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2014 KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY

Results for Business What passed. What didn’t. And what it means to your bottom line.

Kentucky Chamber President & CEO Dave Adkisson and Rep. Leslie Combs

Kentucky Chamber Chairwoman Elizabeth McCoy

Kentucky Chamber Public Affairs Manager Ashli Watts

2014 session missing key pieces of success Lack of legislative progress disappointing THE STATE BUDGET is always the giant in the room when the General Assembly meets in even-numbered years. That’s understandable, since the two-year spending plan sets policy and determines the direction of state agencies across the board. As the giant, the budget gets the most legislative time and attention, particularly in the closing days and hours when differences between the House and Senate are debated in marathon (and sometimes contentious) negotiation sessions. This might make it understandable that, in so-called budget sessions, there generally is limited progress on other initiatives. Add the fact that even-numbered years also find all House seats and half of the Senate seats on the ballot, and you have a scenario that favors slow walking on the policy front. Again, that might be understandable. But understandable and acceptable are two entirely different things, and the missed opportunities of the just-concluded 2014 session falls well into the “disappointment” category. Granted, the 2014-2016 enacted budget does include several positive elements, particularly in its restoration of funding for elementary and secondary education that was lost during the recession and full funding of the Kentucky Retirement System (KRS). There were positive targeted tax relief measures for industries such as our signature bourbon industry and a tax incentive to encourage “angel” investments in new start-up companies. Juvenile justice reforms won passage to give youthful offenders a better chance of turning their lives around. And the legislators standing strong against efforts to increase workers’ compensation costs, politicize the Public Service Commission, repeal the state’s tough academic standards and enact onerous coal-mining restrictions was commendable.

But even a limited review quickly reveals a list of negatives far longer than Kentucky can afford. At the top of the list is the legislation nicknamed “the P3 bill” to develop a mechanism for greater use of public-private partnerships to save taxpayers’ money and create a transparent, accountable process of contracting for needed services or infrastructure projects. The P3 bill passed the House by a 10-to-1 margin and Senate by a 3-to-1 margin, both with overwhelming bipartisan support. But Gov. Steve Beshear vetoed the measure because of a House amendment that would prohibit the use of tolls to help finance the reconstruction of the Brent Spence Bridge in northern Kentucky. And, unfortunately, the House – where the bill originated – declined to override the veto, meaning it did not come up for further action in the Senate. In our view, the bill was the most important piece of job creation legislation passed this year, and, as such, had the support of more than 35 civic and business organizations. The governor’s veto was unnecessary and should have been addressed with swift legislative action in the final days of session. This was definitely a missed opportunity to move Kentucky forward – and to catch up with the 34 other states where public-private partnership laws already exist. In addition to the negative outcome for the partnership legislation, this session came up short in many other key areas as well (see chart). When Kentucky voters approved the constitutional amendment to allow annual legislative sessions, it was with the hope that every session, every year, would mean progress for the state. The 2014 session fell far short of that mark.

Public-Private Partnerships

P3

HB 407 (Combs) would have authorized the use of public-private partnerships (P3s) by state and local governments to encourage competition for private sector investments, save tax dollars and promote transparency and accountability. Every state bordering Kentucky already has P3 legislation. (Passed General Assembly, vetoed by governor, not considered in House for override)

Smoke-Free Workplaces HB 173 (Westrom) and SB 117 (Denton) would have prohibited smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces and received overwhelming support from Chamber members. (Not considered)

Medical Review Panels SB 119 (Denton) would have implemented a medical review panel process for cases brought against health care providers to help put an end to the growing number of meritless lawsuits that increase Kentucky’s health care costs. Medical review panels will have a stabilizing influence on our medical malpractice system, making the state more attractive to employers while helping to retain and attract quality healthcare providers. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Telecomm Reform SB 99 (Hornback) would have modernized Kentucky’s outdated telecommunications laws to encourage investment by telecommunication companies in modern high-speed broadband internet and mobile services. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Charter Schools SB 211 (Wilson) would have allowed persistently low-performing schools to be designated as charter schools in order to provide more flexibility to turn around schools that are not meeting the needs of students. HB 85 (Montell) would have broadly authorized charter schools in Kentucky. (SB 211 passed Senate, not considered by House)

Local Option HB 399 (Thompson) and SB 135 (Hornback) would have allowed voters the chance to authorize local communities to vote for a temporary sales tax to fund important local projects. (Not considered)

