits, but last fall you surprised everyone with colorful, nostalgic shots in your show A State of Mind and the Affairs of its Games. What inspired the change?

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I’ve been intrigued with nature’s reflection lately. It has a universal magnetism that is both spatial and internal at the same time. It feels important to me to explore both sides of this dream at this point in my life—to lose myself in the harmonic balance of my surroundings. The closeness that I’m beginning to feel to myself, to my art, is extremely comforting and infinitely inspiring.

Tasya van Ree


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Tasya van Ree

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Los Angeles

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Tasya van Ree


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A Happy Home

@tricostore

The guys behind motorcycle emporium TRIco only care about one thing

@dicemagazine

Portrait: Tyler Allen

Wil Thomas is a hospitable guy. Part owner of motorcycle emporium TRIco, Wil views bike culture as part of his identity, and lives his life accordingly. Over the past two years, Wil has helped curate the Los Feliz shop to be the ultimate destination for LA bikers: vintage choppers parked out front, a gaggle of men sharing stories on the front steps, copies of Dice Magazine on every available surface, and a generous supply of heritage jackets—all offered up with a much warmer welcome than you might expect. These days, TRICo has positioned itself as a home base for anyone who shares a love for the open road.

TRIco

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Los Angeles

“ Writer: Erin Dennison Photography: Evan Lane

One thing we learned when doing our homework for this story: when it comes to bikers, even casual fans will tell you that there can be a divide within the culture. The old-school riders (think Born Free) tend to side-eye the stylized, postmodern enthusiasts (more of the Deus Ex Machina persuasion). The former isn’t terribly impressed with the latter crowd, pegging them as pretentious hipsters, or worse, disingenuous posers who bastardize the motorcycle’s legacy by turning it into an accessory. Wil isn’t interested in calling it either way. Wil joined the TRIco team a couple years back after meeting the store’s owners, British ex-pats and Dice Magazine founders, Matt and Dean, at a motorcycle rally in Texas. They became fast friends and eventually business partners after Matt and Dean invited Wil to join the TRIco family permanently. These days, the guys split their time riding, producing the print magazine, and kicking it at the shop. TRIco is a cozy space, rich in iron and reclaimed wood. It’s modestly nestled in between Umami Burger and Confederacy on Hollywood Blvd, and might be easy to miss without the motorcycles parked out front. TRIco is meant

People may come here for the wrong reasons, but they end up staying for the right ones. to be the physical embodiment of the cult-favorite Dice Magazine, whose offices are actually located in the back. The store carries apparel and accessories from brands like Electric, Eat Dust, Joe King Helmets, and Abel Brown—an eclectic range of utilitarian gear that’s as smart as it is functional. On any given day of the week (besides Monday; they’re closed) you can catch grisly Harley Davidson enthusiasts breaking bread—or in this case sipping Pabsts—with manicured CB350 riders. Together, they share stories of long rides and women, collectively bonding over the one thing that actually matters, the simple independence a bike inspires. The atmosphere is as sincere and Americana as it sounds. In Wil’s house everyone is welcome. As we packed up, he framed the crux of our conversation perfectly, “I think it’s great. You’re gonna have die hard folks in some niche of bike culture being bummed because new folks are encroaching what they feel is their territory. In reality, it’s all been done before, and we are the beneficiaries of so many that came before. We are the benefactor of the future in bikes, choppers or otherwise.” •

Styling: Laura Clayton Grooming: Jen Winning

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TRIco


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TRIco

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Los Angeles

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TRIco


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Sponsored

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Trend Matrix—

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The Gentleman’s Issue

Editorial

IS S U E 3 0

The Challenger: Shaun Ross Special thanks to Jesse Rogg, Stephanie Le, and Mack Sennett Studios.

Photography: We Are The Rhoads

Model: Shaun Ross @ NEXT Model Management

The Challenger

Stylist: Marissa Peden

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Los Angeles

Sweater: Devon Halfnight from 424 on Fairfax Pants: Vivienne Westwood  Jacket: Vivienne Westwood Coat: H&M Pocket square: Prada  Tie: Prada  Hat: Vivienne Westwood  Shoes: H&M

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Shaun Ross


The Gentleman’s Issue

Editorial

IS S U E 3 0

What were you doing when you were 22?

Pant: Vivienne Westwood Sweater: Vivienne Westwood Jacket: Vivienne Westwood Shoe: Huff

Shaun Ross was giving his first TED Talk to a sold out audience at The Yard Theatre in Hackney, London. The male model has caused quite the stir since entering the fashion scene back in 2008. Judging purely on his résumé, Shaun Ross is a big deal. His dizzying rise as one of the most recognizable faces in fashion has been nothing short of impressive. Sure, his unique looks have something to do the notoriously fickle industry’s endorsement—Ross has albinism, a genetic condition that impairs normal pigmentation of the eyes, hair, and skin—but it’s his attitude that makes him a star. He’s playful, confident, and approachable in person, but when the camera’s on him, the room stops. He’s captivating; you’ve never met anyone quite like Shaun. Ross has spent his entire life standing out. He grew up in the Bronx, where he was bullied for being different throughout grade school. Later on, Shaun was able to find his confidence through dance, where he excelled at Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Company as a teenager. As his perception of himself began to change, the rest of the world took notice. Shaun was discovered at 16 by a photographer on YouTube and signed with Djamee Models, a renowned international agency, soon thereafter. Since then, he’s graced the pages of top glossies like British GQ, Vogue Italia, i-D, and Another Man; appeared on America’s Next Top Model; and has been featured by major design houses like Alexander McQueen, Alexander Wang, and Givenchy. Shaun caught the acting bug after landing starring roles in high-profile music videos like Katy Perry’s E.T., Lana Del Ray’s short Tropico, and most notably, Beyonce’s Pretty Hurts, where he learned one of his most valuable lessons about the business. “Beyonce and her camp are all very kind people—they are all very warm and family oriented,” he says. “That’s something I’ve learned from her: just like to be very humble and kind.” These days, Shaun’s focused on acting, as well as promoting his message of self-encouragement, a concept he’s deeply familiar with. Two years ago, he began the hashtag #InMySkinIWin, after being sent a photo of a young girl with albinism. He wanted her to feel beautiful, like he had learned to, and shared her photo with his thousands of followers. The hashtag began trending, and so did his somewhat subversive take on antibullying. “Forget the bullies, it takes a big person to talk away and know your true worth,” he says. “In My skin I Win is a movement that lets you know that instead of worrying about the bullies, it’s about you, so you’re not bothered by what they say. You can’t control what others do, but you can control what you do. You need to build from the inside.” Dancing, fashion, acting, self-empowerment—whichever the vehicle, Shaun Ross’s MO is breaking pop-culture’s boundaries. Luckily for us, the progressive model now calls LA home, recently relocating to the Downtown hood and signing with NEXT Model Management after a lifetime in NYC. “I love Los Angeles. I think that LA is a great place right now; it reminds me of New York in the ‘80s—very innovative,” he says. “A lot of Parisian houses have come here, and a lot of shows are now taking place here: Tom Ford, DVF, Burberry... I think fashion is definitely migrating this way.” And Ross will be here leading the pack.

