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MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS | FALL 2014

in the law From pioneers to up-and-comers, KU Law alumnae are changing the face of the legal profession

ALUMNI FACES CLASS NOTES DONOR REPORT


KU Law Magazine is published twice a year for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Green Hall, 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7608 785.864.4550 | F: 785.864.5054 law.ku.edu DEAN Stephen Mazza EDITOR & DESIGNER Mindie Paget kulaws@ku.edu | 785.864.9205 CONTRIBUTORS Mike Krings, Emily Sharp, Noelle Uhler PHOTOS Bryant Callahan, Chuck France, iStock, Kelsey Kimberlin, Mindie Paget, Bill Petros, Steve Puppe, Earl Richardson, Noelle Uhler COVER PHOTO Bryant Callahan PRINTING Allen Press, Lawrence, KS

KU Law supports environmental sustainability by purchasing renewable energy certificates (green tags) through the Bonneville Environmental Foundation that offset carbon emissions from producing the KU Law Magazine.

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, 785-864-6414, 711 TTY.

LETTER FROM THE DEAN America’s earliest female lawyers faced daunting obstacles entering the legal profession. In their consideration of Miss Lavinia Goodell’s 1875 application to practice law, the Wisconsin Supreme Court reasoned that “Nature has tempered woman as little for the juridical conflicts of the court room as for the physical conflicts of the battle field. Womanhood is molded for gentler and better things.” Fortunately, KU Law opened its doors in 1878 with a more enlightened admissions policy, friendly to all qualified applicants regardless of gender or ethnicity. We’re proud that our founders were on the right side of history more than 50 years before Columbia Law School and nearly 75 years before Harvard Law School. KU’s welcoming posture lured Ella Weiss Brown from Ohio to Mount Oread, where she completed a two-year course of study in one year and became the first woman to graduate from KU Law in 1891. She practiced and taught law while advancing the cause of women’s suffrage. The Chronicle Monthly Magazine reported that Brown “has done and is doing what she can to better the world and humanity.” Her pioneering spirit lives on in the KU Law alumnae who follow in her footsteps. In this issue alone we feature the first woman and the first African-American on the U.S. District Court in Kansas. The first Latina on the U.S. District Court in Arizona. The leader of the largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the country. The chief defense counsel for the Office of Military Commissions representing Guantanamo Bay detainees. An international public health consultant responsible for training volunteers who dispense life-saving vaccines around the world. Fierce defense attorneys who champion underdogs and help exonerate innocent clients. The winner of a MacArthur “genius grant.” And up-and-comers whose early careers forecast promising futures in advocacy, service and leadership. Thank you for helping us continue to provide an affordable legal education to the next generation of women in law. Your generosity has helped us surpass our $20 million fundraising goal in the Far Above campaign by more than $2.5 million, and we’re still going strong through June 2016. Roughly half of your contributions have created new scholarships or strengthened existing ones. We break down the numbers and recognize donors in the report that begins on page 36. To go far above, we must go together. Your collective professional successes, gifts of time and treasure, and willingness to mentor and provide jobs for recent graduates increase the value of your KU Law degree. I like to think Ella Weiss Brown would be proud of her alma mater.

Stephen W. Mazza Dean and Professor of Law


CONTENTS KU LAW MAGAZINE | FALL 2014

DEPARTMENTS 2 ON THE GREEN

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News briefs: Traveling “On-Campus” Interviews; ‘Best Value’ law school ranking; Class of 2017 stats; Law Review symposium on human migration

20 FACULTY RESEARCH

COVER | WOMEN IN THE LAW From pioneers to up-and-comers, these KU Law alumnae and so many more are changing the face of the legal profession.

Research highlights, media appearances, kudos

24 ALUMNI NEWS Distinguished Alumni named;

reunions celebrated

28 CLASS NOTES Alumni earn promotions, change jobs, win ‘YOU SHOULD NOT’ Professor Michael Hoeflich contextualizes the origins of

23 WITH DISTINCTION Three outstanding jurists

modern legal ethics in a new introduction to an 1896 guide to professional responsibility.

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33 IN MEMORIAM Deaths in the KU Law family 34 GIVING NEWS

Medallion honorees; Why I Give; Far Above campaign update

36 DONOR REPORT

earn the 2014 Distinguished

awards, and expand their families

Recognition of fiscal year 2014 donors

Alumni Award, the highest honor bestowed by the KU School of Law.

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MOST GENEROUS DONORS HONORED The James Woods Green Medallion recognizes individuals and entities whose cumulative contributions to KU Law exceed $25,000.

