Page 1

MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS | FALL 2016

Champions for children

GRADUATION 2016 FAR ABOVE RECAP DONOR REPORT


KU Law Magazine is published twice a year for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law.

FROM THE DEAN

Green Hall, 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7608 785.864.4550 | F: 785.864.5054 law.ku.edu DEAN Stephen Mazza EDITOR & DESIGNER Mindie Paget kulaws@ku.edu | 785.864.9205 CONTRIBUTORS Nicole Krambeer, Mike Krings, KU Endowment, Emily Sharp PHOTOS David Eulitt, Abby Greenawalt, The Larken Photo & Video Co., Mindie Paget, Bill Petros, Earl Richardson, L’08 PRINTING Allen Press, Lawrence, KS COVER PHOTO David Eulitt / The Kansas City Star

KU Law supports environmental sustainability by purchasing renewable energy certificates (green tags) through the Bonneville Environmental Foundation that offset carbon emissions from producing the KU Law Magazine.

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, 785-864-6414, 711 TTY.

THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. With your support, we raised more than $30 million during the Far Above capital campaign. That’s a full $10 million higher than our original fundraising goal. You really came through for KU Law. I’m not exaggerating when I tell you that future Jayhawk Lawyers will be better advocates and leaders as a result of your generosity. That’s because more than half of your campaign contributions created new scholarships — 40, to be exact — or strengthened existing ones. The benefit of those funds cannot be overstated. Scholarships are making it possible for 2L Brynn Blair to pursue a career in public service. “Instead of taking a high-paying job after graduation to pay off my student debt,” she said, “I will be able to take a job I am truly passionate about.” For 3L Kriston Guillot, scholarships mean he can attend law school while still providing for his 2-year-old son. “Scholarships allow me to focus on class rather than on how I will make ends meet,” he said. “I spend my evenings studying and planning my future success rather than working to live paycheck to paycheck. KU Law scholarships provide more than dollars; they provide a sense of dignity.” That’s also true for the alumni profiled in this issue of the magazine — that they provide a sense of dignity for their clients. In this case, those clients are children or people in positions to advance the best interests of children. There’s Gene Balloun, who has completed more than 1,200 pro bono adoptions of children in foster care and created a scholarship fund to help send those kids to college. Christi Bright makes sure children’s needs are prioritized when families falter. Chris Dove and Dan Zmijewski represent victims of student abuse and school bullying. Rebekah Gaston works to ensure all Kansas children have access to nutritious food. Anne Teigen educates state legislators as they reform the juvenile justice system. And these are just a fraction of the stories we could tell about Jayhawk Lawyers who use what they learned in Green Hall to make a difference in people’s lives every day. So take pride in your contributions to KU Law during the Far Above campaign or any other time. Your support transforms lives, immediately and for generations to come. Thank you. I can’t say it enough.

Stephen W. Mazza Dean and Professor of Law


CONTENTS KU LAW MAGAZINE | FALL 2016

DEPARTMENTS 2 IN BRIEF

6

32

FACES + MOMENTS: GRADUATION 2016

POLSINELLI FUNDS KU LAW CENTER

Newest flock of Jayhawk

KU alumni attorneys

Lawyers relish graduation’s

commit $250,000 to create

pomp and circumstance, join

the Polsinelli Transactional

ranks of KU Law alumni

Law Center at KU Law

Symposia, lectures, rankings, honors and a new partnership bringing free legal services to local hospital patients

18 FACULTY NEWS + RESEARCH

Research highlights, media appearances, kudos

22 ALUMNI NEWS Photos: Reunion + Homecoming weekend

and Supreme Court Swearing-In Ceremony, Distinguished Alumni honored

25 CLASS NOTES Alumni earn promotions, change jobs, win

SUPREME COURT SWEARING-IN

31

COVER

CHAMPIONS for CHILDREN

awards, and expand their families

32 GIVING NEWS Polsinelli Transactional Law Center, Medallion

honorees, Far Above campaign recap

37 DONOR REPORT Recognition of fiscal year 2016 donors 45 IN MEMORIAM Deaths in the KU Law family

Performing pro bono adoptions of foster children, standing up against school bullies, ensuring kids come first in family disputes: Meet a few of the many KU Law graduates who have devoted their legal careers to ensuring a brighter future for children.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 1


IN BRIEF

ADMISSIONS

CLASS OF 2019 BY THE NUMBERS Applied

Enrolled

642 107 Median LSAT

156

EARL RICHARDSON

Median GPA

3.44

MOOT COURT MASTERS KU program ranked 19th in nation KU LAW’S MOOT COURT PROGRAM ranks 19th in the nation, according to rankings published in May by the University of Houston Law Center. Headlined by a national championship team, KU Law students accumulated enough points through strong showings at national competitions to break into the top 20 for the first time in the school’s history. “What our students achieved is no small feat,” said Pamela Keller, clinical professor of law and director of KU’s moot court program. “The ranking system is based on cumulative points, so larger law schools have a distinct advantage. We have fewer teams competing than many other schools, meaning most of our teams have to be successful in order to be ranked. I am very proud of how all of our teams performed. It is again proof of what I see year after year — that we have tremendously bright, talented and hard-working students.”

2 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Garnering the most points toward KU’s ranking was its performance at the National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition in March. Ashley Akers (above right) and Maureen Orth (above left), both L’16, won the competition and received the best brief award. Orth was named the second-best oral advocate and received the first-ever G. William Rice Advocate Award for the highest cumulative points in the competition. Another KU Law team placed third and received the second-place brief award.

STARTING STRONG IN 2016-17 KU Law 3Ls Ciara Malone and Nikki Marcotte reached the national finals of the Weschler First Amendment Moot Court Competition in October at American University Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C.

40%

20% minorities

Kansas residents

51%

# of states | 22 # of colleges | 53 # of countries | 4 Age range | 21-47 Average age | 25


Business Insider places KU Law among top 25 public law schools in the country KU LAW IS ONE OF THE 25 BEST public law schools in the nation, according to Business Insider magazine. The rankings, which focus primarily on graduates’ success landing high-quality jobs, place KU at 48th among all law schools and 24th compared to its public peers. “Our students have had increasing success over the past five years finding meaningful legal employment,” Dean Stephen Mazza said. “Our career services office, faculty and alumni all work together to help graduates make connections that lead to their first jobs and to future success. A ranking system that focuses on employment outcomes and low tuition aligns with our goals, and it’s nice to receive recogni-

tion for what we value — an excellent legal education at an affordable price.” KU Law’s tuition is the third-lowest among public schools on the Business Insider list, and the school ranks 25th in the nation for lowest average student loan debt at graduation. Using ABA data, Business Insider considers the percentage of graduates with full-time, long-term jobs that require passing the bar, giving greater weight to positions at the nation’s largest law firms and clerkships with federal judges. The ranking also examines the percentage of graduates who are unemployed but seeking employment, bar-passage rate, tuition and median LSAT scores.

KU Law named a top-20 Best Value Law School for 3rd straight year KU LAW IS THE NO. 17 BEST VALUE Law School in the country, according to National Jurist magazine. The ranking highlights affordable law schools whose graduates perform well on the bar exam and have had success finding legal jobs. National Jurist ranked the top 20 schools and assigned a letter grade to the other 38 honorees. This is the third consecutive top-20 finish for KU Law. “Attending a Best Value Law School means having the freedom to pursue your career goals, no matter what direction they may lead,” said Stephen Mazza, dean of the law school. “We provide an outstanding legal education with ample opportunities for students to

explore different practice areas through hands-on clinics and field placements. KU Law ranks among the top 25 percent of all law schools for employment, and our graduates are able to choose careers that aren’t defined by excessive financial burdens.” National Jurist gives employment success the greatest weight in the Best Value rankings. The magazine also looks at a number of variables, including price of tuition, bar passage rate, cost of living and student debt accumulation. KU Law ranks 25th nationally for least student debt, and more than 75 percent of the incoming class receives scholarships.

LECTURE

Making a case for progressive taxation As the 2016 presidential candidates outlined their tax plans and revenue shortfalls prompted Kansans to consider the effects of recent tax cuts, tax policy became a central issue in this year’s national and state elections. A public administrator and KU Law alumnus examined these themes at the inaugural Dean Martin Dickinson Tax Policy Lecture. Myron Frans, L’83, management and budget commissioner for the state of Minnesota, returned to Lawrence to present “Progressive Taxation: Historical Context and Contemporary Examples.” Experts regard progressive taxation, a system in which tax rates increase with income, as the most equitable and economically effective tax structure. While some states have developed a more progressive tax structure in recent years, others, including Kansas, have established more regressive policies. Frans examined the historical case for progressive taxation and shared contemporary success stories of progressive tax policies in action. Frans previously served as Minnesota commissioner of revenue and has three decades of private practice experience in tax law. The Dickinson Tax Policy Lecture pays tribute to Dickinson’s 48-year legacy of teaching KU Law students and providing excellent analysis of tax policy and changes in tax laws in Kansas and beyond.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 3


IN BRIEF

Clockwise from top left, Myriam Gilles, Cardozo School of Law; Laura Hines, KU Law; Suzette Malveaux, Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law; Adam Zimmerman, Loyola Law School; Deborah Hensler, Stanford Law School; and Robert Bone, University of Texas School of Law.

THE MODERN CLASS ACTION 50 years later, legal scholars explore evolution of aggregate litigation FIFTY YEARS AGO, THE MODERN class action lawsuit was born. When the U.S. Supreme Court amended Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure in 1966, it radically transformed the way plaintiffs could sue on behalf of a group. Half a century later, legal scholars gathered in Lawrence to discuss the changing effects of the guidelines. The 2016 Kansas Law Review Symposium, “50th Anniversary Perspectives on the Modern Class Action,” took place Oct. 14 at KU Law, with support from KU’s Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy. Speakers discussed the ascertainability of class members, post-Comcast heightened scrutiny of class damage models, dual certification of money damages and injunctive class actions, application of the

4 KU LAW MAGAZINE

cy-pres doctrine to class actions and the expansion of class actions globally. “Class actions involve high-stakes litigation, potentially millions of plaintiffs, and important consumer and civil rights,” said Laura Hines, a KU Law professor who studies aggregate litigation. “The symposium brought together nationally prominent class action scholars, judges and attorneys from both sides of the bar to discuss recent Supreme Court cases, emerging trends and the global expansion of class actions.” Speakers included Myriam Gilles, Cardozo School of Law; Suzette Malveaux, Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law; Robert Bone, University of Texas School of Law; Laura Hines, University of Kansas School of Law; Deborah Hensler, Stanford Law

School; and Adam Zimmerman, Loyola Law School. A judges’ panel featured Judge Robert Dow of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Judge John Lungstrum, L’70, of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas, and Judge Laura Denvir Stith of the Missouri Supreme Court. A practitioners’ panel featured Eric Barton, L’93, of Wagstaff & Cartmell; Molly Carella, L’04, of Shook, Hardy & Bacon; Robert Coykendall, L’79, of Morris Laing; Rex Sharp of Rex A. Sharp PA; Holly Pauling Smith, L’99, of Shook, Hardy & Bacon; Victoria Smith of Stinson Leonard Street; and Brad Wilders of Stueve Siegel Hanson. Scholarship associated with the symposium will be published in a spring 2017 issue of the Kansas Law Review.


THE LARKEN PHOTO & VIDEO CO.

PARTNERSHIPS

KU provides free legal services to hospital patients A NEW PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN KU Law and Lawrence Memorial Hospital is offering free legal assistance to low-income patients while providing invaluable handson training to law students. The KU Medical-Legal Partnership at LMH is part of a national movement of hospitals integrating legal services into patient care. The model recognizes that health problems often have solutions rooted in the law, but many patients cannot afford to hire an attorney. “For example, often patients can improve their health by ensuring they have appropriate medical leave from work or by obtaining a legal guardian who can look out for their best interests,” said Lou Mulligan, associate dean for faculty and professor of law. “This partnership is a triple win. First, it provides a great benefit for our community. Second, it improves the level of holistic care that LMH can deliver to its patients. Third, it provides an outstanding opportunity for our law students.” Through the partnership, LMH provides office and meeting space for the Medical-Legal Partnership and funds the salary of managing attorney Juliann Morland DaVee, a KU Law graduate with years of experience in the MLP setting. “Working in the hospital will make it easier for us to meet with patients when they need us most,” DaVee said. “I believe this setting will also be beneficial to students as they learn to interact with patient-clients dealing with very difficult and pressing health and legal needs.” DaVee began taking clients in August. Between four and eight law students will join her in the spring. KU Law has a similar arrangement with the University of Kansas Health Systems in Kansas City, Kansas.

Law student, alumna honored as 2016-17 KU Women of Distinction TWO KU LAW WOMEN HAVE BEEN selected as 2016-17 KU Women of Distinction. Rhavean Anderson, L’18 (left), and Abby Hall, L’16, are among 23 KU students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni who have distinguished themselves through achievements at KU or in their community. Now a research attorney for Kansas Supreme Court Justice Eric Rosen, Abby Hall served as symposium editor for the Kansas Law Review, planning and executing a highly successful symposium about sexual assault on college campuses. She was a member of Women in Law, Outlaws & Allies and Law Students for Reproductive Justice. She excelled as a member of KU Law’s Moot Court Council, finishing on the first-place team in KU’s in-house competition. As a volunteer for the Rose Brooks Bridge Program, Hall provided advocacy and support for victims of domestic violence in Kansas City, Missouri. “My mother taught me early to use any privilege I have as a force for good,” Hall said. “That lesson prompted my decision to pursue a law degree and will forever guide me as I work to make the world a little better.”

Rhavean Anderson, a 2nd lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps, served as KU track-and-field team captain during her first year of law school. She serves on the Dean’s Diversity Leadership Council and as vice president of the Black Law Students Association. This summer she completed her Marine Corps Officer Candidates School training, setting a new obstacle course record for women. Anderson will begin her career in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps after graduation. “I’ve encountered people that told me that because I was African-American, because I was first-generation college, because I was a female I couldn’t do certain things,” Anderson said. “They wanted to put limitations on me. The word ‘can’t’ just kind of triggers something in me to make me want to show that person that I can do it for the simple fact that they told me I couldn’t.” The honorees are featured in the 2016-17 Women of Distinction calendar. The Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, which produced the poster-sized calendar, hosted a reception in August to honor the women and their achievements.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 5


GREEN HALL NEWS

CONGRATS, CLASS OF 2016! Newest Jayhawk Lawyers relish hooding ceremony, walk down the Hill VIEW MORE PHOTOS FROM THE FESTIVITIES AT LAW.KU.EDU/GRAD2016

6 KU LAW MAGAZINE


2015-16 STUDENT AWARDS & PRIZES ORDER OF THE COIF Ashley Akers Ben Baumgartner Sara Anne Fevurly Kendra Lea Frazier Luke M. Hangge Kylie Rose Kuhns Bryce Langford Maureen Orth Nicki Rose Matthew T. Schippers Catherine Ann Zollicker

ROBERT E. EDMONDS PRIZE IN CORPORATION & SECURITIES LAW David A. Hrabik Kinsey N. McKenrick Matthew T. Schippers

WALTER HIERSTEINER OUTSTANDING SERVICE AWARD Nicki Rose*

ROBERT C. FOULSTON & GEORGE SIEFKIN PRIZES FOR EXCELLENCE IN APPELLATE ADVOCACY Best Advocate: Erica McCabe Finalists: Kriston Guillot, Skyler Davenport, Nathan Kakazu Best Brief: Max McGraw and Nathan Mannebach Second-Place Brief: Erica McCabe and Kriston Guillot

JUSTICE LLOYD KAGEY LEADERSHIP AWARD Ashley Akers* SAMUEL MELLINGER SCHOLARSHIP, LEADERSHIP & SERVICE AWARD Bryce Langford* C.C. STEWART AWARD IN LAW Maureen Orth* ROBERT F. BENNETT STUDENT AWARD Abigail Hall* WILLIAM L. BURDICK PRIZE Samuel LaRoque MARY ANNE CHAMBERS SERVICE AWARD Megan Rose GEORGE GARY DUNCAN SCHOLASTIC IMPROVEMENT PRIZE Rachelle Veikune FAMILY FUND AWARD Ashley Akers Maureen Orth

FACULTY AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT Sara Anne Fevurly* Maureen Orth*

HERSHBERGER, PATTERSON, JONES & ROTH ENERGY LAW AWARD Alex Gilmore W. ROSS HUTTON LEGAL AID AWARD Kasey E. Considine Kendra Lea Frazier LAW CLASS OF 1949 AWARD FOR LEADERSHIP Grecia Perez* JANEAN MEIGS MEMORIAL AWARD IN LAW David Carrasco* Julia Leth-Perez* JAMES P. MIZE TRIAL ADVOCACY AWARD Rhavean Anderson

PAYNE & JONES AWARDS Fall 2015 Ashley Billam David Hammack Meghan Harper Sarah McMillin-Beckman Nell Neary Jennifer Schorgl Spring 2016 Megan Carroll Haley Claxton Adam Gillaspie Waynell Henson Bradley Hook Jack Logan Danielle Promaroli SHAPIRO AWARD FOR BEST PAPER ON LAW & PUBLIC POLICY Hannah Brass SUSMAN GODFREY TRIAL ADVOCACY AWARD Chris Teters UMB BANK EXCELLENCE IN ESTATE PLANNING AWARD Matthew T. Schippers

Far left: Kelley Reynolds (left) and Jason Vigil lock eyes with the camera while waiting with fellow graduates for the procession to begin during the May 14 Hooding Ceremony at the Lied Center. Center, from top: Malcolm Jackson, Christopher Teters and family, and S.J.D. graduate Najla Jeaash enjoy their moment in the spotlight during Commencement and the Hooding Ceremony. Above: Ashley Akers, Abby Hall, Bryce Langford and Luke Hangge celebrate Commencement with a group selfie; Tom Meier is hooded by Professor Suzanne Valdez. Photos by Mindie Paget and Earl Richardson

*Received special recognition at the Hooding Ceremony on May 14 at the Lied Center.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 7


8 KU LAW MAGAZINE


CHAMPIONS for CHILDREN KU Law alumni advocate for future generations commercial attorney with a robust pro bono practice. A family law practitioner using new approaches to ensure better outcomes for children. A policy advocate dedicated to ending hunger among Kansas kids. These are just a few examples of the many KU Law graduates who have devoted their legal careers to ensuring a brighter future for children. Whether in private practice or engaged with a nonprofit organization, KU Law alumni take their commitment to children seriously. It’s a passion that is often born in Green Hall, nurtured by faculty and administrators dedicated to educating leaders who make a positive impact on their communities. “It’s a school that believes in training people to go out and help people that need help,” said Chris Dove, L’03. “It comes through in terms of the education, the training, the high-profile clinics, the public interest focus.” In this issue we introduce you to a few of the many KU Law champions for children.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 9


CHAMPIONS for CHILDREN

Gene Balloun, L’54

1,200 adoptions and counting Children find ‘forever families’ through grad’s pro bono efforts ene Balloun has tried more than 100 jury trials and argued just as many appellate cases. He’s a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. In a career spanning more than 50 years, he has earned a reputation as an accomplished, respected commercial attorney. “But if somebody asked what I’m really proud of, I’d be proudest of my work with children,” he said. Balloun, L’54, has completed more than 1,200 adoptions of foster children. He handles the adoptions on a pro bono basis. But rather than decline payment, he and his law firm — Shook, Hardy & Bacon — invest the state fees in a scholarship fund to help send foster kids to college. As of September, the fund had provided more than $800,000 to upwards of 600 students. Balloun’s advocacy for children doesn’t stop there. He and his wife, former school teacher Sheila Wombles, provided a stable, loving home for 29 kids during a 15-year run as foster parents. They legally adopted the first and last of those children, and would have adopted more if circumstances had allowed. “Relatives would show up at the last minute, that sort of thing,” Balloun recalled. “We had a lot of heartbreak.” And a lot of joy. Not long after training to become foster parents in the mid-1980s, the couple received word that a 14-month-old boy needed a home. Balloun was trying a federal case in Wichita when his wife called and said the state wanted an answer by that afternoon. “Let’s do it,” Balloun replied. “I got home that evening, and my secretary had found a baby bed and bought diapers. All of a sudden we were in the kid business.” Right away Balloun and Wombles got a heavy dose of the broken child welfare system. It took nearly three years and a contentious trial to terminate parental rights before the couple could

10 KU LAW MAGAZINE

adopt that first little boy. David was his name. He turned 30 this year. During that uncertain time, Balloun and Wombles joined a support group for foster parents. Balloun became a trusted legal advisor for other parents in the group and soon began handling their adoptions. That led to broader advocacy for children. He challenged Missouri over inadequate subsidies for foster parents and defended the Kansas law providing for the educational rights of undocumented students. When the Olathe School Board banned “Annie on My Mind,” a book about two teenage girls who fall in love, Balloun helped represent students and parents in a successful federal lawsuit. In the 1995 ruling, the judge ordered the schools to put the book back on library shelves and pay the plaintiffs’ legal fees. “We used those fees to create the Johnson County First Amendment Foundation,” Balloun said. “We present programs to educate high school students about the Constitution and their rights.” For example, in 2013 the Foundation hosted Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, who spoke to an audience of 1,000 high school students. Balloun advances children’s interests on the boards of FosterAdopt Connect, Kansas Appleseed and EmberHope. One of the many plaques and trophies on his office shelves anoints him a “Champion for Children.” All this from a Russell native who wanted to be a chemical engineer when he came to the University of Kansas in 1947. Derailed by a required engineering drawing course, Balloun gravitated to the business school, and later to Green Hall. The high school and college debater found his calling in the law. After two years in the Air Force, Balloun practiced law in his hometown and later in Great Bend. He landed at Shook, Hardy & Bacon about 30 years ago. When he moved from the firm’s


Attorney Gene Balloun spoke with Lexie Hicks in February 2015 in a Johnson County courtroom after she adopted Will and McKenna, the 1,000th and 1,001st adoptions Balloun handled pro bono. Photo above and page 8 by David Eulitt / The Kansas City Star.