Expanded Gaming SB 33 (Seum), HB 67 (Clark) and HB 584 (Stumbo) would have allowed voters to decide whether to expand gaming in Kentucky to provide a muchneeded boost to state revenues as well as to recoup the hundreds of millions of dollars being spent annually in casinos in neighboring states. (Not considered)

The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce provides leadership as a catalyst, consensus-builder and advocate to unite business and advance Kentucky. 464 Chenault Road, Frankfort, KY 40601 | 502-695-4700 | kychamber.com | twitter.com/kychamber


PRO-BUSINESS LEGISLATIVE VICTORIES The following measures were considered positive by the Kentucky Chamber and were enacted into law in the 2014 session of the General Assembly. Bourbon Tax Credit

Contractor Notification

HB 529 (Butler) enacts a “Bourbon Barrel Tax Reinvestment Credit,” which levels the playing field for Kentucky bourbon by allowing Kentucky distilleries to take a corporate income tax credit to offset the amount of ad valorem taxes paid each year. Passed as amendment to HB 445.

HB 467 (Denham) allows businesses to enter the information of their subcontractors on the Division of Workers’ Claims website and receive notification when there has been a change or cancellation in their subcontractor’s workers’ compensation insurance coverage. Passed as amendment to HB 84.

Angel Investment Credit HB 37 (Simpson) creates an angel investor tax credit to encourage private investment to help start-up companies grow and prosper. Passed as amendment to HB 445.

Lowered Statute of Limitations HB 369 (Yonts) lowers the statute of limitations for written contracts from 15 years to 10 years.

Kentucky Environmental Standards HB 388 (Gooch) establishes Kentucky-based standards for greenhouse gas emissions by electric utilities. This measure pushes back on U.S. EPA’s ruling to regulate greenhouse gas emissions which will drive up Kentucky’s electricity prices.

Streamlined Alcohol Laws Juvenile Justice Reform SB 200 (Westerfield) reforms Kentucky’s juvenile justice system by helping youthful offenders redirect their lives while ensuring public safety and a more efficient use of state tax dollars.

Data Breach Notification HB 232 (Riggs) sets forth commonsense requirements for employers to notify customers in the event of a data breach that could expose individuals to identity theft.

Small Business Credits HB 301 (Palumbo) simplifies and streamlines the Small Business Tax Credit Program administered by the Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority.

Cyber Security HB 5 (Butler) requires state and local governments to protect citizens’ sensitive, private information and notify citizens and business owners if their data is compromised.

SB 83 (Schickel) continues the effort to modernize Kentucky’s alcohol laws by allowing the expanded sales and production of malt beverages and ciders. The measure also clearly defines the definition of a micro distillery to help start-up companies. HB 475 (Clark) allows a local option election for the sale of alcoholic beverages by the drink at state parks.

Tax Tourism Incentives HB 493 (Adkins) would expand tourism development incentives. The idea originated from the bipartisan SOAR initiative designed to address ways to create opportunities in eastern Kentucky.

Business voices “The passage and enactment of HB 369 would not have occurred without the leadership & advocacy of the Kentucky Chamber. This legislation will reduce our legal risk, provide cost savings and ensure Kentucky remains competitive in attracting and retaining businesses.” Gretchen Copley Counsel for Corporate & Government Affairs KEMI

Linking Education to Employment HB 87 (Yonts) requires higher education institutions to disseminate information regarding employment rates and earnings by degrees and academic majors. This will allow students to make informed educational choices to develop job skills.

Workers’ Comp Reporting HB 349 (Waide) simplifies the requirement for businesses which must file tax returns, partnership agreements and articles of organization with the Department of Workers’ Claims.

Education Financial Accountability HB 154 (Denham) requires annual school district financial reports and annual training requirements for school finance officers to ensure tax dollars are spent efficiently on education.

ANTI-BUSINESS MEASURES DEFEATED The Kentucky Chamber actively lobbied against the measures below and were successful in defeating them and preventing them from becoming law. Protected Academic Standards

Defeated Tax Hike

SB 224 (Schickel) and HB 215 (Kerr) would have eliminated the more rigorous academic standards by prohibiting Kentucky from implementing the English and Math standards, also known as Common Core standards, and the Next Generation Science Standards. (Hearing held in Senate, but no votes taken)

HB 220 (Wayne) would have raised income tax rates, impacting a number of small business owners with pass-through income. (Not considered)

Protected Workers’ Comp Several bills were filed that would have increased the costs of workers’ compensation for Kentucky employers. SB 136 (Buford), SB 137 (Carroll) and HB 507 (Sinnette) would have doubled attorney’s fees and created an incentive to reopen cases. (SB 137 reassigned to prevent vote in Senate committee)