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GREEN HALL NEWS

On the green KU Law welcomes strong Class of 2017

Traveling 'On-Campus' Interview program bears fruit for KU students in Dallas market Seven KU Law students spent two days interviewing and networking in Dallas in August through the law school’s new Traveling “On-Campus” Interview Program. The Career Services Office initiative allows students to interview with employers in select cities and have all of their expenses underwritten by the law school. The experience allows the students to compete with peers attending law schools in key markets across the U.S. as part of the fall On-Campus Interview process. “We basically create a portable KU Law, making it as easy and costeffective for employers to interview our students as going to their local law schools while giving our students the opportunity to interview in-person with the decision makers,” said Arturo Thompson, assistant dean of career services, who accompanied the students in Dallas. “As we expand the program to new cities, it will place our students on a level playing field with schools in Texas,

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“We basically create a portable KU Law, making it as easy and cost-effective for employers to interview our students as going to their local law schools.” — Asst. Dean Arturo Thompson Utah and the Washington, D.C., region.” Two job offers resulted from the trip to Dallas, and another participant accepted a position in Houston that emerged as a part of the outreach supporting the program. Firms, agencies and other potential employers in Dallas, Houston, Salt Lake City and Washington, D.C., who are interested in participating should contact Arturo Thompson at arturot@ku.edu for more information.

The Class of 2017 arrived at Green Hall this summer and fall with impressive academic credentials, diverse backgrounds, and admirable records of service and experience. As of Oct. 5, the class included 125 students, 55 percent of whom are Kansas residents. The remaining 45 percent join KU from 25 other states. Five students boasted an undergraduate GPA of 4.0 or above. Seven students have served in the U.S. military, including tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan. One student overcame homelessness to graduate from college; another speaks six languages; and a third helped build an orphanage in Kenya. Class members studied at 63 different colleges and universities, including 35 students from KU, eight from Kansas State University, and others from schools as diverse as Dartmouth, West Point, Penn State and Pepperdine. KU Law had one of its largest classes ever from Fort Hays State University, with five students enrolling from the western Kansas school. “You should understand that there’s more to being a lawyer than collecting a big salary,” Dean Stephen Mazza told the students in his welcome remarks. “Lawyers are the guardians of the rule of law in this country. We protect individual rights and liberties.” Seven first-year students joined the ranks of the KU Law Student Ambassadors. Learn about them on our website:

READ 1L STUDENT STORIES law.ku.edu/ ambassadors


Applied

Enrolled

808 125 Median LSAT

158 Median GPA

3.47 36% women

13% minorities

Kansas residents

55% # of states | 25 # of colleges | 63 LSAT range | 144-177 Age range | 21-47 Average age | 25

KU ranked 18th among 'Best Value' schools KU Law is the No. 18 “Best Value” law school in the nation, according to preLaw and National Jurist magazines. The ranking highlights affordable law schools whose graduates perform exceptionally well on the bar exam and have had real success finding legal jobs. National Jurist ranked the top 20 schools and assigned a letter grade to the other 33 honorees. “We are proud of this ranking because it reflects our broader definition of value — one that goes beyond our affordable tuition to consider how well our graduates are prepared to excel in their careers,” said Stephen Mazza, dean of the law school. KU was one of only four schools on the “Best Value” list to also appear in the top 25 percent of law schools whose 2013 graduates were hired by the nation’s largest law firms, according to a ranking published in February by the National Law Journal. “Employers know that a KU Law degree is synonymous with in-depth training and a strong work ethic,” Mazza

“Employers know that a KU Law degree is synonymous with in-depth training and a strong work ethic.” — Dean Stephen Mazza said. “We also have reduced our class size to better reflect job opportunities in a recovering legal market and launched innovative career placement programs that we hope will only improve our students’ employment success.” National Jurist gives employment success the greatest weight in the “Best Value” rankings. The magazine also looks at a number of other academic and financial variables, including price of tuition, student debt accumulation, bar passage rate and cost of living.

Symposium explores legal elements of human migration Scholars in international, immigration and human rights law explored the legal complexities surrounding human migration at the 2014 Kansas Law Review Symposium, “Statelessness and Belonging: Perspectives on Human Migration.” Speakers from across the country discussed topics such as: refugee and asylum adjudication; ethics and values in the U.S. immigration system; citizenship and global public health crises, including Ebola; children awaiting adjudication at the U.S. border; human rights and allocation of vital resources to indigenous peoples; home state’s sovereignty over undocumented immigrants abroad; and individuals, corporations and the properties of citizenship.