Overland Park location to its downtown high-rise on the Missouri side of Kansas City, he insisted on a west window so he could look out and see his home state. “I’ve always been a Kansas lawyer,” he said. Lined up along the bottom of those windows — 15 floors up at one of the city’s most prominent law firms — are photos of the children who have passed through Balloun’s home over three decades. In one image, he and his wife are holding a newborn baby girl. That’s Hannah, the couple’s 29th foster child. They were able to adopt her almost immediately. Balloun was 70 at the time and has two biological children, but he beams like a first-time dad when he talks about Hannah. She’s a senior in high school and wants to be a teacher, like her mom. “She’s great working with young kids,” he said. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. More than 1,200 children who found “forever homes” with Balloun’s help can attest to that. “It’s nice to know I have skills as a lawyer that I can use to help other people,” he said. “It makes you feel really good to do an adoption and know you had a part in creating a family.” — By Mindie Paget

It makes you feel really good to do an adoption and know you had a part in creating a family.

Gene Balloun (center) with his wife, Sheila Wombles, and their daughter, Hannah.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 11


CHAMPIONS for CHILDREN

Christi Bright, L’95

Caught in the middle Family lawyer prioritizes children in parental disputes rom the first time they meet her, Christi Bright wants all of her clients to know one thing: She does not play games with kids. “When people are going through divorces or fighting with ex-spouses, they often use anything they can to gain the advantage,” said Bright, L’95. “I see so often that, at the end of the day, it’s the children who are the losers in those battles.” As a family lawyer and sometimes guardian ad litem, Bright fiercely prioritizes children and their best interests, even when she’s representing one of their parents. To her, that means preserving children’s connections to their families whenever possible, and ensuring they benefit from the best traits each parent brings to the table. It also means that her juvenile clients don’t always appreciate the recommendations she makes on their behalf. “I’m not here to do what they want me to do; I’m here to do what’s best for them,” Bright said. “If they tell me they want to live with mom because they can do drugs at her house, I’m not going to advocate for that. I have teenagers of my own, and I recognize that children don’t necessarily understand the big picture 10 years from now. That’s why I’m here.”

12 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Bright has been “here” since 2010, when she opened the Bright Family Law Center in Overland Park with her husband, Michael. The pair handle adoptions; divorces and legal separations; custody, parenting time and support disputes; and guardian ad litem/guardianship cases. But Christi Bright’s child advocacy dates back to law school. She first represented juvenile clients as a student in KU Law’s Legal Aid Clinic. A post-graduate clerkship with a Missouri family law judge cemented her passion for child advocacy. After a brief detour into the corporate world, Bright began working in 2001 as a guardian ad litem, first in child-in-need-of-care cases and then in civil cases. Early on she found that her child clients were too often used by parents and their lawyers as “chess pieces” in divorce, custody, visitation and parenting disputes. So Bright expanded her practice to include representation of parents involved in disputes where children are caught in the middle. As a family lawyer, she can now more directly help parents — who are often navigating relationship difficulties that seem insurmountable — to stay focused on the best interests of their children. “It’s always a win when the parents are able to reach a resolution because the children will then know that their parents have worked together to prioritize their well-being in spite of their feelings for one another,” Bright said. “In family disputes, children want to know that it is OK to love both parents. When parents can agree and remain civil, children are able to thrive in both homes.” One of the challenges Bright encounters in her efforts to keep families whole — when that’s a safe, viable option — is some social workers who, in her estimation, do more harm than good because their background and inexperience limit their perspective. “They sometimes come in with preconceived biases about what a family should


look like and how it should act. I often have to remind them that this child is part of this family whether they think it’s a vibrant family or not, so we have to find answers that work for this family,” Bright said. “As a guardian ad litem or an attorney who also represents parents in these situations, I recognize the parents will often never meet the standards that these social workers expect them to meet, which is sad. There cannot be a cookie-cutter model for every parent or family.” When children are removed from their parents and placed in locations that separate them from extended family and their personal histories, they often age out of the foster system feeling disconnected and lost, Bright said. In addition to service on both the Johnson County and Kansas bar associations, Bright sits on an American Bar Association committee attempting to combat youth homelessness by collaborating with agencies nationwide to create employment, transitional housing and college assistance programs. Bright concedes the work of a family lawyer can be stressful and overwhelming. There are days she feels like she has run out of answers for her clients. But her firm’s motto is “Bringing light into dark situations” for a reason. “You have that one client who calls to say, ‘Thank you. My children and I have never been happier in our lives,’” Bright said. “That reminds me why I do what I do. I know this is my purpose.” — By Mindie Paget

In family disputes, children want to know that it is OK to love both parents. When parents can agree and remain civil, children are able to thrive in both homes.

Students forge path to family law When contemplating career goals, Alison Collins Dessert remembers a law school mentor encouraging her to consider who she wanted her clients to be. “In family law, there is a unique opportunity to serve individuals who are going through a personal crisis. These are the people that I hope to serve,” said Dessert, a second-year KU Law student pictured above with her children. “Going through a divorce can be a very dark time, so I look forward to providing support and empowerment to those looking to make the best out of a challenging situation. I want to equip each family with the knowledge and resources to navigate through proceedings and co-parenting plans with as much ease as possible.”   Students like Dessert with a passion for child and family advocacy find courses and practical opportunities at KU Law to prepare them for careers in the field. Dessert has taken or plans to take Family Law, Practice in Kansas, Estate Planning, Federal Income Tax, LGBTQ Seminar and a special topics course that covers paternity, parenthood and alternative reproductive technology. She will soon begin working in the family law office of Christi Bright, L’95, and plans to enroll in both Family Law Mediation and the Legal Aid Clinic. Seventy percent of cases in the Legal Aid Clinic originate from the Douglas County juvenile docket. Students represent children charged with misdemeanor offenses. When Professors Melanie DeRousse and Meredith Schnug assumed leadership of the clinic last year, they developed a seminar component in which students explore juvenile law issues. “We take a multidisciplinary approach to working with clients,” Schnug said. “Before the crime, there was a back story. Students are trained to take a trauma-informed approach.” DeRousse will begin teaching the school’s Family Law course this spring. She selected a book that is responsive to the Family Law Education Reform Project, a venture between judges, practitioners and academics to align law school teaching with the practice of family law. “While we will still faithfully cover the theoretical underpinnings of family law, including the massive changes in the wake of Obergefell v. Hodges, we can also use the problems in the book to focus on real-life lawyering skills needed by family law attorneys in day-to-day practice,” DeRousse said. — By Mindie Paget

KU LAW MAGAZINE 13


CHAMPIONS for CHILDREN

Chris Dove, L’03 + Dan Zmijewski, L’02

Standing up to bullies Partners help ensure safe learning environment for students or Chris Dove, L’03, and Dan Zmijewski, L’02, an unexpected phone call has grown into a new practice area and opportunity to make schools safer for children. “It was a little bit of chance,” Dove said. “It started with physical abuse of students at a private school, and since then the practice has grown wider and wider.” Zmijewski and Dove’s small firm, DRZ Law in Kansas City, Missouri, focuses on a variety of legal issues, from civil rights to commercial cases. Representing victims of student abuse and school bullying is one of the firm’s growing practice areas, and one that the partners have chosen to prioritize. The team handles cases ranging from cyberbullying, to physical abuse, to sexual assault. “It became an area of real interest and something we wanted to pursue, so we try to actively look for cases, to advocate for the kids,” Dove said. “To us it’s a really big deal.” For parents and guardians, addressing school bullying can be daunting. Often a children’s advocate can make a difference, navigating

14 KU LAW MAGAZINE

the legal circumstances that limit the school’s response. “In public schools for example, there are a fair number of legal barriers to bringing a state, federal or civil rights claim,” Dove said. “There has to be analysis of how to get around immunities.” In some cases legal action is not necessary at all, and connecting clients to appropriate resources is the best solution. “Depending on what’s happened, the first step can be trying to get the parents and child in touch with counselors,” Dove said. “They may already be in a network of support, but sometimes not. It’s a traumatic event, and if they’ve never been down Zmijewski these paths before they don’t know what to do.” In other situations, advocating for children early in the process can bring swift resolution. “There have been some cases where we’ve had early involvement with the school prior to filing


a lawsuit, and the school will end up addressing the issue. We’ve had instances where schools have stepped in, sat students down with parents, put a plan in place, put teachers on notice, and it provides opportunities for students to return to a somewhat normal school environment. In other cases, the end result was getting a little bit of money for the student or parents so they could afford counseling.” In the most serious cases, legal action may be necessary. Some schools are responsive, and the matter is resolved quickly. For schools that are less responsive, “Having a letter from an attorney makes them pay attention a little more,” Dove said. “The people we help, they have been subjected to this for a long time. It’s almost systemic. They’re terrified to go to school. Even so, sometimes you alert the school and they can put action plans in place and can help. In some cases schools become very defensive and don’t want to address it, and the only option is to file a lawsuit.” Dove said KU Law’s practical training and community-oriented mindset encouraged him to pursue public interest work. “It’s more of a pragmatic focus, a school that believes in training people to go out and help people that need help,” he said. “Not a school where they believe that you need to go work at an international law firm in order to be a success. That comes through in terms of the education, training, the high-profile clinics, the public interest focus. “Dan and I do these cases because these are the cases we feel good about doing,” Dove said. “These are not cases that we’re taking to make us rich — they often don’t make any money. But you feel in your heart for these parents.” — By Emily Sharp

Celeste Holder Kling, L’84

A collaborative approach Alumna favors Early Neutral Assessment model ome KU Law graduates are bringing innovative approaches to familiar practice areas. One of those attorneys is Celeste Holder Kling, L’84, a children’s advocate and mediator in Fort Collins, Colorado, who uses a model called Early Neutral Assessment. The strategy resolves family law disputes between parents with the guidance of a team of experts focused on achieving the best outcomes for children. “It’s an early off-ramp to get parties out of the court system, to encourage them to settle,” Kling said. Parties meet with the ENA team in the courthouse for a set period of time — half a day in Colorado. Both parents participate with their attorneys or pro se. The ENA team includes an attorney and a child psychologist — one male and one female, to avoid gender bias. “There’s a huge benefit to parents of having an expert in child development right there who can advise about what kids need at each stage, to provide the psychological and legal background to structure for the children’s success,” Kling said. A family law judge welcomes the group, then leaves them alone to deliberate. ENA begins with each parent sharing photos of their kids and telling the ENA team about them, to focus the discussion on the children. ENA deliberations address only children’s issues, including decisionmaking, parenting time, holiday schedules and safety concerns. Financial and other arrangements are decided separately. The petitioner presents his or her case and summarizes goals and concerns about the best interests of the children, then the responding party shares that parent’s perspective. Each party is allowed to take notes

during the other’s presentation but cannot interrupt. The ENA team evaluates the parents’ information and proposes a framework and successful strategies for their consideration. The goal is not to micromanage the process, but to give parents tools to move forward. Parties discuss options with their attorneys, then the team regroups with the parents to seek a workable solution. Once the plan is decided, the parties appear before the judge immediately to put their agreement on record as a permanent order. “In a period of four hours we have worked through the process with a lawyer and psychologist to help the parents build a framework and agreed parenting plan for the kids,” Kling said. “ENA cases almost always settle. Occasionally it takes a few weeks, but almost always they settle during the session at the courthouse.” Clients pay a flat fee, and state funds are available for indigent parties. The result? Fewer lengthy court battles, lower legal fees, more cooperation between parents, and less disruption for children. Practitioners have seen stunning success since implementing the model in Colorado, and Kling is pressing for expansion of the program. “I love my work,” she said. “That’s what we all want, to wake up in the morning and go out and do something where you still learn every day, where you get to use your head and your heart. It’s such a great thing about the law, and about mediation.” — By Emily Sharp

KU LAW MAGAZINE 15


CHAMPIONS for CHILDREN

Rebekah Gaston, L’05

Feeding young minds Alumna working to deliver adequate nutrition to Kansas children ne in five Kansas kids does not have consistent access to adequate amounts of nutritious food, and the state ranks 42nd for participation in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). It’s Rebekah Gaston’s job to solve that problem. Gaston, L’05, serves as Childhood Hunger Initiative Director for Kansas Appleseed, a statewide nonprofit organization that advocates for vulnerable Kansans, focusing on child welfare, immigration, juvenile justice reform and hunger. She works to increase statewide participation in federal food service programs so all Kansas children have access to nutritious food. She addresses the lack of program awareness and availability, countering negative stigma attached to social programs and overcoming administrative barriers that make it difficult for community members to access benefits. One of her biggest initiatives has been expanding access to summer food programs so that children receive healthy meals even when school is not in session. Despite the obstacles, Gaston has made steady progress. When she began with Kansas Appleseed in 2014, 44 Kansas counties did not have summer food program sites. In 2015 the number shrank to 35, and by 2016 it was down to 19. Gaston’s commitment to children started long before her work with Appleseed. After studying business and economics at KU, she worked for Legal Aid of Western Missouri, helping survivors of domestic violence get back on their feet. She saw

16 KU LAW MAGAZINE

the life-changing work attorneys did providing legal services to vulnerable populations and decided to pursue her law degree. “I had the idea that the only options were big firms with 80-hour work weeks and corporate clients,” Gaston said. “Seeing legal services work was really valuable in my decision to go to law school.” KU Law’s practical learning opportunities and affordable tuition solidified her decision to pursue a JD in Lawrence. At KU Law, Gaston participated in the Defender Project, now known as the Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence, as well as field placements with the Kansas Legislature and the Kansas Attorney General’s Office. She still recalls her final Legislative Field Placement project, which followed a bill from conception to implementation, studying the process influencers and final results. “That was valuable for me,” Gaston said. “I was able to see that legal advocacy isn’t just in the courtroom. You need to have laws to help people.” She credits her experiential work with giving her practice-ready skills and an understanding of the role that policy plays in shaping healthy communities. After law school Gaston pursued child welfare issues with Kansas Legal Services, operated her own family law and mediation practice, and worked as a Douglas County assistant prosecutor. When offered the opportunity to advocate for children with Appleseed, Gaston eagerly accepted the challenge. Throughout each of her roles, common themes have emerged, including the importance of a holistic approach in securing the best outcomes for children. “With children and family law, anytime you can approach the case collaboratively, you’re going to achieve a better result for the kids and family,” Gaston said. “The case will be over in six to 12 months, but they have to live together the rest of their lives.” Child welfare cases require a similar approach, helping parents get services they need and ensuring children are safe. “At Appleseed, the more people you have working toward policy change, the more likely it will happen, and with better results.” — By Emily Sharp


Anne Teigen, L’06

Educating lawmakers Grad arms legislators with info to craft effective juvenile justice policy n the movement to optimize the juvenile justice system, there are those who toil on the front lines and those who operate behind the scenes, providing data and examples of what has worked well for others. Anne Teigen, L’06, falls into the second camp. “I really can’t say that I’m an advocate,” she said. “My role is to educate legislators so they can become champions.” As a program principal at the Denverbased National Conference of State Legislatures, Teigen provides legislative testimony and policy presentations to lawmakers across the country. She keeps pace with the latest research, court decisions and case studies in juvenile justice (among other areas) so she can arm legislators with the information they need to craft effective, innovative policies. Teigen also organizes events that get lawmakers from many states in the same room to discuss priorities and exchange their best ideas. “The reality is that most state legislators are part-time,” she said. “They’re elected because they’re passionate about a certain issue, but they have to vote and be knowledgeable on a wide swath of issues about which they may not know all the intricacies.” Filling in those knowledge gaps the past 10 years, Teigen has noticed a few trends in juvenile justice reform. Nearly all states — except New York and North Carolina — have increased the upper age of youth to 17, so defendants younger than 18 cannot be prosecuted and sentenced as adults. Science supports this shift. “The latest neurological and behavioral science shows that you really have to distinguish juveniles from adults because their brains haven’t fully developed decision-making capacity and impulse control,” Teigen said. “The Supreme Court has cited this science in a number of decisions and ruled that children should be treated differently under the law.” Teigen has also observed more states passing sweeping juvenile justice reform rather than tweaking one law at a time. That hasn’t happened since the early 1990s, she explained, when there

was a movement toward more punitive approaches to combat increasing crime. “Now, because of the brain research and a handful of Supreme Court cases, the pendulum is swinging back toward models that are more rehabilitative,” Teigen said. “States have also looked at the expense associated with current practices and decided they can do better from a cost-benefit standpoint. This really has become a bipartisan issue.” Teigen, who fell in love with the lawmaking process as a student in KU Law’s Legislative Field Placement, relishes opportunities to humanize this issue for legislators. Last year she organized a site visit to AMIKids, a residential placement program in South Carolina that gives troubled youth opportunities to transform into responsible young adults. She gets teary-eyed watching the video of legislators interacting with young men who are building boats, catching crabs, going to school, welding and developing leadership skills to help change the trajectory of their lives. “In the Legal Aid Clinic at KU, I remember having a juvenile client and going to see him in the juvenile justice facility,” Teigen said. “Whenever I write or talk about detention reform, I always think of that little guy.” — By Mindie Paget

KU LAW MAGAZINE 17


FACULTY NEWS

RESEARCH

In the news FACULTY EXPERTS “Any success in decreasing sexual violence hinges on removing the numerous policeimposed obstacles inhibiting investigation and adjudication in rape cases, beginning with substantial reform of police practices.” Professor Corey Rayburn Yung’s article studying systemic policing barriers to the effective prosecution of rape was quoted in a Rolling Stone story, “How Police Still Fail Rape Victims.”

