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SPRING 2008

OUT OF

PRACTICE Nontraditional paths bear fruitful careers for law school grads


LET T E R

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Dear Alumni and Friends, As I write this, spring has returned to Mount Oread. March Madness is behind us, and the Jayhawks emerged victorious in the NCAA championship. In Green Hall, first-year law students frantically prepare for final exams, while their third-year counterparts impatiently count down the days to commencement. Late spring is a bittersweet time for the law school, as another group of KU Law students transforms, over the course of an emotion-filled afternoon, into KU Law alumni. This has been quite a year. Professor Ellen Sward received a Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence, and Professor Rick Levy gave his inaugural lecture as the first holder of the J.B. Smith Distinguished Professorship in Constitutional Law. We celebrated a national moot court win in criminal procedure and a sweep of a national writing competition in international trade. We hosted distinguished jurists, including Chief Justice John Roberts and Judge Judith Barzilay from the U.S. Court of International Trade, and renowned scholars, including Professors Henry “Hank” Greely from Stanford and Philip Frickey from the University of California at Berkeley. We welcomed large numbers of you home to Green Hall – for Alumni Weekend, the 50/50+ Reunion, Make a Difference Day, the Deans Club and Green Medallion dinner, and the first KU Law alumni “Return to Green” continuing legal education program. Justice Carol Beier, L’85, administered a “law student oath” to first-year law students as part of their orientation to law school. Judge Steve Leben, L’82, welcomed new graduates to the ranks of KU Law alumni at the hooding ceremony. Alumni served as adjunct instructors and guest lecturers in our classrooms, and advisers and employers to students seeking summer clerkships and their first jobs as lawyers. We are a stronger law school because of your involvement and your generosity, and we are grateful to you. As you will read in these pages, in January we established a new legal clinic at Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care in Kansas City, Kan., our third “live client” clinic, joining Douglas County Legal Aid and the Paul E. Wilson Defender Project. With this new initiative, KU Law becomes one of fewer than a dozen universities to provide medical students and law students the opportunity to work as professional partners to serve the medical and related legal needs of an indigent patient population. Start-up funding for the medical-legal clinic was provided by the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City. In the coming months, we will continue to seek long-term funding for the clinic. This June, thanks to the generosity of the KU Law alumni at Shook, Hardy & Bacon, we will announce the new Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy. Stay tuned for news of the programs the center will bring to Green Hall. If the measure of a law school is the success of its graduates, we have much to celebrate. Judge Stephen Six, L’93, was named attorney general by Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius. Peggy Kittel, L’83, was appointed to the judicial seat Attorney General Six vacated in the 7th Judicial District. Travis Lenkner, L’2005, became our fifth Supreme Court clerk, set to begin serving Justice Anthony Kennedy in September. And Shannon Roesler, L’2000, increases the teaching ranks of KU Law alumni as she joins the faculty of Oklahoma City University School of Law. You can read more about our successful alumni who took nontraditional paths to success in the pages that follow. I hope you enjoy this issue of KU Law Magazine. Don’t be a stranger in Green Hall.

Rock Chalk, Gail B. Agrawal Dean and Professor of Law


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F e at u r E Out of Practice Meet a few Green Hall veterans who are thriving in nontraditional legal careers

10 Green Hall News Healthy Outlook

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Students offer healing hand in law school's newest clinic

Green Hall Briefs

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International Law Corner

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KU Law hosts delegation of Asian water experts

International Law Briefs

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Student Affairs Update

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Faculty Kudos

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Faculty Notes

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24 Alumni News

Outreach Activities Update

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Alumni make connections at reunions, volunteer events

The Way We Were

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Alumni Notes

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Profile: Travis Lenkner, L'2005

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Kansas native accepts Supreme Court clerkship

Profile: Stephen Six, L'93

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Lawrence judge becomes Kansas attorney general

In Memoriam

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Spring 2008 Gail Agrawal, Dean Mindie Paget, Editor kulaws@ku.edu Contributors: Kevin Kelly Sandy Patti John Peck Wendy Rohleder-Sook P h o t o c r ed i t s : Steve Puppe University Relations Rudy Gutierrez (El Paso Times) Chappell Graduation Images University Archives D es i g n e r : Jackie Berra jackie@jberradesign.com KU School of Law 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7577 (785) 864-4550 Fax: (785) 864-5054 www.law.ku.edu KU Law Magazine is published for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law.

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Nontraditional paths bear fruitful careers for law school grads BY MINDIE PAGET

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athy Greenlee remembers her “Aha!” moment. It was Career Day at KU Law, and the folks from Legal Aid of Western Missouri had come to tout their program. For Greenlee, L’88, the future came into focus. “I thought, ‘Aha! Those are my people,’” she recalls. “I just know myself to be kind of a social advocate on issues, and I was never really interested in the summer law clerk, internship, large firm track. That was never something that felt like the right fit for me.” She is not alone. Roughly 11 percent of law graduates enter the workforce in so-called nontraditional positions – those that do not directly involve the practice of law, according to the American Bar Association. The percentage is slightly lower among KU Law alumni, but there are plenty of Green Hall veterans who are not arguing motions for a living. Of course that doesn’t mean they are not putting their degrees to good use. Greenlee, secretary of the Kansas Department on Aging, draws upon the skills and principles she developed as a law student every day as she weighs in on proposed legislation, enforces regulations and advocates on behalf of the state’s seniors. She revels in victories that don’t necessarily occur in a courtroom – like the recent passage of a funding measure that provides dental services to seniors on Medicaid. “At the end of the day, I didn’t win a lawsuit,” Greenlee says. “But there are people in the state who now have access to the dentist and to dentures. It took a lot of us to get there, but that’s what I win.”

"You have to lay down the label of ‘I’m a lawyer’ and just look at the work. I’m an advocate through and through, and my legal skills support that. I don’t need to walk around with ‘I’m a lawyer’ pinned on my shirt." – Kathy Greenlee, L’88

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READY FOR A CHANGE About half of KU Law graduates each year take the private practice path. In 2006, another 18 percent ended up in the business sector, and 15 percent became government attorneys. Rounding out the field were judicial clerkships, public interest jobs and academic endeavors. What is more common than avoiding a law firm job right out of school is for graduates to practice for a few years and then realize they do not enjoy it, says Todd Rogers, assistant dean of career services. He and his staff counsel alumni who find themselves in that predicament. “We serve as a sounding board,” says Rogers, who himself left a Kansas City firm to take a job in the law school’s Office of Career Services. “Often that’s all they really need: someone who’s familiar with what lawyers do to listen to their plan.” Rogers and his staff also can recommend books designed for frustrated lawyers and connect graduates with other alumni working in nontraditional areas. Even after they have determined their next move, however, identity issues can stifle their confidence. Rogers calls it the Cocktail Party Dilemma: You go to a soiree and someone asks what you do. You say you’re a lawyer, and you immediately command respect.

Skip Granger, L'68, runs Starry Night Winery in California.

“I came to law school because I wanted to learn the thought pattern that goes along with law: find a problem and solve it. And that’s what I’ve used for my careers.” – Skip Granger, L’68

“You feed on that,” he says. “It makes you feel good.” It’s a little less of an ego boost when someone furrows their brow and asks, “What exactly is a director of career services?”

PERSONAL FULFILLMENT Greenlee admits that she has encountered undue prejudice regarding the capabilities of government attorneys. But throughout her career – which has wound from Kansas Legal Services to the offices of former Attorney General Bob Stephan and Insurance Commissioner-turned-Gov. Kathleen Sebelius – she has been driven by a sense that she is making a difference in people’s lives. “You have to lay down the label of ‘I’m a lawyer’ and just look at the work,” she says. “I’m an advocate through and through, and my legal skills support that. I don’t need to walk around with ‘I’m a lawyer’ pinned on my shirt. That’s not the most important part of my self-definition.”

Kathy Greenlee, L'88, serves as the secretary of the Kansas Department on Aging.

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KU Law graduate Ray Rojas feels the same way. The 32-year-old El Paso, Texas, native returned to his hometown in August and became executive director of Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center. The nonprofit agency works to protect the human rights of unaccompanied children of immigrants, foreigners seeking asylum in the United States and immigrant survivors of domestic violence. Rojas, L’2005, always intended to practice public interest law, largely with low-income workers and immigrants. At KU, he served as president of the Hispanic American Law Students Association and helped

LEGAL RESEARCH Law school students or graduates who are contemplating a nontraditional career path might find guidance in the following books, many of which are available for browsing at KU Law’s Office of Career Services: “Nonlegal Careers for Lawyers” (ABA Publishing), by Gary Munneke and William Henslee

Rudy Gutierrez/El Paso Times Photo

“What Can You Do with a Law Degree? A Lawyers’ Guide to Career Alternatives Inside, Outside & Around the Law” (Niche Press), by Deborah Arron “Alternative Careers for Lawyers” (Princeton Review), by Hillary Mantis

Ray Rojas, L'2005, is the new director of Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center in El Paso, Texas.

“The Lawyer’s Career Change Handbook: More than 300 Things You Can Do with a Law Degree” (HarperCollins), by Hindi Greenberg

organize community rallies on immigration rights. He also clerked with the Colorado Legal Services Migrant Farm Worker Division the summer after his first year of law school.

“Life After Law: Second Careers for Lawyers” (W. Smith Company), by Mary Ann Altman

Those activities kept him focused.

“Turning Points: New Paths and Second Careers for Lawyers” (ABA Publishing), by George Cain

“You have to kind of keep that mission while you’re in law school because it easily can go out the window, especially in terms of dealing with student debt,” Rojas says. “I see friends who want to work in public interest and say, ‘I’m going to do this other work for five years and pay off some debt.’ “But after five years, it’s hard to take a $20,000 or $30,000 pay cut.”

Todd Rogers, assistant dean of career services at KU Law, also recommends talking with alumni who have pursued nontraditional careers in fields that interest you. His office can facilitate such meetings.

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Rojas notes that the nonprofit world is an increasingly common destination for law school graduates, who understand the legal intricacies of issues that agencies confront. He also says states could encourage more attorneys to work for nonprofits by introducing loan-forgiveness programs.

PLAN AHEAD, FOLLOW HEART When applying for the Las Americas job, it did not hurt that Rojas had clerked for an immigration law firm and cofounded the nonprofit Kansas City Worker Justice Project while studying for the bar exam after graduation. Rogers recommends that law students who are interested in pursuing nontraditional careers position themselves for employment in those fields by tailoring their summer internships. “Some people could be suspicious of a lawyer who doesn’t want to practice,” he says. “If you think you might want to go into banking, work at a bank for your summer internship. Establish yourself in that field. If you do that, there’s a greater chance the J.D. will be given its proper weight.” Skip Granger, L’68, conducted summer tours for a wholesale travel company in place of a more standard internship. The choice made sense for the Joplin, Mo., native because he never really intended to be a practicing lawyer. “I came to law school because I wanted to learn the thought pattern that goes along with law: find a problem and solve it,” says Granger, who now lives in Kentfield, Calif. “And that’s what I’ve used for my careers.” After graduation, Granger served as a research attorney with the Kansas Supreme Court for a year. But his passion for travel called him back, and he got a job putting together wholesale packages for TWA and Pan American. Later, he got involved in venture debt and asset-based finance, eventually founding a company called Menlo Capital and expanding into venture capital. It wasn’t until 1997 that Granger discovered a career that blended his taste for the exotic with his keen business acumen.

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That’s when he and a couple of friends started making wine in a California basement. Their amateur foray that produced enough Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay to share with their friends has evolved into Starry Night Winery, which now routinely produces awardwinning wines that are sold primarily at fine restaurants and shops on the East Coast and in Europe. Granger frequently puts his legal background to use in the wine business. “Day to day at the winery, it’s constant business contracts. We just spent a year getting a use permit so we could taste at the winery when someone didn’t want us to. That took legal maneuvering and politics. You have to know what your rights are going into all these deals. “I think everyone who’s going into business should have a legal background if they have the aptitude and the money to pay for it.”