“There are an estimated 4,000 ‘citizens of nowhere’ in the United States today. A much higher number of people possess a formal nationality but live a similar experience to that of stateless persons: discrimination, loss of legal rights and lack of access to basic resources. Their marginalization touches many of the human rights crises of our time, domestically and internationally,” said Tamara Combs, symposium editor and third-year KU Law student. “This is a broad and timely issue to explore as the nation continues to talk about possible reforms to the current immigration system.” Scholarship associated with the symposium will be published in a spring 2015 issue of the Kansas Law Review.

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GREEN HALL NEWS

Graduation 2014

View more photos from the ceremony law.ku.edu/grad2014

Clockwise from left: Jacob Wamego and Jesus Guereca; Tori Whitehead and Adrien Piercy; Dean Stephen Mazza congratulates Doctor of Juridical Science graduate Father Alphonsus Ihuoma. (Photos by Kelsey Kimberlin of KU Marketing Communications and Mindie Paget)

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2013-14 STUDENT AWARDS & PRIZES ORDER OF THE COIF Paul Cassat Max Ellenbecker Miriam Friesen David Green Katherine Marples Alexander Melin Peter Montecuollo Whitney Novak Clark Richardson Joseph Schmisseur Miranda Waters Kevin Wempe WALTER HIERSTEINER OUTSTANDING SERVICE AWARD Peter Montecuollo* JUSTICE LLOYD KAGEY LEADERSHIP AWARD Xavier Andrews* SAMUEL MELLINGER SCHOLARSHIP, LEADERSHIP & SERVICE AWARD Katherine Marples* C.C. STEWART AWARD IN LAW Paul Cassat David Green ROBERT F. BENNETT STUDENT AWARD Amanda Marshall* WILLIAM L. BURDICK PRIZE Maureen Orth MARY ANNE CHAMBERS SERVICE AWARD Mark Kind GEORGE GARY DUNCAN SCHOLASTIC IMPROVEMENT PRIZE Xavier Andrews ROBERT E. EDMONDS PRIZE IN CORPORATION & SECURITIES LAW Anna Kimbrell

FACULTY AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT Whitney Novak* FAMILY FUND AWARD Cliff Brazil Rebecca Howlett ROBERT C. FOULSTON & GEORGE SIEFKIN PRIZES FOR EXCELLENCE IN APPELLATE ADVOCACY Best Advocate: Paul Mose Finalists: Paul Brothers, Alex Cleeter & Jason Harmon Best Brief: Jason Harmon & Paul Mose Second Place Brief: Bryanna Hanschu & Alison McCourt HERSHBERGER, PATTERSON, JONES & ROTH ENERGY LAW AWARD Ava Azad HINKLE LAW FIRM TAX PROCEDURE AWARD Trevor Bond W. ROSS HUTTON LEGAL AID AWARD Jessica Fiegel KANSAS TRIAL LAWYERS ASSOCIATION PAUL E. WILSON ADVOCACY AWARD Peter Conley LARRY R. O’NEAL/SHOOK HARDY & BACON LLP LAW SCHOOL AWARD Paul Cassat Joseph Schmisseur LAW CLASS OF 1949 AWARD FOR LEADERSHIP David Barclay* JANEAN MEIGS MEMORIAL AWARD IN LAW Jacob Wamego*

JAMES P. MIZE TRIAL ADVOCACY AWARD Grant Brazill Paul Mose

SHAPIRO AWARD FOR BEST PAPER ON LAW & PUBLIC POLICY Paige Blevins

PAYNE & JONES AWARDS Fall 2013 Amanda Faber Sara Fevurly Abigail Hall Kylie Kuhns Elizabeth Mears Kathleen Watson

SUSMAN GODFREY TRIAL ADVOCACY AWARD Emily Barclay

Spring 2014 Ashley Akers Reid Day Bryce Langford Adam Sokoloff Chris Teters SueZanne Thibodeau

UMB BANK EXCELLENCE IN ESTATE PLANNING AWARD G. Clayton Randle *Received special recognition at the Hooding Ceremony on May 17 at the Lied Center.

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women in the law From pioneers to up-and-comers, KU Law alumnae are changing the face of the legal profession AS A YOUNG ATTORNEY, JUDGE Kathryn Vratil remembers taking the service elevator in the kitchen of a private men’s club to attend bar luncheons with her male colleagues. “The idea that I might become a federal judge was too far-fetched to warrant serious consideration,” she said. Nevertheless, Vratil became the first woman on the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas in 1992, having first achieved partnership at a major Kansas City law firm. She broke glass ceilings for KU Law alumnae who proceeded her – just as female graduates before her had blazed trails that made her successes possible. There was Ella Weiss Brown, the first woman to graduate from KU Law in 1891. She became the city attorney in Holton, Kansas, where she also opened the law firm of Brown & Brown with her husband. Later came Constance Achterberg, a 1953 alumna who