“Although there is loose talk of 10 billion dollars’ worth of judgments against Saudi Arabia, in fact the deck remains stacked against the plaintiffs.” Professor Raj Bhala offered perspective for a New York Times article about a bill allowing families of Sept. 11 victims to sue the Saudi Arabian government for damages.

“Being so closely tied to a for-profit and functioning to benefit it in so many ways — that could be a problem for them. The consequences could be that they lose their tax-exempt status.” Professor Bruce Hopkins was quoted in a Reuters article about how a New York educational charity affiliated with a Chinese company may have violated rules governing tax-exempt organizations in the United States.

The Brownback plan has “really diminished government services generally in Kansas.” Professor Emeritus Martin Dickinson spoke with Bloomberg BNA about how the impact of tax changes at the state level could provide valuable insight for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as they fleshed out their own proposals.

18 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Tribal law provides examples of innovative ways to address environmental challenges ELIZABETH KRONK WARNER, PROFESSOR OF LAW AND director of KU’s Tribal Law & Government Center, has authored an article in Michigan Journal of Environmental and Administrative Law in which she surveyed nine sovereign tribes in four states about environmental laws they have enacted and how they enforce them. The article examines how such tribal laws can provide guidance for local, state and federal governments that are looking to address environmental threats. Kronk Warner notes several similarities among tribal, federal and state laws. Tribal laws often use many of the same tools as federal laws, such as requiring permits for certain actions, issuing fines and making arrests for those who violate them. Where they differ are in instances where tribes may close off tribal lands in order to protect areas with vulnerable water, lands or areas of spiritual significance. Another unique enforcement tactic Kronk Warner found in her review of tribal law was banishment. If a non-native person has been found to have committed violations of tribal environmental law, they can be banished from tribal lands under civil authority, giving tribal police the right to remove them if they return. It would be worthwhile to see agencies try this approach on state and federal lands under the right circumstances, she said. The most important step in turning tribal examples into inspiration for larger laws is simply to make more people aware of them and expand the conversation to those in power to make changes, Kronk Warner said. — By Mike Krings

law.ku.edu/faculty law.ku.edu/faculty-news


RESEARCH

Feminist reforms could reduce violence against Native women This fall, she co-taught the Sex Crimes course and the Tribal Judicial Support Clinic at KU Law. She also taught a class on Feminist Jurisprudence.

A MACARTHUR FELLOW NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED FOR her expertise on sexual violence in Indian country offered legal strategies to improve outcomes for Native women during the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor lecture at the University of Kansas. Sarah Deer, Fall 2016 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor, delivered “Gendering Federal Indian Law” Nov. 2 at the Kansas Union. “Native women suffer from the highest rates of violence in the United States,” Deer said. “I have been studying this phenomenon for the last two decades and have ultimately concluded that a broken legal system is to blame. Under current law, tribal nations are not able to take appropriate action when violent crime occurs. A feminist approach to these legal problems will yield more positive results.” Deer is a graduate of both KU, 1995, and KU Law, 1999. She is currently a professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law.

Deer recently published a book, “The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America,” and she participated in a conference hosted by the White House Council on Women and Girls. Deer’s next book project will feature the writings of young Native women who are working on social justice issues. Down the road, she plans to publish a book on indigenous feminist legal theory in American law. — By Mindie Paget

RESEARCH

Professor analyzing decades of data to determine patent value FOR MORE THAN TWO CENTURIES, PATENTS HAVE BEEN considered a key governmental policy tool for economic innovation. And for just as long numerous assumptions have been made about what they mean to an innovation’s value, where the most important ones are litigated and numerous other questions. A KU Law professor is part of a project that is providing definitive answers to these and other patent questions for policymakers through a unique, big-data approach. Earl B. Schurtz Research Professor Andrew Torrance and colleagues have developed an approach to analyze mountains of detailed U.S. patent data from 1976 to the present day. The Canadian Ministry of Innovation approached Torrance to learn more about the value Canadian inventors add to American patents. Their goal was to learn more about how Canadian inventors and companies perform in the U.S. patent system. The data provided a number of fascinating insights possible only through a big-data approach, including one that should make Canada quite happy.

“We found that, when you add a Canadian to a U.S. patent as an inventor, that patent tends to increase in value by more than 15 percent,” Torrance said. “When you add a generic, non-American from another country, the average patent value actually tends to go down. This raises intriguing questions about how Canada fosters more successful inventors.” Torrance and colleagues have already submitted their preliminary analyses of Canadian inventors and patent owners to the government of Canada, which then hopes to use the resulting insights in future policy decisions regarding the Canadian patent system and how it influences innovation. — By Mike Krings

KU LAW MAGAZINE 19


FACULTY NEWS

BOOKS

International trade law expert’s book objectively analyzes TPP WHEN THE UNITED STATES AND 11 OTHER NATIONS recently agreed to the Trans Pacific Partnership, they set in motion history’s largest free trade agreement. Raj Bhala, associate dean for international and comparative law and Rice Distinguished Professor at KU Law, has authored a comprehensive, objective look at the TPP, detailing what it got right, where it could improve and why it’s important to people around the world. “TPP Objectively: Law, Economics, and National Security of History’s Largest, Longest Free Trade Agreement” is the first comprehensive, objective analysis of the 6,000-page agreement. The book breaks down the agreement’s concepts, goals, membership, logic and various national markets. It also examines nations that are part of the agreement, what they bring to the table specifically, and nations that are not part of the agreement and why they are not included. Bhala, who has worked in 11 of the 12 TPP nations, also addresses short- and long-term challenges for the agreement.

He argues the TPP did not go far enough in addressing women’s rights, LGBTQ rights and those of religious minorities in terms of trade. While well-intentioned human rights treaties have attempted to address such topics, Bhala argues economic agreements among the world’s largest economic powers would garner more attention and effect more change. “The book is the first to argue we need to advance, more resolutely, the rights of women, the LGBTQ community and religious minorities,” Bhala said. “The TPP doesn’t cover much for women’s rights and does nothing for LGBTQ and religious minorities. It’s time to advance human dignity across the board.” — By Mike Krings

BOOKS

Professor’s book on ADR designed to assist students, lawyers A KU LAW PROFESSOR HAS AUTHORED A NEW EDITION of a book designed to help law students and lawyers develop important practical skills and learn the law governing disputes resolved outside of court. Now in its third edition, Stephen Ware’s “Principles of Alternative Dispute Resolution” is a concise guide to the three main processes of alternative dispute resolution, or ADR: arbitration, negotiation and mediation. “Lawyers call these three processes alternative dispute resolution because they are our most common alternatives to courts deciding cases,” Ware said. “While cases resolved by courts — judges and juries — typically get the most media attention, a great many cases are resolved by arbitrators, or by the disputing parties’ agreement reached through negotiation or mediation.” Arbitration is like litigation in court because both arbitration

20 KU LAW MAGAZINE

and litigation allow disputing parties and their lawyers to present evidence and arguments to neutral decision-makers. However, those decision-makers in arbitration are neither judges nor jurors, but arbitrators chosen by the parties and usually paid by the parties. So arbitration is basically a private-sector court created by the disputing parties’ contract. “The idea behind increasing use of ADR,” Ware said, “was that courts were too crowded, litigation was too expensive, and that hopefully through alternative methods we could get better, cheaper resolution of disputes.” — By Mike Krings


RESEARCH

Law professor receives Fulbright to research international ag reform FOR THE THIRD TIME IN HIS career, KU Law Professor John Head has received a Fulbright fellowship from the U.S. Department of State. As the 2016 Fulbright Research Chair in Global Governance, Head is spending the fall term in Waterloo, Ontario, extending his research and writing in the area of international law and agricultural reform. The one-semester fellowship is hosted by the Balsillie School of International Affairs, an institute that supports research in international public policy and shares faculty and facilities with the Centre for International Governance Innovation. Head’s project, “Sovereignty, Global Governance, and Agro-Ecological Integrity: Building an International Legal and Institutional Public-Trust Framework to Reform Agriculture,” builds on a recently completed book to be published later this year by Routledge Press. Head’s research aims to examine and contribute to efforts at reforming global agriculture in ways that will help address crises in the areas of climate change, ecological degradation, and food insecurity. Reflecting his international-law specialization, his work will give special emphasis to concepts of sovereignty, global governance, and the public trust doctrine. In exploring institutional issues at the global level, Head will draw from his experience with global economic institutions. The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields. — By Mindie Paget

Honors FACULTY KUDOS Six elected to be next leader of national Association of Academic Support Educators Professor Betsy Brand Six was elected president-elect of the Association of Academic Support Educators at the organization’s national conference over the summer. Six has previously served as treasurer and secretary of AASE, which supports the professional development of academic support educators, who work to ensure legal education is accessible to and effective for all students. Current president Jamie Kleppetsch lauded Six’s role in expanding AASE to the largest organization for academic support professors in the country; developing streamlined registration, renewal and accounting systems for the organization; and leading through her innovative and insightful presentations at AASE conferences. Being part of the organization, Six said, “gives me the opportunity to interact with leading experts on cutting-edge ways to maximize student learning — to reach students where they are and help them succeed.”

Andrew Torrance and Eric von Hippel (MIT Sloan) coauthored the first chapter in “New Production of Users: Changing Innovation Collectives and Involvement Strategies,” a book that received the 2016 Freeman Award. The Freeman Award is given biannually by the European Association for Studies of Science and Technology for “a publication which is a significant collective contribution to the interaction of science and technology studies with the study of innovation.”

Stephen Ware was named to the editorial board of the Association of American Law Schools’ Journal of Legal Education (2016-2019).

Elizabeth Kronk Warner was selected as a 2016-2017 KU Senior Administrative Fellow. Now in its 24th year, the program identifies and cultivates current and potential leaders already on the KU faculty.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 21


ALUMNI NEWS 1

5

2

6

3

7

4

8

22 KU LAW MAGAZINE


9

Reunion Weekend 2016 KU Law celebrated Reunion and Homecoming weekend October 21-22 with alumni from across the country. We extended a special welcome to the classes of 1976, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2006 for their milestone reunions. How did the weekend go? These smiling faces tell the story. 10

1

Professor Joyce Rosenberg, L’96, embraces a classmate during the All-Reunion Cocktail Reception at The Oread.

2 Fellow 2006 graduates Carly Farrell Boothe and Megan Scheiderer catch up during the All-Reunion Cocktail Reception.

11

12

3

Steven Gough, L’76, and his granddaughter, Lizzie Gough, enjoy time together at the Homecoming Tailgate Party.

4

Kevin Wickliffe, L’87 (right), grabs a bite to eat with his “Little Brother,” Natrone Dixon, at the KU Law Homecoming Tailgate Party.

5

Alumni — including Katie Sangha, L’13 (red jacket) and Erika Hane, L’13 — bask in the sunshine during the KU Law Homecoming Tailgate Party.

6

Col. Karen Mayberry, L’86, catches up with classmates at the KU Law Homecoming Reception at The Oread.

7

Emily Barclay, L’16, 2L Nolan Wright, and Whitney Novak, L’14, enjoy each other’s company during the KU Law Homecoming Reception.

8

Sisters Holly Zane, L’86 (left), and Kristen Zane at the All-Reunion Cocktail Reception.

9

A group of 2014 graduates poses for a class photo during the Homecoming Tailgate Party (from left): Rob Williams, Matthew Moriarty, Shannon Williams, Tori Whitehead, Peter Conley and Emily Smith.

10 Larry Michel, L’89, enjoys the KU Law Homecoming Reception with his wife, Jennifer (left), and daughter, KU Law 2L Laurel Michel. 11 Stephen, L’86, and Sabrina Crooke traveled to Lawrence from Texas to participate in reunion festivities. 12 Judy Pottorff, L’84, Mike Delaney, L’76, Jim Pottorff, L’84, and Bob Barnes, L’77, at the KU Law Homecoming Reception.

Photos by Mike Yoder | More at law.ku.edu/homecoming

KU LAW MAGAZINE 23


ALUMNI NEWS

THREE RECEIVE LAW SCHOOL’S HIGHEST HONOR An attorney, a legal scholar and a federal judge received the Distinguished Alumni Award, the law school’s highest honor, at an April 16 ceremony in Lawrence. The award is presented annually to graduates who have distinguished themselves through exemplary service to the legal profession, their communities, KU and the state or nation. Photo by Earl Richardson

PROFESSOR JOHN PECK, L’74

JUDGE KATHRYN VRATIL, L’75

LARRY KEENAN, L’54

Peck received his bachelor’s in civil engineering from Kansas State University in 1968. After three years at the U.S. Public Health Service and the EPA in Washington, D.C., he began at KU Law, where he was an articles editor for the Kansas Law Review and graduated Order of the Coif in 1974. He practiced with Everett, Seaton, Peck in Manhattan, before joining the KU Law faculty in 1978. He teaches contracts, land transactions, water law and family law and has received numerous teaching accolades. In addition to his tenured faculty position, Peck serves as special counsel to Foulston Siefkin LLP.

Vratil graduated from KU in 1971 with an American studies degree and in 1975 with a law degree, serving on the Kansas Law Review and earning Order of the Coif membership. After clerking three years for U.S. District Judge Earl O’Connor, she practiced commercial and business litigation for 14 years with Lathrop & Gage, serving as Prairie Village municipal judge for two years. In 1992, President Bush appointed her to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. The first woman to serve on the court, she was named chief judge in 2008 and served in that capacity until she assumed senior status in 2014.

After completing his joint undergraduate and law degree in 1954, Keenan served three years in the U.S. Army JAG Corps. He returned home to Great Bend in 1958 to practice with his older brother at the Keenan Law Firm, where he still practices today. Keenan served as Barton County Attorney for four years and is a past chairman and member of the Farmers Bank & Trust Board of Directors. He currently serves as president of Globe Exploration Inc. in Great Bend. Keenan is an avid supporter of his alma mater and a past president and lifetime member of the KU Law Board of Governors.

WHO WILL BE NEXT? Submit nominations by January 27 | law.ku.edu/distinguished

WITH DISTINCTION 24 KU LAW MAGAZINE


ClassNotes

Items were received or collected prior to Nov. 1, 2016. Submit your news online at law.ku.edu/keep-touch. KU Law Magazine relies on alumni for the accuracy of information reported. 1951 Charles Svoboda retired from the active practice of law in 2002. He worked as a trial lawyer for more than 50 years, utilizing his undergraduate education in engineering to specialize in construction, technical and tort litigation in state and federal jurisdictions across the country. Svoboda has held an AV Preeminent peer rating with MartindaleHubbell for professional excellence and ethical standards for more than 35 years. 1960 Byron Springer retired after practicing law for more than 55 years. He and his wife, Marion, recently moved to Highlands Ranch, Colorado. 1964 Hon. Gerald T. Elliott will retire in January 2017 after serving as a judge on the Johnson County District Court since his appointment by Gov. Mike Hayden in 1990. Elliott has served on Kansas courts at all levels, including hearing cases with the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court. 1965 Jim L. Lawing opened The Law Office of Jim Lawing in Wichita. 1966 Reid Holbrook retired in June as an attorney and founder of Holbrook & Osborn in Overland Park. Jerry Palmer and Donald W. Vasos were recognized as Kansas Chapter Members for Excellence in the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution by the National Academy of Distinguished Neutrals. Palmer is an attorney at Palmer, Leatherman & White in Topeka; Vasos is an attorney at Vasos Law Offices in Fairway. 1971 Bill Sampson, a partner at Shook, Hardy & Bacon in Kansas City, Missouri, was recognized by Best Lawyers in America 2016 for Bet-The-Company Litigation, Commercial

Litigation, Litigation-Banking and Finance, and Product Liability Litigation-Defendants. 1972 Drue Jennings was honored with a professorship established in his name at the University of Kansas Medical Center. The A. Drue Jennings Professorship in Medical Oncology resulted from substantial gifts from the Hall Family Foundation and the Sunderland Family Fund. Now retired, Jennings formerly served as chairman of the Board of Trustees at KU Endowment, chairman and CEO of Kansas City Power & Light, and senior counsel at Polsinelli PC in Kansas City, Missouri. Stephen M. Joseph was recognized by Chambers USA for General Litigation: White-Color Criminal and Government Investigations. Joseph, a partner in the Wichita office of Joseph, Hollander & Craft, has been ranked in Chambers USA each year since 2009. He was also named to the Best Lawyers list for the 30th consecutive year. He was honored for expertise in both Criminal Defense: General Practice and Criminal Defense: White Collar. 1973 Hon. Robert Fairchild retired Sept. 9 as chief judge of the Douglas County District Court in Lawrence, stepping into the position of senior judge in districts around Kansas. Fairchild served 14 of his 20 years on the court as chief judge. Rusty Leffel curated an online exhibition of his photography related to the 2016 presidential campaign. The exhibit, titled “Signs of Protest,” can be viewed on the Social Documentary Network.  Paul T. Moxley was honored by the Utah State Bar, which created the Paul

T. Moxley Mentoring Award in his name. Moxley is a shareholder at Cohne Kinghorn PC in Salt Lake City. He is also state chairman of the American Bar Foundation Fellows. 1974 Ross C. Hartley was honored by the Baxter Springs Historical Society and the Baxter Springs Heritage Center as a new member of the Museum’s Wall of Fame. Hartley is a co-founder and director of NIC Inc., a director of the Empire District Electric Company, and former president of The Hartley Insurance Group. 1975 Michael Helbert joined The Expert Network, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Helbert is managing partner at Helbert & Allemang Law Offices in Emporia.  Richard K. Walker was elected chairman of the Arizona Law Enforcement Merit System Council after having been appointed to the council by Gov. Doug Ducey in Fall 2015. The council hears appeals of disciplinary actions against Arizona Department of Public Safety officers. 1976 Kenneth W. Gaines was appointed clinical legal education director at the University of South Carolina School of Law, where he is also an associate professor. Ross Hollander was named Best Lawyers’ Wichita Lawyer of the Year for Employment LawManagement and was recognized for expertise in the areas of Labor Law-Management, and Litigation-Labor and Employment. He was featured as a leading expert and recommended professional in Financier Worldwide’s 2016 Litigation & Alternative Dispute Resolution handbook, and was recognized by Chambers USA for Labor/

KU LAW MAGAZINE 25


ALUMNI NEWS

Employment Litigation and General Litigation: Mediators. Hollander is a partner in the Wichita office of Joseph, Hollander & Craft. 1977 William H. Sanders Jr. was recognized as a Kansas Chapter Member for Excellence in the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution by the National Academy of Distinguished Neutrals. Sanders is an attorney at Sanders, Warren & Russell in Overland Park. 1978 Mike Meacham was elected to the board of directors of the Association of University Programs in Healthcare Administration. He is an associate professor in health leadership and management at the Medical University of South Carolina. 1979 Kelly W. Johnston participated in the 2016 Kansas Author’s Club District 2 Poetry Contest, where his poem “Wild Kalaska” won first place in the narrative poetry division and “Hitchhiker” won first place in the free verse division. Johnston is an attorney at The Johnston Law Offices in Wichita. 1980 Jay Fowler, an attorney at Foulston Siefkin LLP in Wichita, was inducted as a fellow to the International Academy of Trial Lawyers.   Brenda West Hagerman joined Smith & Burnett LLC in Larned, where she practices family law and serves as guardian ad litem through various courts in the region. 1981 Anne Burke and Jace McClasky, L’02, opened Burke McClasky Stevens in February in Overland Park. The family law firm specializes in high-net-worth clients with complex assets. Jeff Carmichael celebrated 35 years with Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chartered, in June. He is a shareholder at the Wichita firm. Hon. Patricia Macke Dick was reappointed for a two-year term as chief judge of the 27th Judicial District in Reno County, and was elected president of the