Stylist Assistant: Brittny Moore Set Design: Chloe Parks Grooming: Jenna Kristina @ Tomlinson Management Group

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Los Angeles

Pant: Vivienne Westwood Sweater: Vivienne Westwood Jacket: Vivienne Westwood Shoe: Huff

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Shaun Ross


Editorial

top /

White Button down: Vivienne Westwood Tie: Prada Skirt: Vivienne Westwood Hat: Stetson

b ot tom & r ig h t (sh aun) / Shaun Coat: Prada Shirt: Prada  Tie: Prada  Shoe: H&M 

Boyfriend Shirt: Saint Laurent Jacket: Saint Laurent  Pants: Saint Laurent  Shoe: H&M  Bandana: Stylist’s own 

The Challenger

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Los Angeles

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Shaun Ross


Editorial

Coat: Prada Shirt: Prada  Tie: Prada 

The Challenger

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Los Angeles

Pant: Vivienne Westwood Sweater: Vivienne Westwood Jacket: Vivienne WestwoodÂ

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Shaun Ross


Editorial

The Challenger

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Los Angeles

left /

Coat : (424) Blackfist Shirt : Moods of Norway Pants : H&M Shoes : H&M Fur : Stylist’s own Hat : Saint Laurent

top & b ot tom /

Pant: Vivienne Westwood Sweater: Vivienne Westwood Jacket: Vivienne Westwood  

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Shaun Ross


Neighborhood Watch

The Koreatown Edition

Koreatown is one of the most dynamic cultural enclaves in Los Angeles, which—if you’re behind the notion that LA is the new cultural capital of the US—is really saying something. From foodie destinations to day spas, K-town is home to some of the city’s most alluring hidden gems. In the spirit of all things bespoke, LAC editors assembled a tidy edit of our favorite spots between Western and Vermont. Take a day off, why don’t you?

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Locals Only •

Hippest Variety

The Line Hotel

3014 West Olympic Boulevard

3680 Wilshire Boulevard

3515 Wilshire Boulevard

Great Mexican food can be found in nearly every LA neighborhood—even Koreatown. Just ask Jonathan Gold. The Pulitzer Prize-winning LA Times food critic calls K-town’s Guelaguatza “the best Oaxacan restaurant in the country.” The red-orange mole sanctuary located at the intersection of Olympic and Irolo boasts the most authentic Mexican fare in town with dishes like grilled cactus and sautéed grasshoppers, grilled goat, Especial de Carnes, tlayudas, life-changing mole options, and you guessed it, an epic mezcal bar.

Shiatsu massage, rigorous body scrubs, cryo-thermo soothing…and a driving range? There’s something for everyone at Aroma Spa and Sports on Wilshire. The full-service spa and 150-yard driving range is chockfull of leisurely options, making it the perfect local getaway for folks looking to disconnect for the day. Book a spa appointment and enjoy complimentary drinks, hot baths, and traditional Korean body scrub, or head over to the golf range’s third floor and indulge in their healthy juice bar and breathtaking scenery.

You’ve heard the hype, but sneaking away to The Line Hotel for an overnight trip, dinner, or even just an afternoon, is a guaranteed treat. Not only is the Brutalist lobby an IRL mid-century modern Pinterest board, famed chef Roy Choi’s critically acclaimed dining program— POT, POT Café, POT Lobby Bar, and the greenhouseinspired, veggie-centric Commissary—is a well-rounded medley of culinary bliss. And if you’re lucky enough to book a staycation at The Line, expect some of the best décor and city views in town.

The Best Dive R Bar

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Best Noodles

Western Doma Noodles

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3331 W 8th Street

429 N. Western Avenue

You aren’t a true Angeleno if you haven’t spent a dark night inside the R Bar. Marked only by an “R” out front, the Koreatown speakeasy is a true hidden gem, requiring a password to gain access (check their social media). Once inside, you’ll be treated to one of the best dives in the city: a solid beer list, stiff cocktails, intimate vibes, and a consistently interesting crowd to boot. Known for its great live music, stellar karaoke, and generous happy hour menu (offered 7 days a week), R Bar recently started serving brunch Wednesday-Friday. Pro trip: try The Triathlete— peanut butter, applewood smoked bacon, bananas, and a scrambled egg topped with maple syrup.

Sure, K-Town is not without ramen and pho offerings, but Western Doma Noodles is home to one of the best noodle menus in LA. Tucked away in a strip mall, the banchan staple is owned and operated by the same woman who does all the cooking and serving. If it’s greens you’re craving, we suggest the No. 25 on their main menu. A separate menu offers a variety of noodle options that aren’t necessary soup-inspired, or even hot. The soybean soup is both delicious and filling—one of the healthiest options around. If you’re on the hunt for something unique, try the chilled potato starch noodles, which are made without flour and covered with chopped lettuce and cucumbers, and topped with sesame seeds and a hard-boiled egg. Want more spice? Pass the kimchi.