No Kentucky Wage Mandates HB 1 (Stumbo) and SB 215 (Rhoads) would have raised the Kentucky minimum wage far above Kentucky's competitor states. The Chamber supports current state law that automatically indexes the state minimum wage to the federal minimum wage, rather than one that puts Kentucky employers at a competitive disadvantage. (HB 1 passed House, not considered by Senate)

Slowing Lawsuit Growth HB 148 (Marzian) would have created a new subjective measure, deemed “equivalent jobs." An employer not paying the same wages to two people holding potentially different jobs of "equivalency" would be guilty of discrimination and open to lawsuits, despite wage discrimination already being illegal. (Passed House as part of HB 1, not considered by Senate)

Prevented Mandated High Cost Energy HB 195 (Marzian) would have mandated the use of renewable energy portfolio standards in Kentucky, increasing electricity costs unnecessarily. (Not considered)

Business voices “Thanks to the continued leadership of the Kentucky Chamber ... my small business and ALL Kentucky businesses avoided large increases to our workers’ compensation system by the Chamber’s steadfast opposition to SB 137. The measure would have hobbled our workers’ compensation system with more litigation and questionable benefits. I certainly want an injured employee to receive care and commensurate benefits. This bill would have doubled lawyer fees and resulted in Kentucky losing the competitive edge we worked so hard to achieve.” Ron Sanders Executive Vice President People Plus, Inc.

Stopped Utility Cost Driver HB 241 (Jenkins) would have caused electric prices to increase by classifying coal ash from electric utilities as a hazardous waste and created excessive state regulations more stringent than federal rules. (Not considered)

Blocked Coal Mining Restrictions HB 288 (Wayne) would have continued the attack on Kentucky's coal industry by requiring increased restrictions, beyond current federal requirements, for operating surface mines as well as reclaimed sites. (Not considered)

Stopped Public Cost-driver No Bounties for Lawsuits HB 335 (Stumbo) would have created a Kentucky false claims act to give private citizens a strong financial incentive to sue a company that contracts with the state alleging fraud. (Not considered)

HB 96 (Donohue) would have unnecessarily increased costs on public construction projects by requiring construction materials, such as iron and steel, to be produced in the United States, regardless of cost or availability. (Not considered)

Bad Medicine

Protected Energy Rates

No Union Mandates

SB 35 (Jones) would have expanded Kentucky’s Public Service Commission (PSC) from three appointed commissioners to seven elected commissioners. Electing the PSC would lead to higher utility rates across the state. (Not considered)

Stopped Blocking Energy Sources

HB 420 (Glenn) sought to increase requirements for sprinkler fitters and require a certification and union apprentice permit. This would have increased costs to current professionals and set a negative precedent, increasing costs in the future. (Not considered)

HB 31 (Tilley) would have limited the ability to transport natural gas liquids, including propane and butane in Kentucky by denying the ability to use eminent domain in the rare instance it would be used. (Passed House, not considered by Senate)

SB 73 (Buford) would have limited cost savings and medical review of the current preauthorization system by pharmacy benefit managers. (Passed Senate and House, but stopped late by Senate procedural move)


MISSED OPPORTUNITIES Several measures would have improved the economic climate of Kentucky. Sadly, the long list of positive, pro-business measures below were not passed by the 2014 General Assembly. Public-Private Partnerships HB 407 (Combs) would have authorized the use of public-private partnerships (P3s) by state and local governments to encourage competition for private sector investments, save tax dollars and promote transparency and accountability. Every state bordering Kentucky already has P3 legislation. (Passed General Assembly, vetoed by governor, not considered in House for override)

Medical Review Panels SB 119 (Denton) would have implemented a medical review panel process for cases brought against health care providers to help put an end to the growing number of meritless lawsuits that increase Kentucky’s health care costs. Medical review panels will have a stabilizing influence on our medical malpractice system, making the state more attractive to employers while helping to retain and attract quality healthcare providers. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Telecomm Reform SB 99 (Hornback) would have modernized Kentucky’s outdated telecommunications laws to encourage investment by telecommunication companies in modern high-speed broadband internet and mobile services. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Tax Simplification

Business voices “The Chamber led the fight in Frankfort to establish common sense malpractice reform this legislative session. They were instrumental in forming a coalition of over 20 business and health care groups to establish medical review panels, so that medical practitioners can refocus on caring for patients and stop worrying about the next meritless suit from personal injury lawyers.” Dr. Andrew Henderson CEO Lexington Clinic