hung a shingle in Salina, Kansas, long before any male attorneys would go into practice with her. Kristina Engstrom followed in 1974, leveraging her law degree to forge an international public health consulting career in the absence of female role models in the field. The success stories exploded in the 1970s, when women flooded KU and law schools across the nation in unprecedented numbers. “The female graduates of the ’70s were pioneers in every sense of the word,” said Professor Martin Dickinson, who served as dean from 1971 to 1980. “Their hard work and achievements assured that later graduates would not face the same obstacles.” Women lawyers still lag behind men in salaries, leadership positions and other measures of success. Acknowledging that work remains, we highlight a handful of KU Law alumnae whose accomplishments show how far we’ve come.

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Constance Achterberg, L’53 Trailblazing alumna paves way for spike in women attorneys CONSTANCE ACHTERBERG graduated from KU Law at a time when legal employers asked female job candidates about their typing skills with little interest in their ability to litigate a case or negotiate a deal. So she became a trailblazer. Nearly two decades before any other woman practiced law in Salina, Kansas, Achterberg hung a shingle and built her business primarily through contacts with women she met in the local chapter of the American Association of University Women. “There were a lot of women then from western Kansas who came from relatively wealthy families who owned farm land,” said Achterberg, who opened her Salina law office in 1959. “They came to me with their work, and later I handled their estates. That helped me survive.” A Lincoln, Kansas, native who studied political science at Northwestern University, Achterberg veered toward law school after watching her father negotiate pipeline contracts for Northern Natural Gas. She was one of three women in the class that entered KU Law in 1950, and she remembers law school fondly. “Everything about it was wonderful,” she said. “I loved the school. I loved the people. It was just kind of a golden September.” But the legal job market was not as welcoming. After initially struggling to find employment, a friend helped Achterberg secure a position with the Kansas Highway Commission the same year that President Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act. “Overnight, they were flooded

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with cases. They finally decided that I could be a regular lawyer and go out on the road,” Achterberg said. She traveled the state litigating cases, mostly property value disputes — all the while gaining skills and confidence. Although she loved the work, she wanted to try private practice. Achterberg approached established attorneys in Salina about a partnership, but none were ready to practice alongside a woman. Undeterred, she opened her own office. “I didn’t know any better,” she said. “I just did it.” Now 84 years old, Achterberg is a respected Salina institution who served as Saline County Counselor for 15 years and has been active in the Saline/Ottawa Bar Association, the Kansas Bar Association and the Kansas Bar Foundation. In her 40s, Achterberg married Salina attorney C.L. Clark and took up fly-fishing. The shared hobby led the couple across the United States and around the world, including adventures to picturesque rivers and lakes in Yugoslavia and New

Zealand. Although Clark died in 2004, Achterberg continues an annual trout-fishing trip to Montana. Back home in Salina, she still goes to the office each day. She finds it gratifying that so many women are following in her footsteps and establishing successful legal careers. In 1995, she gave a speech at the annual meeting of the Kansas Women Attorneys Association and was astonished to look out at the sea of female faces. “It’s been quite a transformation — and a source of great pride to me — that by accident of time and space I was able to see this transformation and the special contributions of brilliant, energetic, young lawyers to the profession and to the communities in which they live,” Achterberg recalled a year later while accepting KU Law’s Distinguished Alumni Award. “For me personally their contributions have added another dimension. I notice when someone asks me what I do, I no longer say I am a woman lawyer. I simply say I am a lawyer.” —Mindie Paget


Kristina Engstrom, L’74 International public health consultant carves her own niche BY THE TIME KRISTINA ENGSTROM arrived at KU Law, she had taught English in the Philippines and helped eradicate smallpox in Afghanistan. After finishing her history degree at Boston University, Engstrom set off on a cross-country trip, landing in Taos, New Mexico. President Kennedy was encouraging young people to devote two years to international service in the Peace Corps, a prospect that intrigued the young graduate. Months later, Engstrom left for the Philippines, ready for an adventure and a challenge. She got both. After her service, Engstrom managed training programs and negotiated contracts at Peace Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C. She trained a group of women volunteers for a smallpox vaccination program in Afghanistan, which was carried out in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Afghan Ministry of Health. “The challenges for volunteers were physical and psychological,” Engstrom said. “Most Afghans in rural areas didn’t know about preventive medicine. They were wary of government involvement in their lives. Volunteers had to be both persuasive and patient.” The