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Chef

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THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS

Chef Luke Reyes combines unique ingredients for your new favorite dish Luke Reyes

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Luke Reyes


✽ Los Angeles

Writer: Renée George Photography: Trisha Angeles

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For a media dinner at the Houston Brothers’ Butchers and Barbers, we were treated to champagne, charcuterie boards of delight, and popcorn like we’ve never tasted—rosemary, roasted garlic, and thyme oil—among other delectables, like their to-die-for market crudité with spiced yogurt tahini. The light forecast? Dim with twinkling candles, just as it should be. While the evening-perfect fare was not a surprise, we were surprised by an old friend. At the end of the spread stood Luke Reyes, executive chef of Butchers and Barbers. With one towel over his left shoulder, his eyes shifted focus from his kitchen flow to the mingling of Hollywood creatives, us mag folk included, and therein, a reunion. In between general catch up and offerings of perfectly roasted cauliflower with sheep’s milk feta and brown butter, an interview request. Lucky for us, we were back for another tasting by Reyes, this time with more depth: pork chops with creamy white beans; chicorie; plum and pine nut gremolata; grilled asparagus, accompanied by burrata, mushrooms, house cured bottarga, and anchovy butter (who knew?); more of that roasted cauliflower; and king salmon with a parsnip puree, hazelnuts, celery, and pea tendrils for a kick that we didn’t expect. Our drink, a Honeycomb Hideout—the nectarines and rosemaryinfused honey got us right there—went down smoothly with each exploratory bite. Reyes, a Massachusetts native with six years strong in LA, has always wanted to be a chef. “I can remember being a kid and telling my mother that I wanted to be a chef when I grew up,” he says. His fi rst gig as a cook was working under James Beard Award-winning Chef Ming Tsai, where his work ethic in the kitchen was instilled. Then came Aujourd’hui at the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, where he honed in on more skills in fi ne dining and expanded his knowledge base. Moving to LA in 2009, he worked alongside Chef Ilan Hall at The Gorbals (as chef de cuisine) building relationships with local farmers and purveyors—this is probably when creativity in menus and ingredients started—before moving on to the Tasting Kitchen (as junior sous chef), where he mastered his butchery and charcuterie skills with the restaurant’s “whole hog” program. After that, he opened The Corner Door in Culver City (as executive chef) with a well-curated menu that focused on local and seasonal ingredients. Landing the gig with the Houston Brothers seems to have had the potent ingredient of timing. While still the chef at The Corner Door, he started doing pop-ups at Houston Brothers’ Harvard and Stone. “We started talking about working together back then,” Reyes says, “but it didn’t materialize right away. When they approached me about doing Butchers and Barbers, we sat and talked about the space and concept... and I loved it. Since going into the project, they’ve really helped foster what I wanted to do with the food.” On what’s next as the food collaborator with the bros, he surprisingly details, “We’ve got some fun stuff planned for fall. A lot more focus on our in-house charcuterie program, lots of curing and pickling. All the good stuff.

Luke Reyes

We have several food concepts being created in Hollywood: we’re opening Madame Siam below Butchers and Barbers, which is going to really amaze people, and where I’ll be serving some really cool Thai-inspired food. We also have a hotel and restaurant opening in Palm Springs. So, there’s a lot in store.” After our exquisite meal, we realize Reyes may have also mastered how to combine disparate elements one might never think would mix—or pair—perfectly in a dish. He gives a certain amount of credit to Los Angeles for this knowledge. “I’ve had the opportunity to be surrounded by incredibly talented friends in the industry that inspire and drive me to want to be a better chef,” he says. “I know the saying ‘ingredient driven’ is kinda fucking beat over the head nowadays, but I really can’t think of another way that explains how I try to cook. If we use an ingredient, we’re going to use several different preparations of the ingredient, to really highlight how amazing the, let’s say tomato, might be. That’s why it’s important to use the best produce, fish and meats—because we can’t really hide behind anything. If it’s a shitt y tomato, the guest will know it.” In Reyes’ case, plenty do know it. He was victorious on The Food Network’s show “Chopped” and kept his cool behind the line to win. “They threw some prett y fucked-up ingredients at us,” he says, “but to me it was more about just keeping calm. And, time management. I could see some of the people I was competing with starting to lose their shit, which just pushed me more.” Winning his episode took turning canned chicken, lime gelatin and imitation crab meat into $10,000 dishes. To us, that may seem impossible, but Reyes carries a competitive bug. “I wrestled in high school and college, and I’m in the boxing ring a few days a week. I’ve used that drive and competitive nature in the kitchen since I started cooking. You have to want to be the best in whatever you do. If you don’t want to be the best at it, there’s no reason to do it at all.” Reyes’ competitive spirit earned Butchers and Barbers three stars from Los Angeles Magazine’s Patric Kuh. “We didn’t see that coming at all,” Reyes says. “It’s just a testament to how hard the team at Butchers and Barbers works day in and day out; it was a really proud moment. We’ve had some other critics come in and give us prett y good reviews also. I try and take those types of things with a grain of salt. Its nice to be recognized, but in the end, it means absolute shit if you’re not consistent with your food.” He communicates plenty with the use of “we” and clearly puts teamwork on top, interacting with his staff throughout the busy night. As dinner wraps, we ask him what he enjoys most within his cooking process. He grins widely. “My most inspirational time in the kitchen is when we get back from the farmers market and organize the produce we brought in. Th is is when I get the ideas to put together our dishes, and start thinking about what were going to cook,” Reyes says. “There’s really nothing better than that.” •


Liquid Diet Food Scoops

Protein shakes, superfood smoothies, and pressed juice: not just for athletes anymore. Over the past few years, the liquid-diet sector has been booming, particularly here in LA. And for good reason. If health and efficiency are your objectives, nothing does the trick like a nutritious meal replacement. These days, Angelenos have more than enough options to cop both nutrients and a glow, but like most foodie endeavors, a little research is required. In the spirit of our most sartorially focused issue of the year, we’ve decided to get our lean protein intake up, and our empty caloric consumption down. During the process, we put together some CliffsNotes for you.

Beaming • Malibu

Try: Rockstar Smoothie + Spinach Superfoods, chia pudding, vegan ice cream, salads, juices, smoothies— Beaming in Santa Monica has it all for the health-conscious Angeleno. The superfood-centric cafe offers an organic lunch menu and a generous variety of juices and smoothies. Warm dishes like their butternut squash soup and zucchini lasagna are worth the Montana Ave. parking struggle, and their juice options are made with fresh, nutrient-dense ingredients to keep your energy high throughout the day. Taking it easy on sugar? Try their low-glycemic base as an alternative to a banana base.

livebeaming.com � @livebeaming

Juice Crafters • Downtown

Try: Chunky Monkey + Protein Powder When it comes to juice and shakes, Downtown LA certainly has options. But with regard to taste, quality ingredients, price, and efficiency, there’s really only one worthy spot: Juice Crafters. The Historic Core spot is known for its smoothies, but offers wellness shots, cold juice, and Brazilian açai bowls (which are big enough for two people) as well. From fruit blends like Slim n Fit to green-infused smoothies like Greenest #3, these guys specialize in unique, refreshing recipes. If you can’t choose, just ask the staff—they’re warm, knowledgeable, and ready to recommend your new favorite drink.