HB 346 (Damron) would have simplified Kentucky tax laws with regard to calculating estimated tax payments for taxpayers whose income fluctuates during the year and attempts to mimic the penalty calculations at the federal level to ease compliance for taxpayers. (Not considered)

Clear Employer Guidelines SB 81 (Schickel) would have created a clear set of guidelines for employers on the definition of an independent contractor. (Passed by Senate, unfriendly amendment added by House)

Public Pension Audits Small Business Tax Simplification HB 136 (Yonts) would have clearly defined the cost of goods sold under Kentucky’s Limited Liability Entity Tax (LLET) which is paid by many small businesses in Kentucky. (Not considered)

Prevailing Wage HB 419 (Hoover) would have saved taxpayers money by excluding educational buildings and facilities from the prevailing wage mandate currently in law. (Voted down by House Labor Committee)

HB 389 (Yonts) would have required all of Kentucky’s public employee pension systems to undergo an independent audit every five years. (Passed House, not considered by Senate)

Taxpayer Fairness HB 345 (Damron) would have stopped the Department of Revenue’s unfair treatment of taxpayers by equalizing the interest rate between taxpayers’ overpayments and underpayments. (Not considered)

Tax Incentives for Coal Workers’ Comp Special Fund

Charter Schools SB 211 (Wilson) would have allowed persistently lowperforming schools to be designated as charter schools in order to provide more flexibility to turn around schools that are not meeting the needs of students. HB 85 (Montell) would have broadly authorized charter schools in Kentucky. (SB 211 passed Senate, not considered by House)

SB 63 (McDaniel), HB 504 (Greer) and HB 557 (Montell) would have saved employers costs on their workers’ compensation assessments by encouraging one-time settlements on claims before 1996. It would also have phased out the siphoning of funds out of the special fund to fund the day-to-day operations of the Labor Cabinet. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Smoke-Free Workplaces

Teacher Tenure

HB 173 (Westrom) and SB 117 (Denton) would have prohibited smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces and received overwhelming support from Chamber members. (Not considered)

SB 168 (Wilson) would have permitted the suspension or termination of a teacher's continuing service contract if the teacher fails to successfully meet the requirements of a corrective action plan. (Passed Senate, not considered by the House)

Tribunal Reform

Business voices “Kentucky business leaders know that a smokefree state will improve our companies’ bottom lines, help us attract new businesses and workers, produce a more productive workforce and ultimately save lives. This is why the Chamber fought diligently for a smoke-free workplace law.” Tom Hudson CEO and President nth/works

Right to Work HB 496 (Hoover) would have allowed workers the freedom to decide whether to join a union, which would prevent it from being a condition of employment. This is a huge factor in economic development as a key metric of competitiveness in attracting new business to a state. (Voted down by House Labor Committee)

Expanded Gaming SB 33 (Seum), HB 67 (Clark) and HB 584 (Stumbo) would have allowed voters to decide whether to expand gaming in Kentucky to provide a much-needed boost to state revenues as well as to recoup the hundreds of millions of dollars being spent annually in casinos in neighboring states. (Not considered)

Addressing Heroin Epidemic SB 5 (Stine) would have created more treatment beds for drug addicts and lengthened prison sentences for drug traffickers to address the growing heroin problem in Kentucky. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Local Option HB 399 (Thompson) and SB 135 (Hornback) would have allowed voters the chance to authorize local communities to vote for a temporary sales tax to fund important local projects. (Not considered)

SB 169 (Wilson) would clarify the causes for which a contract of a teacher may be terminated. It would also require the commissioner of education to initiate the appropriate procedure in response to a teacher's appeal and appoint hearing officers to hear the case. (Not considered)

Contracting Sunshine Law SB 189 (Westerfield) would have created transparency requirements for contingency fee contracts between the attorney general and private attorneys, set reasonable limits on contingency fees, and codified recent case law requirements to ensure the state remains in control of litigation when hiring contingency fee counsel. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Judgment Interest Reforms SB 214 (Girdler) would have set Kentucky’s judgment interest rate at the lesser of 12% or 1% above the prime interest rate in the calendar year in which the judgment is entered. (Not considered)

HB 474 (Adkins) would have permitted coal mining or processing companies to potentially qualify for certain sales and use tax incentives offered. (Passed House, not considered by Senate)

Childcare Rating System HB 332 (Graham) would have directed the Early Childhood Advisory Council to develop a qualitybased rating system for licensed childcare and certified family childcare homes. (Passed House, amended by Senate, House refused to concur)