Former college athlete becomes key player at alma mater Like many of her colleagues who went straight from college to law school, Missy Conboy didn’t have a clear, long-term career goal. Perhaps that is why she feels extraordinarily fortunate to be working for her alma mater – the University of Notre Dame – doing work that ties her legal expertise to her experience as a former basketball player at the Division I school. “I’ve just completed my 20th year in the Notre Dame Department of Athletics,” says Conboy, who graduated from KU Law in 1985. “For an ‘army brat’ to stay in one place for so long, it must be someplace special.” Conboy currently serves as Notre Dame’s deputy director of athletics, with responsibility for facilities, human resources and legal issues such as contracts, risk management, injury and medical claims, promotional events and NCAA compliance. Twenty-five years ago, Conboy wasn’t sure what she wanted to do. She spent her first summer at a small law firm in Lubbock, Texas. The following summer, she worked for a real estate/corporate firm in Kansas City.  “While I enjoyed the experience,” she says, “I didn’t feel particularly inspired by the work.”  During her final year, Conboy got a tip from then-Dean Mike Davis that the NCAA was looking to add more women to its staff and had a particular interest in hiring former student-athletes with law degrees. “It certainly seemed like a perfect fit,” Conboy says.  She spent a couple of years as an enforcement representative with the NCAA, investigating potential violations at member institutions and processing cases before the infractions committee. She says it wasn’t uncommon in the mid-1980s, when the NCAA was smaller, for employees to work there for a few years and then transition to a member institution. Conboy was invited to make that jump in 1987. ThenNotre Dame Athletic Director Gene Corrigan hired

Missy Conboy, L'85, is deputy director of athletics at the University of Notre Dame. She is pictured at the school's football stadium with her three daughters, from left, Killian Rose, Darby and Delaney.

the KU Law alumna as an assistant athletic director for compliance, a new area at the time.  “While he assumed that I must be an ‘expert’ in compliance due to my enforcement function at the NCAA, I must admit that I had to take a crash course from some NCAA compliance colleagues in order to arrive at Notre Dame with a working knowledge of my new area of responsibility,” Conboy says. “In retrospect, it was very exciting to be involved in NCAA compliance at the grassroots level. Many of the compliance responsibilities and initiatives in operation on university campuses today were developed and refined by those of us who oversaw compliance during those formative years.” Conboy has enjoyed the variety of her work under three different athletic directors, and the flexibility she’s been given to combine career and family. It’s possible, she says, to reap great satisfaction from your career. “If you don’t have a strong passion for the work you are doing, or if it isn’t a good fit with your lifestyle, start making some personal contacts with people that are in the line of work you want to pursue,” she advises. “As a general rule, people are very anxious to give advice, provide contacts and share experiences that might prove very helpful in segueing into a more desirable line of work.” — BY MINDIE PAGET

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Happenstance helps build real estate developer’s career Art Piculell didn’t have a plan B. When he started law school at KU in 1962, he knew he would graduate in three years, move back to western Kansas and practice at a small-town firm. And that is precisely what he did … until it wasn’t right for him and his family anymore. “The practice of law in a small town can be very limiting,” he says. “You don’t get that much to do in any specific area to develop any expertise.” In 1972, the Piculells rented a U-Haul, packed everything it would hold and headed west. Art Piculell, L'62, looks over plans for a real estate development in Arizona.

“We spent five days on the road,” says Piculell, a native of Long Island, N.Y. “We could have gone to Seattle if the light had turned red or green. We just decided we were going to live on the West Coast. We had no jobs and didn’t know anybody.” That was OK for Piculell, who has always believed that happenstance plays an important role in life. That is how he ended up in Kansas, after all. He was working as a mechanic in New York when he ran into a high school buddy who was heading to Emporia State University. Piculell figured that was better than doing brake jobs, so he withdrew his money from the bank and headed to the heartland. At Emporia, Piculell earned a degree in social work and then ran the social welfare programs in Scott and Wichita counties. He was later granted a stipend from the state to get his master’s degree at the University of Denver, but a Scott City attorney he went to see about a reference convinced him he would make a good lawyer. “I didn’t know what law school was,” Piculell says. “I didn’t know what the law was. I’d never been in the courtroom. No one in my family had a college degree.” The series of whims that characterized Piculell’s early career continued when he and his family arrived in Portland, Ore., in 1972. He had owned a title company in Kansas, so he went to one of Oregon’s large title operations to see the manager, who agreed to mentor Piculell while he interviewed professionals in a variety of fields about career opportunities.

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Eventually, the man hooked Piculell up with someone who was starting a real estate company. Piculell was given national accounts right away and started putting together deals. From that point on, he’s been in the business of commercial and residential development. Piculell finds his legal expertise is indispensible when grappling with contracts, finance and sometimes new legislation. He loves the professional niche he has carved for himself, and he has fond memories of KU Law. Piculell has even named streets in some of his developments after his former law professors, such as Robert Casad and the late Earl Shurtz. “I think you have to know who you are,” he says of carving a career path after law school. Many of Piculell’s classmates at his 20-year KU Law reunion asked him how he was able to quit practicing law. He says it is important to follow your talents and understand that there is more than one way to put a law degree to good use. “I think Dean (Frederick) Moreau was very succinct in his statement on my first day of law school – in my very first law school class – that you’re not only here for a law degree,” Piculell says, “you’re also here to get one of the finest liberal arts educations you’re going to get.” — BY MINDIE PAGET


International law graduate practices her trade in the tropics Sheree Tinder came to KU Law intent on pursuing a career in sports law. She had been an athlete in high school and college, and it seemed like a natural fit. Funny how one little pamphlet can change the course of your life. “During the second semester of my first year of law school, I saw the brochure for the summer study abroad program in Istanbul, Turkey and decided I had to do it,” Tinder says. “It was during this dynamic summer program that I became interested in international law and refocused my career plans.” After earning her law degree in 2003 – and passing the bar exam – Tinder took a job with the Shawnee County Election Office to pay the bills while she continued to hunt for a more global appointment. “I took the Foreign Service Exam and applied for any international job I could find,” Tinder says. In late January of 2005, Tinder got the call she had been waiting for. The legal counsel office for the House of Delegates of Palau contacted her and, after a long-distance interview process, offered her a position. Now Tinder – who grew up in Topeka – lives, works and plays in the South Pacific island nation. During the week, she reviews and drafts national legislation, committee reports, international policy and treaties, speeches and press releases for the House of Delegates. On the weekend, she does a lot of scuba diving and travels all over the

Sheree Tinder, L'2003, enjoys scuba diving on the weekends in Palau, where she serves as legal counsel to the House of Delegates.

Asia-Pacific region meeting people and experiencing new cultures. “The best thing about my job is assisting political officials in forming national policy and law for a developing nation,” Tinder says. “It is exciting to be part of a country that is just starting out in terms of legal precedent. I am doing things in Palau that I would never get to do in the United States this early in my career.” Tinder says it would be hard to deal with the work requests she receives on a daily basis without the ability to dissect complex legal concepts – a skill she picked up at KU Law. She encourages law students or attorneys considering a nontraditional career to take chances. “This may mean that you have to take a job to pay the bills while you pursue the career of your dreams,” she says, “but when it comes to fruition, it is definitely worthwhile.” — BY MINDIE PAGET

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HEALTHY OUTLOOK

LAW SCHOOL'S NEWEST CLINIC ENVISIONS HEALING THROUGH LEGAL HELP BY MINDIE PAGET

Trinia Arellano worked as a registered nurse for 10 years before coming to KU Law. When she heard about the school’s new Family Health Care Legal Services Clinic, she was intrigued by the opportunity to get involved with patients again. She has not been disappointed. “I get to help people with legal problems that are affecting their health,” says Arellano, a second-year law student. “Hopefully, the services I provide will help them improve their health status.” Indeed, that is the goal of the law school’s newest clinical program, which started in January. Six students, under the supervision of Professor David Gottlieb and a staff attorney, have been assisting clients referred to them through Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care in Kansas City, Kan. The health clinic offers services to patients living in some of the poorest areas of the community. Arellano and her KU Law classmates have helped clients resolve past due medical bills; apply for disability and general financial assistance; research safe, clean housing; navigate divorce and custody disputes and more. “It has become increasingly evident over the past 20 years that many of the health concerns of the poor are directly related to the social and legal trials that often accompany poverty,” said Dr. Sharon Lee, director of the medical clinic and an adjunct faculty member at the University of Kansas Medical Center. ”We added social services to our medical black bag years ago and anticipate the law can be used as a remedy as well.”

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KU Law students, from right, Trinia Arellano, Tina Garner and Monika Groom converse with a KU School of Medicine student about how they can work together to meet the needs of patients and clients at Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care in Kansas City, Kan.

PIONEERING EFFORT Although some situations the law students encounter will not require litigation, Lee says, all of them will require some level of advocacy for the clients. For example, a child with asthma needed frequent emergency room visits. “The apartment they were in had problems with mold,” Lee explains. “A letter helped the family get out of the lease in order to move to a better location, and the boy has done much better.” The precedent for the relationship between the health and law clinics originated in Boston, home of the 15-year-old Medical-Legal Partnership for Children, which “draws on the strengths of two professions in order to reduce health disparities for vulnerable populations by addressing the social determinants of health.” There are about 60 places in the country where similar partnerships exist, Gottlieb says, but only about 10 of those involve law schools. That makes


The new legal clinic sits adjacent to Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care in Kansas City, Kan. Clients referred from the clinic come from some of the poorest areas of the community.

“We help them identify some of the legal problems, and they help us identify medical aspects that we can be helpful with. It’s doctors and lawyers arm in arm instead of fighting.” In that spirit, the law students have adopted the moniker LawHawks, a complement to the nickname of the decidedly larger slate of volunteer KU medical students.

CHANGE FOR THE BETTER The health clinic occupies a bright, contemporary building on Southwest Boulevard. The law students work next door in a building that is undergoing renovation. Their space consists of a reception area, several conference rooms and an office for the staff attorney.

KU’s clinic something of a pioneering effort, and the students are embracing the opportunity. “We are really on the ground floor of developing how this clinic works and building relationships with our medical partners,” says Jared Abel, a secondyear KU Law student. “I am very excited to be one of the first students involved in this clinic. If nothing else it is great to see the amount of effort that people are willing to put in … to help individuals who are underserved.” The law students spend four to seven hours at the clinic each week, but they log additional time doing research and documentation on cases. Beyond engaging in the one-on-one advocacy work that lies at the heart of the clinic’s mission, the students also have met with their counterparts from the University of Kansas School of Medicine – the JayDocs, who offer a free clinic at the center two nights a week – to determine how to work together most effectively. “The idea of this is that the education flows two ways,” says Gottlieb, who is also associate dean of clinical programs.

Clients trickled in for the first several weeks after the clinic opened, but traffic was expected to increase as the medical staff became more aware of the services provided by the neighboring law clinic. When applying for grant funding, Gottlieb estimated the clinic would work 150 cases a year. “We won’t have any trouble meeting and exceeding that,” he says. Tina Garner, a second-year law student, says her work at the clinic has helped satisfy her interest in family law. She has assisted clients with housing complaints, denials of disability benefits and paternity questions related to birth certificates. “It’s not always easy because we don’t always have set procedures and the building hasn’t always been ready for business,” Garner says. “But those difficulties just make for good memories.” Second-year law student Monika Groom says she has enjoyed assisting people who are often intimidated by the magnitude of the legal system. “My goal is always to get the client the assistance they require, whether it is from us or another organization,” she says. “Specifically, I want to ensure that my clients understand the legal situation they are in and what their options are.” For her part, Dr. Lee is thrilled to have the budding attorneys on board. “My real goal, in human terms, is to not have to listen to the struggles of families being ripped apart by agencies, losing their homes, enduring violence or environmental illnesses or being denied access to needed care due to legal impediments that I have no means of addressing,” she says. “The Medical-Legal Family Partnership for Health gives me and my patients an important tool for improving their health and changing their lives for the better.”

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GREEN HALL NEWS BRIEFS Banquet celebrates diversity in the law The Asian Law Students Association hosted the 13th annual Diversity in Law Banquet on Feb. 16. The event drew students, faculty and alumni from across the country in a celebration of KU Law’s proud tradition of admitting and graduating students from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. The banquet serves as a fundraiser for the Minority Scholarship Fund which, indirectly, has enriched law school classrooms by broadening the range of perspectives. Students from the Asian American Law Students Association, Black Law Students Association, Hispanic American Law Students Association and Native American Law Students Association collaborate in supporting the banquet and take turns hosting the event.

“Donald Low interwove KU Law’s celebration of diversity with his own personal story as well as America’s immigration history,” says Anna Kowalewski, president of the Asian Law Students Association. “His thoughtful speech made the audience consider how each individual is a part of the American fabric, and how important it is to embrace others of different backgrounds.”

speaker champions tribal law SCHOLARSHIP Philip Frickey grew up in a town of less than 2,000 people in northwest Kansas.

The sheriff didn’t spend a lot of time throwing people in jail. Residents had their own ways of dealing with habitual shoplifters or trouble-prone teenagers. They might follow the thief to discourage stealing or gently suggest to the teen’s parents that he join the Army. Some call it rural justice. Most wouldn’t question its valuable role in keeping the peace in small communities.