experience of this team of vaccinators was chronicled in the documentary, “Once in Afghanistan.” Engstrom stayed in Afghanistan for the next year and a half. She established Peace Corps’ first incountry volunteer training center, then found herself at another turning point. “I needed a job and thought I should have an advanced degree,” Engstrom said. She settled on law. “I thought it would be a good degree and would impress people, which it has. I also thought it would increase my critical thinking skills.” Engstrom was accepted to KU Law, which took some adjustment after her stint overseas. “By this time I was in my mid-30s, and most of my classmates were 10 years younger,” Engstrom said. “I had a lot of work experience, and most of them had come straight from college. I had been teaching people for a number of years, but law school education was different. It wasn’t practice-oriented.” With her law degree in hand, Engstrom passed the Massachusetts bar and set out as an independent consultant. She designed programs and developed instructional materials

for nongovernmental organizations in Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia. Her clients ranged from Save the Children to UNICEF and WHO. During her career, Engstrom has seen women’s roles in the workplace and public policy arena evolve. “Young women today can look at Mrs. Clinton and heads of auto companies and say, ‘Wow, I can do that,’” Engstrom said. “That wasn’t true for my generation.” Nearly 50 years after she set out for Afghanistan, Engstrom thinks the principles of a successful vaccination program — education, science, logistics and perseverance — still apply to today’s public health challenges. And the skills she learned in law school remain invaluable. “I think it helped me be better as a problem solver,” Engstrom said of her time at KU Law. “I find myself even now saying, ‘Well, let’s look at both sides. Let’s figure out a way to solve this problem, to be able to compromise.’ Law school helped me be more articulate about positions, about looking at issues in a critical way.” —Emily Sharp

Kristina Engstrom in Afghanistan, 1968

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Marie Woodbury, L’79 Alumna builds career at intersection of science, medicine and law

“I saw how energetic the women at KU Law were, how vibrant and engaged and articulate. I was captivated by them and the things they were doing.”

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MARIE WOODBURY ALWAYS HAD A passion for science. “I really wanted to go to med school,” she said. “But I’d never met a woman who was a doctor. I didn’t have any mentors. So I moved to liberal arts.” Woodbury graduated from Georgetown University with a degree in international affairs, then relocated to Kansas, where she got to know the KU Law community. “I saw how energetic the women at KU Law were, how vibrant and engaged and articulate,” Woodbury said. “I was captivated by them and the things they were doing.” Inspired, she decided to enroll in law school too. Woodbury has since settled into a 33-year career with Kansas City firm Shook, Hardy & Bacon, where her work has centered on mass torts litigation in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. “I had the opportunity to combine my interest in science and medicine with the law,” Woodbury said. “It seemed too good to be true.” Her practice takes her across the country. “I’ve had cases in almost every state, been in federal jurisdictions from coast to coast, had appeals in federal circuits and state supreme courts. My clients are national and international.” Her work may be big in scope, but it hits close to home. “One of the cases I worked on as a young lawyer involved DPT vaccine,” Woodbury said. “I had small children at the time. The lawsuits claimed these vaccines caused encephalopathy, brain damage, seizure disorders. It was a personal issue for me. I had to decide what I was going to do about my kids—was I going to vaccinate them?” Woodbury’s work gives her the opportunity to consult with physicians, learn about medical products, study plaintiffs’ disease

conditions and determine the link between product and disease, if any. “I’m persuaded by science, not by what I hear on TV or read in a magazine,” Woodbury said. “I’m a big advocate of vaccines. All my kids were vaccinated consistent with the requirements when they were born. We have a remarkable lifestyle in this country, in part because of the success of vaccination programs.” Supporting women throughout their legal careers is also an issue Woodbury has taken to heart. “I thought over time there would be more and more women lawyers practicing and in leadership positions,” she said. “While I have seen more, it hasn’t been as much change as I thought there would be.” Woodbury helped launch Shook’s Women’s Management Council, ensuring that her firm actively recruits, mentors and retains women attorneys. She is an active member of community groups that support and promote women’s leadership at local companies. One of her favorite initiatives is helping to train the next generation of lawyers through her involvement with KU Law’s Deposition Skills Workshop. “After three days of trying and learning from their peers and watching some demonstrations, it’s remarkable how much better they’ve gotten, how much more confident they feel,” Woodbury said. “I’m a big proponent of this program.” — Emily Sharp