Protecting Student Data SB 89 (Higdon) would have required Kentucky to adhere to transparency and privacy standards when outsourcing Web-based tasks to vendors and would have permitted a school council to supplement the state board-approved academic content standards with more rigorous standards. (Passed Senate, amended by House with unrelated provision, Senate refused to concur)

University Bonding HB 261 (Damron) would permit universities to issue bonds for capital projects when there is a dedicated funding source from using a combination of cash restricted funds, federal funds and private funds and would establish conditions under which projects will be authorized. (Passed House, not considered by Senate)

Attracting Data Centers HB 308 (DeCesare) would have exempted qualified data centers from paying certain state and local taxes to create an incentive to encourage the establishment of data centers, a fast growing industry which states are working to recruit. (Not considered)

Good Samaritan Protections Pension Reform Clarifications SB 142 (McDaniel) would have helped state and local governments reduce their unfunded liability by addressing pension “spiking,” which occurs when a public sector employee increases their creditable compensation by taking a higher paying job late in their career. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Nuclear Power SB 67 (Leeper) & HB 52 (Watkins) would lift Kentucky’s ban on nuclear power generating facilities in Kentucky and clarify the disposal of nuclear waste in the state. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

Property Owner Liability SB 78 (Girdler) would have clarified liability for landlords whose tenants own a dog that bites a person on the property. (Passed Senate, not considered by House)

HB 304 (Moore) would have expanded liability protections for those who administer emergency care at no charge at the scene of an emergency, eliminating a disincentive for caregivers to help. (Not considered)

Bad Debt Credits HB 516 (Pullin) would have permitted a retailer or lender to claim a deduction for bad debts or claim a refund of the sales and use tax previously reported by the retailer on the unpaid balance due on a private label credit card. (Not considered)


2014 LEGISLATIVE VOTING RECORD

Robert Leeper Paducah

Julie Denton Louisville

Jeff Hoover Jamestown

Charles Miller Louisville

Ernie Harris Crestwood

Standing up for Kentucky business THE KENTUCKY CHAMBER would like to extend a special thanks to the following 11 Senators and 12 Representatives whose voting record on key business issues show a dedication to the principles of free enterprise. On 90 percent or more of every key vote – sometimes with vocal opposition from labor unions and personal injury lawyers – these legislators stood strong for the business community!

House

Ron Crimm Louisville

Jim DeCesare Bowling Green

Bob DeWeese Louisville

Myron Dossett Pembroke

Jim Glenn Owensboro

Toby Herald Beattyville

Jeff Hoover Jamestown

Adam Koenig Erlanger

Michael Lee Meredith Brownsville

Charles Miller Louisville

Brad Montell Shelbyville

Julie Denton Louisville

Chris Girdler Somerset

Ernie Harris Crestwood

Paul Hornback Shelbyville

Alice Forgy Kerr Lexington

Robert Leeper Paducah

Chris McDaniel Latonia

Robert Stivers Manchester

Damon Thayer Georgetown

Mike Wilson Bowling Green

David Osborne Prospect

CHAMBER POSITION

Yes

BILL NUMBER SB63 LEGISLATOR

DISTRICT

Walter Blevins D-Morehead Joe Bowen R-Owensboro Tom Buford R-Nicholasville R-Berea Jared Carpenter D-Frankfort Julian Carroll D-Louisville Perry Clark R-Louisville Julie Denton R-Leitchfield Carroll Gibson R-Somerset Chris Girdler R-Greensburg David Givens R-Monticello Sara Beth Gregory D-Louisville Denise Harper Angel R-Crestwood Ernie Harris R-Lebanon Jimmy Higdon R-Shelbyville Paul Hornback R-Cadiz Stan Humphries D-Pikeville Ray Jones R-Lexington Alice Kerr I-Paducah Robert Leeper R-Latonia Chris McDaniel D-Louisville Morgan McGarvey D-Louisville Gerald Neal D-Winchester R.J. Palmer D-Elizabethtown Dennis Parrett D-Madisonville Jerry Rhoads D-Henderson Dorsey Ridley R-London Albert Robinson R-Union John Schickel R-Fairdale Dan Seum R-Hazard Brandon Smith R-Southgate Katie Stine R-Manchester Robert Stivers R-Georgetown Damon Thayer D-Lexington Reginald Thomas D-Prestonsburg Johnny Turner D-Grayson Robin Webb Whitney Westerfield R-Hopkinsville R-Bowling Green Mike Wilson

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

SB67

SB78

SB83

SB99

No Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes

Yes Yes No X Yes Yes Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes X Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Yes SB119