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In his talk, titled “Local Knowledge, Tribal Institutions and Federal Indian Law,” Frickey, who has a bachelor’s in political science from KU, asserted that tribal institutions function well. It’s just that members of the dominant legal system aren’t familiar with them. “It seems to me that federal Indian law … is impoverished by a lack of real understanding of tribal law and tribal institutions,” he said.

Donald Low, L’75, director of the utilities division for the Kansas Corporation Commission, presented this year’s keynote address.

He started his speech by giving advice to law students and talking about how diversity at KU has increased. Then he connected those observations with the current hot topic of immigration and his own family’s immigration story. Low also discussed the history of Asian immigration in America and how exclusionary laws imposed by the government still affect the lives of today’s Asian-American population.

Government Conference, sponsored by the University of Kansas School of Law. Nearly 100 people attended the Feb. 1 event, which featured presentations by tribal attorneys, judges, CEOs and leading scholars. It’s the only recurring national conference to address tribal practices rather than federal law that dictates to tribes.

Yet when it comes to tribal law – often similarly defined by the values and mores of a particular culture – federal courts exhibit a suspicion toward this “law in action” versus “law on the books” approach, Frickey said, especially as it pertains to tribal jurisdiction over nonmembers. Frickey, professor of law at the University of California at Berkeley, offered explanations for and solutions to this discrepancy during his keynote address at the 12th annual Tribal Law &

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That dearth of knowledge, Frickey contended, exists partly because scholars have failed to provide an accurate empirical picture of tribal law. He argued that academics ought to pursue that line of work, even while noting that such studies could be intrusive into tribal affairs. Frickey also suggested that tribes work through Congress to reverse the effects of 30 years worth of damaging U.S. Supreme Court decisions pertaining to tribal sovereignty. Also addressed at the conference were issues of tribal property law and economic development. Professor Stacy Leeds, director of KU’s Tribal Law & Government Center, helped organize the conference. Other KU Law faculty involved in the event were Angelique EagleWoman, visiting professor of law and indigenous nations studies at KU, who moderated a panel on creative avenues for tribal economic development; and Andrew Torrance, KU associate professor of law, who served as a panelist in that discussion.


Symposium tackles contentious biolaw issues A group of world-renowned scholars whose thoughts are helping shape the future of biolaw offered perspectives on the emerging field during the Kansas Law Review 2007 Symposium on Nov. 9. • Speakers at the event, titled “Biolaw: Law at the Frontiers of Biology,” confronted topics that often incite controversy: human biological enhancement, FDA regulation, patents and human evolution, the legality of  cutting-edge but unproven medical treatments, and environmental conservation.  “It was truly a highlight to witness these great minds explore  such complex and fascinating issues that will surely impact all of our lives in one way or another,” said Jonathan Grossman, symposium editor for the Law Review.

by Jerry Menikoff, director of the Office of Human Subjects Research at the National Institute of Health and director of the Institute for Bioethics, Law and Public Policy at the University of Kansas School of Medicine “Patents & the Future of Human Evolution,” by Andrew Torrance, KU professor of law “Cutting Edge Legal Issues in Biotechnology,” panel moderated by Rudolf H. Beese of Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP “Against All Odds: Creating the Virgin Islands Park System,” by Sen. Adlah Donastorg of the U.S. Virgin Islands

day, the workshop participants, led by book editor David Driesen, a law professor at Syracuse University College of Law, introduced the project to the public. Professor Glicksman gave a short summary of current climate change science, focusing on its known and potential effects, and scientific experts from departments across the KU campus presented their work in the field and explained its significance. The event culminated with a presentation by Professor John Applegate of the Indiana University School of Law that was designed to tie together the scientific issues with the policy questions being addressed in the CPR book.

Papers presented at the symposium were published last month in the Kansas Law Review (Volume 56, Issue 4). Sponsors for the symposium were Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP and the Kansas Technology Enterprise Corporation. Scholars probe impacts of climate change Climate change is real.

Presentations included: • “Biolow: Cracking the Code,” by Jim Chen, dean of the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law • “Law & Human Biological Enhancement,” by Henry T. Greely, professor of law at Stanford Law School with a courtesy appointment in Stanford’s genetics department • “State of the Art in Food & Drug Law,” by Peter Barton Hutt, professor of law at Harvard University and senior counsel at Covington & Burling • “Maybe Medicines: Dealing with the ‘Controversial’ Right to CuttingEdge Unproven Treatments,”

There’s no question about that anymore, and a group of experts devoted to studying its causes and effects – as well as potential remedies – converged in late October at the law school. The conference – “Facts, Ideas and U.S. Climate Change Policy: A Conference on Climate Change” – emerged from efforts by a group of scholars at the Center for Progressive Reform to write a book on U.S. climate change policy, explains Robert Glicksman, a KU Law professor and CPR board member. The scholars come mostly from law schools at top universities across the country, and each is involved in research on the legal and policy aspects of climate change. During the conference, which lasted a day and a half, the scholars first held a closed workshop to discuss and revise draft chapters for the book. The following

“The conference was a unique opportunity for law professors and other social scientists to exchange ideas with professors on the front lines of cutting-edge research on the physical science side of climate change,” Glicksman says.   The CPR book will be published by MIT Press and, among other things, will supply a series of recommendations for the development of an effective, equitable and feasible set of climate change policies for the U.S. moving forward. The University of Kansas School of Law, the Center for Progressive Reform and KU’s The Commons jointly sponsored the conference. Also participating from the KU Law faculty was Associate Professor Andrew Torrance, who serves as a research associate at KU’s Biodiversity Research Center.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW CORNER Asian, American water experts exchange knowledge, solutions BY JOHN PECK Water is often in the news these days. Climate change is causing glaciers to melt. Precipitation patterns are shifting. We are polluting our rivers and groundwater and depleting our groundwater aquifers. Water shortages appear throughout the world. Some say that the shortage of water, not oil, will cause the wars of the 21st century. For several years, I have been working with the International Water Management Institute (IWMI), headquartered in Sri Lanka, on groundwater depletion issues. First I was invited to write a book chapter,1 then an IWMI scholar participated in a Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy symposium on groundwater management, and finally, in the fall of 2006, the law school hosted a group of Asian water management2 experts to expose them to groundwater management approaches in countries outside their region. IWMI chose one institution in Australia3 and one in the U.S. for this program. KU hosted six Asians from India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and China. Diana Carlin of the KU Office of International Programs and I co-directed the program, and KU Law graduate Burke Griggs, L’2006, served as project coordinator.

The KU School of Law hosted a group of Asian water management experts as part of an International Water Management Institute program to expose them to groundwater management approaches in countries outside their region. Pictured at the Kansas Capitol, from left, are Shiraz Islam (Bangladesh), Burke Griggs, L'2006, Madhav Shrestha (Nepal), Puskar Ghimira (Nepal), Sushil Kamra (India), Ynpeng Xue (China) and John Thomas (India).

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The program involved a large group of Kansas water professionals from university faculties, state water agencies, an appellate court, the legislature, public water suppliers, groundwater management districts (GMDs), a farm, and industry. In addition to day trips to Topeka and Kansas City, a three-day field trip took the Asian group to Wichita, Garden City, Great Bend, and Salina. They visited GMD offices, the Wichita Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project, the Wichita Water Center (polluted groundwater remediation), the Big Well in Greensburg, the Dodge City wastewater reuse project, the Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area near Great Bend, the dried-up Arkansas River near Larned, and the K-State Agriculture Research Station and Sunflower Electric Cooperative’s office, both in Garden City. KU faculty lectures on law (Robert Glicksman on environmental law, John Head on international law, and John Peck on water allocation law), civil engineering, geology, and economics were supplemented by talks and meetings with state water administrators. John Draper of Santa Fe, N.M., Lee Rolfs, L’75, and David Pope described their work for Kansas on the two U.S. Supreme Court interstate water cases. Each Asian guest presented a lecture on the law, water problems, and management issues in his country. Although the Asian guests were scientists and administrators and not lawyers, they came equipped to explain the basics of water law in their countries. The Asians ate in Lawrence homes, attended a KU concert and a KU basketball game, visited the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo., witnessed a Christmas parade in downtown Lawrence, enjoyed a wide variety of food in restaurants, and visited informally with Kansans. The goal of the program was to exchange ideas on groundwater management. We learned that while we share similar physical problems of pollution and depletion, our laws and the nature and settings of these physical problems are very different. Our Asian guests described water laws in their countries. India’s water law, for example, draws from several sources – the constitution, irrigation acts from the colonial period, statutes, and English-based common law, including a judicial recognition of a human right to water.4 The Indian groundwater allocation law is like that of Texas (and Kansas prior to 1945), the “Absolute Ownership Doctrine.” Landowners own the water under the surface as they own the soil. There is no

Campuswide panel explores ‘path forward’ from Sept. 11 Two University of Kansas organizations marked the sixth anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., by sponsoring a panel discussion on Sept. 11 at Green Hall. “9/11, the United States and the World — What Path Forward?” included eight panelists from across the KU campus. The KU chapter of Phi Beta Delta, an honor society for international scholarship and education, and the International Law Society, a campus organization open to all students and headquartered at the School of Law, co-sponsored the event. “The forum took a forward-looking approach in order to see what a variety of people in our community — particularly faculty and students — draw from 9/11 and its aftermath as we look to the future,” said John Head, professor of law and president of Phi Beta Delta at KU. Beau Jackson, a second-year law student and president of the International Law Society, joined Head as a moderator for the panel discussion. Other speakers were Bill Tsutsui, executive director of the Confucius Institute; David Lambertson, former ambassador to Thailand and U.S. representative in North Korea; Melissa Birch, director of the Center for International Business Education and Research; Lawrence Indyk, second-year law student; Thomas Heilke, professor of political science and interim associate vice provost for International Programs; Jomana Qaddour, Syrian-American second-year law student; David Gottlieb, professor of law; and Beverly Mack, professor of African and African-American studies. Issues addressed by the panelists included the impacts of U.S. retaliation on its global economic and diplomatic prospects, the nation’s superpower status in light of the fear it displayed after the attacks and the political motives behind anti-Muslim propaganda.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW CORNER New agreement forges ties with Korean law school A delegation from the Pusan National University College of Law arrived in late October to finalize a wide-reaching set of cooperation arrangements with the University of Kansas School of Law. Among the elements of the agreement are faculty collaboration and exchanges, and one-semester study visits to Green Hall by PNU students. PNU is a major player in a new initiative to create American-style Juris Doctorate programs at a few leading Korean universities. Dean Gail Agrawal and Professors Raj Bhala, John Peck and Mike Davis represented KU Law in playing host to the delegation. “As the practice of law becomes increasingly global in scope, agreements like the one we were privileged to sign with Pusan University become increasingly important to our students and to the legal community as a whole. I am grateful for the leadership of my faculty colleagues, Professors Raj Bhala and John Head, in this important arena,” Agrawal said. “We expect the agreement with Pusan University to be a model for those that will, inevitably, follow it. We are looking forward to working with our colleagues at Pusan University for the enrichment of both our faculties and student bodies.” Facilitating the development of the cooperative arrangements between the two law schools was Taewoo Sohn, a professor of law at PNU and a recent visitor to Green Hall under KU’s Overseas Visiting Scholars Program.

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permitting process, except in a few states that are now experimenting with regulation. The Indian Constitution provides that material resources of the community are so distributed as best to serve the common good,5 and that the operation of the economic system not result in the concentration of wealth and means of production to the common detriment.6 Together, the state and the citizens share a fundamental duty to protect and improve the environment.7 In the U.S., water rights are deemed to be property rights, protected to some extent against governmental regulatory takings without compensation. Kansas has a highly detailed and regulated method of obtaining and changing water rights. The state follows the prior appropriation doctrine of the Western U.S., which requires permission from the government before making beneficial uses of water, except for domestic use. Nondomestic water use without a permit is a crime. Kansas Groundwater Management Districts (GMDs) aid the Kansas Division of Water Resources (DWR) in regulating groundwater withdrawals. DWR can also establish Intensive Groundwater Use Control Areas (IGUCAs) in problem areas, which gives DWR extraordinary regulatory power to curtail pumping. Even if an Asian country wanted to adopt some ideas from Kansas groundwater allocation law and management, the nature of the problems and their settings would make such adoptions difficult. Compared to South Asia, Kansas is sparsely populated, dry and wealthy; and it has a highly developed groundwater management regime. By contrast, South Asia is densely populated, wet and poor; and it lacks workable groundwater management regimes. India, for example, has over 21 million agricultural “tubewells” compared to roughly 23,000 in Kansas and 380,000 in the U.S. For this reason, it is unlikely that these countries will adopt much of our management system. Yet some ideas are potentially transferrable. Several Indian states are experimenting with groundwater permitting and water user associations to manage irrigation systems. The most interesting part of the program for the Chinese expert was the open and public discussion of the contentious Sunflower coal-fired power plant issue. After a presentation by Sunflower Electric’s representative in Garden City, the Asian group wanted to hear the arguments from the other side, so we asked the Kansas Sierra Club to provide those arguments. Interestingly, recent media stories report more open airing of these types of debates and controversies in China.8 If Kansas seems to be ahead in institutional groundwater management, India seems to be ahead in “water harvesting,” a topic of increasing interest in the U.S.9 Ancient techniques called zings,10 kunds,11 and baoris or bers12 may sound quaint to us now, but recent serious droughts in the U.S. have demonstrated the potential need to consider such methods here.13

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This program gave participants on both sides a chance to explore differences in problems and problem solving. In April, Rex Buchanan of the Kansas Geological Survey and I traveled to Hyderabad, India, to visit with IWMI officials about the possibility of more collaboration.