26 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Kansas District Judges’ Association. Macke Dick has been a district judge since 1980. 1980 Monte Vines is the new president of the Wesley E. Brown Inn of Court. Vines is an attorney at Adams Jones Law Firm in Wichita. 1982 Hon. Karen Arnold-Burger, a judge on the Kansas Court of Appeals, received the Warren W. Shaw Distinguished Service Award from the Topeka Bar Association and the Distinguished Service Award from the Wichita Bar Association. The Kansas Women Attorneys Association honored Arnold-Burger with the Amelia Earhart Award, recognizing her efforts to educate Kansans about the importance of the judicial system’s role in government. Julia Craft was recognized as one of the nation’s top-40 family law attorneys in the National Law Journal’s inaugural issue of Divorce, Trusts & Estates Trailblazers. Craft is a partner chair of the family law division at Joseph, Hollander & Craft in Wichita. Gary H. Hanson is of counsel to Stumbo Hanson LLP in Topeka. Jim Muehlberger, a partner at Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP in Kansas City, Missouri, recently published “The 116: The True Story of Abraham Lincoln’s Lost Guard.” The book tells the story of the 116 men who acted as Lincoln’s “secret service” and who camped out in the White House for the first 10 days of the Civil War, probably saving Lincoln’s life. Almost half of the men were Kansans, and 46 were lawyers. The book has been nominated for The Lincoln Prize, awarded annually to the finest scholarly work in English on Abraham Lincoln. David W. Nickel was named consumer counsel for the Citizens’ Utility Ratepayer Board, a state agency that advocates for Kansas utility customers. Nickel previously practiced oil and gas

law with Depew, Gillen, Rathbun & McInteer LC in Wichita. Michael Santos retired in April 2016 as city attorney of Overland Park after 30 years of service. Stan Smith accepted the Chester I. Lewis Diversity Award from the Wichita Bar Association on behalf of Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace & Bauer, where he works as an attorney.  Todd N. Thompson was inducted as a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers at the organization’s annual meeting in Chicago. Fellowship is extended by invitation only to experienced trial lawyers who show high standards of ethical conduct, professionalism, civility and collegiality. Thompson is an attorney at Thompson Ramsdell Qualseth & Warner PA in Lawrence. 1983 M.B. Miller was named deputy city attorney for North Little Rock, Arkansas. Miller will represent and advise the mayor, city council and other city officials in legal matters. F. James Robinson Jr. received the Howard C. Kline Distinguished Service Award from the Wichita Bar Association. Robinson is a partner at Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP in Wichita. Gentra Sorem was recognized by The Best Lawyers in America and Super Lawyers. Sorem is a partner at Conner & Winters LLP in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 1984 Mary Rothwell Davis edited New York State’s “Lawyer’s Manual on Domestic Violence: Representing the Victim” (6th edition). The manual contains more than 30 chapters covering legal issues that arise in domestic violence matters. Davis serves as chair of the New York State IOLA Fund and pro bono appellate counsel at Sanctuary for Families in New York. Diane H. Sorensen became a panel member of the American Arbitration Association. Worth is a shareholder at Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy in Wichita.


Calvin Wiebe is an attorney at Wiebe Law Office in Great Bend. 1985 Justice Carol Beier, of the Kansas Supreme Court, received the Amelia Earhart Award from the Kansas Women Attorneys Association. The award recognizes Beier’s efforts to educate Kansans about the importance of the judicial system’s role in government. Kelly J. Rundell was elected president-elect of the Wesley E. Brown Inn of Court in Wichita. Rundell joins fellow alumnus Monte Vines, L’81, who serves as the organization’s current president. 1988 Patrick X. Fowler is chair of Snell & Wilmer’s data privacy and cyber security practice and has been a judge pro tem with the Maricopa County (Arizona) Superior Court since 2014. He was recently recognized by Best Lawyers in America for Product Liability Defense and by Southwest Super Lawyers for Personal Injury-Products. W. Scott Toth was inducted as a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers at the organization’s annual meeting in Chicago. Toth, a partner in the Olathe firm of Garretson & Toth LLC, has practiced law in Johnson County for 27 years. 1989 Tracy A. Cole relocated to the Hutchinson office of Gilliland & Hayes PA. Cole maintains an active statewide litigation practice with an emphasis on medical malpractice and insurance defense. Sharon Dickgrafe received the President’s Award for Outstanding Service from the Wichita Bar Association and was elected president of the City Attorney’s

Association of Kansas. She was also recognized as a Local Government Fellow by the International Municipal Lawyers Association at its annual convention in San Diego. Dickgrafe is the chief deputy city attorney for the City of Wichita. James Scott Kreamer was elected president-elect of the Federation of Defense & Corporate Counsel in July. He has also been named to the board of directors of Lawyers for Civil Justice and the Defense Research Institute, and was recently selected by his peers for inclusion in the 2017 edition of The Best Lawyers in America for Construction Litigation. Kreamer is the managing member of Baker Sterchi Cowden & Rice LLC in Kansas City, Missouri. 1990 Curtis G. Barnhill was elected to the board of the Douglas County Bar Association. He operates a solo law practice in Lawrence. Cheryl L. Denton was elected to the board of the Douglas County Bar Association. She is the founder of Denton Law LLC in Lawrence. Madeleine McDonough was elected chairwoman by the partners at Shook, Hardy & Bacon in Kansas City, Missouri. Her five-year term begins Jan. 1, 2017. McDonough serves on the Shook Executive Committee and chairs the pharmaceutical and medical device division. She will be the first woman to lead the firm as chair. Susan Krehbiel William retired from the active practice of law on April 30,

Moved recently? Changed your email address? Landed a new job?

2016. She had worked at Coffman, DeFries & Nothern PA (formerly Schroeder, Heeney, Groff & Coffman PA) in Topeka since 1990 and retired as a shareholder. 1991 F. Charles Dunlay joined McAnany, Van Cleve & Phillips PA as a shareholder in the Kansas City, Kansas, office. Stephanie Quincy, a partner at Quarles & Brady in Phoenix, has been named chair of the firm’s labor and employment practice group. Dionne Scherff and Lindsey Erickson, L’94, merged their Overland Park criminal defense firm (previously Erickson Scherff) with Joseph, Hollander & Craft, creating a fourth location serving the Kansas City area. Joseph, Hollander & Craft also has offices in Wichita, Topeka and Lawrence. 1993 Alison McKenney Brown was appointed city attorney of Englewood, Colorado. Roger Fincher is a personal injury attorney at the Law Office of Roger Fincher in Topeka. 1994 Erin Syring was promoted to executive vice president of operations at IMA Inc., a financial services company specializing in risk management, insurance and employee benefit solutions. Syring will oversee resources in Denver, Dallas, Kansas City and Wichita. Syring joined IMA in 2012.

SEND US AN UPDATE!

Submit updates and news online at LAW.KU.EDU/KEEP-TOUCH. Send photos to MPAGET@KU.EDU.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 27


ALUMNI NEWS

Christina Hartman Vassey is a client representative at Thomson Reuters in Washington, D.C. John F. Wilcox Jr. was elected secretary/treasurer of the Transportation Lawyers Association. Wilcox is a shareholder/ director at Dysart Taylor Cotter McMonigle & Montemore PC in Kansas City, Missouri.  1995 Cynthia Bryant is special counsel for alternative dispute resolution in the Federal Communications Commission’s Office of Workplace Diversity. She has been selected to serve as a mediator in the Sharing Neutrals Program, a free service that provides collateral-duty mediators to participating federal agencies. Bryant was also chosen through the African American Federal Executive Association as a fellow in the senior executive service program. Alice Craig was inducted into the Topeka West 2016 Graduate Hall of Fame. Craig is an attorney in KU Law’s Project for Innocence & PostConviction Remedies and an instructor in the school’s trial advocacy and mock trial programs. Sal Intagliata was named Best Lawyers’ Wichita Lawyer of the Year for General Practice Criminal Defense. Intagliata is a shareholder at Monnat & Spurrier, Chartered, in Wichita. 1996 Terence E. Leibold was elected secretary of the Douglas County Bar Association board of directors. He is a partner at Petefish, Immel, Heeb & Hird LLP in Lawrence.   Gwendelyn Garcia Milligan is an attorney at Garrison Law Office in Overland Park. 1997 Grant D. Bannister, formerly of Knopp & Bannister PA in Manhattan, has

28 KU LAW MAGAZINE

been appointed a judge for the 21st Judicial District, which covers Clay and Riley counties. Hale E. Sheppard, a shareholder in the Atlanta office of Chamberlain Hrdlicka, received recognition in the annual Chambers & Partners directory for his work in tax law. 1998 Jeff Rogers became associate director of tax planning and analysis at MGP in Atchison. He previously worked as a senior tax manager for Stratagem in Lakewood, Colorado. Tom Wagstaff Jr. has joined the Kansas City firm Miller Schirger LLC as of counsel. Wagstaff comes to the firm from Wagstaff & Cartmell, where he partnered with Miller Schirger on several cases. 1999 Jean Block is chief legal officer of Little Rock Wastewater, serving as legal adviser and counsel to the wastewater utility’s staff and the Little Rock Water Reclamation Commission. She was previously chief legal counsel at the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery. Sarah Deer represented more than 100 women’s organizations as interested parties in the Dollar General Corporation v. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians case before the U.S. Supreme Court by co-authoring an amicus brief on the proceedings. Deer delivered a public lecture at KU titled “Gendering Federal Indian Law” as part of her appointment as the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor. Karrie Clinkinbeard became managing attorney of Armstrong Teasdale’s Kansas City, Missouri, office, effective Sept. 1. She is the first woman elected to the role of office managing attorney in the firm’s 115-year history. Jody M. Meyer was elected to the board of the Douglas County Bar Association. She operates a solo law practice in Lawrence.

2000 Amy Fellows Cline was honored by the Wichita Business Journal as part of its 2016 Women in Business issue. Cline is an attorney at Triplett, Woolf & Garretson in Wichita. Stephanie Goodenow was welcomed into the Kansas Fellows of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. She is an attorney at Goodenow Law in Lenexa. Christopher M. Joseph was named Best Lawyers’ Topeka Lawyer of the Year for Criminal Defense: General Practice. Joseph is a managing member of Joseph, Hollander & Craft LLC in Lawrence. Michael Porter is a partner at Miller Nash Graham & Dunn in Portland, Oregon. 2001 Bill Yanek was named CEO of  the Professional Retail Store Maintenance Association. He currently serves as executive vice president of the Glass Association of North America and will begin his new role in September. 2002 Michelle Meier received the President’s Award for Outstanding Service from the Wichita Bar Association. Meier is an attorney at Kansas Legal Services in Pittsburg. U.S. Rep. Kevin W. Yoder received a Champion of Science Award from the University of Kansas in recognition of his support for federal funding for basic scientific research. David E. Waters received the Kansas State University College of Arts & Sciences Young Alumni Award in October 2015 and was elected in April to the Westwood (Kansas) City Council. Waters is a partner at Lathrop & Gage LLP in Kansas City, Missouri. 2004 Jeffrey Li became an owner at Garvey Schubert Barer in Washington, D.C. Li will advise Chinese companies in strategic business activities in the United States, including mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, investment, securities and compliance matters. He will also guide


U.S. companies on Chinese corporate and investment law. 2005 Tanya Rodecker Wendt is a partner at Deacy & Deacy in Kansas City, Missouri. Deborah Williams was selected as a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Scholar. She will attend a fourweek summer institute titled “Extending the Land Ethic: Current Humanities Voices and Sustainability” at Northern Arizona University. Williams is professor and chair of environmental science at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park and an adjunct professor at KU Law. 2006 Branden L. Smith was elected president of the Douglas County Bar Association board of directors. He is an attorney at Smith Legal LLC in Lawrence.   2007 Mayra Aguirre received the 6th annual NFL Hispanic Heritage Leadership

Award, which recognizes the contributions of Hispanic leaders in each NFL market. Aguirre is executive director of the Greater Kansas City Hispanic Development Fund. Hilary Velandia was included on the Rising Stars recognition list published by Super Lawyers. Velandia is an associate at Conner & Winters LLP in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 2008 Sean Carver joined the Overland Park office of Bukaty & Aubry, Chartered, as an associate. Anne B. Hall was elected vice president of the Douglas County Bar Association board of directors. She is associate litigation counsel at the Kansas State Board of Healing Arts. Abigail Grantstein Howard was named assistant commissioner for compliance and governance at the American East Conference in Boston. Sara Stieben was promoted to partner at Montgomery Amatuzio Dusbabek Chase LLP. The firm has offices in Denver,

Fort Collins, Colorado, and Cheyenne, Wyoming. 2009 Laci L. Boyle joined Koch Companies Services LLC in April as a tax attorney. Boyle previously practiced at Bever Dye LC in Wichita. Brutrinia D. Cain is a senior policy advisor in the Office of the Surgeon General, Division of Commissioned Corps Personnel and Readiness in Washington, D.C. Demetrius Peterson joined Husch Blackwell LLP as senior counsel in Kansas City, Missouri. Peterson’s practice will concentrate on serving the needs of educational institutions. Rachel Stahle was named partner at Dollar Burns & Becker in Kansas City, Missouri, where she will lead the firm’s growing nursing home, medical negligence and long-term care practice. She was previously a partner at Franke Schultz & Mullen PC in Kansas City. Alexis Zayas became staff director

Scholarships make a KU education possible for future leaders Supporting KU with your gift will benefit students now and for generations. To learn more, please visit kuendowment.org/kulaw.


ALUMNI NEWS

of the Office of Administrative Adjudication at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington, D.C. She previously worked as an attorney advisor for the Federal Communications Commission. 2010 Blake Hardwick joined the national commercial services division of First American Title Insurance Company in July 2016 as senior underwriting counsel and Colorado counsel. Hardwick was previously a commercial finance and real estate lawyer at Snell & Wilmer LLP. 2011 Ryan McAteer, a corporate health care law attorney at Polsinelli PC in Los Angeles, is participating in the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce Leadership Southern California program. He is one of 40 mid- to senior-level executives from a variety of industries selected through a competitive process for the eight-month leadership development program. Gregory Trum and his wife, Katherine, welcomed a daughter, Lily Marie, on Oct. 24, 2015, in Overland Park. Trum is legal counsel at Cross-Midwest Tire Company. Sean Douglas Walsh relocated to the downtown office of Hinkle Law Firm in Wichita. 2012 Christian Corrigan joined the Institute for Justice in Arlington, Virginia, as a constitutional litigation fellow. Corrigan will focus on economic liberty, property rights, free speech and school choice at the national public interest firm. Will Manly joined the office of Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt as an assistant attorney general in criminal litigation. He will handle domestic violence cases statewide. Manly had served as an assistant district attorney in Shawnee County since 2012. Michael A. Mulloy is approaching the one-year anniversary of opening Stebbins

30 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Mulloy Attorneys at Law in Bismarck, North Dakota, with his law partner, Jackie M. Stebbins. Mulloy practices in the areas of real estate, estate planning, probate and family law. Jeff Spahr joined the Missouri Attorney General’s Office in the litigation division in St. Louis, Missouri. 2013 Matthew A. Gorney joined Monnat & Spurrier, Chartered, in Wichita as an associate focusing on trial and appellate practice, criminal and DUI defense and municipal defense.  Eric A. Sader was elected to the board of directors of the Kansas Statewide Homeless Coalition. 2014 Jesús Güereca became lead attorney at Immigration Professionals, a nonprofit immigration legal services law firm in Kansas City, Missouri. Patrick Newsum joined Wiggin & Dana in New York as an associate attorney. 2015 Paul Budd joined Meadows, Collier, Reed, Cousins, Crouch & Ungerman LLP in Dallas as an associate attorney practicing tax law. He recently earned an LL.M. in Taxation from the New York University School of Law. M. Johnathan Koonce completed a fellowship program with the Colorado Attorney General’s Office and began a term clerkship with the Hon. Judge Wiley Y. Daniel, a senior judge on the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado. Robert A. Langer joined Langer & Langer in Valparaiso, Indiana. He focuses

his practice on personal injury, medical malpractice and wrongful death. Cooper Mach joined the Popham Law Firm as an associate. He will focus his practice on personal injury and employment law. He joins his father, Scott Mach, L’81, who is a partner at the firm, practicing civil litigation. 2016 Melanie Brewer joined the asset management team at Travois, a Kansas City, Missouri, consulting firm focused on promoting housing and economic development in Indian Country. Brewer will help clients meet investor and state reporting requirements for the life of Low Income Housing Tax Credit projects. Abby Hall was named a 2016-2017 KU Woman of Distinction by the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity at the University of Kansas. Hall is a research attorney for Kansas Supreme Court Justice Eric Rosen. Lauren G. Hughes joined Wise & Reber LC in McPherson as an associate in the firm’s estate planning and transactional practice groups. Nicole Lawson accepted a position at the Johnson County Public Defender’s Office. Trent Rogers joined the housing development department at Travois as a project manager. Rogers will help clients navigate affordable housing projects at the consulting firm in Kansas City, Missouri.