juicecrafters.com � @juicecrafters

SunLife Organics • Malibu

Try: Strawberry Protein Shake

Located in the Pointe Dume plaza in Malibu, SunLife Organics boasts a medley of pressed juice, Brazilian açai bowls, salads, and smoothies with a retail shop offering organic food (human and dog) and beauty products up front. Known for their Wolverine Smoothie—banana, almond butter, dates, royal jelly, bee pollen—SunLife also offers a liberal selection of add-ons, like raw organic protein powder, goji berries, probiotics, and young Thai coconut. With ample parking and a zenned out atmosphere (like, a lot of crystals), SunLife is the perfect finale for your hiking/beach day.

sunlifeorganics.com � @sunlifeorganics

HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 3pm-7pm $2 House-made Empanada $4 Glass of Wine

The Daily Shake • Mid-City

$3 Beer

Try: The Original Daily Shake

If you’re like us, you’ve often found yourself hungry, with an awkward amount of time to kill in Mid-City. The Daily Shake is here to help. The neighborhood’s cult obsession carries a variety of tasty meal-replacement shakes like the Coffee Shake, Green Shake, and the Coconut Vanilla Shake, along with a full espresso bar and an assortment of gluten-free baked goods. When it comes to their smoothies, we’re talking actual meal replacements here—without low-quality fillers. The Daily Shake boasts clever recipes that implement smart ingredient alternatives, like avocado, coconut oil, and almond butter, in lieu of sugary bananas.

dailyshake.com � @thedailyshake

Tuesdays Bottled Wine Half Off

Rainbow Acres • Culver City Try: Make Your Own

You don’t have to be a hippie or a 4th grader to appreciate Culver City’s best-kept secret. Rainbow Acres is home to one of the best juice and smoothie bars in LA, but also offers an excellent organic lunch menu to boot—think oven-roasted thyme chicken, wild Hawaiian ono with caper tomato sauce, curry turkey pasta, and polenta with roasted vegetables— all GMO and gluten free, and served between 11am-7pm daily. When it comes to their liquid menu, Rainbow Acres uses fresh, high-quality ingredients, like apple, kale, lemon, ginger, berry, and cucumber for their customizable blends—Oh yeah, and they’re only $5.

rainbowacresca.com � @rainbowacres

The scoop on LA’s latest eats • lacanvas.com

Downtown 105 W. 9th St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 p. 213/623-1810

Pasadena 121 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 p. 626/795.5658

1810restaurant.com twitter: @1810Restaurant


The Gentleman’s Issue

Restaurant

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When East Meets West West Hollywood hotspot E.P. & L.P. showcases Southeast Asian and Pacific cuisine at the hands of award-winning Aussie chef Louis Tikaram Writer Vi Nguyen

Photo by Antonio Diaz

A

sian food is in no short supply here in Southern California. Whether you’re indulging that KBBQ craving in K-Town, ordering from dim sum carts in the San Gabriel Valley, gett ing thrift y picking up buy-two-get-one-free banh mi in Orange County, or slurping boat noodle soup in East Hollywood’s Thai Town, the options are plentiful thanks to the region’s richly diverse ethnic enclaves. But outside of Chef Kris Yenbamroong’s Night + Market Thai eatery, the neighborhood of WeHo isn’t necessarily known for its Asian delights. Th is makes room for E.P. & L.P. Opened up by Aussie restaurateurs David Combes and Grant Smillie, E.P. & L.P. lies just at the corner of La Cienega and Melrose, and its culinary identity is a curious intersection of Asian and Pacific. Executive chef Louis Tikaram’s background is Fijian, Chinese, Indian, Scott ish, and Australian, and his mixed heritage clearly shines through in the restaurant’s menu, which ranges from the savory baby greenlipped Tasmanian abalone grilled over fi rewood with green curry paste and kaffi r lime leaf, to an impossibly tender twice-cooked lamb neck dish served lett uce-cup style with Vietnamese mint, Thai basil, and chili jam. Tikaram was awarded Australia’s prestigious 2014 Josephine Pignolet Young Chef of the Year award, before relocating to Los Angeles in the fall to begin new endeavors. When he fi rst arrived, he was surprised at the wide availability of produce. “We saw galangal, turmeric, kaffi r lime leaves—everything and all really, really underutilized,” he says. “In Australia, this produce is regularly quite expensive.”

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The highly fragrant produce, if used too generously can overwhelm, but the dishes we sample are all incredibly tasty. Tikaram is careful to keep a flavor balance. While sampling his menu, our conversation turns to the personal, and I ask him to describe a gentleman in three words. He jokes, “In the words of T.L.C, ‘Crazy. Sexy. Cool.’” Funnily enough, they’re the perfect words to describe one of my favorite dishes off the menu, the Kakoda: a Fijian style ceviche that is reminiscent of Thai tom kha in flavor profi le, but served cold and refreshing with sweet, supple Baja shrimp bathed in a creamy, velvety coconut milk, laced with lime, chili, and an abundance of spice. (For another interesting interpretation on a “non-asian” dish, you might also dig into the Wagyu Cracker Party, a hot and sour beef tartare that is smooth but packs a punch, served with crunchy, slightly nutt y cassava-and-rice crackers and egg yolk shavings.) Reflecting on the move from Sydney to LA, Tikaram says, “It was amazing. I could recreate what I’ve always loved to cook, in a completely different environment, for a completely different clientele.” A pungent combination of earthy umami and hot, sour, sweet, and salty, the menu is clearly a departure from the syrupy sweet pad thai and blandly spiced curries WeHo’s residents might be accustomed to now. Just a few months into service, we’re looking forward to seeing how Chef Louis Tikaram can shake up the neighborhood. •

603 N La Cienega Blvd, West Hollywood, CA Eplosangeles.com @eplosangeles


The Gentleman’s Issue

Bar

is s u e 3 0

A Casual Affair The Normandie Club Joins K-Town’s Growing List of Cocktail Establishments Writer Vi Nguyen Photography Katie Boink