Yes

Alcohol at State Parks

Tax Credits

Public-Private Partnerships

Ky. Environmental Standards

Lowered Statute of Limitations

Early Childhood Education

Commonsense Data Breach Rules

Contractor Notification

Cyber Security

Charter Schools

Juvenile Justice Reform

Medical Review Panels

Telecom Reform

Streamlined Alcohol Laws

Workers’ Comp Special Fund

Senate Bills

Property Liability

Joe Bowen Owensboro

Nuclear Power

Senate

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

SB200

SB211

HB5

HB84

HB232

HB332

HB369

HB388

HB407

HB445

HB475

Yes

Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No Yes Yes X No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes

Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No

SUPPORT %

76% 94% 88% 76% 82% 71% 100% 88% 100% 82% 76% 65% 100% 82% 94% 82% 71% 100% 94% 100% 71% 65% 76% 82% 76% 82% 65% 82% 88% 76% 88% 100% 100% 76% 71% 53% 82% 94%

No Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes

No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes X No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes No No Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes

EXPLANATION OF BILLS USED IN VOTING RECORD The roll call votes you see in this record reveal how legislators voted on bills the Kentucky Chamber publicly supported or opposed during the 2014 General Assembly (an “X” indicates the legislator did not vote on the bill). The voting record includes bills that received a full vote before the entire House and/or Senate. Please note the substance of a bill may be significantly altered during the legislative process. Unless otherwise noted, the legislation referenced in the voting record is based on the final version of the bill receiving a floor vote for each house. To access the language of the bills highlighted in this document, the Kentucky Chamber invites you to visit the Legislative Research Commission’s website at lrc.ky.gov.


BILL NUMBER

LEGISLATOR

DISTRICT

R-Louisville Julie Adams D-Sandy Hook Rocky Adkins R-Marion Lynn Bechler D-Glasgow Johnny Bell R-Lexington Robert Benvenuti R-Louisville Kevin Bratcher R-Williamsburg Regina Bunch D-Louisville Thomas Burch D-Louisville Denver Butler R-Harned Dwight Butler R-Campbellsville John Carney D-Louisville Larry Clark D-Wittensville Hubert Collins D-Pikeville Leslie Combs R-Hyden Tim Couch D-Symsonia Will Coursey D-Lexington Jesse Crenshaw R-Louisville Ron Crimm D-Nicholasville Robert Damron R-Bowling Green Jim DeCesare D-Maysville Mike Denham R-Louisville Bob DeWeese D-Fairdale Jeffery Donohue R-Pembroke Myron Dossett R-Morgantown C.B. Embry R-Fort Thomas Joseph Fischer D-Lexington Kelly Flood R-Bardstown David Floyd D-Owensboro Jim Glenn D-Providence Jim Gooch D-Frankfort Derrick Graham D-Brandenburg Jeff Greer D-Phelps Keith Hall R-Danville Mike Harmon R-Mayfield Richard Heath Richard Henderson D-Mt. Sterling R-Beattyville Toby Herald R-Jamestown Jeff Hoover D-Shively Dennis Horlander R-Murray Kenny Imes D-Shively Joni Jenkins D-Versailles James Kay II D-Wilder Dennis Keene R-Taylor Mill Thomas Kerr R-Harrodsburg Kim King D-Lewisburg Martha King R-Erlanger Adam Koenig D-Elizabethtown Jimmie Lee R-Lexington Stan Lee R-Dry Ridge Brian Linder D-Louisville Mary Lou Marzian R-Winchester Donna Mayfield D-Cynthiana Thomas McKee R-Stanford David Meade D-Louisville Reginald Meeks Michael Lee Meredith R-Brownsville R-Owensboro Suzanne Miles D-Louisville Charles Miller D-Lebanon Terry Mills R-Shelbyville Brad Montell R-Elizabethtown Tim Moore D-Middlesboro Rick Nelson R-Prospect David Osborne D-Paris Sannie Overly D-Louisville Darryl Owens D-Lexington Ruth Ann Palumbo D-South Shore Tanya Pullin R-Georgetown Ryan Quarles R-McKee Marie Rader D-Bedford Rick Rand D-Bowling Green Jody Richards D-Louisville Steven Riggs D-Louisville Tom Riner R-Tompkinsville Bart Rowland R-West Paducah Steven Rudy R-Florence Sal Santoro R-Lancaster Jonathan Shell D-Mallie John Short D-Covington Arnold Simpson D-Ashland Kevin Sinnette D-Richmond Rita Smart R-Lakeside Park Diane St. Onge D-West Liberty John Stacy D-Hazard Fitz Steele R-Flat Lick Jim Stewart D-Scottsville Wilson Stone D-Prestonsburg Greg Stumbo Tommy Thompson D-Owensboro D-Hopkinsville John Tilley R-Somerset Tommy Turner R-Monticello Kenneth Upchurch R-Madisonville Ben Waide D-Henderson David Watkins D-Paducah Gerald Watkins D-Louisville Jim Wayne R-Shepardsville Russell Webber D-Lexington Susan Westrom R-Burlington Addia Wuchner D-Greenville Brent Yonts R-Grayson Jill York