KU Law Supreme Court Swearing-In Ceremony Every other year, KU Law graduates have an opportunity to become members of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States alongside fellow Jayhawk Lawyers. This year 15 alumni and their guests traveled to Washington, D.C., to be sworn in during open court and enjoy a private reception with Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Clarence Thomas. Join us in 2018! Watch your email and the KU Law website for details about the next ceremony. Photos by Bill Petros | More at law.ku.edu/scotus

KU Law graduates sworn in to the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States included, back row from left, Rury Grisham, L’10, Dennis Mandsager, L’76,Wakil Oyedemi, L’08, D. Steven Marsh, L’85; second row from left, Dean Stephen Mazza, Andrew Yeretsky, L’06, Kenneth Van Blaricum, L’70, Richard Cram, L’83, Kurt Level, L’92, Justin Hendrix, L’09, Kathy Taylor, L’86; front row from left, Jan Fink Call, L’87, Karen Snyder, L’91, Debra Lumpkins, L’87, Katherine Goyette, L’12, and Dee Foster Marsh, L’80. Above: Wakil Oyedemi and his family meet Justice Clarence Thomas.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 31


GIVING NEWS

KU alumni at Polsinelli fund center to prepare students for careers in transactional law THE POLSINELLI LAW FIRM AND ITS University of Kansas alumni attorneys have committed $250,000 to create the Polsinelli Transactional Law Center at the KU School of Law. The Polsinelli Transactional Law Center capitalizes on its namesake’s distinguished reputation to cultivate a new generation of lawyers with the practical skills necessary for successful careers. The Center will serve as the umbrella for transactional law courses, symposia and programming related to mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, stock offerings, financing, real estate and other business transactions. “KU students work extremely hard learning the foundations of law, then getting the hands-on experience necessary to begin their careers ready for practice. It is important that graduates enter the workforce with the

32 KU LAW MAGAZINE

ability to understand clients’ business challenges and context,” said 1972 KU Law graduate Thomas Kokoruda, a shareholder in Polsinelli’s health care litigation practice group. “The new Polsinelli Transactional Law Center will help KU Law students become business-minded and go beyond technical lawyering.” The Center was established with $250,000 in gifts and pledges from 67 KU Law alumni and friends employed by Polsinelli – representing a 100 percent alumni participation rate. Stephen Mazza, dean and professor of law, expressed gratitude for the gifts. “This generous support from Polsinelli allows us to expand practical opportunities for KU Law students, maximizing their ability to hit the ground running right out of law school,” he said. “These gifts help us build on our exceptional Far Above

fundraising success, and they create a program that will benefit law students immediately and for generations to come.” Over the past 30 years, Polsinelli has funded KU Law moot court teams, diversity scholarships and classroom remodeling. And the firm’s commitment extends beyond financial support. As part of the Polsinelli Transactional Law Center, firm attorneys helped teach an intensive simulation course on Due Diligence in Business Transactions this spring, and the firm will sponsor and help prepare KU teams for the National Transactional LawMeet. “The Center bridges legal knowledge with the actual practice of law,” said Lisa Schultes, a 1985 KU Law alumna and a Polsinelli corporate and transactional law attorney who coordinated the Center’s inaugural


course. “The KU Law students were excited to be involved in an actual business acquisition and to learn the real-world steps necessary to successfully close a transaction. The Polsinelli attorneys enjoyed the opportunity to share their expertise and to give back to the law school. We were impressed with the students’ legal skills, business acumen and enthusiasm.” Student Beth Hanus learned valuable practical skills in the course. “Just two weeks later when I started as a summer associate at a law firm in Kansas City, I was excited to be able to directly apply the skills that I had learned in the course,” she said. “Polsinelli is invested in the quality of the KU law school,” said Jack Kilroy, a firm shareholder and 1973 KU Law graduate. “We are proud to employ more than 65 KU Law grads, and we interview on campus, planning to hire more.” Law professors Webb Hecker and Virginia Harper Ho will serve as co-directors of the Center. “Having spent a career teaching doctrinal business law, I am excited to participate in an endeavor that will enable KU students to integrate that law with practice,” Hecker said. “The Polsinelli Transactional Law Center will benefit aspiring transactional lawyers in multiple significant ways not previously possible.” That outcome aligns with Polsinelli’s commitment to education. “A steadfast partner to the academic community, Polsinelli has invested in universities across the country by providing sponsorships, in-kind and pro bono services,” said Polsinelli Business Services Division Chair Edward “Trip” Frizell, who earned his bachelor’s, master’s and juris doctor from KU. “To sponsor the Transactional Law Center was a natural fit for us.” — By Mindie Paget

POLSINELLI TRANSACTIONAL LAW CENTER DONORS The Center was established with $250,000 in gifts and pledges from 67 KU Law alumni and friends employed by Polsinelli — representing a 100 percent alumni participation rate. Christopher S. Abrams Collin B. Altieri Douglas K. Anning Jennifer Gille Bacon Vedrana Balta Jacob W. Bayer Jr. Catherine R. Bell Marina L. Bell Marla R. Bell Jay E. Berryman Paul D. Boppart R. Dan Boulware Gerald W. Brenneman Casandra L. Carpenter Lynn D. Cockle Dan E. Cranshaw Thomas C. DeBacco Denise K. Drake Zachary R. Dyer Amy L. Fritton Edward E. Frizell Michael B. George Amy K. Hansen Kathleen A. Hardee John P. Healy Jay E. Heidrick Darren R. Hensley Scott M. Herpich Robert J. Hingula Cullin B. Hughes Andrew M. Johnson Robert C. Johnson Brian M. Johnston Allen R. Jones

John M. Kilroy, Jr. Alicia M. Kirkpatrick Roxsen E. Koch Kraig M. Kohring Thomas G. Kokoruda William W. Mahood III Ryan M. McAteer Brendan L. McPherson Ryan J. Mize Amy E. Morgan Andrew J. Nazar S. Patrick O’Bryan Daniel D. Owen William E. Quick Blake H. Reeves Arnold A. Ressin Thomas M. Ruane Travis L. Salmon Katharine K. Sangha Erin D. Schilling Lisa M. Schultes Jennifer M. Schwartz William J. Shull Christopher P. Sobba Mark L. Sprecker Kelly D. Stohs Robert B. Sullivan Lawrence A. Swain Angela S. Taylor Brian A. Wolf Brisa Izaguirre Wolfe William L. Yocum G. Gabriel Zorogastua

Polsinelli attorneys helped teach Due Diligence in Business Transactions, the Center’s inaugural course, in May 2016.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 33


GIVING NEWS

KU LAW transformed As a strong regional school with a growing national reputation, KU Law prepares students to be leaders in the legal community. Your generous support during Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas has helped move the school to even greater heights over the past eight years. Here’s a snapshot of the many ways you have helped transform KU Law. Thank you!

ROBIN RANDOLPH J.D. 2016 | Amelia, VA

Far Above Scholarship Mark V. and Stacy A. Parkinson Student Support Fund

What is your passion? I love helping people get through their difficulties and solve their problems. That’s why I went to law school. I love my family, friends and mentors who encourage me to strive for my best.

How have scholarships helped you? The Parkinson Fund made the 6th Semester in Washington, D.C. program possible for me. There, I interned with lawyers at the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. Additional scholarships helped support my education and reduced my student loan debt.

Have you overcome any obstacles in pursuing your education? Lack of confidence and lack of funds were my biggest hurdles. I gained confidence working as a paralegal for five years. I helped pay for school by working for myself as a Spanish-English document translator for a year and continued part-time during school.

What is your goal in the future? I have a few practice areas in mind, but I mostly look forward to using my legal education in public service.

What would you say to KU donors? Thank you. For me, this was a dream come true.

Story by KU Endowment | Photo by Abby Greenawalt

34 KU LAW MAGAZINE


79% of total gifts were $500 or less

Total amount of gifts $500 or less —

$1,186,491

10,517

Total number of gifts Donors came from all

50

and

states + D.C.

3

countries

57%

$12.2M

of gifts came from Kansas

Students

63%

$12M

Unrestricted $5.4M

Programs

40 New scholarships

$1M

Faculty $0.3M

Facilities

of all donors are from Kansas

3,747

Total number of donors

35% of donors were NEW donors

KU LAW MAGAZINE 35


GIVING NEWS

Bion J. Beebe, L’76 & Vicki L. Beebe

Dan Crabtree, L’81 & Maureen Mahoney, L’84

Jeanne Gorman, L’78

Martin Pringle Law Firm

The James Woods Green Medallion

Patrick Stueve, L’87 & Janna Stueve

Accepted by Stan Smith, L’82

LAW SCHOOL AWARDS JAMES WOODS GREEN MEDALLIONS The law school honored recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion at a dinner on April 16 in Lawrence. The medallion, named in honor of the law school’s first dean, recognizes those whose cumulative contributions to the school exceed $25,000. This year’s honorees are pictured above with their medallions. Unable to attend the ceremony were recipients Steve Davis, L’78; Ross C. Hartley, L’74; Mark, L’90 & Janelle Hegarty; Sherri Lee Meigs, L’82; James R. Walters, L’75; and the Oscar F. and Alta M. Belin Foundation.

Photos by Earl Richardson

36 KU LAW MAGAZINE


WITH SINCERE THANKS TO OUR DONORS JAMES WOODS GREEN MEDALLION HONOREES The James Woods Green Medallion honors donors whose cumulative giving to the University of Kansas School of Law is $25,000 & above. Honorees whose names are italicized are deceased. MOST RECENT HONOREES Bion J. Beebe, L’76 & Vicki L. Beebe Oscar F. and Alta M. Belin Foundation Dan Crabtree, L’81 & Maureen Mahoney, L’84 Steve Davis, L’78 Jeanne Gorman, L’78 Ross C. Hartley, L’74 Mark, L’90 & Janelle Hegarty Martin Pringle Law Firm Sherri Lee Meigs, L’82 Patrick, L’87 & Janna Stueve James R. Walters, L’75 PAST HONOREES INDIVIDUALS Constance M. Achterberg, L’53 Frank A. Ackerman, L’80 Donald D. Adams, L’64 & Ann Wees Adams Terry Arthur, L’69 & Virginia Thomas Arthur Jennifer Gille Bacon, L’76 J. Eugene Balloun, L’54 Richard A. Barber, L’34 Mrs. Richard A. Barber Barbara Blake Bath, PhD & Thomas D. Bath, PhD Lydia I. Beebe, L’77 & Charles E. Doyle, L’78 Blake A. Biles, L’75 Richard L. Bond, L’60 & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond William F. (Brad) Bradley Jr., L’80 John K. Bremyer, L’46 & Jayne Williamson Bremyer Hon. Clayton Brenner, L’28 Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Max & Mary Brown Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad Barkley Clark Gertrude Clark Peggy A. Clark Walter L. Cofer, L’81 & Nicola R. Heskett John D. Conderman, L’69 & Patricia R. Conderman Teresa Blatchley Conkey Mary K. Connell O. J. Connell Jr., L’38 Donald L. Cordes, L’59 Professor Mike Davis & Faye Davis Mark M. Deatherage, L’85 Suzanne M. Decker Michael F. Delaney, L’76 & Kathleen L. Delaney Glen W. Dickinson Professor Martin Dickinson & Sallie Dickinson Carolyn A. Dillon & Richard W. Dillon William R. Docking, L’77 & Judy O. Docking Robert L. Driscoll, L’64 Gary Duncan, L’74 & Adrianna D. Gonzales Duncan Ruth Adair Dyer, L’21 Mildred A. Early David S. Elkouri, L’78 Clem Fairchild Dorothy Feir, PhD Bruce A. Finzen, L’73 David H. Fisher, L’38 & Mary Frances Fisher Charles L. Frickey, L’69 Loren M. Gensman Roland D. Gidney Jr., L’47

Donald W. Giffin, L’53 & Esther Brown Giffin Ernest J. Goppert, L’17 David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Frederick B. Gould, L’89 & Julie Pigott Gould Brian G. Grace, L’67 Jordan L. Haines, L’57 & Shirley Cundiff Haines Barry D. Halpern, L’73 & Cynthia A. Halpern Kenneth M. Hamilton, L’47 & Ruth Hamilton Roberta B. Harkness Minnie I. Harms Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Edward J. Healy, L’79 Harry H. Herington Jr., L’93 & Cindy Herington Alvin D. Herrington, L’57 Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Elma A. Holdeman Alice A. Hook Charles H. Hostetler, L’63 & Julie A. Hostetler Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin John E. Hurley Jr., L’62 & Jo Sicking Hurley Elizabeth Ann Hylton Hon. Theodore B. Ice, L’61 & Sue H. Ice Howard M. Immel, L’38 & Sue Immel Balfour & Margaret Jeffrey Arne L. Johnson Family Trust Richard Kane Janice Miller Karlin, L’80 & Calvin J. Karlin, L’77 Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Larry E. Keenan, L’54 Matthew, L’84 & Lori Keenan John M. Kilroy Jr., L’73 Jennifer Johnson Kinzel, L’78 Fred C. & Mary Robinson Koch Thomas G. Kokoruda, L’72 Bradley G. Korell, L’97 Florence M. Kuske Linda S. Legg, L’75 & Judge Lawrence G. Crahan Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Logan Robert W. Loyd, L’62 & Mary Jo Loyd Lyle D. Lutton Jr., L’50 & De Nell T. Lutton Daniel J. Lyons, L’77 & Maryanne Lyons Lucy E. Mason, L’92 & Cris Sena Glenn E. McCann, L’40 Madeleine M. McDonough, L’90 Brian K. McLeod, L’89 Teresa M. Meagher, L’79 & T. Bradley Manson Eunice H. Melik Col. Edward A. Metcalf III, L’49 Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Dara Trum Miles, L’87 & Robin J. Miles, L’86 George D. Miner, L’22 Deborah Cawley Moeller, L’91 & Michael Moeller, L’91 John R. Morse, L’75 Eric, L’84 & Tracy Namee Jeffrey S. Nelson, L’80 & Lisa K. Nelson Hon. Ronald C. Newman, L’70 Holly Nielsen, L’82 Bernard E. Nordling, L’49 & Barbara A. Nordling Charles H. Oldfather Jr. Hortense Casady Oldfather Bernard V. O’Neill Jr., L’76 & Marion W. O’Neill Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 Marjorie L. Page Robert A. Page, L’53 Mary Louise Parker Diane S. Parrish, L’79 Professor John C. Peck, L’74 & Pamela C. Peck

Patrick E. Peery, L’81 William B. Pendleton, L’57 Mary Ruth Watermulder Petefish Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65 & Dee W. Piculell Donald H. Postlethwaite, L’26 & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Raymond F. Rice, L’1908 & Ethel Rice Mike, L’84 & Elaine Riggs John M. Rounds, L’39 Hon. M. Kay Royse, L’78 Joan R. Ruff, L’73 & Dennis P. Wilbert, L’73 Bill R. Sampson, L’71 Drucilla J. Sampson, L’96 Elizabeth A. Schartz, L’88 Janet Manning Schroeder Robert A. Schroeder, L’37 Kelley D. Sears, L’74 & Jane A. Sears Carolyn Henry Shinkle & J. Frank Shinkle, L’41 Mary Maurine Shurtz Richard L. Sias, L’54 Beatrice Siegel Leo R. Sissel, L’50 Justice Fred N. Six, L’56 & Lilian Six Christopher Smith, L’72 Glee S. Smith Jr., L’47 & Geraldine B. Smith Shannon L. Spangler, L’87 & Michael E. Spangler Frank L. Snell, L’24 Mary Ellen Stadler Roger D. Stanton, L’63 & Judith Duncan Stanton Kate Stephens Hon. Donnan Stephenson, L’48 & Patricia Ledyard Stephenson John D. Stewart, L’40 & Hannah T. Stewart Mikel L. Stout, L’61 & LeAnn R. Stout Peter E. Strand, L’79 & Sheila C. Strand Edna J. Sullivan & James E. Sullivan, L’29 Willard B. Thompson, L’58 Erma B. & Frank E. Tyler Omer G. Voss, L’39 & Annabele K. Voss Omer G. Voss Jr. Sen. John Vratil, L’71 Katherine Hall Wagstaff & Robert W. Wagstaff Gary A. Waldron, L’79 & Carol A. Foster Charles R. Wall Steve, L’83 & Sandra Walton Martha S. Warren, L’87 Perry D. Warren, L’73 & Janet Beebe Warren Professor William E. Westerbeke Douglas D. Wheat, L’74 & Laura L. Wheat Houston L. Whiteside Willard G. Widder, L’49 Karl T. Wiedemann Paul L. Wilbert, L’38 Susan Scott Wilner R. Dean Wolfe, L’69 Marie S. Woodbury, L’79 & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD Stanley N. Woodworth, L’78 Robert S. Wunsch, L’58 & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Paul Yde, L’85 & Sarah Elder D. Spencer Yohe, L’54 FIRMS & FOUNDATIONS Barber Emerson LC Bever Dye LC Chevron Products Company Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Foulston & Siefkin LLP Hampton & Royce LC Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite Fanning & Honeyman LLP Kansas Women Attorneys Association Leon & Lee T. Karelitz Trust Lathrop & Gage LLP

Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chartered Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC Snell & Wilmer LLP The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP Wal-Mart Stores Inc. DEANS CLUB AMBASSADORS $10,000 & above Constance M. Achterberg Julia Gille Anderson & Jett B. Anderson Lydia I. Beebe & Charles E. Doyle John P. Bowman & Katie-Pat Bowman Mary Kathleen Connell Dee Ehling Dillon & David B. Dillon Kaye M. Drahozal & Professor Christopher R. Drahozal David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Alfred Gerald Ferguson Professor Emeritus David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb David E. Hall & Laura H. Hall Ross C. Hartley & Christine Ness Hartley Edward J. Healy & Helen B. Healy Elizabeth Ann Hylton Thomas K. Jones & Patricia Lynn Jones Jennifer Johnson Kinzel Linda S. Legg Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd T. Bradley Manson & Teresa M. Meagher Patrick E. Peery & Cheryl Messer Peery Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Elizabeth A. Schartz Patrick J. Stueve & Janna M. Stueve Mark A. Van Blaricum & Jackie DeSouza Van Blaricum James R. Walters & Mary Clayton Walters Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall Virginia Ann Wright DEANS CLUB BENEFACTORS $5,000-$9,999 Marshal B. Allshouse & Amy Allshouse Jennifer Gille Bacon & Charles L. Bacon Jr. Mary Ann Bernard Jo Ann Butaud Steve Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey Brad Korell & Justin McNulty Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Dean Stephen W. Mazza Christopher K. McKenzie & Manuela Albuquerque Robin J. Miles & Dara Trum Miles Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Barbara A. Nordling Janet M. O’Neal Bill Sampson & Drucilla Mort Sampson Professor Elinor P. Schroeder Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout Richard K. Walker H. Steven Walton Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD DEANS CLUB PATRONS $3,000-$4,999 Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams J. Eugene Balloun Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett

KU LAW MAGAZINE 37


DONOR REPORT Georgia K. Erickson Jay F. Fowler Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Jo Sicking Hurley Brian A. Jackson Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan John M. Kilroy Jr. Thomas G. Kokoruda & Polly Kokoruda Mon Yin Lung Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Madeleine M. McDonough Brian K. McLeod Deborah Cawley Moeller Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Stephen M. Schutter & Karen Zambri Schutter Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith Scott B. Strohm & Tracy Strohm Martha S. Warren DEANS CLUB $1,000-$2,999 Frank A. Ackerman & Tim Cook Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman Joseph R. Alexander Jr. Julie Nordling Andrews Douglas K. Anning & Kirk L. Isenhour Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Gary L. Ayers & Charleen S. Ayers Orval F. Baldwin II Hon. Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Daniel A. Belhumeur & Ree A. Belhumeur Nancy L. Berry & Tony D. Buffington J. Rod Betts Anne H. Blessing & William R. Blessing Hon. Donald W. Bostwick & Jill D. Bostwick Barbara Sample Brand Gerald W. Brenneman Cynthia R. Bryant Marian Mussatto Burns & Clyde M. Burns M. Katie Gates Calderon & Pedro D. Calderon Melissa L. Conboy & William E. Mountford II Tim Connell Gary E. Cooper & Elfriede Cooper Hon. Daniel D. Crabtree & Maureen M. Mahoney Stephen J. Craig & Joan Stover Craig Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Professor Emeritus Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Professor Emeritus Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Bryan J. Didier & Jeremy Wilkins Didier Daniel H. Diepenbrock & Paula Diepenbrock Donald N. Dirks Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Lauren E. Douville Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll Sonnet C. Edmonds & Christopher S. Edmonds Melvin L. Ehrlich & Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Marc E. Elkins & Jana B. Elkins Justin D. Elkouri & Mica Elkouri Kent R. Erickson & Lisa R. Erickson Marc K. Erickson & Lindsey Pease Erickson Timothy J. Evans & Mary S. Evans Jane A. Finn, PhD Bruce A. Finzen Myron L. Frans Shelly L. Freeman & Kimberly A. Jones Edward E. Frizell III & Allison Miller Frizell Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Teodoro Garcia Jr. Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates

38 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Timothy A. Glassco Jeanne Gorman Edward H. Graham & Julia N. Graham Jonathan H. Gregor Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Casey S. Halsey & Paula Bush Halsey Nancy Fligg Hampton Anne Fleishel Harris John E. Hayes III Katharine Milberger Haynes Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Lindsey Morse Heinz & Bradley D. Heinz Harry H. Herington Jr. & Cindy Herington Alvin D. Herrington Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Andrea G. Horvath & Charles F. Smith Ryan J. Huschka Hon. Teresa J. James Brian M. Johnston & Tonya O. Johnston Calvin J. Karlin & Hon. Janice Miller Karlin Christopher J. Kaufman & Allison Draffan Kaufman Professor Mike A. Kautsch & Elaine M. Kautsch Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Robert F. Kethcart & Stephanie A. Kethcart Frank H. Kirk & Nancy A. Kirk Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD Peter C. Knops & Barbara A. Knops Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Jason P. Lacey & Skye D. Lacey Hon. Edward Larson Hon. Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Linda L. Lee Travis D. Lenkner & Erin Delaney Donald A. Low & Diane C. Low John W. Lungstrum & Linda E. Lungstrum Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum William W. Mahood III & Michelle Elwell Mahood Crystal Whitebread Mai Thomas P. Maltese Carolyn L. Matthews & William P. Matthews Barbara L. McCloud Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Douglas C. McKenna & Nina Schloesser McKenna J. Nolan McWilliams, Esq. Professor Emeritus Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer William H. Moore & Kristin M. Brulez John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse N. Royce Nelson & Linda L. Nelson John C. Nettels Jr. Tamara L. Niles & R. Lance Niles Michael F. Norton & Susan Roffman Norton Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Hon. James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW David J. Rebein Douglas R. Richmond James A. Riedy Michael L. Riggs & Elaine P. Riggs Chris Robe & Debra A. Robe Hon. Julie A. Robinson Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Hon. Gerald L. Rushfelt & Debbie Rushfelt Stephanie S. Sankar Kelley D. Sears & Jane A. Sears Angela M. Seaton William H. Seiler Jr. J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD, JD & James A. Sherman John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson Stephen N. Six & Professor Elizabeth Brand Six