H

idden away in a non-descript corner of Koreatown is The Normandie Club, a partnership between 213 Nightlife and Proprietors LLC. You might better know them collectively as the folks behind Seven Grand and The Varnish, or NYC’s Death + Company and Nitecap, respectively. Together, the two liquor-loving entities have collaborated on downtown’s technicolor-lit Honeycut and are now responsible for K-Town’s newest destination for casual indulgence. Unlike their other ventures, The Normandie Club isn’t hyperfocused on a highly customized, themed experience. You won’t fi nd any fancy cocktails here with clever names to be deciphered. Neighborhood casual is The Normandie Club’s game, and as bar manager Daniel Eun (of The Varnish, Please Don’t Tell, Honeycut) tells me, The Normandie Club is all about being an accessible spot where locals feel comfortable congregating. And, casual doesn’t necessarily mean compromised, nor is the The Normandie Club lacking charm. The Normandie takes iconic cocktails, retains their familiarity by keeping their names unchanged, and elevates the classic concoctions by tweaking staple ingredients in subtle but delightfully tasty ways. Eun and his team have got quite a few tricks up their sleeve, from sous-vide coconut to strange-looking, newfangled distilling devices that look more like the tools of a mad scientist rather than a mixologist’s. Still, it’s a cozy litt le place, and one of which K-Town has been in dire need. Nestled against the bar is an alleyway that’s like Litt le Tokyo’s Far

Bar, with its amber string lights swaying above. But with just a handful of two-tops, the space plays more like a romantic date spot than a cursory pregame joint. When you visit Normandie, try their take on an Old Fashioned: Bourbon infused with nutt y sous-vide toasted coconut; Apple Brandy; Spiced Almond Demarara; and Angostura Bitters, which join for a thankfully non-syrupy rendition of the classic cocktail. Eun says that coconut-haters are often surprised by The Normandie Club’s interpretations and suggests that perhaps the modern gentleman not only knows what he wants, but is also unafraid of what he doesn’t know. “The menu embodies that,” Eun tells us. Their cocktails strike the perfect balance of the familiar and the unchartered. For those willing to venture one step further into unknown territory, a litt le-known secret is that The Normandie Club actually houses another smaller bar, the omakase-style (“bartender’s choice”) Walker Inn. With 27 seats, it’s an even more intimate way to dive into new territory with coursed-out cocktail tastings at the counter, and servers who essentially act as bartenders for those who choose to go à la carte at the tables. The Normandie Club and its Walker Inn joins other celebrated recent K-Town additions, such as The LINE Hotel (and their POT Lobby Bar, Commissary, and Break Room 86), Le Comptoir, and Saint Martha. Indeed, K-Town is experiencing a gastronomic upswing, and that’s something we can defi nitely get down with. •

3612 W. 6th St. Los Angeles, CA Thenormandieclub.com @thenormandieclub ◆ @normandieclubla

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Escala: Spanish for “Stopover” or “Layover”.A A unique stop the heart L.A.’s Koreatown Renaissance. Escala: Spanish for “Stopover” or “Layover”. unique stop inin the heart ofof L.A.’s Koreatown Renaissance. Inspired owner OG Chino’s uncommon roots, Chef Chris Oh mixes classic Colombian recipes with Korean flavors love for communal eating drinking. Inspired byby owner OG Chino’s uncommon roots, Chef Chris Oh mixes classic Colombian recipes with Korean flavors && aa love for communal eating && drinking. Urban Art Music our marquee family World Class Artists DJs.Stopover Stopover for the food, stay for the experience. Urban Art && Music byby our marquee family ofof World Class Artists && DJs. for the food, stay for the experience.

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The Gentleman’s Issue

Drink

is s u e 3 0

Into The Blue Inside One of LA’s Most Exclusive Bars, the Blue Room, and What to Drink Once You’re In Writer Vi Nguyen Photography Antonio Diaz

A

n athletic club isn’t exactly a traditional destination for a speakeasy. But inside the stately façade of the members-only Los Angeles Athletic Club (LAAC)—up the third floor, behind a shelf full of well-worn books—is a hidden staircase leading to what might be LA’s most difficult-to-fi nd bar. A clandestine location, the Blue Room is a “club within a club,” for a hand-selected group of LAAC members designated “The Uplifters.” To the untrained eye, the Blue Room could probably be mistaken for a combination of Restoration Hardware and Ben Sherman but was actually outfitted by designer Timothy Oulton. Framed vintage photos make charming decorations, the room’s walls dotted with enlarged monochromatic prints that could easily be mistaken for manufactured vintage. But the split-second captured moments of boxing matches and wrestling bouts come from the LAAC’s extensive archives. One foot in the past, the Blue Room is part of a club founded in 1880 and steeped in Los Angeles history. Once a gentlemen’s only establishment, these days, the LAAC membership is now open to everyone. Alongside other aged memorabilia and quirky touches—like bronze casts of former members’ running shoes (in which they ran 100 mile races), bowler hats, and plenty of leather—is a cylindrical column of stacked books (an idea perhaps borrowed from nearby The Last Bookstore), and old gym lockers, which are used to store the members’ seemingly expensive scotch. With former members including Clark Gable, Walt Disney, Charlie Chaplin, and L. Frank Baum (Wizard of Oz author and Uplifters founder), it’s tempting to dub the Blue Room an old WASP’s nest for the elite. But according to Cory Hathaway, assistant general manager, the average age of LAAC’s new members is 27, with an ever-shift ing demographic, perhaps coinciding with the city’s own changing tide. While the LAAC does stay true to its athletic roots with gym facilities and classes, the management’s focus is on att racting an entrepreneurial set of members, from your favorite DTLA whisky bar’s

management to the start-up whiz whose app you’re downloading. The Uplifters’ modern-day membership is a purposefully chosen mix of innovative individuals in the arts, hospitality, technology, design, nonprofit, and culture realms. So what does such a club serve its members? Thanks to a partnership with The Macallan, the Blue Room is well stocked and ready to sample out one of the room’s most popular drinks: The Uplifters Cup. A variation on a Manhatt an, The Uplifters Cup is a creation of Liquid Assets’ bar program. And though somewhat taboo to mix scotch aged 12 years into a cocktail, it does boast Macallan 12 in its ingredients. The drink layers chocolate in multiple ways, from the Aztec Chocolate Bitters to the dark chocolate hinted by Macallan aged in sherry oak and the small wedge of dark chocolate as garnish. Unfortunately, to become an Uplifter and sip at the bar, you must fi rst be a member of the LAAC and be invited by a fellow Uplifter, pending their approval, of course. Fret not if you’re unsure of your likeability, for the recipe for The Uplifters Cup follows. •

The Uplifters Cup Ingredients: 2 oz Macallan 12 .75 oz Carpano Antica .25 oz Uplifters Serum (Licor 43, Creme de Cacao) Dash of Aztec Chocolate Bitters

Combine ingredients. Garnish with a piece of bitter dark chocolate (85% cocoa).