Early Childhood Education

Ky. Environmental Standards

Public Pension Audits

Alcohol at State Parks

Contractor Notification

Streamlined Alcohol Laws

Limiting Transport of Energy

Juvenile Justice Reform

Cyber Security

Public-Private Partnerships

Commonsense Data Breach Rules

Tax Credits

Lowered Statute of Limitations

CHAMBER POSITION

Minimum Wage

House Bills

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

HB1

HB332 HB388 HB389 HB475 HB467 SB83

HB31 SB200

HB5

HB407 HB232 HB445 HB369

SUPPORT % 86% 86% 86% 71% 86% 71% 64% 86% 86% 86% 79% 86% 71% 79% 71% 79% 71% 93% 86% 93% 79% 93% 86% 93% 79% 71% 86% 79% 93% 86% 86% 79% 71% 64% 71% 71% 93% 93% 86% 86% 86% 86% 86% 79% 64% 79% 93% 79% 64% 64% 86% 79% 79% 79% 86% 93% 86% 93% 86% 93% 79% 64% 93% 79% 86% 86% 71% 86% 86% 86% 71% 86% 71% 79% 79% 71% 71% 71% 79% 79% 86% 86% 64% 64% 64% 79% 86% 86% 79% 71% 71% 71% 86% 86% 79% 79% 86% 71% 86% 79%

No Yes No Yes No No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No No No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes X Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No Yes No No Yes No Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes

Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes X No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes No No No Yes No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes No No Yes No X No No Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No Yes X Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No No Yes No Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No Yes Yes No Yes X Yes No Yes No No No Yes No No Yes No Yes Yes X No No No Yes X Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes X Yes Yes X No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes X Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes X Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes X Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes


The Kentucky Chamber’s Key Investors are an exclusive group of top Kentucky executives whose companies provide significant financial support and leadership for Chamber involvement in critical issues affecting Kentucky businesses. Hood Harris Louisville

Bruce Broussard Louisville

Paul Varga Louisville

Victor Staffieri Louisville

Chairman’s Circle

Commonwealth Partners

KEY INVESTORS MAKE ADVOCACY EFFORTS POSSIBLE

Presidential Advisors

Wil James, Jr. Georgetown

Deb Moessner Louisville

Ruth Brinkley Louisville

Paul Rooke Lexington

Stephen Hanson Louisville

Jim Booth Lovely

Stephen Williams Louisville

Charles Denny Louisville

Kevin Canafax Covington

Robert Strub Florence

William Jones Paducah

Terry Forcht Corbin/Lexington

Connie Harvey Lexington

Alltech

Alpha Natural Resources

Anheuser Busch, Inc.

Atmos Energy Corporation

BB&T

Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP

Bingham McCutchen LLP

Bluegrass Pipeline

Briggs & Stratton

Central Bank & Trust Company

Chase Kentucky

Deirdre Lyons Nicholasville

Donnie Ratliff Bristol, Va.

Katie Grove Atlanta, Ga.

Stephen Loyal Owensboro

Heath Campbell Lexington

Phillip Scott Lexington

Tracee Whitley Lexington

Bill Lawson Tulsa, Okla.

Rodney Bohannon Murray

Luther Deaton, Jr. Lexington

Paul Costel Louisville

IMG College / Frost Brown Jim Beam Brands Company Todd LLC UK IMG Sports Marketing

Churchill Downs Inc.

Kevin Flanery Louisville

DHL

Travis Cobb Erlanger

Ky. Association of Electric Cooperatives The Kroger Co.

Bill Corum Louisville

Stites & Harbison PLLC

Harold Butler Louisville

Trustees

Greg Pauley Frankfort

Calvin Kaufman Louisville

Dinsmore & Shohl LLP

Duke Energy

EQT Corporation

Farm Credit Mid-America

Fifth Third Bank, Kentucky

Laura D’Angelo Lexington

Jim Henning Cincinnati, Ohio

David Cannon Jr. Pittsburgh, Penn.