Holly Pauling Smith John L. Snyder & Diane P. Snyder Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., PhD Kenneth W. Spain Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson Jeffrey L. Stowell & Carol A. Stowell Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Jon A. Strongman Howard T. Sturdevant & Mrs. Howard T. Sturdevant Robert C. Sturgeon & Linda Ann Sturgeon Professor Ellen E. Sward S. Lee Meigs Taylor Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Earl D. Tjaden & Shirley A. Tjaden Kristen V. Toner & Ryan M. Toner Robert W. Tormohlen Kirk Underwood Mauricio A. Uribe & Cynthia Briggs Uribe Roger K. Viola & Karen S. Viola Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Professor William E. Westerbeke J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson David L. Wing & Kristin D. Wing Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD Jo E. Wochner & William J. Wochner Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Stephen L. Young CAMPANILE CLUB $500-$999 Christopher S. Abrams Patrick H. Allen Charles F. Bunch George A. Burns Brent J. Burtin & Theresa O’Connor Burtin Cindy J. Colglazier Timothy E. Congrove Staci L. Cooper Robert W. Coykendall Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Paul F. DeBauge & Janice B. DeBauge Deborah S. Doud John D. Dunbar Pauline Peppercorn Dye Anne Murray Emert & Mark T. Emert Parthenia B. Evans & Dan T. Evans Laura D. Fent Hayward D. Fisk & Diane Haxby Fisk Patrick X. Fowler & Susan J. Fowler Perry L. Franklin Lynne A. Friedewald Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin C. Peter Goplerud III & Mariette Brodeur Sharon E. Greenfield Andrew F. Halaby & Ann Marie Halaby Dave Harder Blake T. Hardwick & Monica Grewal Hardwick Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven David R. Hederstedt & Valerie Hederstedt Bernard J. Hickert Molly Westering Hunter & Mark Hunter Joy Noakes Isaacs William W. Jeter Andrew M. Johnson Christopher M. Joseph & Jaime Marie Joseph Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Jeffrey A. Kennard & Rachel Deleon Kennard Brenda Roberts Kissam Patricia A. Konopka Paul C. Lantis Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Steven K. Linscheid Peter T. Maharry & Robyn S. Stone

Terry L. Malone & Monica S. Malone Coy M. Martin Charles D. Marvine & Professor Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Margaret F. Mathewson Ryan M. B. McAteer Ann McElhenny Lori Connors McGroder Philip C. McKnight & Jill McKnight Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Peter R. Montecuollo Professor Lumen N. Mulligan & Emily Vrabac Mulligan Thomas M. Mullinix III & Constance Baker Mullinix Jane P. Murphy & Barry L. Murphy, MD Thomas V. Murray Donald L. Norman Jr. S. Patrick O’Bryan & Shannon Kerr O’Bryan Jacqueline Egr Pueppke William E. Quick & Jennifer A. Quick Larry G. Rapp & Dianne J. Rapp Blake H. Reeves Thomas M. Ruane III & Sarah S. Ruane Ryan J. Schletzbaum Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell Michael K. Seck & Sharon K. Mossman Keith C. Sevedge & Jan M. Sevedge David E. Shay & Kimberly R. Shay Hon. Lawrence E. Sheppard Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge G. Phillip Shuler III James J. Sienicki & Chirl Ann Sienicki Hon. David H. Sivright Jr. Donald E. Sloan, PhD Randall J. Snapp & Beth Bertelsmeyer Snapp Erin E. Syring Kathryn Marie Timm Melanie L. Trump & Timothy T. Trump John A. Vetter & Susan E. Vetter Scott E. Vincent Michael L. Walden & Chasitie Burgess Walden Professor Stephen Jordan Ware Connor K. Warner, PhD & Professor Elizabeth A. Kronk Warner Sara E. Welch Robert E. Williams & Mary L. Williams Rebecca A. Winterscheidt & Robert J. Werner Cynthia S. Woelk Hon. William S. Woolley & Debra Lee Barnett Guillermo G. Zorogastua CRIMSON AND BLUE CLUB $300-$499 John G. Atherton Grant D. Bannister & Stephanie J. Bannister W. F. Barber Jr. Jacob W. Bayer Jr. & Leslie Russo Bayer Stephen J. Bednar F. Richard Bernasek & Regina Y. Bernasek Larry J. Bingham & Ann H. Bingham Robin C. Blair & Deborah M. Blair Elizabeth Blake Michael S. Boohar & Jennifer J. Boohar Bradley L. Brehm & Judith L. Brehm J. Craig Cartwright & Angela Power Cartwright Donald E. Chambers Crissa A.S. Cook & Jerald J. Cook Adam S. Davis Ed W. Dosh Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Sparkle Ellison, JD, PhD Regent Timothy R. Emert & Barbara Meitner Emert Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Harold E. Goss N. William Hines Jr. & Jean S. Hines Robert D. Hovey Richard G. Hunsucker & Carol A. Hunsucker


Bruce R. Jeide Topper Johntz & Linda D. Johntz Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph John J. Jurcyk Jr. & Rita Menghini Jurcyk Judy Kish & Bernie Kish, PhD Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Larry D. Leonard Ryan J. Mize Elizabeth Drill Nay John D. Osborn & Sarah P. Osborn Melissa M. Plunkett Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post R. Kent Pringle & Cathy M. Pringle Eric C. Rajala & Mitzie Milliken John L. Richeson & Jan Erni Richeson March M. Runner Hon. Janice D. Russell Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Amanda C. Sheridan Hon. Fred N. Six & Lilian O. Six Randolph W. Starr Edwin A. Stene & Sally L. Stene Hon. John L. Vratil & Teresa C. Vratil Hon. Marcia K. Walsh Aaron A. Wilson Jr. William M. Yanek II William L. Yocum 1865 CLUB $100-$299 David C. All & Priscilla A. All Mark A. Andersen & Susan E. Andersen David W. Andreas Angela S. Armenta Christina Arnone & Michael Arnone Hon. G. Gordon Atcheson & Cheryl A. Pilate Matthew E. Austin & Lindsey Austin John M. Avondet & Jamie Avondet Caroline A. Bader & Travis M. White William J. Bahr & Rachelle D. Bahr Katherine J. Bailes, JD, PhD Ernest C. Ballweg Vedrana Balta Sarah Emile Lynn Baltzell & Brian P. Baltzell Frank S. Bangs Jr. Jon R. Barbee John W. Barbian David P. Barclay Jan Barron & Jan Roskam, PhD Eric W. Barth & Maggie A. Barth John L. Beck, Jr. & Alicia M. Beck Frank J. Becker & Barbara A. Becker Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Beverly A. Smith Billings Rodney L. Bishop, MD Michael R. Bizal Marjorie A. Blaufuss & Larry J. Libeer Lawrence W. Blickhan & Patricia Ann Blickhan Laura J. Bond & Fred L. Bond III Karen L. Borell & Barbara R. Stein, PhD James T. Borelli & Melinda Krautmann Borelli, RN, MS Edward M. Boyle Martin R. Brown Carrie Temm Bumgardner & Brian D. Bumgardner Anthony D. Burgin Donald L. Burnett & Deanne LaGree Burnett Hon. Michael D. Burrichter Hon. Michael B. Buser & Holly L. Buser Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Paige Vicker Butler & Henry N. Butler Samuel Butler IV Charles W. Cade & Mary Cranford Cade, PhD Jan Fink Call Terrence J. Campbell & Kristin S. Campbell Kenneth D. Cannon & Claudia N. Cannon Stephen C. Chambers Dan G. Clothier & Kristin Clothier

Christopher S. Cole Kenneth L. Cole Christopher P. Colyer Timothy R. Cork & Janice Irwin Cork David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss Brent N. Coverdale & Michel Coverdale Richard L. Cram Dan E. Cranshaw Donald A. Culp & Judy S. Culp Angi L. Cunningham Daniel A. Cunningham Sean C. Cunningham Peter F. Davidson Hon. Kathryn E. Davis Nathaniel Davis Jr. Thomas C. DeBacco John P. DeCoursey Anna Marie Dempsey Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Troy A. Dierking R. Stanley Ditus Philip V. diZerega Brian T. Docking & Emily Cassell Docking Michael A. Doll Paula E. Drungole Debra S. Duncan Charles A. Etherington & Joni Walk Etherington Edwin H. Fields & Aramide Fields Gretchen E. Fisher Mary J. Fitts Leonard G. Fleske & Mary Ann Fleske Gregory L. Franken Barbara Varner Frizell Jana Patterson Gagner & David W. Gagner Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson John J. Gates & Carolyn K. Gates Tony L. Gehres & Shawna L. Gehres Michael B. George Harry T. Gibson & Becky G. Gibson James R. Gilliland & Karen Gilliland Hon. Linda Powell Gilmore & Darin Gilmore Ellen R. Goheen & John R. Goheen, MD William E. Goss Leon B. Graves Col. James L. Green, Retired Larry Greenbaum Robert I. Guenthner & Susan S. Guenthner Michelle A. Hamilton Gary H. Hanson & Jeanne M. Hanson Richard C. Harris Joe A. Harter William D. Haught Harold L. Haun Elizabeth I. Hayes D. Randall Heilman & Joyce E. Heilman Seanna L. Higley Dana Smith Hines & Robert Eugene Hines Jr. Duane R. Hirsch & Shirley Hirsch Wyatt A. Hoch & Mary Ann Hoch William M. Hougland & Carolie Hougland David W. Howard & LeAnn Stuewe Howard Matthew H. Hoy & Heather Gray Hoy Geoffrey D. Hulsey Jody L. Huxman John J. Immel & Sheila Murphy Immel Ralph R. Inman & Sandra Wood Inman Beau A. Jackson & Laura S. Jackson Alan M. Jacobson Milos J. Jekic Michael T. Jilka Karen I. Johnson Shannon Cohorst Johnson Donald A. Johnston & Alice Ann Dowell Johnston Annette Buhler Jones & Robert L. Jones Fairfax Jones & Lynn Jerner Jones Heather A. Jones, L’99 Heather A. Jones, L’00 Michael W. Jones Gina Kaiser & David Gale

William A. Kassebaum & Jennifer M. Kassebaum Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, MD David W. Kennedy Rachel J. Kibler-Melby Loy W. Kirkpatrick Jerome G. Korkoya Lydia H. Krebs Philip C. Lacey & Nancy Owens Lacey John C. Landon Meredith S. Lang Stephen J. Lautz Ronald L. Leslie & Joleen M. Leslie Ralph E. Lewis II & Sara McKie Lewis Miguel L’Heureux Jeffrey Li Charles S. Lindberg Aubrey G. Linville & Nancy Myer Linville Margaret L. Livingood & David H. Livingood Robert R. Lohse Jr., DDS & Kathy J. Lohse Bob Londerholm & Bev Londerholm Sheila M. Long Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love Professor Quinton D. Lucas Barbara A. Lundin & Lawrence P. Daniels Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Melissa Wangemann Maag & Jared S. Maag Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach Hon. William J. Madden III & Mary Kubicz Madden Hon. Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Dennis L. Mandsager & Sherrie Koester Mandsager Katherine E. Marples John C. Martin David R. Maslen Wynetta Massey Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Harold T. McCubbin Janette R. McCullough Patricia Anne McDonald & Robert J. Wilshire Hon. Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Eric B. Metz & Susan J. Metz Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney R. B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller William S. Mills & Peggy Mills Nancy L. Mitchell & David W. Mitchell, PhD Kevin F. Mitchelson & Frances Mitchelson William M. Modrcin Jr. Judith A. Moler & Donald L. Moler Jr. U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran & Robba Addison Moran M. Margaret Moran & Kevin J. Moran Stephen R. Morgan & Paula M. Morgan Benjamin G. Morris & Nancy Johnson Morris Jeffery B. Morris Kelsey Patterson Nazar & Andrew J. Nazar Robert B. Neill & Margaret E. Neill Stephen D. Nelson & Dianna Johnson Nelson C. David Newbery, JD & Denise L. Newbery Darin A. Nugent Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien James A. Oppy Floyd V. Palmer & Marilyn Henning Palmer Randall D. Palmer Kyungjoo Park William T. Pendergrass Kathryn Pruessner Peters Steven B. Pollicoff John A. Potucek II Erica Ramsey & Eric Ramsey Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Hal C. Reed Brenda Petrie Register & Benton W. Register Ronald S. Reuter Christie F. Reynolds & David O. Reynolds Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. & Tiffany L. Rhodes

William C. Richardson George E. Rider & Jeannene E. Rider Shon C. Robben & Michelle L. Robben Sara J. Roesler Hon. Trish Rose Devin K. Ross Duane K. Ross Leon E. Roulier & Barbara Hauck Roulier Rachel B. Rubin Angela L. Rud & Jeff L. Rud Rebecca A. Ryan William H. Sanders Jr. John O. Sanderson & Joann L. Sanderson William K. Sauck Jr. Nancy Racunas Saugstad & Lee Saugstad Gerald Sawatzky & Wilma Sawatzky Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Brian J. Schulman & Jami Levine Schulman Steven D. Selbe Veronica R. Sellers & Jere D. Sellers Larry M. Sewell, ATJG & Patricia N. Sewell Emily Cameron Shattil & Daniel M. Shattil Andrew R. Shaw & Laura Hall Todd A. Sheppard Eldon J. Shields & Bonnie Shields Adam M. Siebers Devin S. Sikes & Sheebani S. Patel Amy Logan Sliva Cheryl C. Smith G. Sid Smith Steven P. Smith & Deborah J. Smith Christopher P. Sobba Christine Kay Solso & Robert J. Huber William B. Sorensen Jr. David A. Sorenson Amanda Stanley John H. Stauffer Sr. & Barbara E. Stauffer Christopher L. Steadham & Shanna C. Steadham John T. Stewart III & Linda Bliss Stewart Kara Trouslot Stubbs Michael L. Sullivan R. Kent Sullivan & Phyllis L. Sullivan, DO Linda L. Sybrant Wendy K. Tatro & Richard T. McCollum Frank W. Taylor Jr. & Betty D. Taylor Lawrence L. Tenopir Leah Terranova Victoria Thomas, JD & Roger O. Lambson, PhD Willard B. Thompson & Barbara L. Thompson Gerald A. Thorpe & Patti H. Thorpe Rev. Mary Al Titus Stephen M. Todd & Carlene M. Todd Tom Triplett & Christie Triplett Rebecca Anita Tsosie Thomas M. Tuggle & Suzanne F. Tuggle Kimberley H. Tyson Thomas M. Van Cleave III James D. Van Pelt Larry S. Vernon & Jill A. Casado Brad A. Vining Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III Daniel L. Watkins & Phyllis Watkins William K. Waugh III & Judith Watson Waugh Nathan B. Webb & Sanna M. Harjusola-Webb, PhD John C. Wesley & Millicent Hunt Wesley Nathan H. White & Annette M. White Deborah L. Wilkerson & Kevin M. Wilkerson John P. Woolf & Mary L. Woolf Judith Locy Wright, PhD & Jack B. Wright, PhD Morgan Wright & Joan Wright Steve P. Wright Ernest N. Yarnevich Jr. & Anne Beeson Yarnevich Jeannie P. Yockey-Fine & Michael R. Fine

KU LAW MAGAZINE 39


DONOR REPORT Professor Corey R. Yung & Betty B. Yung Katherine Bollig Zogleman JAYHAWK CLUB $10-$99 David A. Ambler & Mary Kate Ambler Michael R. Andrusak Homer P. Appleby Jr. Christopher M. Bailey Doyle Baker Curtis G. Barnhill & Martha G. Barnhill Marilyn Bell Carol Y. Berns & Jeffrey P. Berns Elizabeth Roth Best & Michael R. Best David A. Brace Clarence Bradford Aubrey J. Bradley Jr. & Audrey Bacon Bradley Thomas R. Buchanan & Joyce Fuhrken Buchanan Jeanette Cabrera Patricia L. Campbell Stuart R. Collier Crystal R. Cook Roy E. Creek & Florine M. Creek Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, EdD Antonio R. Cruz Clark H. Cummins David W. Davis & Rhona Thorington Davis Adrian G. Dejeu Andrew M. DeMarea & Tracey DeMarea Hon. Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Betty Cram Dickerson & Thomas J. Dickerson Sue Smith Dickey Sharon L. Dickgrafe Shelley J. Diehl Graham R. Doeren Mark A. DuPree Hon. Jeffrey R. Elder Peggy A. Elliott Jeffrey E. Feinstein Barbara Wagner Foster Diane Frazier Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Dana McGlamery Galiga Michael L. Galiga Ronald F. Gann Gloria S. Garrett Peggy Glazzard, EdD, JD Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough Michael R. Gould Christopher C. Grenz & Esther Y. Grenz Timothy J. Grillot & Janette K. Grillot John N. Gutschenritter & Sharon A. Gutschenritter Carroll M. Hacker John R. Hamilton Erika L. Hane Robert H. Haymaker John C. Hickey & Cynthia L. Hickey David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Tonda Jones Hill John I. Hughes & Ruth Roney Hughes Gordon A. Jones Michael R. Keenan Lesley T. Ketzel Wayne B. Klawier Derele W. Knepper Eric T. Knorr & Darlene R. Knorr Justin B. Kohlbeck W. Robert Lasater Jr. Dr. William M. Lathrop & Bonita Lathrop Craig T. Lawson Brett D. Leopold Zachary A. Lerner Clayton D. Lewis Robert D. Lewis Kelli Colyer Lieurance & Thomas R. Lieurance Stanley L. Lind Allison Stroup Long & Lt. Col. Jeffrey L. Long