431 W. 7th St. Los Angeles, CA LAAC.com @losangelesathleticclub

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Wildcard

Jonathan Gold

The LA Times

The Belly of Los Angeles Pulitzer Prize-winning Food Critic Jonathan Gold + The LA Times present: The Taste Writer Jesy Odio Photographer Marie Astrid Gonzalez

J

onathan Gold is not afraid to eat and tell. What goes in the mouth of the Pulitzer Prize-winning food critic goes on the page of The Los Angeles Times and in KCRW’s weekly show Good Food. His appetite does not discriminate between the dishes served with fi ne silverware or the grub wrapped in tin foil on a paper plate. Most recently, he has turned his insatiable hunger to thirst for spirits. The pours and sips that have captured his palate in the local scene will all be on display at Paramount Pictures Studios for LA Times’ culinary festival The Taste. After several years of masticating incognito, Gold put his anonymity act to rest in 2007. At this year’s fete, not only will he confess his gastronomic crushes to the eager ears of LA’s food-lovers, but he will also evangelize on the chemistry between bites and sips. The smell and flavor you cannot capture in a photo or a hashtag is recorded vividly in Gold’s reviews. So before you share another #foodiepic, listen to the belly of this city.

How do you think technology and social media has changed the way we eat and drink in LA?

In your most recent cocktail survey, the Moscow Mule is ranked as the Los Angeles drink. But what would you consider to be the Los Angeles food and spirit pairing?

I sense the long, cruel reign of eggs on everything may fi nally be coming to an end.

It has never been easier to fi nd untrustworthy reviews of inedible food from unremarkable kitchens. Truly, my idea of a personal hell would involve wandering the San Gabriel Valley for all eternity, allowed only to eat in the restaurants most highly rated by Trip Advisor. Given that the year is almost over, what has been the biggest surprise so far in the culinary scene in 2015?

I always like to think the best is yet to come, but the biggest surprise so far has probably been the subtlety and depth of Helen Johannesen’s wine list at Jon & Vinny’s. I mean, you probably expected Bryant Ng, Ray Garcia, and Neal Fraser to come up with something good, but a great wine list in a pizza parlor? Who knew! And is there a gastronomic trend that you believe should die before the year is over?

Now that you have renounced your anonymity forever, tell us about the positive aspects that this has brought to your dining experience.

The Moscow Mule, fi rst concocted on the Sunset Strip in 1946, is the most prominent cocktail associated with the city. But the quintessential food and liquor pairing in Los Angeles is still probably a Welsh rarebit at the Musso & Frank Grill in Hollywood chased with an icy Gibson from the bar. If it was good enough for Faulkner, it’s good enough for you.

It is so much easier to appreciate the nuances of a nice Poulsard now that I no longer have to sip it through a Lucha Libre mask. •

What do you think is the most underrated cocktail?

A spritz is often despised for its simplicity (and in Europe for its ubiquity), yet the version at the Normandie is shimmering, complex, and delicious. Also, it should be noted that there is no better nightcap than a limpid Aviation #2 from the shaker of the Varnish’s Eric Alperin.

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If it was good enough for Faulkner, it’s good enough for you.

Jonathan Gold @thejgold


LA CANVAS CARES A spotlight on local nonprofits

Life Rolls On Life Rolls On Foundation 2901 Washington Blvd. Marina del Rey, CA 90292 (424) 219-9441

Life Rolls On is a nonprofit whose mission is to improve the quality of life for young people affected by spinal cord injury. The foundation came to fruition back in 2002 after Junior US surfer Jesse Billauer was slammed into a sandbar by a wave, leaving him instantly paralyzed. Months and multiple doctor visits later, it became apparent that the paralysis was permanent. Billauer desperately wanted to get back to the surf, but at the time, he didn’t see many options. Billauer took matters into his own hands; forging a path for paraplegics to actively participate in the community he still loved. Jesse worked with the open surf community to create adaptive equipment that would make it easier for people with this specific disability to achieve. Billauer went on to compete at the US Open of Surfing and was also the first paraplegic to tackle the waves of Fiji. After regaining his freedom, Jesse was motivated to share his victory with others. Today, Life Rolls On hosts annual athletic tours on both coasts, improving the quality of life for hundreds of thousands of athletes with disabilities. Want to learn more? Life Rolls On is headed to La Jolla on September 12th—visit liferollson.org/volunteer to get involved.

Photography ImagesByCatGregory.com

The Special Olympics Back in the 1950’s, Eunice Kennedy Shriver saw how unfairly those with intellectual disabilities were treated by our society. She saw that children with disabilities weren’t able to participate in many of the activities that other kids were, putting special needs children at even more of a handicap. She then decided to hold a summer day camp for kids with intellectual disabilities in her own backyard. Shriver’s goal was to encourage the children to focus on what they could do, instead of dwelling on what they couldn’t. Her vision and drive for equality quickly took shape as something much bigger: The Special Olympics. The Special Olympics is one of the of the world’s greatest sporting achievements to date; it is one of only two organizations authorized by the U.S. Olympic Committee to use the word “Olympics” in the US. This summer, Los Angeles hosted the international games that brought in over 6,500 athletes, 2,500 coaches, and support staff from about 165 countries. The 10-day event held games around the city from Long Beach to Griffith Park. It showcased fireworks; musical performances by Avril Lavigne, Stevie Wonder, and J Balvin; and featured a special appearance by Michelle Obama, who greeted the thousands of athletes with a warm welcome, “My husband and I, we are so proud of you, so incredibly proud of you, and we love you all from the bottom of our hearts.” Seven Special Olympics athletes were chosen to photograph the World Games in LA, sharing their unique perspectives and abilities with everyone. The Peale Project put together a book of their shots in celebration of this year’s events, which is now available through la2015.org. There are many ways to get involved with the Special Olympics. For donation and volunteer opportunities in Southern California, head to sosc.org.

Special Olympics | Southern California 1600 Forbes Way, Suite 200 Long Beach, CA 90810 (562) 354-2600

LA CANVAS Cares

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Scene & Heard Get in on-the-know of your beloved city

BNKR Best Mates

us.fashionbunker.com â—† @fshnbnkr 109 S. Robertson Blvd. LA, 90048

In August, Aussie women’s contemporary collective, BNKR popped up on Robertson Blvd. To celebrate, blogger pals Jenn Im (@imjennim) and Steph Villa (@soothingsista) played host to the Best Mates party, complete with beauty touch-ups by The Glam App, Suja pressed juice, small bites, giveaways, and beats by DJT-Roy.