Forum features Saudi Arabian diplomat A key player in Saudi Arabia’s entrance into the World Trade Organization spoke about how the kingdom is “adapting to global change while preserving valuable traditions” during a Nov. 8 lecture at KU Law. Dr. Fawaz Al-Alamy, former deputy minister of commerce and industry and chief WTO technical negotiator for the Middle Eastern nation, presented his public lecture as part of the Diplomat’s Forum. The forum is the law school’s most prestigious annual international and comparative law event.

Professor John Peck led the Asian delegation on a tour that included a stop at the Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area near Great Bend.

— John Peck is a Connell Teaching Professor of Law at the University of Kansas and author of several articles and book chapters on water law and comparative water law. This piece draws from “Groundwater Law and Management: The Asia (IWMI)-Kansas Program,” an article Peck co-authored with Burke Griggs, L’2006, that will be published in the spring issue of Creighton Law Review. Peck may be reached at (785) 864-9228 or jpeck@ku.edu.

FOOTNOTES: 1. “Groundwater Management in the High Plains Aquifer in the USA: Legal Problems and Innovations,” in “The Agricultural Groundwater Revolution: Opportunities and Threats to Development” (M. Giordano and K.G. Villholth, ed.) (2007). 2. “Does Groundwater Management Work?” held in February 2006. See 15 Kan. J. of Law & Pub. Pol. 391-571 (Spring 2006). Dr. Tushaar Shah of India presented and published “The Groundwater Economy of South Asia: An Assessment of Size, Significance, and Socio-Ecological Impacts,” 15 Kan. J. of Law & Pub. Pol., 407 (Spring 2006), as well as “Institutional Groundwater Management in the United States: Lessons for South Asia and North China,” Id, at 567. 3. In Australia, the program was administered by the Centre for Comparative Water Policy and Law at the University of South Australia, Adelaide, headed by Professor Jennifer McKay, who also directs the Centre. 4. See Philippe Cullet, “Water Law in India: Overview of Existing Framework & Proposed Reforms,” IELRC Working Paper, 2007 - 01 (International Environmental Law Research Centre) (2007), online at http://www.ielrc.org/content/w0701.pdf . 5. Id., Art. 39 (b). 6. Id., Art. 39 (c). 7. Id., Art. 48A & 51A (g). 8. For an example of objection to a dam project, see “China’s dam drive slows amid growing opposition,” Wall Street Journal, Dec. 19, 2007, at A1, col 4 (online at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119802214926737977.html ). For an example of objection at public hearings to a chemical plant, see Howard W. French, Letter from China, “A ‘harmonious society’ hearing different notes,” Int. Harold Tribune, Jan. 5-6, 2008, at p.2, col. 1 (online at http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/01/04/asia/letter.php ). 9. See, e.g., T. Payne & J. Neuman, Remembering Rain, 37 Environ. L. 105 (2007) (rainwater harvesting should have a role in the future); “Harvesting Rainwater by not Letting it Go to Waste,” Morning Edition, Nat. Pub. Radio, Jan. 10, 2008 (described simple methods of rainwater harvesting). 10. Small tanks that collect glacier water. 11. Circular underground wells that have a saucer-shaped catchment that gently slopes toward the center, collecting the rainfall that percolates down. 12. Ancient drinking water wells. 13. P. Jonsson, “To fight drought, Georgians get creative,” Christian Sci. Monitor, Dec. 19, 2007, p.3, col. 1 (in droughts people supply themselves with water).

In his talk, Al-Alamy outlined both challenges and global prospects for Saudi Arabia, which joined the WTO in December 2005. Under the leadership of its “visionary” leader, King Abdullah, the oil-rich nation is working to diversify its economic base, strengthen the role of the private sector, create a favorable investment climate, streamline decision making and integrate into the world economy, Al-Alamy said. “Doctor Al-Alamy provided a world-class review of the strengths and difficulties faced by the kingdom as it integrates more fully into the world trading system, and as it attempts to diversify its export base and provide highquality job opportunities for its burgeoning population,” said Raj Bhala, Rice Distinguished Professor of Law. The aim of the forum is to provide a platform for an open sharing of thoughts on international law and relations and the United States through the unique perspective of an insightful professional with notable diplomatic experience in the service of a foreign government. Al-Alamy was born in Abha, Saudi Arabia. He obtained his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate in energy physics in the United Kingdom, and completed the advanced executive management program at Stanford University. He has served as chair of the physics department, dean of environmental studies and chair of the research center at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

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Students display philanthropic, social, competitive sides BY WENDY ROHLEDER-SOOK, ASSOCIATE DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS KU Law’s Office of Student Affairs and its 35 student organizations planned numerous fundraising, community service and social activities during the fall. The semester kicked off with a Welcome Back Picnic at Green Hall hosted by the student affairs office for all students, faculty and staff. In late August, the International Law Society organized a picnic at Clinton Lake, providing students with an opportunity to learn more about the international law opportunities at KU. In conjunction with Alumni Weekend in early October, the Student Bar Association organized Race Ipsa, a 5K run/walk for charity. Great weather and a competitive spirit brought out a large group of students and alumni to participate. Later that month, the Public Interest Law Society played host to “Casino Night” to raise funds for summer stipends for students working in public interest positions. Make a Difference Day brought students and alumni together for an afternoon of community service in the Lawrence community. While volunteering for organizations such as Habitat for Humanity and Big Brothers Big Sisters, current and former students got a chance to bond by sharing their experiences at KU Law. November brought the Black Law Students Association’s annual food drive, which provided Thanksgiving meals for hundreds of families in the community. Throughout the football season, the Student Bar Association played host to numerous tailgates, cheering on our Kansas Jayhawks football team to its Orange Bowl victory. Also last fall, the National Criminal Procedure Moot Court team became national champions, winning the National Criminal Procedure Tournament in San Diego, Calif. Clay Britton and Luke Sinclair represented KU Law, placing first in the competition and for best brief. Britton was also recognized as second-place oralist.

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Top: Members of the Black Law Students Association take a breather during their annual food drive, which provides Thanksgiving meals for hundreds of families in the community. Pictured, from left, are Josh Monteiro, Eunice Lee, Rury Grisham, Trinia Arellano, Eric Williams, Demetrius Peterson and Burton Warrington. Middle: KU Law students and alumni line up for the start of the 8th annual Race Ipsa 5k race/walk for charity. The Student Bar Association organized the event to coincide with Alumni Reunion Weekend, Oct. 5-6. Bottom: KU Law student Sonja Kramer, left, and Dean Gail Agrawal prepare a flower bed for spring bulbs with Kendra Baldridge, director of the Centro Hispano Resource Center, on Make a Difference Day.


FACULTY KUDOS

Sward honored for teaching excellence

FACULTY NOTES SPRING 2008

Ellen Sward, professor of law, is presented a W.T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence by Dale Seuferling, president of the KU Endowment Association, center, and Chancellor Robert Hemenway.

KU Law Professor Ellen Sward received a $5,000 Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence from the University of Kansas. The fellowships recognize outstanding teachers and advisers at KU as determined by a seven-member selection committee. It’s not unusual to see Professor Sward dining with her students. She regularly schedules informal lunches with small groups of students as a way to advise and mentor them. In her 23 years at KU, Sward has influenced the lives of countless students, and many of them continue to stay in touch with her throughout their careers. Her students fondly report a lasting effect of the lessons learned in her classes. One student said that “some of the most challenging and educational discussions in law school took place in her Federal Courts classroom.” Another student said the one-on-one sessions Sward provided were invaluable and encouraged him to accept a student teacher position at the law school and to consider becoming a law professor in the future. In all, 20 KU professors were honored and $100,000 distributed as part of the Kemper tradition, now in its 12th year. The awards are supported by $650,000 in gifts from the William T. Kemper Foundation and $650,000 in matching funds from KU Endowment.

Gail Agrawal spoke at the Southwest Kansas Bar Association meeting in September in Dodge City and at a conference sponsored by the Seattle University School of Law and the Society of American Law Teachers that focused on promoting diversity in law deanships. She also spoke to the Harvey County Bar Association in Newton and was the featured speaker at the Kansas Honors Program in Garden City.   Raj Bhala published the new edition of his textbook, “International Trade Law: Interdisciplinary Theory and Practice” (3rd edition, LexisNexis, 2008). The book contains 50 chapters covering all aspects of multilateral, regional and domestic trade law and policy, such as the Doha Round of negotiations in the World Trade Organization (WTO); new free trade agreements (FTAs) with Arab countries like Bahrain, Jordan, Morocco and Oman; and America’s remedies against unfair trade practices, including countervailing duty actions against nonmarket economies like China. The textbook also covers special economic sectors, such as agriculture, intellectual property and services. It integrates perspectives on trade law and policy from other fields, notably economics, history, philosophy, political science and religion. Accompanying the textbook is a new edition of the “Documents Supplement,” which contains the primary

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texts of WTO accords and FTAs, plus a new edition of the “Teacher’s Manual,” which contains 10 sample course syllabi and 600 questions and answers for classroom use. LexisNexis also published the 1st edition of Bhala’s “Dictionary of International Trade Law.” This new product, which can accompany the textbook or be used as a standalone volume, defines hundreds of trade terms, and terms in other disciplines that relate to trade. Annexes contain analyses of FTAs and summaries of Chinese economic history and EU law and institutions. Bhala also published three articles: “Competitive Liberalization, Competitive Imperialism, and Intellectual Property,” 28 Liverpool Law Review 1 (2007); “Empathizing with France and Pakistan on Agricultural Subsidy Issues in the Doha Round,” 40 Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 3 (October 2007) (invitation symposium on food security); and “WTO Case Review 2006,” 24 Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law 2 (2007). Finally, Bhala has been appointed to the Editorial Advisory Board of the Shari’a and Law Journal, which is a refereed quarterly journal at United Arab Emirates University that publishes scholarly research on Islamic legal issues. Robert Casad published a book, “Kansas Civil Jury Instruction Companion Handbook” (ThompsonWest, 2007), and an article, “Doctrinal Issues in Civil Court Procedures,” in Vol. 1 of the Encyclopedia of Law and Society (Sage, 2007). He also published annual supplements to two treatises: “Jurisdiction and Forum Selection” (2d ed., Thomson-West)

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and “Kansas Code of Civil Procedure Annotated” (4th ed., ThomsonWest). George Coggins published the four-volume treatise “Public Natural Resources Law” (2d edition, Thomson-West, December 2007), co-authored with KU Law Professor Robert Glicksman, and “Federal Public Land and Resources Law” (6th ed., Foundation Press, July 2007). Joseph Custer has been elected vice president/president-elect for the Mid American Association of Law Libraries (MAALL). His two-year post started in November. At the organization’s annual meeting on Nov. 1, Custer spoke on “Citizens as Law Makers: Initiatives and Referendums.” He published “Researching Initiatives and Referendums in Arkansas,” 26 Legal Reference Services Quarterly 31, Fall 2007.  Michael J. Davis presented a paper in October titled “Religion, Democracy and the Public Schools” to the faculty and graduate students at the University of Limerick, Ireland. A few weeks later, he teamed with alumnus David Davenport, L’77, to offer a shortened version of the same presentation to approximately 20 KU Law alumni here for Alumni Weekend. Davis also has been appointed by the American Bar Association to two ad hoc committees on legal education: 1) a broad-based committee charged with recommending to the Accreditation Committee and the Council on Legal Education additional accreditation standards based on “outcome measurements”; and 2) a small committee charged with recommending to the Council a new funding structure for the entire Section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar.