40 KU LAW MAGAZINE

James A. Long & Larissa J. Long James W. Lusk & Hon. Nancy Niles Lusk Sheila C. Maksimowicz & John N. Maksimowicz Donald F. Martin Michael P. Martin Charles A. Marvin & Betsy Wilson Marvin Brian R. Matula Michael J. McNally & Elizabeth Shertzer McNally Edward J. Militti E. J. Militti Jr. Patricia I. Miller Rick G. Morris Micheal A. Mulloy Stephanie M. Neidig Patricia Cram Nelson & Michael A. Nelson, MD Loren L. Obley Alphonse B. Perkins Reed A. Peters & Ruth Olson Peters Kevin L. Petracek & Barbara Stokes Petracek James P. Pottorff Jr. & Judith E. Pottorff Wendy M. Rohleder-Sook & Christopher W. Sook Jason P. Romero & Jackie Romero J. Alan Sanders, MD & Diane Sandberg Sanders Ted J. Sauer & Gay Galliart Sauer Matthew L. Scarber Robert E. Schulman, PhD & Anne Fink Schulman Kathryn A. Seeberger & James T. Seeberger Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake Charla Smith, Esq. David G. Smith David M. Staker & Christina Dunn Staker Carl E. Stallard Keith L. Stanley & Jan Stanley Alan R. Stetson James D. Stevens & Susan Cox Stevens Benjamin J. Stringer William F. Swegle & Martha Ann Swegle Linda K. Tivorsak W. Scott Toth & Dana E. Toth Emily Schutte Vijayakirthi & Victor A. Vijayakirthi Jeanne M. Vratil Andrea McGrath Wehner & Alex E. Wehner Jeffery B. Weinberg & Mary Haynes Weinberg Sandra Wiechert & Allen L. Wiechert Raymond H. Wilbur & Marian Mathews Wilbur Mike Wildgen & Linda DeMarais Wildgen Thelmarie Wilhite Jan Willey & Dale Willey Jeffrey J. Williams Stanley D. Williams & Janae L. Schaeffer Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Eleanor A. Woodyard George W. Yarnevich & Margaret E. Yarnevich Holly R. Zane Elaine Oser Zingg & Otto M. Zingg Cathy Gerlinger Zumbehl & Glenn E. Zumbehl NEW FUNDS EDWIN W. HECKER JR. TEACHING FELLOWSHIP was established by James R. Walters, L’75. This fund will support a faculty teaching fellowship. ELINOR SCHROEDER FUND FOR THE JOURNAL OF LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY was created by KU Law Professor Elinor Schroeder. It will support operating

expenses for the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy. PROFESSOR MICHAEL DAVIS LEGAL STUDY ABROAD FUND was established by Doug Wheat, L’74. This fund will provide support for study abroad programs at the School of Law. JOHN P. BOWMAN LAW FUND was established by John Bowman, L’80. The fund will provide unrestricted support to the School of Law. KUH-KU MEDICAL-LEGAL PARTNERSHIP FUND will provide support for KU Law Medical-Legal Partnership activities with KU Hospital. LMH-KU MEDICAL-LEGAL PARTNERSHIP FUND will provide support for KU Law Medical-Legal Partnership activities with Lawrence Memorial Hospital. BAR EXAM STUDENT SUPPORT FUND will provide third-year law students with assistance for expenses associated with preparing for and taking the bar exam. JOHN W. HEAD INTERNATIONAL LAW SCHOLARSHIP will provide scholarships for international students with financial need. KU LAW CLASS OF 1963 SCHOLARSHIP will provide scholarships for the School of Law. PERLE AND CATHERINE FRAZEE LAW SCHOLARSHIP was established through the estate of Perle Frazee, L’31, and Catherine Frazee. It will provide scholarships to academically qualified students at the School of Law. MARK AND JACKIE VAN BLARICUM SCHOLARSHIP was established by Mark Van Blaricum, L’02, and Jackie Van Blaricum. It will provide scholarships to students with financial need. ALFRED FERGUSON LAW SCHOLARSHIP was established through the estate of Alfred Gerald Ferguson. It will provide scholarships to School of Law students who have graduated from an accredited Kansas high school. DAVIS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP was established by Steve Davis, L’78, and Kim Bowen Davis, BS’78. It will provide scholarships for students with academic merit and financial need. LIBRARY SUPPORT FUNDS Hazel A. Anderson Law Library Fund Louise Ahlstedt Beebe & Jack E. Beebe Law Library Fund Thomas W. Boone Law School Library Fund Ruth Adair Dyer Law Library Fund Clem W. Fairchild Law Fund Friends of the University of Kansas Law Library Arthur W. Hershberger Memorial Law Book Fund Frank G. Hodge Memorial Library Fund KU Law Library Unrestricted Fund Kate McKay Memorial Book Fund Evart Mills Memorial Book Fund Douglas D. & Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund

LAW FIRM, CORPORATE & FOUNDATION GIFTS Asian American Bar Association of Kansas City Association of Corporate Counsel, Mid-America Chapter Baird Holm LLP Barber Emerson LC Belin Foundation Bever Dye Foundation The Law Offices of David J. Brown LC Bryan Cave LLP Cerner Corporation Clark, Mize & Linville, Chartered Whitney B. Damron PA First National Bank of Hutchinson Foulston Siefkin LLP Perle and Catherine Frazee Foundation The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation Hinkle Law Firm LLC Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Johnson County Bar Association Kansas Bar Association Kansas Bar Foundation Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association Kansas Women Attorneys Association KC Lesbian, Gay & Allied Lawyers KS Prosecutors Foundation KU Alumni Association KU Endowment Lathrop & Gage LLP Law School Admission Council Lawrence Country Club Lewis Rice LLC Littler Marks Jewelers Inc. Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace & Bauer LLP Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock and Kennedy Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart PC Payne & Jones, Chartered Payne & Jones Foundation Polsinelli PC Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation The Ethel & Raymond Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Seigfreid Bingham PC Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Sloan, Eisenbarth, Glassman, McEntire & Jarboe LLC Southwest Kansas Bar Association Spencer Fane LLP Kate Stephens Trust Stinson Leonard Street LLP Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans SW Caging Corporation Trevino Law Office LC UMB Bank NA United States District Court Bar Registration Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP Wichita Bar Association Withers, Gough, Pike, Pfaff & Peterson LLC MATCHING GIFTS CNA Foundation Deloitte Foundation Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation The H&R Block Foundation Kansas City Southern Kinder Morgan Foundation KU Endowment Macy’s Foundation Polsinelli PC SBL Charitable Trust Seigfreid Bingham PC Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Snell & Wilmer LLP


Sprint Foundation Thompson & Knight Foundation Thomson Reuters Wells Fargo Foundation Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP WPX Energy Inc. GIFTS RECEIVED IN HONOR OF Professor Michael J. Davis Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. Professor Edwin W. Hecker Jr. Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 Francis and LaVerne Winterburg Family GIFTS RECEIVED IN MEMORY OF Robert F. Bennett, L’52 Peggy A. Clark Raymond Goetz Professor Emeritus William A. Kelly, L’49 Philip C. Kissam Philip C. Lacey, L’74 Jack E. Lungstrum, MD Kenton J. Mai, L’89 Bernard E. Nordling, L’49 Donald R. Paxson, L’70 Marion J. Roesler, L’54 Geraldine Buhler Smith Glee S. Smith Jr., L’47 Douglas L. Stanley, L’84 Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens OTHER FUNDS Bradley Family Legal Internship Beebe/Doyle Family Classroom Fund Richard L. & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Fund Walter Brauer Faculty Support Fund Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Elder Law Fund Robert C. Casad Comparative Law Lectureship Class of 1971 Fund Donald L. Cordes School of Law Opportunity Fund Paul and Janice DeBauge Pre-Law Fund Charles L. Decker Fund Dean Martin Dickinson Tax Policy Lecture Mary Ann Mize Dickinson Memorial Garden Fund G. Gary Duncan Fund Elder Law Program Fund David H. Fisher Law Fund Elizabeth M. Gallup, MD, JD, MLP Fellowship Loren M. Gensman Fund David & Rita Gottlieb Family Fund GUF/Law School Unrestricted Jordan L. & Shirley Haines Law Faculty Fellowship Kenneth M. & Ruth Elizabeth Hamilton Law Fund John W. Head International Law Research Fund Ed & Helen Healy Law School Opportunity Fund Hinkle Elkouri Conference Room Fund Charlie & Julie Hostetler Pre-Law Dinner Fund Humphrey School of Law Discretionary Fund Ice Family Fund Joy M. Johnson Trust for the School of Law Leon Karelitz Charitable Trust Kansas Defender Project Kansas Law Review Mike and Elaine Kautsch First Amendment Fund Law School Building Fund Law School Dean’s Discretionary Account Law School Media, Law & Policy Program Legal Aid Clinic Fund Linda S. Legg & Lawrence G. Crahan Professionalism Fund James K. Logan Fund Fred B. Lovitch & Michael J. Davis Law Fund

Jana Mackey Support for Public Advocacy Fund Robert B. McKay Memorial Fund Medical-Legal Clinic at the Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care Clinic Richard F. Mullins Moot Court Competition Fund John A. Naill School of Law Fund Judge Edmund L. Page Jurist-in-Residence Program Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Fund Don & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Fund Public Interest Law Fund William O. Rice Law Fund Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellowship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy Shughart, Thomson & Kilroy Fund Fred N. & Lilian Six Unrestricted Law School Fund James Barclay Smith Fund Snell & Wilmer Courtroom Renovation Fund Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lecture Stephenson Lectures in Law & Government Fund Stinson Morrison Hecker Fund Tax Certificate Program Fund Tribal Law & Government Center Fund Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster Law School Dean Discretionary Fund Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster Law School Fund Douglas D. & Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund Houston Whiteside Fund Dennis P. Wilbert & Joan R. Ruff Fund Paul L. & Florine T. Wilbert Fund Wolfe Family Moot Court Assistance Fund Dean and Cheryl Wolfe KU Law Moot Court Office Fund Worrall Family Media Law Fund Paul Yde Law & Economics Fund PRIZES & AWARDS Barber Emerson LC Bluebook Relays Robert F. Bennett Student Award Fund William L. Burdick Prize Mary Anne Chambers Service Award Jack E. Dalton Legal Writing Award G. Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Robert E. Edmonds Prize for Corporation & Securities Law Family Fund Robert C. Foulston & George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Hinkle Law Firm Tax Procedure Award W. Ross Hutton Prize Howard M. & Sue Immel Annual Teaching Award Lloyd M. Kagey Leadership Award Law Class of 1949 Leadership Award Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Fund Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership & Service Award James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Dean Frederick J. Moreau Faculty Award Larry R. O’Neal/Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Fund Payne & Jones Lawyering Program Award Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Sonnenschein Scholars Program C. C. Stewart Award Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Fund UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award

PROFESSORSHIPS Centennial Teaching Professorship Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law E. S. & Tom Hampton Professorship John H. & John M. Kane Distinguished Professorship Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professorship in Law John M. Rounds Distinguished Professorship in Law Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professorship Earl B. Shurtz Law Professorship J. B. Smith Distinguished Professorship in Constitutional Law Frank E. Tyler Professorship in Law Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professorship in Law Paul E. Wilson Professorship in Law SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS Constance M. Achterberg & C.L. Clark Scholarship Mark H. Adams Sr. Memorial Scholarship Warren D. Andreas Scholarship in Law Association of Corporate Council Mid-America Chapter Scholarship Richard A. Barber Scholarship Beebe/Doyle Family Scholarship Judge Willard M. & Lucile H. Benton Memorial Scholarship Berkley Memorial Scholarship in Law Bever Dye Scholarship John Emerson Blake Memorial Scholarship Book Exchange Scholarships Bremyer Summer Intern Scholarship Fund Jo Ann Butaud Law Scholarship Fund Judge Clayton & Cecile Goforth Brenner Scholarship in Law Claude E. Chalfant Memorial Scholarship John W. & Gertrude Clark Scholarship Claude O. Conkey Memorial Scholarship O.J. Connell Jr. Law Scholarship Glen W. Dickinson Scholarship in Law William & Judy Docking Law School Scholarship Port & Mildred Early Scholarship Judge A. M. Ebright Memorial Scholarship Elkouri Family Expendable Scholarship Fund Erickson Family Scholarship Ethics for Good Scholarship Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Scholarship Foulston Siefkin 2L Scholarships Foulston Siefkin Diversity Scholarship Foulston & Siefkin Law Review Scholarship Gould Family Scholarship Jordan & Shirley Haines Scholarship Thomas H. Harkness KU Law School Scholarship Sally Harris Scholarship Aldie Haver Memorial Scholarship in Law The Help of Our Lord & Saviour Jesus Christ Scholarship Harry Herington Law Enforcement Scholarship Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Law Scholarship Hinkle Law Firm Scholarship Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Scholarship Michael H. Hoeflich & Karen J. Nordheden Scholarship in Law Enos A. Hook Memorial Scholarship Oliver H. Hughes Memorial Scholarship A. Bryce Huguenin School of Law Scholarship Judge Walter A. Huxman Scholarship Jackson Lewis Law Scholarship Arthur M. Jackson Memorial Scholarship Elmer C. Jackson Jr. Scholarship in Law for Black Americans Margaret S. Jeffrey Scholarship Grant in Law

Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Scholarship KC Lesbian, Gay & Allied Lawyers (KC LEGAL) Scholarship Kansas Women Attorneys Association Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Scholarship Calvin & Janice Karlin Annual Scholarship Andrew Keenan Memorial Scholarship Kirk Family School of Law Dorothy Arlene Bates Kirk Scholarship KWAA Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Scholarship Law Class of 1953 Scholarship Law School Class of 1925 Scholarship Law School Scholarship Fund Linda Legg KU Law Scholarship Robert W. Loyd Scholarship in Law Frank A. Lutz Memorial Scholarship Kenton Mai Memorial Scholarship Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace and Bauer Law Scholarship Minorities in Law Scholarships Harriet & Mancel Mitchell Scholarship in Law Peter A. Manville Family Law Scholarship John R. Morse Law School Scholarship Ronald C. Newman Scholarship Major Eugene H. Nirdlinger Memorial Scholarship Bernard E. Nordling Scholarship Judge Earl E. & Jean Ann O’Connor Memorial Scholarship Larry R. O’Neal Law Scholarship Charles H. Oldfather Scholarship Gary Olson Scholarship Joseph O. & Mary Louise Parker Scholarship Peery Family Law Scholarship Olin K. & Mary Ruth Petefish School of Law Scholarship Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Diversity Scholarship Polsinelli Shughart Scholarship Public Interest Summer Stipends Charles B. Randall Memorial Scholarship Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Scholarships Rice Scholar Legacy Ross Foundation Law School Scholarship Judge M. Kay Royse Scholarship in Law Judge J. C. Ruppenthal Memorial Scholarship Stephen & Janice Scheve Law Scholarship Richard & Vivian Schmidt Law Scholarship Robert A. & Janet Manning Schroeder Scholarships in Law Elisha Scott Memorial Scholarship Professor William R. Scott Scholarship Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee Law Scholarship J. Frank & Carolyn Henry Shinkle Memorial Scholarship J. Frank Shinkle Student Aid Fund Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholarships Professor Earl B. & Mary Maurine Shurtz Tribal Lawyer Scholarship Clarine Smissman J.D. & Edward Smissman PhD Scholarship in Law Carl T. Smith Memorial Scholarship Glee & Geraldine Smith Law Scholarship Snell & Wilmer Alumni Law School Scholarship William C. Spangler Memorial Scholarship Judge Robert F. Stadler Memorial Scholarship Evelyn, Richard & Blanche Thompson Scholarship Leslie T. Tupy Scholarship Suzanne Valdez & Stephen McAllister Scholarship Voss Kansas Law Scholarship Vratil Family Law Scholarship Wal-Mart Legal Diversity Scholarship Frederick L. Ward Memorial Scholarship J. L. Weigand Jr. Notre Dame Legal Education Trust Scholarship Willard G. Widder Scholarship Karl T. Wiedemann Scholarship in Law

KU LAW MAGAZINE 41


DONOR REPORT Withers, Gough, Pike, Pfaff & Peterson Law Scholarship Worrall Family Scholarship Paul R. Wunsch Scholarship

1962 Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Howard T. Sturdevant & Mrs. Howard T. Sturdevant

CLASSES 1948 W. F. Barber Jr. Stanley L. Lind

1963 Lawrence W. Blickhan & Patricia Ann Blickhan Gary E. Cooper & Elfriede Cooper Paul F. DeBauge & Janice B. DeBauge Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Richard G. Hunsucker & Carol A. Hunsucker Aubrey G. Linville & Nancy Myer Linville

1949 Aubrey J. Bradley Jr. & Audrey Bacon Bradley Randall D. Palmer 1950 Aaron A. Wilson Jr. Morgan Wright & Joan Wright 1951 Richard C. Harris Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy 1952 William E. Goss 1953 Constance M. Achterberg John G. Atherton Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson 1954 J. Eugene Balloun Robert D. Hovey Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Charles S. Lindberg Marian Mussatto Burns & Clyde M. Burns Gerald Sawatzky & Wilma Sawatzky 1955 Donald N. Dirks Bob Londerholm & Bev Londerholm 1956 Hon. James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Hon. Fred N. Six & Lilian O. Six Carl E. Stallard John C. Wesley & Millicent Hunt Wesley 1957 R. Stanley Ditus Alvin D. Herrington Duane R. Hirsch & Shirley Hirsch John J. Jurcyk Jr. & Rita Menghini Jurcyk Loy W. Kirkpatrick Frank W. Taylor Jr. & Betty D. Taylor Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall 1958 Donald L. Burnett & Deanne LaGree Burnett Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Hon. Gerald L. Rushfelt & Debbie Rushfelt Willard B. Thompson & Barbara L. Thompson James D. Van Pelt Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch

1964 Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Patrick H. Allen Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll William D. Haught Leon E. Roulier & Barbara Hauck Roulier Tom Triplett & Christie Triplett Robert E. Williams & Mary L. Williams 1965 Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman David C. All & Priscilla A. All Edward M. Boyle Bradley L. Brehm & Judith L. Brehm Donald A. Culp & Judy S. Culp Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, EdD Regent Timothy R. Emert & Barbara Meitner Emert David R. Hederstedt & Valerie Hederstedt Karen I. Johnson Topper Johntz & Linda D. Johntz Ronald L. Leslie & Joleen M. Leslie Loren L. Obley John L. Richeson & Jan Erni Richeson 1966 Stephen C. Chambers Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Donald A. Johnston & Alice Ann Dowell Johnston Benjamin G. Morris & Nancy Johnson Morris Hon. Lawrence E. Sheppard Stephen M. Todd & Carlene M. Todd Thomas M. Van Cleave III 1967 John D. Dunbar Robert I. Guenthner & Susan S. Guenthner Harold L. Haun Frank H. Kirk & Nancy A. Kirk Donald F. Martin Floyd V. Palmer & Marilyn Henning Palmer William T. Pendergrass Duane K. Ross Robert E. Schulman, PhD & Anne Fink Schulman Thomas M. Tuggle & Suzanne F. Tuggle

1960 Edward H. Graham & Julia N. Graham Hon. Edward Larson

1968 Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Hon. Donald W. Bostwick & Jill D. Bostwick Peter F. Davidson Hayward D. Fisk & Diane Haxby Fisk John J. Immel & Sheila Murphy Immel Fairfax Jones & Lynn Jerner Jones David W. Kennedy William S. Mills & Peggy Mills David A. Sorenson William K. Waugh III & Judith Watson Waugh John P. Woolf & Mary L. Woolf

1961 N. William Hines Jr. & Jean S. Hines Pauline Peppercorn Dye Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout

1969 Homer P. Appleby Jr. Ernest C. Ballweg Kenneth D. Cannon & Claudia N. Cannon

1959 David A. Brace Col. James L. Green, Retired Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Edwin A. Stene & Sally L. Stene