Photography Ben Riches

Scene & Heard


Mark Bradford: Scorched Earth @ Hammer Museum

Art

Event

Swing Dance Lessons @ Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill

8

8

Desert Nights @ The StandardHollywood

Party

9

Craft Spells @ The Echo

Concert

Concert

The Internet @ El Rey Theatre

9

$6 Margaritas Tortilla Republic

Happy Hour

2

Paley Fest Fall TV Previews @ Paley Center for Media

Event

9

Miguel @ Warner Grand Theatre

Concert

2

W

8

Taking Back Tuesday: Emo Night LA @ Echoplex

Event

1

Hey Marseilles @ The Satellite

Concert

1

T

September

The Odd Market @ Autry National Center

Event

Concert

Wavves @ The Observatory

Concert

11

Raymond Saunders @ Lora Schlesinger Gallery

Art Openings

$1 Tacos @ Leo’s Taco Truck

Food

12

LA Loves Alex’s Lemonade @ Royce Quad, USC

Event

12

Moulin Rouge @ Syd Kronenthal Park

Film

12

Fight Club @ The Autry

Film

Event First Fridays @ Pehrspace

5

5

S

Dam-Funk @ Teragram Ballroom

Concert

5

4

11

Tune-Yards @ Santa Monica Pier

F

Los Angeles Times: The Taste 2015 @ Paramount Studios

Event

4

10

HARD Presents: A Night at Fairplex @ Pomona Fairplex

Event

10

Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles @ The Getty Villa

Art

3

Game Night @ Grand Central Market

Event

3

TH

Event

Party

Wicked Paradise VI @ Skybar at Mondrian Hotel

Event

13

Sunday Funday @ The Abbey Food & Bar

Bar

13

Monday Mayhem Game Night @ Angel City Brewery

Event

14

Ms. Lauryn Hill @ Greek Theatre

Concert

14

Speakeasy @ The Last Bookstore

7

#DrakeParty pt.2 @ Hotel Figueroa

M

The Funk Volume Tour 2015 @ Ventura Theater

Concert

7

6

Manufactured in Los Angeles @ Complex LA

Festival

6

S


L.A. Kings VS Anaheim @ Staples Center

Sports

Concert

Catfish & The Bottlemen @ The Fonda Theatre

29

Tunesday @ Skybar at Mondrian Hotel

Event

22

29

Joywave @ Troubadour

Concert

22

Westside Wednesdays w/ The House of Vibe All Stars @ Harvelle’s Santa Monica

Bar

30

Pop Noir’s Uango DJ Night @ The Regent Theater

Party

23

Blonde Redhead @ Center for the Arts-Eagle Rock

Concert

Comedy

Rhys Darby’s Saying Funny Things Society @ Largo

23

LA Galaxy II VS. Portland Timbers 2 @ StubHub Center

Sports

16

An Evening w/ Terence Blanchard @ The Grammy Museum

Event

16 16

22

$5 Beers @ Catch & Release

Happy Hour

15 15

Blackalicious @ The Roxy Theatre

Concert

15

Comedy

Concert

Glass Animals @ The Wiltern

Concert

24

Pop-Up Magazine @ Theatre at The Ace Hotel-DTLA

Event

24

Mobb Deep Kevin Hart @ The Glass House @ Honda Center

17

17

Autograf @ Sound Nightclub

Event

17

KDay Fresh Fest 2015 @ Shrine Auditorium

Festival

25

Music

18

HUSHfest @ TheSoundYouNeed Santa Monica Pier L.A @ Park Plaza

Festival

18

IBEYI @ Mayan Theater

Concert

18

All Instruments Agree @ Hammer Museum

Event

26

TarFest @ Hancock Park

Event

26

LA Cider Fest @ Raleigh Studios Hollywood

19

Drink

80’s Double Feature @ Exposition Park

Film

26

LA Pysch Fest @ The Regent Theater

Festival

19

Mad Decent Block Party @ Los Angeles Center Studios

Party

19 16

$6 Monster Dishes @ Plan Check

Happy Hour

28

ZEDD True Color Tour @ The Staples Center

Concert

28

Fetty Wap @ The Observatory

Concert

21

For more events in real time • lacanvas.com

Disclosure “Caracal” Tour @ Los Angeles Sports Arena

Concert

27

Live Talks: An Evening with Mindy Kaling @ Alex Theatre

Event

27

Concert

20

14th Annual Kickin’ KCRW’S World Cancer!® Festival @ San Vicente Blvd @ Hollywood Bowl