Janet + Mary Murguia, L’85 Success runs in family for twins realizing parents’ American Dream JANET AND MARY MURGUIA’S parents believed in the power of education and the promise of the American Dream. Their children are evidence of that dream realized. “My education at the University of Kansas School of Law has been powerful,” said Judge Mary Murguia, a 1985 graduate who sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, with chambers in Phoenix. “It’s remarkable that this young Mexican-American girl from a Latino neighborhood in Kansas City, Kansas, can preside over cases on the Ninth Circuit. It’s a credit to my parents and a credit to this institution.” Mary’s twin sister, Janet, serves as president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza, the largest Hispanic civil rights organization in the country. She has twice been selected as one of Washingtonian magazine’s “100 Most Powerful Women in Washington.” “For our parents, education wasn’t just a goal. It was a value. They didn’t know exactly how to help us with our homework, but they always cleared the kitchen table for us and made sure we had good lighting and enough time,” said Janet, L’85. “They taught us that we could be anything we wanted to be.” HUMBLE UPBRINGING Alfred and Amalia Murguia came to the United States from Mexico and raised their seven children in one of the poorest neighborhoods of Kansas City, Kansas. Speaking little English and lacking high school diplomas, Alfred labored as a steel worker and Amalia stayed home to care for the couple’s children and others in the community. The Murguia children learned to value hard work and strong family bonds.

Judge Mary Murguia, left, and her twin sister, Janet, deliver the 2010 Emily Taylor and Marilyn Stokstad Womens Leadership Lecture at KU. (Chuck France/KU Marketing Communications) They also learned to seize opportunities. Having five children in college at once would not have been possible on her father’s income, Mary noted, without the wizardry of KU’s financial aid office. The Murguia siblings applied for scholarships and grants, and took work study jobs to pay their way through school. When Janet and Mary thought they should enter the workforce after earning degrees in journalism and Spanish, KU Law Admissions Director Lilian Six convinced them that law school would pave the path to their futures. So they followed in the footsteps of their older brother, Carlos Murguia, who graduated from KU Law in 1982 and went on to become the first Latino judge on the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas in 1999. When Mary was appointed to the same position in

“It’s remarkable that this young MexicanAmerican girl from a Latino neighborhood in Kansas City, Kansas, can preside over cases on the Ninth Circuit.”

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Alumnae on the federal bench CHIEF JUDGE MARY BECK BRISCOE, L’73 | U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit Mary Beck Briscoe has climbed the ranks of public service law, working for the Interstate Commerce Commission, as assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Kansas and as a judge and chief judge for the Kansas Court of Appeals. President Clinton nominated her to the 10th Circuit in 1995, and she has served as chief judge since 2010. “I did not ‘pursue’ this career, it was more of an evolution. KU Law introduced me to the law and taught me how to approach and analyze legal issues. And, as with all who are in the legal profession, I am still learning.” JUDGE JULIE A. ROBINSON, L’81 U.S. District Court, District of Kansas A fourth-generation Kansan, Robinson clerked for Chief Bankruptcy Judge Benjamin E. Franklin, then served as an assistant U.S. attorney for 11 years and a U.S. bankruptcy judge for seven years. In 2001, President Bush appointed Robinson to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas, making her the first African-American named to the post. Robinson is chair of the Court

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the District of Arizona a year later, they made history twice more: Mary became the first Latina federal judge in Arizona, and she and Carlos became the first brother-sister duo in the country to serve as federal judges. A fourth sibling, Ramon, is a prominent Kansas City attorney with a Harvard law degree. CLEARING THE WAY “I don’t focus on obstacles much. I focus on my goals,” Janet said. “I’m heading up the largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the country. It’s my job now to make sure there are as few obstacles as possible for everyone who wants to achieve the American Dream, including those in the Latino community.” Janet began her career in Washington, D.C., as legislative counsel to former Kansas Congressman Jim Slattery. She worked at the White House from 1994 to 2000, ultimately serving as deputy assistant to President Clinton. In 2001, she joined the University of Kansas as executive vice chancellor for university relations, where she oversaw KU’s public and governmental affairs until assuming the top leadership role at La Raza in 2005. Now approaching 10 years at the helm of La Raza, she is proud of strengthening ties with affiliates and community-based organizations that serve Hispanic and Latino families; spearheading coalition-based advocacy with partners in the African American, Native American, Asian Pacific and LGBTQ communities; and increasing civic engagement by registering 500,000 new Hispanic voters. “I’ve always believed that public service is important. But you don’t have to be in the West Wing of the White House to make a difference,” Janet said. “You can make a difference just by being an engaged citizen.” CAREER PINNACLE Mary began her career closer to home as an assistant district attorney in Wyandotte County, Kansas, where she prosecuted crimes against women and children. She credits Professor Dennis Prater with awakening her zeal for the courtroom in her trial advocacy courses. “He introduced me to the courtroom, to litigation, and inspired me to be a trial attorney,” she said. “I took his course, I knew I wanted to be in the courtroom, and I’ve basically never left.” She went on to become an assistant U.S. attorney in the District of Arizona before moving to the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. She served as director of the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys until President Clinton tapped her for the federal judiciary in 2000. Although she presided over a number of high-profile trials on the district court, her most memorable was U.S. v. Mitchell, the first federal death penalty case brought in Arizona since the reinstatement of the Federal Death Penalty Act. “I had to impose a sentence of death,” Mary said. “Anytime you sentence anybody, it’s a very serious and deliberate matter. When it comes to the death penalty, it’s just truly extraordinary.” Despite the challenges, she has enjoyed each of her jobs and considers it an incredible privilege to serve as a judge — a position she never imagined possible. “There weren’t a lot of role models for women or people of color in the judiciary back in Kansas,” Mary said. “This is probably the pinnacle for me, being a federal judge in a system that I really believe in and have a great deal of passion for in terms of justice being served.” — Mindie Paget