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Chris Drahozal was named an associate reporter for the “Restatement (Third) of the U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration,” a new restatement being prepared by the American Law Institute. He published two articles: 1) “An Empirical Study of CostBased Challenges to Arbitration Agreements,” 1 World Arb. & Med. Rev. 355 (2007); and 2) “International Arbitration Law in the United States,” International Commercial Arbitration: A Comparative Survey 63 (N. Eksi et al. eds., 2007), published by the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce. Drahozal presented a paper on “Private Ordering, the Lex Mercatoria, and International Commercial Arbitration” at the 24th Annual Conference of the European Association of Law & Economics on Sept. 15 in Copenhagen, Denmark. He also chaired a panel at the conference on contracts and contractual regulation, and was a discussant for a paper, “Can Group Litigation Improve Deterrence?” He presented a paper, “Is There a Flight from Arbitration?” at the Midwestern Law & Economics Conference on Oct. 13 at the University of Minnesota Law School in Minneapolis. He also did a presentation on “Arbitration Costs and Forum Accessibility: Empirical Evidence” as part of a panel on “How Bad are Mandatory Arbitration Terms?” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Law Schools on Jan. 4 in New York, N.Y. The paper will be published with other papers from the panel in the University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform. Drahozal participated in a roundtable workshop on “Regulation

and Arbitration” sponsored by the Cecil D. Branstetter Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program at Vanderbilt University Law School on Feb. 8 in Nashville, Tenn. He was reappointed to a term on the Academic Council of the Institute for Transnational Arbitration and attended a planning committee for the Council on Jan. 19 at the University of California-Berkeley. Drahozal also served as a member of an informal working group that developed a form for providing feedback to international arbitrators. The form was published in the October issue of Transnational Dispute Management, together with an article describing the project. Robert Glicksman published the following books and articles: the 4-volume treatise “Public Natural Resources Law” (2d edition, Thomson-West, December 2007), co-authored with KU Law Professor George Coggins; the “Summer 2007 Teachers Update” to his environmental law casebook, “Environmental Protection: Law and Policy” (5th ed., 2007), with a new Web site at http://lawstudy.law. ku.edu/glicks/envprot; “Balancing Mandate and Discretion in the Institutional Design of Federal Climate Change Policy,” 102 NW. U. L. Rev. Colloquy 196 (February 2008). He delivered the following presentations: “The Impact of Environmental Law on Rural Legal Practice: Dealing with Bogs and Bugs” at a KBA-Kansas Farm Bureau continuing legal education program on “Agricultural Law Update” on Sept. 21 in Manhattan; and “The Influence of Facility Characteristics on Environmental Performance Following Government Interventions Under the Clean Water Act” at the Boston College Law School Environmental Affairs Law Review Fall Symposium: “The Greening


of the Corporation” on Oct. 25 in Boston (with Dietrich Earnhart). Glicksman also gave three presentations – “The Failure of U.S. Climate Change Policy,” “A Familiar Litany: Industry and Political Opposition to Climate Change Action” and “A Summary of the Consequences of Global Climate Change” – at “Facts, Ideas, and U.S. Climate Change Policy: A Conference on Climate Change,” Oct. 19-20 at the University of Kansas School of Law. Glicksman organized the conference, which included a one-day, closed session to work on a book about climate change and half a day of presentations open to the public. The court in Green Mountain Chrysler Plymouth Dodge Jeep v. Crombie, 508 F. Supp. 2d (D. Vt. 2007), cited Glicksman’s article, “From Cooperation to Inoperative Federalism: The Perverse Mutation of Environmental Law and Policy,” 41 Wake Forest L. Rev. 719 (2006), in holding that federal law does not preempt state regulation of greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles. Glicksman also was appointed to the board of directors for the Center for Progressive Reform and agreed to act as the organization’s treasurer. David J. Gottlieb helped prepare the 2008 supplement for “Practice Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines,” which is published by Aspen Law and Business. He also helped plan the Family Health Care Legal Services Clinic, a medicallegal clinic which the KU School of Law opened in January.  John Head helped organize a forum on Sept. 11 on the topic of “9/11, the United States, and the World — What Path Forward?” Eight speakers offered summaries of their views on issues

fitting within that topic. Also in September, Head began service on two university committees – one responsible for reviewing sabbatical leave applications, and the other established to search for a new associate vice provost for international programs.  In early October, Head taught a short course on international financial institutions in Veracruz, Mexico, to a group of about 15 Mexican graduate law students under the auspices of the faculty cooperation agreement that KU has with Anáhuac University of Xalapa. In mid-October, Head joined with KU Law Professor Raj Bhala to present a noon forum in Green Hall on career opportunities in international law and business. In late October, Head helped host a law school symposium on law and policy in international financial institutions, focusing especially on the World Bank and IMF. Symposium participants included high-level legal officers from those and other similar institutions, including the deputy general counsel of the IMF and the former general counsel of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Head also completed an article for the symposium, to be published in the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy. Throughout the fall and early spring terms, Head continued his work with both the Jessup International Law Moot Court Team and the International Environmental Law Moot Court Team, as well as his work as president of the KU chapter of Phi Beta Delta, the honor society for international scholarship and education. He also finished an article on international letters of credit, to be published soon in the Journal of the Kansas Bar Assocation. His recent book, “Losing the Global Development War,” was released

recently and was the subject of a faculty research workshop that he presented in October.  Head also continues his service as faculty co-adviser (with Bhala) to the International Law Society and chair of the Graduate and International Programs Committee. As part of his involvement in the law school’s very active International and Comparative Law Program, Head hosted visitors from Senegal, Korea and Japan. Most recently, he co-authored an article with KU Law Professor Jelani Jefferson, “In Whose ‘Best Interests’? An International and Comparative Assessment of U.S. Rules on Sentencing of Juveniles,” which will appear in an upcoming issue of the Human Rights & Globalization Law Review. Laura Hines served as a panelist for a Sept. 7 program, “The Relationship Between Punitive Damages and Class Actions,” which was part of a symposium at the Charleston School of Law titled “Punitive Damages, Due Process, and Deterrence: The Debate after Philip Morris v. Williams.” On Sept. 18, she was co-presenter of a program, “The Whole is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts: The Certification of Limited Issues,” presented at the National Forum on Class Actions and Complex Litigation, co-sponsored by the University of Kansas School of Law and Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP.                                           Jelani Jefferson presented a work-in-progress, “Stumbling Into Reasonableness: Why Guidelines Miscalculations Have No Place Within the Presumption of Reasonableness,” in November at Washington University Law School’s regional junior faculty workshop in St. Louis. Recently, she co-authored an article with KU Law Professor

John Head, “In Whose ‘Best Interests’? An International and Comparative Assessment of U.S. Rules on Sentencing of Juveniles,” which will appear in an upcoming issue of the Human Rights & Globalization Law Review. Mike Kautsch wrote two articles for the Media, Privacy and Defamation Law Committee News, published under the auspices of the American Bar Association Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section: “That’s My Picture! Don’t Use It! Photos, Publicity Rights and the First Amendment” (Winter 2007) and “Scoping Out Change: The Future of Media and the Law” (Spring 2007). His review of “Darkest Before Dawn: Sedition and Free Speech in the American West” (University of New Mexico Press, 2005), by Clemens P. Work, appeared in the American Studies Journal. Kautsch co-presented a professional development program on Kansas open government laws during a Kansas Press Association conference on June 7 in Hays. He also co-presented a continuing legal education program, “A Potpourri of Hot Topics in Media Law,” during the annual Kansas Bar Association conference on June 8 in Wichita. He served as moderator and presenter, and prepared written materials, for “When Courtrooms Become Showrooms,” a CLE program during the annual Kansas Women Attorneys Association on July 19 in Lindsborg. Kautsch also made presentations and prepared written materials for a day-long courts and media seminar for judges, sponsored by the Kansas Judicial Branch, on Sept. 19 at KU’s Dole Institute of Politics. Kautsch was a visiting professor in the fall at the University of North Carolina School of Law in Chapel

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Hill, N.C. He taught a first-year torts class and consulted with the law dean and others about the development of a media law center at UNC. Pam Keller co-published an article with KU Law Professor Elinor Schroeder titled “Kansas Employment Law Survey,” 55 Kan. L. Rev. 887 (2007). Richard Levy prepared a report in September concerning hearing officer independence and administrative adjudication on behalf of the Administrative Procedure Advisory Committee of the Kansas Judicial Council for the Kansas Legislature’s Special Committee on the Judiciary. He addressed the “State of University Governance” at the University of Kansas Faculty Convocation in September. Levy gave a continuing legal education presentation in January for the government and administrative law sections of the Kansas Bar Association titled “The Straight Skinny on Judicial Review and Proposed Changes to KAPA and KJRA.” Also in January, he was named to the task force on “Serving the Needs of Kansas” as part of the university’s strategic planning initiative. Stephen Mazza delivered a continuing legal education presentation in December as part of the 25th Annual Plaza Lights Institute CLE in Kansas City, Mo. His talk, “The Interaction Between Tax Practitioner Penalties and Ethical Obligations or Are You ‘More Likely Than Not’ Going to Be Penalized for Giving Tax Advice?” focused on recent changes to the preparer penalty standards. In his role as associate dean for academic affairs and co-chair of the Curriculum Reform Committee, he attended an invitation-only conference on current trends in legal education in October in South Carolina. The Curriculum Committee 22

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is considering potential changes to the first-year schedule of courses. Stephen McAllister made the following presentations: “Affirmative Action” (commentator, Federalist Society Noon Forum, KU School of Law, Oct. 4); “The Roberts Court” (featured speaker, Johnson County Bar Association luncheon, Oct. 3); “Constitution Day: The Roberts Court” (panelist, Constitution Day Forum sponsored by the American Constitution Society, KU law school, Sept. 19); and “Constitution Day: The Roberts Court” (organizer and moderator of forum at Dole Institute of Politics, Sept. 18). This semester, McAllister became the first law professor to teach the group course for 20 outstanding KU sophomores selected for the University Scholars Program. He also was a member of the Academic Performance Rate Improvement Plan Committee for the KU athletics department. In his capacity as solicitor general of Kansas (assisting the attorney general’s office with constitutional litigation), McAllister argued three cases before the Kansas Supreme Court during the fall: a death penalty case raising numerous issues, including whether the state’s death penalty statute violates the Kansas Constitution; a case raising the question whether there is a constitutional right to a jury trial in juvenile proceedings; and a case challenging the constitutionality of the new funeral privacy law passed in spring 2007. Sandra Craig McKenzie spoke about elder law to Dr. David Ekerdt’s gerontology proseminar on Nov. 8. Ekerdt directs KU’s Gerontology Center. McKenzie also was asked to be the faculty mentor for Matthew

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Hudson, a KU junior majoring in psychology, as part of the Dean’s Scholars Program. Established in 1992, the program provides recipients with annual scholarships and faculty mentors, and is designed to diversify the talent pool available for liberal arts and sciences faculties. Keith Meyer made two presentations: 1) “U.S. Farm Policy and the Doha Round” at the two-day conference “Understanding the Growing Complexities of International Trade and Agriculture” on Sept. 27 at Michigan State University Law School in East Lansing, Mich.; and 2) “Current Issues in Commercial Law” on Dec. 7 at the 25th Annual Plaza Lights Institute CLE in Kansas City, Mo. Meyer prepared long PowerPoint presentations for the Michigan State conference and a 60-page outline for the Plaza Lights presentation. Joyce McCray Pearson sat on a panel called “It’s My Prerogative” with Deryl W. Winn, a partner at McAnany, Van Cleave & Phillips P.A., on Feb. 19 at Washburn University School of Law. The event, sponsored by the school’s Black Law Student Association, focused on the panelists’ experiences as minority practitioners in two contexts: large firm practice and a legal career as a law librarian. Pearson also re-published “Red and Black – A Divided Seminole Nation: Davis v. U.S.” in the e-book “The First and the Forced: Essays on the Native American and African American Experience,” published by KU’s Hall Center for the Humanities in conjunction with “The Shifting Borders of Race and Identity: A Research and Teaching Project on the Native American and African American Experience.”