42 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Dan G. Clothier & Kristin Clothier Timothy J. Evans & Mary S. Evans Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey Alan M. Jacobson W. Robert Lasater Jr. John D. Osborn & Sarah P. Osborn Ronald S. Reuter G. Phillip Shuler III Hon. David H. Sivright Jr. R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe Ernest N. Yarnevich Jr. & Anne Beeson Yarnevich 1970 Frank S. Bangs Jr. William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Philip C. Lacey & Nancy Owens Lacey Hon. John W. Lungstrum & Linda E. Lungstrum Michael P. Martin Michael J. McNally & Elizabeth Shertzer McNally James A. Oppy Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Keith L. Stanley & Jan Stanley G. Sid Smith 1971 Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson Harold T. McCubbin Thomas M. Mullinix III & Constance Baker Mullinix John A. Potucek II Bill Sampson & Drucilla Mort Sampson Larry M. Sewell, ATJG & Patricia N. Sewell R. Kent Sullivan & Phyllis L. Sullivan, DO Hon. John L. Vratil & Teresa C. Vratil 1972 Jon R. Barbee F. Richard Bernasek & Regina Y. Bernasek George A. Burns Ronald F. Gann James R. Gilliland & Karen Gilliland Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Thomas G. Kokoruda & Polly Kokoruda R. B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Jane P. Murphy & Barry L. Murphy, MD N. Royce Nelson & Linda L. Nelson Chris Robe & Debra A. Robe Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith George W. Yarnevich & Margaret E. Yarnevich 1973 Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Stephen J. Craig & Joan Stover Craig Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Bruce A. Finzen Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Joe A. Harter David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Bruce R. Jeide Gordon A. Jones John M. Kilroy Jr. Linda L. Lee Douglas C. McKenna & Nina Schloesser McKenna Stephen D. Nelson & Dianna Johnson Nelson C. David Newbery, JD & Denise L. Newbery John O. Sanderson & Joann L. Sanderson Emily Cameron Shattil & Daniel M. Shattil Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake Kenneth W. Spain Randolph W. Starr Hon. Marcia K. Walsh Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren

1974 Stephen J. Bednar David W. Davis & Rhona Thorington Davis Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Melvin L. Ehrlich & Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates C. Peter Goplerud III & Mariette Brodeur Ross C. Hartley & Christine Ness Hartley David W. Howard & LeAnn Stuewe Howard Thomas K. Jones & Patricia Lynn Jones Larry D. Leonard Stephen R. Morgan & Paula M. Morgan Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Hal C. Reed Kelley D. Sears & Jane A. Sears William H. Seiler Jr. Eldon J. Shields & Bonnie Shields Michael L. Sullivan Larry S. Vernon & Jill A. Casado Roger K. Viola & Karen S. Viola Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat Elaine Oser Zingg & Otto M. Zingg 1975 William W. Jeter Leon B. Graves Linda S. Legg Donald A. Low & Diane C. Low Barbara A. Lundin & Lawrence P. Daniels John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson Victoria Thomas, JD & Roger O. Lambson, PhD Earl D. Tjaden & Shirley A. Tjaden Kirk Underwood Richard K. Walker James R. Walters & Mary Clayton Walters Daniel L. Watkins & Phyllis Watkins 1976 Jennifer Gille Bacon & Charles L. Bacon Jr. Nathaniel Davis Jr. Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Gina Kaiser & David Gale Dennis L. Mandsager & Sherrie Koester Mandsager Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge Gerald A. Thorpe & Patti H. Thorpe 1977 Lydia I. Beebe & Charles E. Doyle Nancy L. Berry & Tony D. Buffington Robin C. Blair & Deborah M. Blair Karen L. Borell & Barbara R. Stein, PhD Charles F. Bunch Hon. Michael B. Buser & Holly L. Buser David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Ed W. Dosh Jane A. Finn, PhD Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven Calvin J. Karlin & Hon. Janice Miller Karlin Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Kathryn Pruessner Peters Brenda Petrie Register & Benton W. Register James A. Riedy Hon. Janice D. Russell William H. Sanders Jr. J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD, JD & James A. Sherman Robert C. Sturgeon & Linda Ann Sturgeon John A. Vetter & Susan E. Vetter Cynthia S. Woelk William L. Yocum


1978 Tim Connell Timothy R. Cork & Janice Irwin Cork Steve Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Deborah S. Doud David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Lynne A. Friedewald Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Jeanne Gorman Jennifer Johnson Kinzel T. Bradley Manson & Teresa M. Meagher William M. Modrcin Jr. George E. Rider & Jeannene E. Rider Hon. Trish Rose William B. Sorensen Jr. Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III David L. Wing & Kristin D. Wing Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Cathy Gerlinger Zumbehl & Glenn E. Zumbehl 1979 Gary L. Ayers & Charleen S. Ayers Anne H. Blessing & William R. Blessing Robert W. Coykendall Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Edward J. Healy & Helen B. Healy John C. Hickey & Cynthia L. Hickey Eric C. Rajala & Mitzie Milliken Larry G. Rapp & Dianne J. Rapp Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD 1980 Frank A. Ackerman & Tim Cook David W. Andreas Orval F. Baldwin II Carol Y. Berns & Jeffrey P. Berns John P. Bowman & Katie-Pat Bowman Thomas R. Buchanan & Joyce Fuhrken Buchanan Stuart R. Collier Jay F. Fowler Edward E. Frizell III & Allison Miller Frizell Bernard J. Hickert Ralph R. Inman & Sandra Wood Inman Hon. William J. Madden III & Mary Kubicz Madden Sheila C. Maksimowicz & John N. Maksimowicz Hon. Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Ann McElhenny Hon. Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Eric B. Metz & Susan J. Metz Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson R. Kent Pringle & Cathy M. Pringle David J. Rebein Linda L. Sybrant Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett 1981 Hon. G. Gordon Atcheson & Cheryl A. Pilate J. Rod Betts Jo Ann Butaud Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett Hon. Daniel D. Crabtree & Maureen M. Mahoney John P. DeCoursey Hon. Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Ralph E. Lewis II & Sara McKie Lewis Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach David R. Maslen Margaret F. Mathewson

Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney Patrick E. Peery & Cheryl Messer Peery Hon. Julie A. Robinson Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Christine Kay Solso & Robert J. Huber Stanley D. Williams & Janae L. Schaeffer 1982 Julia Gille Anderson & Jett B. Anderson Kenneth L. Cole Hon. Kathryn E. Davis Marc E. Elkins & Jana B. Elkins Parthenia B. Evans & Dan T. Evans Tony L. Gehres & Shawna L. Gehres Timothy J. Grillot & Janette K. Grillot Casey S. Halsey & Paula Bush Halsey Gary H. Hanson & Jeanne M. Hanson Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD John C. Landon Hon. Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Terry L. Malone & Monica S. Malone Patricia Anne McDonald & Robert J. Wilshire Christopher K. McKenzie & Manuela Albuquerque Kevin F. Mitchelson & Frances Mitchelson U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran & Robba Addison Moran William K. Sauck Jr. Michael K. Seck & Sharon K. Mossman James D. Stevens & Susan Cox Stevens S. Lee Meigs Taylor Lawrence L. Tenopir 1983 Richard L. Cram Michael A. Doll Hon. Jeffrey R. Elder Peggy A. Elliott Myron L. Frans D. Randall Heilman & Joyce E. Heilman Wyatt A. Hoch & Mary Ann Hoch Michael W. Jones M. Margaret Moran & Kevin J. Moran Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien Kevin L. Petracek & Barbara Stokes Petracek Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Keith C. Sevedge & Jan M. Sevedge James J. Sienicki & Chirl Ann Sienicki Amy Logan Sliva Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., PhD Melanie L. Trump & Timothy T. Trump H. Steven Walton Rebecca A. Winterscheidt & Robert J. Werner 1984 James T. Borelli & Melinda Krautmann Borelli, RN, MS Gregory L. Franken Larry Greenbaum Hon. Teresa J. James Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan James W. Lusk & Hon. Nancy Niles Lusk Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Elizabeth Drill Nay James P. Pottorff Jr. & Judith E. Pottorff Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Michael L. Riggs & Elaine P. Riggs Alan R. Stetson Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Stephen L. Young

1985 Hon. Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Michael S. Boohar & Jennifer J. Boohar Gerald W. Brenneman Charles W. Cade & Mary Cranford Cade, PhD Melissa L. Conboy & William E. Mountford II Daniel H. Diepenbrock & Paula Diepenbrock Charles A. Etherington & Joni Walk Etherington Peggy Glazzard, EdD, JD Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Nancy L. Mitchell & David W. Mitchell, PhD Judith A. Moler & Donald L. Moler Jr. Rick G. Morris John C. Nettels Jr. Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson Randall J. Snapp & Beth Bertelsmeyer Snapp 1986 Marjorie A. Blaufuss & Larry J. Libeer Martin R. Brown Daniel A. Cunningham Sue Smith Dickey Paula E. Drungole Barbara Wagner Foster Anne Fleishel Harris Steven K. Linscheid Robin J. Miles & Dara Trum Miles Donald L. Norman Jr. Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Kathryn Marie Timm Hon. William S. Woolley & Debra Lee Barnett Holly R. Zane 1987 Jan Fink Call Gretchen E. Fisher Dave Harder Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Steven D. Selbe David E. Shay & Kimberly R. Shay Patrick J. Stueve & Janna M. Stueve Kimberley H. Tyson Martha S. Warren 1988 Katherine J. Bailes, JD, PhD Michael R. Bizal Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Paige Vicker Butler & Henry N. Butler David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss Clark H. Cummins Patrick X. Fowler & Susan J. Fowler Perry L. Franklin Shelly L. Freeman & Kimberly A. Jones Jana Patterson Gagner & David W. Gagner Michael T. Jilka William A. Kassebaum & Jennifer M. Kassebaum Michael F. Norton & Susan Roffman Norton Elizabeth A. Schartz Kathryn A. Seeberger & James T. Seeberger Steven P. Smith & Deborah J. Smith W. Scott Toth & Dana E. Toth 1989 Laura J. Bond & Fred L. Bond III Sharon L. Dickgrafe Michael L. Galiga David E. Hall & Laura H. Hall Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Wynetta Massey Lori Connors McGroder Brian K. McLeod Alphonse B. Perkins Douglas R. Richmond Andrea McGrath Wehner & Alex E. Wehner

1990 Mark A. Andersen & Susan E. Andersen John W. Barbian Curtis G. Barnhill & Martha G. Barnhill Kent R. Erickson & Lisa R. Erickson Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Brian M. Johnston & Tonya O. Johnston Crystal Whitebread Mai Madeleine M. McDonough Robert W. Tormohlen Jeannie P. Yockey-Fine & Michael R. Fine 1991 Doyle Baker Anna Marie Dempsey Shelley J. Diehl John E. Hayes III Brian R. Matula Deborah Cawley Moeller Scott E. Vincent 1992 Brent J. Burtin & Theresa O’Connor Burtin Timothy E. Congrove Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, MD Peter C. Knops & Barbara A. Knops Robert B. Neill & Margaret E. Neill Kara Trouslot Stubbs Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD 1993 Christopher M. Bailey Staci L. Cooper Troy A. Dierking Andrew M. DeMarea & Tracey DeMarea Jonathan H. Gregor Harry H. Herington Jr. & Cindy Herington Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love William W. Mahood III & Michelle Elwell Mahood Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Angela L. Rud & Jeff L. Rud Brian J. Schulman & Jami Levine Schulman Veronica R. Sellers & Jere D. Sellers Todd A. Sheppard Stephen N. Six & Professor Elizabeth Brand Six Deborah L. Wilkerson & Kevin M. Wilkerson 1994 Hon. Michael D. Burrichter Christopher S. Cole Sean C. Cunningham Marc K. Erickson & Lindsey Pease Erickson Hon. Linda Powell Gilmore & Darin Gilmore Jeffrey A. Kennard & Rachel Deleon Kennard Wayne B. Klawier Patricia A. Konopka Melissa Wangemann Maag & Jared S. Maag Shon C. Robben & Michelle L. Robben Stephen M. Schutter & Karen Zambri Schutter John L. Snyder & Diane P. Snyder Erin E. Syring Steve P. Wright 1995 Douglas K. Anning & Kirk L. Isenhour Cynthia R. Bryant Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Craig T. Lawson Coy M. Martin David M. Staker & Christina Dunn Staker Scott B. Strohm & Tracy Strohm 1996 J. Craig Cartwright & Angela Power Cartwright Andrew F. Halaby & Ann Marie Halaby Charles D. Marvine & Professor Joyce Rosenberg Marvine

KU LAW MAGAZINE 43


DONOR REPORT Philip C. McKnight & Jill McKnight Rebecca A. Ryan Nancy Racunas Saugstad & Lee Saugstad 1997 William J. Bahr & Rachelle D. Bahr Grant D. Bannister & Stephanie J. Bannister Terrence J. Campbell & Kristin S. Campbell Antonio R. Cruz Edwin H. Fields & Aramide Fields Michael R. Gould Sharon E. Greenfield Matthew H. Hoy & Heather Gray Hoy John C. Martin Carolyn L. Matthews & William P. Matthews Brad Korell & Justin McNulty 1998 Brent N. Coverdale & Michel Coverdale Laura D. Fent Teodoro Garcia Jr. Brian A. Jackson Barbara L. McCloud Blake H. Reeves Angela M. Seaton Mauricio A. Uribe & Cynthia Briggs Uribe 1999 Marshal B. Allshouse & Amy Allshouse Anthony D. Burgin Heather A. Jones Peter T. Maharry & Robyn S. Stone Darin A. Nugent Rachel B. Rubin Holly Pauling Smith Wendy K. Tatro & Richard T. McCollum 2000 John J. Gates & Carolyn K. Gates Heather A. Jones Christopher M. Joseph & Jaime Marie Joseph Jason P. Lacey & Skye D. Lacey Stephen J. Lautz Robert D. Lewis Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. & Tiffany L. Rhodes March M. Runner Nathan B. Webb & Sanna M. Harjusola-Webb, PhD 2001 Tamara L. Niles & R. Lance Niles Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Wendy M. Rohleder-Sook & Christopher W. Sook Christopher P. Sobba Jeffrey L. Stowell & Carol A. Stowell Michael L. Walden & Chasitie Burgess Walden William M. Yanek II 2002 Timothy A. Glassco Molly Westering Hunter & Mark Hunter Mon Yin Lung Jon A. Strongman Mark A. Van Blaricum & Jackie DeSouza Van Blaricum 2003 Eric W. Barth & Maggie A. Barth Stephanie M. Neidig Katherine Bollig Zogleman 2004 Bryan J. Didier & Jeremy Wilkins Didier Michelle A. Hamilton Seanna L. Higley Jeffrey Li

44 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Jeffery B. Morris Christopher L. Steadham & Shanna C. Steadham Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson Emily Schutte Vijayakirthi & Victor A. Vijayakirthi Nathan H. White & Annette M. White 2005 Matthew E. Austin & Lindsey Austin John L. Beck, Jr. & Alicia M. Beck Elizabeth Blake Philip V. diZerega Brian T. Docking & Emily Cassell Docking Anne Murray Emert & Mark T. Emert Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough Katharine Milberger Haynes Robert F. Kethcart & Stephanie A. Kethcart Meredith S. Lang Travis D. Lenkner & Erin Delaney Clayton D. Lewis Miguel L’Heureux Kelli Colyer Lieurance & Thomas R. Lieurance Kelsey Patterson Nazar & Andrew J. Nazar S. Patrick O’Bryan & Shannon Kerr O’Bryan Kyungjoo Park Steven B. Pollicoff 2006 John M. Avondet & Jamie Avondet Lydia H. Krebs William H. Moore & Kristin M. Brulez Thomas M. Ruane III & Sarah S. Ruane Linda K. Tivorsak Kristen V. Toner & Ryan M. Toner 2007 Christopher S. Abrams Angela S. Armenta Carrie Temm Bumgardner & Brian D. Bumgardner M. Katie Gates Calderon & Pedro D. Calderon Crissa A.S. Cook & Jerald J. Cook Adrian G. Dejeu Ryan J. Huschka Shannon Cohorst Johnson Guillermo G. Zorogastua 2008 Sarah Emile Lynn Baltzell & Brian P. Baltzell Daniel A. Belhumeur & Ree A. Belhumeur Adam S. Davis Justin D. Elkouri & Mica Elkouri Andrew M. Johnson Zachary A. Lerner Thomas P. Maltese J. Nolan McWilliams, Esq. Stephanie S. Sankar Devin S. Sikes & Sheebani S. Patel Brad A. Vining Jeffrey J. Williams 2009 Christina Arnone & Michael Arnone Caroline A. Bader & Travis M. White Vedrana Balta Christopher P. Colyer Lindsey Morse Heinz & Bradley D. Heinz Beau A. Jackson & Laura S. Jackson Rachel J. Kibler-Melby Jerome G. Korkoya Jason P. Romero & Jackie Romero Devin K. Ross Andrew R. Shaw & Laura Hall Amanda C. Sheridan

2010 Christopher C. Grenz & Esther Y. Grenz Blake T. Hardwick & Monica Grewal Hardwick Christopher J. Kaufman & Allison Draffan Kaufman Paul C. Lantis Erica Ramsey & Eric Ramsey Ryan J. Schletzbaum Adam M. Siebers 2011 Michael B. George Milos J. Jekic Ryan M. B. McAteer Melissa M. Plunkett 2012 Lauren E. Douville Sparkle Ellison, JD, PhD Tonda Jones Hill Ryan J. Mize Micheal A. Mulloy David G. Smith 2013 Michael R. Andrusak Samuel Butler IV Crystal R. Cook Thomas C. DeBacco Graham R. Doeren Erika L. Hane Joy Noakes Isaacs Michael R. Keenan 2014 David P. Barclay Geoffrey D. Hulsey Katherine E. Marples Peter R. Montecuollo William C. Richardson Amanda Stanley 2015 Andrea G. Horvath & Charles F. Smith Justin B. Kohlbeck Charla Smith, Esq.

This donor report covers fiscal year 2016, which ran from July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2016. Please bring omissions or errors to the attention of Mindie Paget: mpaget@ku.edu 785-864-9205


IN MEMORIAM 1938 Justin D. Hannen Denver, Colorado June 16, 2016

1965 Ronald L. Leslie Hutchinson, Kansas August 12, 2016

1985 Patricia Hagen Matassar Colorado Springs, Colorado April 15, 2016

1950 James M. Rhine Manhattan, Kansas May 15, 2016

Philip C. Lorton Kansas City, Kansas August 11, 2016

1989 Mara Sprecker Herrington Kansas City, Missouri March 30, 2016

1952 Laird P. Bowman Lawrence, Kansas June 18, 2016 1957 Benjamin F. Farney Lenexa, Kansas July 3, 2016 1959 Jackie L. Smith Boise, Idaho April 27, 2016 1960 Wendell E. Yockey Topeka, Kansas March 19, 2016 1962 Theodore L. Sexton Jr. Leavenworth, Kansas August 18, 2016 1963 Michael A. Morrow San Antonio, Texas March 20, 2016

1970 Joseph L. Dioszeghy Olathe, Kansas June 16, 2016

Ellen E. Gallagher Overland Park, Kansas May 23, 2016

1974 John R. Morris Weatherby Lake, Missouri September 2, 2016

1993 Evan Ice Lawrence, Kansas August 5, 2016

Thomas F. Wobker Post Falls, Idaho April 23, 2016

1995 Stephen L. Parker Kansas City, Kansas March 28, 2016

1976 Ellen Spalding Mission, Kansas March 16, 2016 1980 Timothy B. Mustaine Wichita, Kansas July 9, 2016 1983 Peggy A. (Ramsey) Elliott Gardner, Kansas June 20, 2016


Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

PAID

Lawrence, KS Permit No. 116

Green Hall 1535 W. 15th Street Lawrence, KS 66045-7608

law.ku.edu

Have you ever wanted to reconnect with a former classmate? Find local counsel with a KU Law pedigree? Network with alumni across the country?

Tap the

JAYHAWK LAWYER DIRECTORY As a KU Law graduate, you now have FREE ACCESS to the names, locations and practice areas of the more than 7,600 Jayhawk Lawyers working in the U.S. and around the world. Only your business contact information is available to other users by default. Ensure your information is up to date and start taking advantage of this powerful tool.

law.ku.edu/directory Printed on paper that contains at least 10% post-consumer recycled content

PLEASE RECYCLE

KU Law Magazine | Fall 2016  

Performing pro bono adoptions of foster children, standing up against school bullies, ensuring kids come first in family disputes: Meet a fe...

KU Law Magazine | Fall 2016  

Performing pro bono adoptions of foster children, standing up against school bullies, ensuring kids come first in family disputes: Meet a fe...