Administration and Case Management Committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States. “I love the daily challenge of managing the diversity of cases I draw as a federal trial judge, the opportunity to decide difficult and unique issues, the exposure to litigants, attorneys, jurors and witnesses from all walks of life, and the fulfillment of participating in the resolution of disputes and the appropriate disposition of issues, matters and cases.”

Col. Karen Mayberry, L’86 Military lawyer climbs ranks from JAG officer to chief defense counsel for Gitmo detainees EVERY RUNG ON U.S. AIR FORCE Col. Karen Mayberry’s career ladder has prepared her for the job she holds today, yet her responsibilities are unprecedented. As chief defense counsel for the Office of Military Commissions in Washington, D.C., Mayberry oversees the criminal defense of Guantanamo Bay detainees accused of committing terrorist acts against the United States. She is responsible for ensuring that the death penalty defense teams under her supervision have the resources necessary to represent the five men charged with crimes related to the 9/11 attacks and another charged in the U.S.S. Cole bombing. “It’s frustrating and rewarding at the same time, and certainly unlike anything I have ever done,” said Mayberry, L’86. “Every day is kind of building this whole enterprise from scratch. And these cases are on the world stage. Every maneuver, every filing – everything is being analyzed and criticized.”

“These cases are on the world stage. Every maneuver, every filing — everything is being analyzed and criticized.” Indeed, Mayberry made international headlines last year when she testified about a security breach on the government computer network that resulted in thousands of private defense emails being shared with the prosecution and entire files disappearing from defense team drives. “That really slowed us down because we lost confidence in our ability to maintain attorney-client privilege. We stopped putting information on the server,” Mayberry said. “As a result of that very painful process, the Department of Defense

SENIOR JUDGE KATHRYN H. VRATIL, L’75 | U.S. District Court, District of Kansas Judge Vratil is the 23rd judge and the first woman named to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. She served as law clerk to Judge Earl O’Connor from 1975-78 and spent 14 years in private practice with Lathrop & Norquist, where she held a partnership and specialized in commercial and business litigation. She also served as municipal judge in Prairie Village, Kansas. She was the district’s chief judge from January 2008 to April 2014. “Back then, it was common for bar organizations to meet in private men’s clubs – as a lawyer, I remember having to take the service elevator in the kitchen of the University Club to attend bar luncheons. The idea that I might become a federal judge was too far-fetched to warrant serious consideration.” Read Judge Vratil’s account of her journey to the bench: law.ku.edu/vratil-story

KU LAW MAGAZINE 13


just awarded the contract for our independent network in September.” That year-long technological quagmire is characteristic of the complex and protracted process of bringing the Gitmo defendants to trial. Mayberry’s rise to the rank of colonel with top secret clearance has been less glacial. After living in Johnson County as a child, Mayberry returned to Kansas from New Jersey for law school because she “liked the idea of being a lawyer, of advocating for a cause.” She flourished in the school’s Kansas Appellate Practice Clinic and represented indigent felons at the Appellate Defender’s Office for two years after graduation. The promise of immediate courtroom experience lured her to the JAG Corps in 1990. Since then, Mayberry has served in a dizzying variety of legal roles that have taken her to Air Force bases across the United States, to Germany, on deployments in Bosnia and Turkey, and straight into the heart of the Department of Defense at the Pentagon. She has been a prosecutor, a defense attorney, an executive officer and a trusted advisor to 4-star generals. Her proudest memories as a military attorney date back to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, when she and her legal team — also victims of the disaster — adjudicated and paid more than 800 personal property claims for military members and families stationed at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi. “Many of the people in my office lost their homes,” Mayberry said. “We still came to work every day and put our clients’ interests first — and got a tremendous sense of satisfaction doing it.” Mayberry has been pleasantly surprised to see the U.S. military awarding more women with three and four stars in recent years. She has never considered her gender an impediment in her military career and praises the breadth of experiences that KU Law and the U.S. Air Force have provided. “The kinds of classes that I had and the opportunity to interact with faculty as a law student prepared me for the diversity of practice and opportunities that a lawyer coming into the military can have,” she said. “It’s not lost on me that I’m a colonel, but I’d like to think that doesn’t define me. It just gives me more opportunities that I wouldn’t have had.” — Mindie Paget