John Peck gave two continuing legal education presentations: 1) “Basic Principles of Water Law,” as part of a program, “Water Law: The Best of the West,” Water Law Institutes, CLE International, Sept. 17-18 in Las Vegas; and 2) “Kansas Water Allocation Law as Part of Agriculture Law,” KBA Agriculture Law Section, Sept. 21 in Manhattan. Peck also presented a talk, “Can the Ogallala Aquifer in Western Kansas be Saved for Future Generations?” during a University Forum on Oct. 3. He testified before the Kansas Legislature Interim Committee on “Review of Kansas Water Appropriation Law and the Law Permitting Intensive Groundwater Use Control Areas (IGUCAs)” on Oct. 22. Elinor Schroeder published an article in the Kansas Law Review titled “Kansas Employment Law Survey,” 55 Kan. L. Rev. 887 (2007). Professor Pam Keller is co-author. Andrew Torrance published the following articles: “An Extinction Bar to Patentability,” Georgetown International Environmental Law Review, 2008; “Are the BrookhillWilk Patents Impediments to Market Growth in Cybersurgery?” (co-author Thomas McLean), International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery, 2008; “Metaphysics and Patenting Life,” University of Missouri-Kansas City Law Review, 2008; “Intellectual Property as the Third Dimension of GMO Regulation,” 16 Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy 3, Spring 2007; “Patents to the Rescue – Disasters and Patent Law,” 10 DePaul Journal of Health Care Law 3, Spring 2007. He presented “An Interactive Patent System Simulation (PatentSim™): Initial Empirical Results,” in


September at Works In Progress In Intellectual Property 2007 at the American University School of Law in Washington, D.C.; “Protecting and Promoting Biotechnology Innovation” as a guest lecturer in October at a life science business course at KU’s Edwards Campus; “Endangered Species and Climate Change – Aiming the Law at Moving Targets” at “Facts, Ideas, and U.S. Climate Change Policy: A Conference on Climate Change,” sponsored by the Center for Progressive Reform and the KU School of Law in October; “Patent Law Reform” (panelist with Professors Mark Lemley and Christopher Holman) in October at Hot Topics in Intellectual Property Law at the UMKC School of Law; “Patenting Human Evolution” at Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences in October at Louisville University School of Law, Louisville, Ky.; “Patent Our Future” at the Kansas Law Review’s biolaw symposium in November at the KU School of Law; “Intellectual Property and Biodiversity Conservation” in January at the 2008 American Association of Law Schools annual meeting in New York, N.Y.; “PatentSim™ and Entrepreneurship,” in January for the Kauffman Global Scholars Program at the Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City, Mo.; “Tribal Sovereign Immunity from Patent and Copyright Infringement” in February at the 12th Annual Tribal Law and Government Conference, sponsored by the KU School of Law and organized by its Tribal Law and Government Center; “Physiological Steps Doctrine” in February at the 2007 IP & Communication Law Scholars Workshop at the Michigan State University School of Law in East Lansing, Mich.; “Metaphysics and Patenting Life” in February as part of the Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable at Drake

University School of Law in Des Moines, Iowa. Suzanne Valdez presented “Grandparent Visitation Rights” at three continuing legal education programs: Johnson County Bar Association Family Law CLE Program, Overland Park, December; Wichita SRS CLE Program, Wichita, November; and the Kansas Legal Services CLE Program, Pittsburg, November. She was a radio guest in November on the topic of grandparent visitation rights in Kansas on “Til Divorce Do Us Part,” a talk radio show that deals with the legal and emotional reality of divorce, hosted by Susan Saper Galamba on 1510AM. Valdez published “Recent Developments in Kansas Residential Landlord-Tenant and Eviction Law,” 55 Kan. L. Rev. 935 (2007). She also was appointed to two subcommittees in the Judicial Council Family Law Advisory Committee – one to draft divorce forms and the other to redraft PFA (Protection from Abuse) and PFS (Protection from Stalking) forms. Stephen Ware published “Selection to the Kansas Supreme Court,” available at www.ffed-soc. org/kansaspaper and forthcoming in the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy. He has spoken about the topic of Kansas Supreme Court selection to groups across the state: Goddard (Nov. 9), Wichita (Dec. 4), Overland Park (Jan. 9), Topeka (Jan. 15), Dodge City (Jan. 17), Garden City (Jan. 17) and Great Bend (Jan. 18). He also presented his research at the Midwest Law & Economics Association annual meeting on Oct. 13 in Minneapolis and published oped pieces on the topic in the Wichita Eagle (Nov. 29) and the Lawrence Journal-World (Dec. 8).

Ware led a discussion of his work on “Mandatory Rules of Law in Arbitration” on Feb. 8 at Vanderbilt University Law School and spoke on arbitration to Federalist Society student groups at several law schools: George Mason University School of Law (Oct. 25), University of Minnesota School of Law (Oct. 12), University of Missouri School of Law (Sept. 20) and Saint Louis University School of Law (Sept. 19).   In the Kansas Law Review’s 2007 symposium issue, Ware published “’Medical-Related Financial Distress’ and Health Care Finance: A Reply to Professor Melissa Jacoby.” Elizabeth Weeks published “Failure to Connect: The Massachusetts Plan for Individual Health Insurance,” 55 Kansas L. Rev. 4 (2007), included in Kansas Law Review Symposium “The Massachusetts Plan and the Future of Universal Coverage” in November 2006; “Beyond Compensation: Using Torts to Promote Public Health,” 10 J. Health Care L. & Pol’y 27 (2007), based on a talk that she gave at the Association of American Law Schools annual meeting in January 2006; and “Loopholes: Opportunity, Responsibility, or Liability?” 35 J. Law, Med. & Ethics 320 (2007), an invited contribution to a regular column in the journal on “The Ethical Health Lawyer.”

meeting in Washington, D.C.; and the Midwestern Law & Economics Association annual meeting on Oct. 12-13 at the University of Minnesota School of Law in Minneapolis. Weeks also presented “Tort Litigation for the Public’s Health” at a symposium on “Public Health Perspectives on Charged Legal Issues” on Oct. 19 at the Widener University School of Law in Wilmington, Del. Weeks was elected vice president of the board of directors for the Health Care Access Clinic in Lawrence and served as faculty adviser to KU Law’s inaugural Health Law Moot Court Competition team, comprised of two second-year students who competed at the national competition Nov. 9-10 at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill.

Weeks presented “Right to Experimental Treatment: FDA New Drug Approval, Constitutional Rights, and the Public’s Health” at four venues: a faculty workshop on Feb. 14 at the University of North Carolina School of Law, Chapel Hill, N.C.; a faculty workshop on Dec. 11 at the Drexel University College of Law in Philadelphia; a panel on research rights and policies on Nov. 5 at the American Public Health Association annual university of kansas

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Alumni rekindle KU Law memories at reunion, volunteer events BY KEVIN KELLY, OUTREACH ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR

The 2007-2008 academic year saw meaningful interaction between the school and its valued alumni and friends. Make a Difference Day brought the law school community together to volunteer its time for service projects in Lawrence. KU Law alumni, students, faculty and staff converged on Green Hall on a Saturday morning for thanks and a pep talk from Dean Gail Agrawal and Judge Jan Karlin, the 1980 graduate who organized the event. Then the volunteers rolled up their sleeves and got to work at Big Brothers and Big Sisters, Habitat for Humanity, Habitat ReStore, Centro Hispano and the Douglas County Child Safety Seat Inspection Station. They also helped several elderly Lawrence residents with house cleaning and yard work. The event was held in cooperation with the Roger Hill Volunteer Center, which coordinates volunteer opportunities in Douglas County.

Dean Jimmy Green gazes down at KU Law grads during a campus tour stop at old Green Hall. Pictured are, from left, Chuck Zarter, L’67, Karen Borell, L’77, and Mike Walker, L’67.

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Judge Steve Leben, L’82, and alumnae Liz Rogers and Saraliene Smith, both L’2007, made things a bit easier for firstyear students as they arrived on a chilly December morning


for their law school finals. The trio donated their time to supply the students with hot coffee and donuts, orange juice and other refreshments. The serving table quickly became a place for nervous chatter by the anxious students and words of encouragement from the alums. KU Law hosted its first alumni reunion weekend on Oct. 4-5, honoring the classes of 1967, 1977 and 1982. The weekend featured several events, including a continuing legal education program, a KU football watch party and an all-class reunion dinner at Liberty Hall. The Student Bar Association coordinated its charity walk to take place during the weekend. The next reunion will be in October, for the classes of 1968, 1978, 1983 and 1988. Events will include a walk from old to new Green Hall led by former Dean and current Professor Martin Dickinson, a tentative KU vs. Iowa State football watch party, a one-hour ethics CLE and an all-class reunion dinner hosted by Dean Agrawal at the Kansas Union. Please stay tuned for additional details, and let us know if you would like to help with the planning.

We love to hear from our alumni about what they are doing – and what they would like us to do to promote their sense of connection to the school. Please contact Kevin Kelly, outreach activities director, to share your thoughts. He can be reached

Top: Congressman Jerry Moran, L’82, Professor Webb Hecker, Kansas Appeals Court Judge Steve Leben, L’82, and Dave Seely, L’82, pause for a photo during the all-class reunion dinner at Liberty Hall. The event was part of the school's first alumni reunion weekend, Oct. 4-5. Bottom left: At Habitat ReStore, two KU Law students help Cal Karlin, L’77, assess how best to move a large storm window on Make a Difference Day. Bottom left: At Big Brothers and Big Sisters, law school volunteers prepare an invitation to a holiday event and mail out the agency's newsletter. Pictured are Justice Fred Six, L’56, left, and 2005 graduate Tanya Rodecker Wendt.

at kevkelly@ku.edu or (785) 864-9281.

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The Way We Were

Tug-of-war photo dredges up memories of rivalry, ‘skullduggery’ It has been a long but friendly student rivalry at the University of Kansas: law versus engineering. Although we cannot be certain, we think this photograph shows a particularly exuberant manifestation of that rivalry.

University Archives

We found the shot in the law school photo files at University Archives with no identifying information, other than an indication that it was taken in the 1950s. We were curious, so we sent out a call to a few alumni from the era. The colorful and amusing responses are reprinted here with permission from the graduates. Justice Fred Six, L’56: “I cannot identify any of the students; however, the law school and the engineering school did have a spring tug-of-war with a rope over the lake. I recall participating in one such event. I believe we lost, accusing the engineers of using spiked or lugged boots to ‘dig in’ their feet. Perhaps the picture is of the losing lawyers coming out of the lake.” Six also found an undated scrapbook photo, published by the Lawrence Journal-World, of the tug in which he took part. In that scene, Six is wearing a straw hat and cheering on the law team. Former Dean Frederick J. Moreau stands by, “offering all the moral support he can muster,” according to the newspaper caption. The newspaper also reported that, shortly after the picture was taken, the rope broke for the third time and the tug-of-war was called off: “There

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were charges from both camps of skullduggery with the rope, but nothing had been proven late today.” Stan Ditus, L’57: “I don’t recognize anybody in the photo, but you know that could be guys bringing the rope across Potter Lake for the 1955, 1956 or 1957 grand tugof-war between the law students and the engineering students, where each were trying to pull the other into the lake. As I recall, KU Law won! I may be in error as to the reason for the guys in the water as it would seem that the raft people could have brought the rope from shore to shore without anyone getting wet.” Ditus went on to reveal his winning strategy: “I was at the end of our side of the rope, high up on the bank, and had wrapped the end of the rope around a large tree trunk so that each time we gained footage, I could take up the slack and the engineers could never regain it. Those were the days!! What a great school and what great guys (and girls – I think there were two).” Does this photo stir memories for you, too? If so, please share your stories with Mindie Paget at mpaget@ku.edu. We may reprint them in a future issue of the magazine.


1960s

Richard L. Bond, L’60, Overland Park, is the recipient of a University of Kansas 2007 Fred Ellsworth Medallion. The Medallion was presented to Bond in September at a dinner held at the Adams Alumni Center. Bond is a former chairman of the Kansas Board of Regents and was a Kansas state senator. He served on the boards of KU’s Edwards Campus, cancer center and medical center. He is a past-president and current member of the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors.

Items were received or collected prior to Feb. 16, 2008. Information received after that date will appear in the next issue of the magazine. Alumni news items may be sent by the return postcard attached to the back of this issue, by e-mail to patti@ku.edu or by visiting the law school’s Web site at www.law. ku.edu – click on Alumni and look for Keeping in Touch.

Peter K. Curran, L’66, has been selected for repeat inclusion in the 2008 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. Inclusion is based on a peer-review survey in which leading attorneys throughout the country confidentially evaluate the legal abilities of other lawyers. Curran is with the Lawrence law firm of Stevens & Brand LLP. Robert W. “Bob” Green, L’67, announces the promotion of law partner Blaine B. Finch to ownership and presidency of the law firm now known as Green & Finch Chartered in Ottawa, effective Jan. 1, 2008. Green will remain Of Counsel to the firm and will be available to meet with clients by appointment. He is attorney for five rural water districts and for Ransom Memorial Hospital in Ottawa.