Event

20

Grand Opening @ Broad Museum

Art

20


Sounds of LA @ FIGat7th

Music

Concert

Art

Autre Ne Veut @ Troubadour

10

Sleepless: The Music Center After Hours @ The Music Center

10

Event

JR JR @ Teragram Ballroom

Concert

10

Common Kings @ Club Nokia

Concert

3

9

Downtown Artwalk @ Downtown Los Angeles

S

Supersonico @ Hollywood Palladium

Festival

3

8

Culture Collide @ Echoplex

Event

Festival

Open Screen @ Echo Park Film Center

Event

2

9

Joshua Tree Music Festival 2015 @ Joshua Tree Lake Campground

F

Launch Fridays @ Micky’s

Party

2

8

$4 Beers @ L & E Oyster Bar

Happy Hour

1

Tove Lo @ The Wiltern

Concert

1

TH

October

$7 Cocktails @ Harlowe Bar

Happy Hour

11

Frances Stark @ Hammer Museum

Art Openings

11

Jamie XX @ Shrine Auditorium & Expo Hall

Concert

11

Van Halen @ Hollywood Bowl

Concert

4

7th Annual Good Food Pie Contest @ The Fowler Museum at UCLA

Food

4

S

Late Night Happy Hour-$1 Oysters @ EMC Seafood And Raw Bar

Happy Hour

12

Monday Mayhem Game Night @ Angel City Brewery

Event

12

The Tragically Hip @ The Wiltern

Concert

5

M

Cured, Pickled, Preserved @ Skirball Cultural Center

Food

13

My Morning Jacket @ Shrine Auditorium & Expo Hall

Concert

13

The Aquadolls @ Whisky A Go Go

Concert

6

Record Club @ El Prado Bar

Music

6

T

Superhumanoids @ El Rey Theatre

Concert

14

Ishiuchi Miyako in Conversation @ The Getty Center

Art

7

L.A. Kings VS San Jose @ Staples Center

Sports

7

W


The Neighbourhood @ Shrine Auditorium & Expo Hall

Concert

29

Burrito Project @ Various Locations

Event

22

New Kingston @ The Mint

Concert

23

LA Air: Sandra De La Loza @ Echo Park Film Center

Film

30

Bootie LA @ Echoplex

Party

23

Wanda Sykes @ The Wiltern

Comedy

Concert

The Airborn Toxic Event @ The Wiltern

23

Deafheaven @ The Glass House

Concert

16 16

22

Playhouse District Block Party @ Zona Rosa Caffe

Party

15 15

alt-J @ Hollywood Bowl

Concert

15 15

West Hollywood Halloween Carnaval @ Weho

Event

31

Babes Ride Out @ Joshua Tree

Event

24

16th Annual Dia de los Muertos @ Hollywood Forever Cemetery

Event

24

Treasure Island Music Festival @ Treasure Island

Festival

Party

Funky Sole @ The Echo

17

17

Kygo @ The Greek Theatre

Concert

17

Iron and Resin Hooligan Hoedown IV @ Pozo Saloon

Event

25

Casa De Mi Padre @ Hammer Museum

Film

25

Hudson Mohawke @ The Fonda Theatre

Concert

18

Shitty Jobs @ Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre

Comedy

18

Ghost w/ Purson @ Mayan Theater

Concert

26

LA Jazz Orchestra Unlimited @ Catalina Bar and Grill

Bar

19

Marina and The Diamonds @ Greek Theatre

Concert

19 16

LA Mart All-Access Wednesday @ LA Mart

Event

28

Daley @ El Rey Theatre

Concert

28

Here @ Hammer Museum

Film

21

Marilyn Manson @ Theatre at Ace Hotel- DTLA

Concert

21

For more events in real time • lacanvas.com

MS MR @ The Wiltern

Concert

27

A Simple Space @ Irvine Barclay Theatre

Theater

27

Marian Hill @ The Roxy Theatre

Concert

20


The Gentleman’s Issue

Last Look

is s u e 3 0

The Storyteller Charlie Roberts Fuses Social Commentary with Contemporary Realism

C

harlie Roberts has a lot going on, kind of like his paintings. Take our cover, for example: we’ve got Rambo, an avocado, a bong, brass knuckles, a cigar, a skull, and a cat—among other seemingly random items. We discovered Roberts’ work at the Richard Heller Gallery [article on page 32] in Santa Monica and quickly fell in love with his haphazard, testosterone-infused narratives. Although a lot of pieces lack symmetry and order, his work is carefully considered. Roberts draws parallels between big ideas and objects, often humorously. His work uses symbols, movement, and grouping as means to examine our social landscape. Above all, Roberts is a storyteller, and an innate observer of the human condition. “It’s a mixed bag,” he says of his daily life. The artist now tucks himself away in a Norwegian forest, but Roberts grew up in Kansas. In high school, an influential teacher had turned him on to painting and art. But it wasn’t until his time at University of Kansas when an art history professor’s stories of fi ne artists and their work compelled Roberts to go all in. Soon after, he enrolled at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver, BC, and dove head fi rst into the international art world. Today, he dabbles in everything from sculpture to large-scale murals. Th is summer, he’s stepped foot in the fashion world by joining forces with Danish menswear brand Soulland, known for their progressive artist collaborations. Roberts created the backdrop for the design house’s Spring/Summer 2016 presentation for London Collections: Men. His largest work yet, the piece was made with several mediums and is a rhythmic compilation of iconography, contradiction, and direct pop-culture references. We caught up with the contemporary artist to talk art world, sporty girls, and his personal favorite rapper and record producer, Chief Keef. Who are some of your favorite artists?

[Henri] Matisse, [Pieter] Bruegel, Chief Keef, [David] Hockney, Alice Neel, [Helen] Frankenthaler. What kind of music do you listen to while you’re working?

Rap music. Right now, the rotation is heavy on Dej Loaf, Lil Herb, Meek Mill, Katie Got Bandz, K Camp, Angel Haze, Rich Gang, and always Chief Keef.

Charlie Roberts Money Productions Presents, 2011 n.

You were drawing smaller figures a few years ago. These days your subjects are more singular. What inspired the change?

It happened unconsciously. I think it is probably natural to begin to pare down and refi ne things as you mature. When you are 20, all you have is dumb energy and you are swinging for the fence every time, but as that wanes, you have to adjust your game, work the angles, and use your patience and experience to your advantage. What’s your favorite thing to draw these days?

I have been drawing sporty girls for a while, but am now in the process of switching things up. I’m in the lab.... tooling around with some new subjects, TBA. When did you start sculpting?

I’ve been making the sculptures in a serious way for around six years. Which do you prefer right now?

Each has a time. Sculpture: spring, summer. Painting: fall, winter. How’d you end up linking with Soulland?

I met Jacob and Silas through David Risley and his gallery. What was that collaboration process like with Soulland?

They are wicked dudes, we are on similar frequencies, it’s all been very cool, laid back, and a total pleasure to do. I gave Silas a stack of drawings and paintings. He did all of the design work—it looks sick. Dropping spring 2016. Which is stranger, the art world or the fashion world?

I can’t speak on the fashion world, I just saw a slim sliver of it, but I’m guessing it is also a hideout for freaks, which is perfect and the whole point. I’m sick of people complaining about the art life; if you can swing it in whatever way, on whatever scale—it’s a great zone man, enjoy it. Quit bitching, buck up. •

Charlie Roberts

@colonelcatfish www.richardhellergallery.com

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WE PUT COLD ON THE MAP

©2015 COORS BREWING COMPANY, GOLDEN, CO


Profile for LA CANVAS

LA CANVAS - THE GENTLEMAN'S ISSUE (SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015)  

SHAUN ROSS, TAYSA VAN REE, CHARLIE ROBERTS, THUNDERCAT, JONATHAN GOLD, TRICO, CLAUDE VONSTROKE, CYRCLE, THE BLUE ROOM, TIN VUONG, EDDIE OBRA...

LA CANVAS - THE GENTLEMAN'S ISSUE (SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015)  

SHAUN ROSS, TAYSA VAN REE, CHARLIE ROBERTS, THUNDERCAT, JONATHAN GOLD, TRICO, CLAUDE VONSTROKE, CYRCLE, THE BLUE ROOM, TIN VUONG, EDDIE OBRA...

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