Bill Johnson Louisville

Tom Partridge Louisville

Lockheed Martin

North American Stainless

Owensboro Health

Papa John’s International, Inc.

Hector Alverez Lexington

Mary Jean Riley Ghent

Phillip Patterson Owensboro

John Schnatter Louisville

Stoll Keenon Ogden PLLC

UPS

Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs, LLP

J. David Smith, Jr. Lexington

Scott Casey Louisville

William Hollander Louisville

ADP Jeff Schaftlein Louisville

Alliance Coal, LLC Joseph Craft, III Lexington

Armstrong Coal Company, Inc. Kenny Allen Madisonville

Gray Kentucky Television, Inc. Chris Mossman Lexington

Kentucky Community & Technical College System Dr. Michael McCall Versailles

Kentucky League of Cities, Inc. Jon Steiner Lexington

Kentucky State Fair Board Rip Rippetoe Louisville

Kosair Charities Vicky Weber Louisville

Passport Health Plan Mark Carter Louisville

PharMerica Corporation Gregory S. Weishar Louisville

Pikeville Medical Center Juanita Deskins Pikeville

Mountjoy Chilton Medley LLP Diane Medley Louisville

Mubea, Inc. Doug Cain Florence

Big Ass Fans Mike Robinson Lexington

Brenntag Mid-South, Inc. Joel Hopper Henderson

Century Aluminum of Kentucky, LLC Jason Curry Hawesville

Laurel Grocery Co. Winston Griffin London

Planters Bank, Inc. Elizabeth McCoy Hopkinsville

Pfizer

Josh Brown Franklin, Tenn.

Coca-Cola Refreshment Columbia Gas Roy Potts of Kentucky, Inc. Louisville Herbert Miller, Jr. Lexington

Lexington Clinic Dr. Andrew Henderson Lexington

Logan Aluminum Randy Schumaker Russellville

Signature HealthCARE Joseph Steier III Louisville

Splash Analytics Kevin Foley Louisville

John Crockett Louisville

Brian Miller Lexington

Kentucky American Water

Nathan Crosley Frankfort

Cheryl Norton Lexington

PremierTox Laboratory

Publishers Printing Co.

R.J. Corman Railroad Group

Seimens Rail Automation

Robert Donnell Russell Springs

Nick Simon Shepherdsville

Craig King Lexington

Kevin Riddett Louisville

Dean Dorton Allen Dressman, Benzinger Ford, PLLC & LaVelle, PSC Paula Hanson Mark Guilfoyle Lexington Ft. Mitchell

Lourdes Hospital Lynn King Paducah

SRG Global Joseph Hoban Morehead

Farmers Capital Bank Corporation Lloyd Hillard, Jr. Frankfort

Emerson Power Transmission Dan Fannin Maysville

Maker’s Mark Distillery, Inc. Mitch Wagner Louisville

Marathon Petroleum Company LP Richard Hernandez Catlettsburg

Steptoe & Johnson PLLC Eric Lycan Lexington

Stock Yards Bank and Trust David Heintzman Louisville

Gray Construction Stephen Gray Lexington

Meritor-Florence Messer Construction Company Tim Bauer John Megibben Florence Louisville

Sumitomo Electric Wiring Systems Matt Adams Bowling Green

Sun Tan City Rick Kueber Louisville

Trustees not pictured: ABM Government Services Joe Walsh Hopkinsville

Tiffany & Co. Wayne Howard Lexington

TKT-Nectir Global Turner Construction Staffing, LLC Company Tierra K. Turner Brian Mooney Louisville Cincinnati

Tyson Foods Craig Coberley Robards

UK Healthcare Dr. Michael Karpf Lexington

WellCare Health Plans, Inc. Mike Minor Louisville

Whitaker Bank, Inc. Elmer Whitaker Lexington

Windstream Communications Jamie Mullins Louisville

Dana Holding Corporation Jeff Cole Maumee, OH Kentucky Farm Bureau Insurance Bradley Smith Louisville

AK Steel Corp. Barry Racey West Chester, OH

Clarendon Flavors Tammy Rigney Louisville

ConAgra Foods Ed Judice Louisville

Doe Anderson, Inc. Todd Spencer Louisville

Envision Contractors Steve Bosley Owensboro

Kentucky Council of Area Development Districts Randy Stevens Frankfort

Steel Technologies Michelle Mees Harper Louisville

Time Warner Cable Carla Deaton Lexington

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Results for Business (2014)  

The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce's annual publication on the results of the Kentucky General Assembly and what it means for businesses in th...

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