1970s

The Hon. John W. Lungstrum, L’70, Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Kansas, is the recipient of the Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association’s 2007 Joseph E. Stevens Aspire to Excellence Award, recognizing an individual who has improved the quality of the administration of justice in the Kansas City area. The award was presented at the KCMBA’s annual meeting Dec. 6 in Kansas City, Mo. First presented at the 1999 KCMBA annual meeting, this award was created as a memorial to the late judge of the U.S. District Court, Western District of Missouri, to honor his dedication to the bench and the bar in the metropolitan area. James W. Clark, L’75, accepted a position as staff attorney with the Health Care Stabilization Fund in Topeka. Deana S. Peck and Richard K. Walker, both L’75, who practice in the Phoenix office of the national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP, have been selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2008. Best Lawyers bases its listing on an exhaustive study of the legal professional in which attorneys nationwide are asked to rank the top practitioners in their specialties in their jurisdictions. This year, more than 16,000 attorneys throughout the country cast more than 500,000 votes. Because listings are based on the votes of other lawyers and cannot be solicited, inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a particular honor. Jack E. Salyer, L’75, is practicing before the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board, from which he retired in 2006. Daniel L. Watkins, L’75, a Lawrence attorney, has been named senior adviser for the Kansas presidential campaign of U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill. Watkins worked with field organizers to secure a win for Obama in the Kansas Democratic Party caucus on Feb. 5. John W. Fisher, L’78, district attorney for Polk County, Texas, has announced his retirement effective the end of 2008. Polk has served as district attorney since 1999. He has worked at the district attorney’s office since 1987 and also had a private practice in Monmouth. Fisher also served four years in the Navy Judge Advocate General Corps. Marie Woodbury, L’79, was featured in the January 2008 edition of The American Lawyer for being a part of the Litigation Department of the Year in the product liability

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Alumnus humbled by selection to Supreme Court clerkship

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category. Woodbury is a partner at Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP in Kansas City, Mo.  

1980s

James D. Eggleston Jr., L’80, is managing partner of Eggleston Flowers LLP, a 10-lawyer firm in Fort Worth and Weatherford, Texas. Eggleston heads the transaction section and is a board certified real estate attorney. He and his wife have three children – a son in the U.S. Army, a son in law school, a daughter at Texas A&M – and one granddaughter. Eggleston also owns Star E Land and Cattle, a real estate and ranching operation.

Every time the phone rang, Travis Lenkner jumped in his chair. It had been about a week since his interview with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, and Lenkner was awaiting news about whether he would be offered a clerkship with the court. One particular phone call has since cemented itself into his memory. “The Justice came on the line and asked me to join him in his chambers next year,” recalled Lenkner, L’2005. “I was so excited, and at the same time I was struck by his phrasing – here was Justice Kennedy ‘asking’ me if I would accept a position. I just said ‘of course’ and thanked him profusely.” In December, Lenkner became the fifth graduate of the University of Kansas School of Law to be accepted for a U.S. Supreme Court clerkship. The Coats native will clerk for Justice Kennedy during the 2008-09 term. He is the son of Edwin and Deana Lenkner. Clerkships for the Supreme Court are highly sought after and extremely competitive. “We are thrilled for Travis,” said Gail B. Agrawal, dean of the law school. “A Supreme Court clerkship is an unparalleled experience for a young lawyer. All of us in the KU Law community feel honored by Justice Kennedy’s selection of Travis. We know he will do an outstanding job, just as he has done in everything else he has undertaken.”

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Bruce Mallonee, L’80, Bangor, Maine, was named the 2007 Lew Vafiades Pro Bono Award Recipient by the Maine Volunteer Lawyers Project. The Vafiades award was created to honor attorneys in northern and eastern Maine who provide pro bono legal services in civil lawsuits. Lawyers are not required by the rules that govern their profession to volunteer their services, but pro bono work is a deeply rooted professional tradition. Linda Kenepaske, L’81, is a private practitioner in immigration law. She is currently chairperson of the Liaison Committee of the American Immigration Law Association (liaison to the U.S. Justice Department’s Immigration Courts Administration). Kenepaske is also chairperson of the New York City Bar Association’s Committee on Immigration Law. William H. Colby, L’82, announced that his latest book, “Unplugged: Reclaiming our Right to Die in America,” was released in paperback on Nov. 28, 2007. It has been chosen by Library Journal as one of the Best Consumer Health Books of 2006. It won first place in the trade category of the American Medical Writers Association’s Medical Book Awards Competition for 2007. “Unplugged” is a book of stories — some tragic, some remarkable – and all have helped shape our modern medical world. Colby also joined the Center for Practical Bioethics as the senior fellow, law and patient rights. In that role, he will direct the center’s activities around the intersection of law, medicine and ethics with a special emphasis on patient rights. Colby is the lawyer who represented the family of Nancy Cruzan in their right-to-die case, the first such case heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. Sherri L. Loveland, L’82, has been selected for repeat inclusion in the 2008 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. Inclusion is based on a peer-review survey in which leading attorneys

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throughout the country confidentially evaluate the legal abilities of other lawyers. Loveland is with the Lawrence law firm of Stevens & Brand. Kenneth L. Wagner, L’83, has been named vice president and assistant general counsel for Peabody Energy. Wagner will have legal responsibility for corporate governance and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) compliance for the company. Peabody Energy is the world’s larges private-sector coal company. Its coal products fuel approximately 10 percent of all U.S. electricity generation and more than 2 percent of worldwide electricity.   Sarah Toevs Sullivan, L’84, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Bryan Cave LLP as a member of the firm’s environmental client service group. Peter B. Sloan, L’85, a partner at Blackwell Sanders LLP in Kansas City, Mo., is the recipient of a Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association’s 2007 President’s Award. The award, chosen by the current KCMBA president, recognizes individuals or entities who have contributed to the success of the association during the bar year. Sloan is recognized by this award as the driving force behind the 2007 Heartland Diversity Job Fair. The award was presented at the KCMBA’s annual meeting on Dec. 6 in Kansas City, Mo. Dean A. Kuckelman, L’86, reports that he is putting his undergraduate degrees of Chinese and philosophy to good use as general counsel for the International Table Tennis Association in Beijing. Rick Padilla, L’87, was appointed by Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter to a three-year term on the Colorado State Banking Board. Brian C. Wright, L’87, was inducted into the American College of Trial Lawyers in October 2007 at the ACTL annual meeting in Denver. Wright is a solo practitioner in Great Bend. David Corliss, L’88, Lawrence city manager, has been named by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius to the Kansas Water Authority. The panel reviews plans for the development, management and use of Kansas water resources. Corliss’ term expires in January 2009. Darren Hensley, L’88, co-founded Hensley Kim & Holzer LLC in 2002 in Denver. The firm was


selected to the Inc. 5000 list of the fastest growing private companies in America in 2007 at No. 662 (No. 13 in Denver metro area and No. 62 in business services). Elizabeth Schartz, L’88, co-authored a chapter on employment law in SMU Law Review’s 2007 Annual Survey of Texas Law. Schartz is practicing with Thompson & Knight LLP in Dallas. She and her co-authors are Thompson & Knight labor and employment law partners. Schartz is the firm’s labor and employment practice group leader. She represents management in client counseling and litigation of labor and employment law matters.

1990s

Molly Wood, L’91, has been selected for repeat inclusion in the 2008 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. Inclusion is based on a peer-review survey in which leading attorneys throughout the country confidentially evaluate the legal abilities of other lawyers. Wood is with the Lawrence law firm of Stevens & Brand LLP. Evan Ice, L’93, has been selected for repeat inclusion in the 2008 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. Inclusion is based on a peer-review survey in which leading attorneys throughout the country confidentially evaluate the legal abilities of other lawyers. Ice is with the Lawrence law firm of Stevens & Brand LLP. Dr. Daniel J. Martin, L’93, was announced as Mount Vernon Nazarene University’s sixth president in November 2006, and officially took office at the Mount Vernon, Ohio, school on Feb. 1, 2007. Martin has served in a number of roles in Nazarene higher education. He was most recently vice president of university advancement at Point Loma Nazarene University. He served at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe in various roles, such as the vice president for finance, vice president for enrollment development and executive assistant to the president.

on Jan. 31, 2008. He had been a Douglas County District Court judge since 2005. Kimberly Jones, L’94, was named one of Missouri’s “rising stars” and was recognized in a recent issue of Missouri Lawyers Weekly. Honorees show exemplary dedication to the practice of law and a commitment to making their communities better places to live. The 10th annual “Up and Coming Lawyers” issue honored 35 Missouri attorneys. Kimberly is a partner at Blackwell Sanders LLP in Kansas City, Mo. Mayor Joe Reardon, L’94, has been elected president of the League of Kansas Municipalities for 2007-2008. Reardon’s election is a landmark event in the history of the league. It marks the first time that a father and son have served in the post. Mayor Jack Reardon, Joe’s father, was league president in 1978 and 1979 while he served as mayor of Kansas City, Kan., the position Joe now holds in the unified government. James Brent Getty, L’96, has relocated to Montana and is working in the Kalispell Public Defender Office. Getty previously served as the deputy national finance director for the 2006 campaign of U.S. Sen. Jon Tester (D.-Mont.). Robin J. Kempf, L’96, has been hired by the Kansas Health Policy Authority Board as inspector general to audit, investigate and conduct performance reviews for Medicaid, MediKan and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. She has been associate general counsel for the Kansas Board of Regents since 2005. Charles D. Marvine, L’96, is the chief trial attorney for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission’s Division of Enforcement office in Kansas City, Mo. Marvine has been with the commission since 2004.

Robert L. Phelps, L’93, has been appointed Clerk of the Court for the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Iowa.

Monica Fanning, L’97, has been named a shareholder for Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC, where she focuses her practice on employment discrimination and business litigation. She has practiced in the firm’s Kansas City, Mo., office since 2001.

The Hon. Stephen N. Six, L’93, has been appointed Kansas attorney general by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius. Six was sworn in

Megan Brackney, L’98, was awarded a 2008 Nolan Fellowship from the American Bar Association Section of Taxation

Lenkner said he had been interested in clerking at the Supreme Court since law school, when he learned more about then-Dean Stephen McAllister’s experiences clerking for Justices White and Thomas. “My interest grew considerably during the two years I practiced in the D.C. office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher,” Lenkner said. “Several people at the firm had clerked at the Court, and aside from it being an incredible honor, it sounded like a wonderful experience for a young lawyer.” Lenkner is currently clerking with Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Kavanaugh also clerked for Justice Kennedy, and he fueled Lenkner’s interest in the position even more. An outstanding law student, Lenkner was editor-in-chief of the Kansas Law Review and president of the secondyear class. He was a Raymond F. Rice Foundation Scholar, receiving a prestigious three-year full-tuition merit scholarship. Lenkner was the recipient of the Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership and Service Award, the law school’s highest award given at commencement. He also was awarded the Dean William L. Burdick Prize and the West Group Outstanding Scholastic Achievement Award. He is a member of Order of the Coif, a scholastic honor society in legal education. He said being selected for the Supreme Court clerkship has been humbling, and that he appreciates the guidance and support of mentors and friends at KU Law. “I’m sure the clerkship will be challenging but rewarding,” he said. “I’m very excited to work with and learn from Justice Kennedy and to interact with the other Justices throughout the year. My three co-clerks are great, so I’m also looking forward to spending the year with them. Most of all, I think the clerkship will be a wonderful opportunity to spend a year immersed in the Court’s cases – working hard and learning as much as possible.” — BY MINDIE PAGET

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Stephen Six appointed Kansas attorney general

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section’s midyear meeting in Lake Las Vegas, Nev., in January. Nolan Fellows are young tax lawyers who are actively involved in the section and have demonstrated leadership qualities. Robert D. Maher, L’98, has been named a partner at Husch & Eppenberger LLC. Maher is a member of the Insolvency Practice Group in the firm’s Kansas City, Mo., office and concentrates his practice on creditors’ rights and workouts.

A 1993 graduate of the University of Kansas School of Law became the 43rd attorney general of Kansas in January. Former Douglas County District Judge Stephen Six was appointed by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius to replace Paul Morrison, who left office amid a sex and ethics scandal. In accepting the post, Six said he was mindful of the responsibility and trust that the governor had placed in him, and he promised to “serve with integrity as an independent representative of the people of Kansas.” Six, 42, will finish the three years left in Morrison’s term. Gail B. Agrawal, dean of the law school, said everyone at KU Law was excited by news of Six’s appointment. “His legal alma mater is very proud of him, and we know that he will excel in this new role, as he did as a practicing lawyer and a judge,” Agrawal said. “He is a true role model for our current students.” The Six family has indelible ties to the KU School of Law. Stephen Six is the son of retired Kansas Supreme Court Justice Fred Six, a 1956 graduate of the school and former Board of

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Hale E. Sheppard, L’98, is a shareholder in the Atlanta office of Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Williams & Martin, where his practice focuses on tax audits, administrative appeals and tax litigation. He was elected treasurer and executive committee member of the Georgia Bar Tax Section. He was appointed to the IRSPractitioner Liaison Committee, and is a member of the advisory board of the Journal of Tax Practice & Procedure. Sheppard also published “Where There’s a Will, There’s a Delay: Do Recent Legislative Changes to the CDP Rules Solve the Perceived Problems? in TAXES – The Tax Magazine, Vol. 85, No. 11 (2007). Sheppard also was named an adjunct professor of tax at Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School, where he will be teaching an intense course on the complexities of federal income tax law. Karrie J. Clinkinbeard, L’99, has been named a partner in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Armstrong Teasdale LLP. She is a member of the firm’s Explosion Fire and Electrocution Practice Group and is a certified fire and explosion investigator through the National Association of Fire Investigators. Clinkinbeard is a certified Instructor for the National Fire Academy and has presented at the National Association of Fire Investigators National Seminar on Fire Analysis Litigation and the International Symposium on Fire Investigation Science and Technology. Daniel C. Estes, L’99, has been appointed a partner in the Overland Park office of Fisher, Patterson, Sayler & Smith LLP. His practice emphasizes construction litigation — representing contractors in construction defect cases and other construction related litigation and claims. He also practices in general insurance defense and advises clients in insurance coverage disputes.

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LAW

Brian D. Goodman, L’99, has been appointed director of legal services for Southern California for Resources Global Professionals, a leading multinational provider of professional services and the operating subsidiary of Resources Connection Inc. Goodman joined the company in 2004. Resources’ legal practice is one of the company’s newest business lines. Goodman resides in Costa Mesa, Calif., with his wife and child. Matthew M. Merrill, L’99, was named a shareholder at Brown & Dunn PC. In August 2007, Matt had the honor of being selected as “Up and Coming Lawyer 2007” by Missouri Lawyers Weekly. He lives in Lawrence with his wife and two daughters. Kyle Roehler, L’99, is practicing with Foland Wickens in Kansas City, Mo.

2000s

Justin W. Arnold, L’2000, Newark, N.J., left the Securities and Exchange Commission to become an assistant U.S. attorney in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in New Jersey. He is working in the securities and health care fraud unit. Justin and his wife are also pleased to announce the birth of their second child, daughter Lucy Annabel, who joins big brother Tyler (2). Stephen L. Brave, L’2000, has joined Pistotnik Law Offices PA in Wichita. Amy M. Fowler, L’2000, has been named a partner in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Blackwell Sanders LLP. Eric Hatchett and Jen DeCook Hatchett (both L’2000) welcomed their first child, Quentin DeCook Hatchett, in July 2007. Shannon M. Roesler, L’2000, has accepted a position on the law faculty of Oklahoma City University, beginning in the fall of 2008. Roesler is currently clerking for The Hon. Deanell R. Tacha, United States Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. Amy Speck Vinton, L’2000, and her husband, Billy Vinton, are pleased to announce the birth of their first son, William Thomas Vinton, in August 2007.  Amy is practicing with Schoeb & Vinton LLP in Overland Park.


Brad Burke, L’2001, and his wife, Robin, are pleased to announce the birth of their first child, John Bradley Burke, in October 2007. Jaime Dachelet, L’2001, has been named chief legal officer for Eco-Energy Inc., a renewable fuel marketing company in Franklin, Tenn. Christie Hudson, L’2002, has joined the Washington, D.C., law firm of Crowell & Moring, where she is an associate in the insurance coverage and reinsurance group. Jill K.B. Kenney and Corey F. Kenney, both L’2002, announce the birth of their daughter, Amelia Kay Kenney, in December 2007. She joins older brother Asher Francis Kenney. Jill is an assistant district attorney for Johnson County, Kan. Corey is a city prosecutor for Lenexa. Jason H. Klein, L’2002, has accepted an associate position at Shutts & Bowen LLP in Orlando, Fla. Robert J. Wonnell, L’2002, has been named a shareholder at McAnany, Van Cleave & Phillips. Wonnell represents employers and insurance carriers’ workers’ compensation claims in Kansas and Missouri. A member of the firm’s workers’ compensation defense practice group in Kansas City, Wonnell often speaks at seminars concerning Kansas and Missouri workers’ compensation laws. Dan Cranshaw, L’2003, has been selected as a top performer by Stakeholders 100, honoring the top 100 law associates of color in the United States. Cranshaw is with Lathrop & Gage LC in Kansas City, Mo. Daniel J. Dye, L’2003, has been selected for a tenure-track assistant professorship with the Phoenix School of Law’s lawyering process program, commencing August 2008. Jeremy Fotheringham, L’2003, has taken a position at the University of Utah Hospital as administrator of critical care services and will begin working on his Ph.D. He is also teaching health care administration courses at the University of Phoenix. He and his wife welcomed their third child, Audrey Emilia, in May.

Carey Goetz, L’2003, has joined Vogel Law Firm’s Bismark, N.D., office, where she is practicing primarily in the areas of domestic law, criminal defense and class action litigation.

Governors president, and Lilian Six, who served as admissions director and placement director for KU Law. Stephen Six’s wife, Betsy Brand Six, is a Lawyering instructor at the law school.

Jason C. Parks, L’2003, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Lathrop & Gage LC as an associate in the intellectual property practice area.

His family expressed pride in his appointment.

Robert J. Bruchman, L’2004, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC, practicing in the area of general business and focusing on corporate law, corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions, and national franchise offerings Jack D. McInnes V, L’2004, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC, where he practices as an associate in business litigation. Jason C. Parks, L’2004, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Lathrop & Gage LC as an associate in the intellectual property practice area. Chris Steadham, L’2004, and wife Shanna were married in September 2007 in Wichita. Chris is faculty services & research librarian for the KU School of Law Wheat Law Library. Anne C. Emert, L’2005, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP as a business litigation associate. Jehan Kamil, L’2005, has joined the Overland Park office of Lathrop & Gage LC as an associate in the business disputes law group. Travis Lenkner, L’2005, has accepted a clerkship at the U.S. Supreme Court with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy for the 2008-2009 term. Michael D. Smith, L’2005, and his wife, Kim Smith, are pleased to announce the birth of their first child, Emma Marie Smith, in October 2007. Mike is practicing with Sanders Conkright & Warren LLP in Overland Park.

“We are confident that he will succeed in the important task before him,” Fred Six said. As a student, Stephen Six was a member of The Kansas Law Review. He then clerked for U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Deanell Tacha. He worked as an attorney at Shamberg, Johnson & Bergman in Kansas City, Mo., until 2005, when Sebelius appointed him to the bench. He is a former member of the law school’s Board of Governors. Six and his wife live in Lawrence with their four young children. Kansas residents are fortunate, Sebelius said, to have such a fair and objective leader for the state’s legal system. “I’m confident that, in Judge Six, the people of Kansas have an attorney general dedicated to ensuring that the people’s law firm is led both effectively and responsibly with character and integrity,” she said.

Seeking western Kansas alumni A future issue of KU Law Magazine will include an article about alumni who are practicing at law firms in western Kansas. If this describes you or someone you know, please send contact information to Mindie Paget at mpaget@ku.edu.

Jillian Hekmati, L’2006, accepted a position in the financial services department of

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Ernst & Young. She is a tax adviser in the company’s London office. Rachel E. Rolf, L’2007, joined the Roeland Park office of McAnany, Van Cleave & Phillips as an associate in the litigation practice group. Teresa Schreffler, L’2006, has accepted a clerkship with Judge Mary Beck Briscoe of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals for the 2008-2009 clerkship term. Schreffler is currently clerking for Judge Monti Belot of the United States District Court for the District of Kansas. Derek T. Teeter, L’2007, has joined the litigation department of Blackwell Sanders LLP as an associate. Chris Abrams, L’2007, is an associate in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC. Abrams is practicing in the area of general business. Angie Armenta, L’2007, has joined the Kansas City office of Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP, where she is a member of the corporate practice group. Armenta’s practice focuses on mergers and acquisitions, securities regulation, private equity and corporate governance.

NEWS

Catherine Bell, L’2007, is an associate in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC. Bell is practicing in the area of business and construction litigation. Sarah Voss Hanson, L’2007, is a member of Armstrong Teasdale LLP in Kansas City, Mo. Hanson is in the firm’s business litigation department, where she concentrates her practice in tort litigation. Allen R. Jones II, L’2007, has joined the international law firm of Bryan Cave LLP as an associate in the Kansas City, Mo., office. Jones is a member of the commercial litigation client service group. David R. Lloyd, L’2007, has joined the corporate department of Blackwell Sanders LLP as an associate.

Julie Bunn Pine, L’2007, is an associate at McDowell, Rice, Smith & Buchanan in Overland Park. Elizabeth Rogers, L’2007, was recognized as the Dodge City Community College Distinguished Alumnus for 2008 at the spring commencement ceremony, where she delivered the commencement address. Rogers graduated from DCCC with an Associate of Arts degree in 2001 and an Associates of Science degree in 2002. She went on to complete her bachelor’s degree in political science at Washburn University in 2004 and her law degree from KU in 2007. She is currently a research attorney for Justice Lawton Nuss at the Kansas Supreme Court. Guillermo G. Zorogastua, L’2007, is an associate in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC. Zorogastua is practicing in the area of business litigation.

Tyler Milligan, L’2007, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP as a staff attorney in the corporate finance division. His practice focuses on general corporate law and securities law compliance. Leena D. Phadke, L’2007, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP as a business litigation associate.

IN MEMORIAM George V. Allen, L’38, Lawrence, Kan., Sept. 5, 2007

Clifford L. Malone, L’52, Wichita, Kan., Nov. 15, 2007

Charles B. Anderson, L’36, Missoula, Mont., March 21, 2007

Joseph L. Norton II, L’67, Overland Park, Kan., Jan. 19, 2008

R. Blaine Barker, L’67, Santa Rosa, Calif., July 1, 2007

Hortense “Tensie” Oldfather, Lawrence, Kan., Oct. 2, 2007

Everett Bell, L’48, Houston, Texas, Aug. 30, 2007

Larry R. O’Neal, L’72, Leawood, Kan., Sept. 26, 2007

William J. Conroy Sr., L’52, Houston, Texas, Oct. 29, 2007

Ed L. Randels, L’82, Wichita, Kan., Sept. 12, 2007

Donn J. Everett, L’56, Manhattan, Kan., Nov. 29, 2007

Howard A. Rankin, L’48, Portland, Ore., Sept. 28, 2007

Guy Lee Goodwin, L’53, Washington, D.C., Dec. 10, 2007

Lawrence M. Sigmund, L’41, Newton, Kan., Oct. 25, 2007

Michael John Grady, L’70, South Weymouth, Mass./Garfield, Ark., Nov 2, 2007

Harvey J. Snapp, L’49, Newton, Kan., Oct. 28, 2007

James M. Haughey, L’39, Billings, Mont., Sept. 13, 2007

Walter F. Stueckemann, L’50, Hutchinson, Kan., Feb. 3, 2008

Charles D. Kennedy, L’52, Houston, Texas, Oct. 11, 2007

John W. Sumi, L’78, Wichita, Kan., Sept. 13, 2007

James E. Lyons, L’67, Albuquerque, N.M., Sept. 1, 2007

Shannon Irene Tauscher, L’2001, Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 1, 2007

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Top left: Graduate Owen Grieb basks in the spotlight at the December hooding ceremony. Top right: KU Law Professor Webb Hecker hoods Brendan McPherson during the December ceremony. Center: From left, Jessie Thompson, Nancy Dodik and Sara Siesco. Bottom left: Joyce McCray Pearson, left, associate professor of law and director of the Wheat Law Library, and Jelani Jefferson, associate professor of law, smile at the December hooding ceremony. Bottom right: Jeremy Mai, left, and David Jackson.

David McKinney/Office of University Relations

David McKinney/Office of University Relations

David McKinney/Office of University Relations

David McKinney/Office of University Relations

December Hooding 2007


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