14 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Cheryl Pilate (left) and Melanie Morgan are partners in Morgan Pilate LLC. (Photo by Bryant Callahan)


Cheryl Pilate, L’90 + Melanie Morgan, L’93 Defense attorneys ‘give life and breath to the Constitution’ A FRAME IN THE MAIN HALLWAY AT MORGAN Pilate LLC displays a sheet of plain white paper with 59 typed words that stop Cheryl Pilate in her tracks several times a day. It’s an order from the U.S. Supreme Court halting the execution of Missouri death-row inmate Russell Bucklew pending an 8th Circuit appeal. “That’s such a rarity,” said Pilate, L’90. “In your whole career you might never get anything like that. I’m just astonished at the amazing challenges that we have had the opportunity to take on.” Tough cases define the work of Pilate and her law partner, Melanie Morgan, L’93. Their distaste for injustice draws them into battles that other litigators might consider unwinnable. But they prevail because they are meticulous in their investigations and passionate about their clients. “The people who come to us are typically at a really low place in their lives,” Morgan said. “Sometimes they are facing really significant consequences in terms of loss of liberty, family or employment – all of the things that define who they are as individuals. So we feel a very significant responsibility to help them maneuver through the legal system.” That can be a complex undertaking. Morgan

represented 82-year-old Burundian immigrant Lazare Kobagaya, accused by the U.S. government of participating in Rwanda’s 1994 genocide and then lying on immigration forms about where he was during the atrocities. Working the case almost exclusively for two years, Morgan traveled twice to Africa to depose witnesses scattered widely in refugee camps. A judge dismissed all charges against Kobagaya after a five-week trial in 2011, and Morgan became the first female recipient of the Kansas Bar Association’s Courageous Attorney Award for her advocacy in the case. “It presented a number of factual and legal challenges that really had never been addressed in a U.S. court before,” she said. “It was probably the case of a lifetime for me.” A high point in Pilate’s career came in 2010 with an $833,250 judgment in favor of Barron Bowling. The cement worker suffered permanent brain damage when a Drug Enforcement Administration agent beat him after their cars collided on a narrow street in Kansas City, Kansas. “I’ve always been attracted – and I think this is true for Melanie, too – to representing somebody who looks like they’re not getting a fair shake,” Pilate said.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 15


Timeline

WOMEN AT KU LAW Since its start in 1878, KU Law has been open to all qualified applicants, regardless of gender or ethnicity.

} 2% women 10

410

1890

1891 } Ella Weiss Brown

becomes first woman to graduate from KU Law. She is admitted to practice before the Kansas Supreme Court in 1893.

1900 6

} 1% women

405 1910 3

} 0.7% women

427 1920 7

339

} 2% women

} 2% women 1930

7

396

1935 } Hazel Anderson

hired as first full-time law librarian at KU. She attends law school while working at the library and earns her degree in 1945.

1940 14

} 5% women

287

16 KU LAW MAGAZINE

DEFENDERS FROM THE START Morgan and Pilate both cut their teeth with Professor David Gottlieb in KU’s Defender Project (now the Project for Innocence and PostConviction Remedies), representing prisoners in appellate and postconviction litigation in state and federal courts. Morgan remembers working on one appeal where the trial attorney failed to interview key witnesses who might have helped prove the client’s innocence. “It made me sick to my stomach,” she said. “It made me fully appreciate that there were lawyers out there who did not take seriously their responsibility of being entrusted with another human being’s life.” After graduation, Morgan joined the Law Office of Joseph D. Johnson in Topeka, where she handled murder, rape and other criminal cases. She later opened a solo practice in Olathe. Pilate practiced criminal law at Wyrsch Hobbs & Mirakian PC in Kansas City, Missouri, where, just four years out of law school, she took her first innocence case. She eventually won the release of Ellen Reasonover and a $7.5 million settlement to compensate her client for spending 16 years in prison for a murder she didn’t commit. Since then, Pilate has been responsible for the exonerations of three more innocent clients. She also won a significant settlement for Dennis Fritz and Ron Williamson, who spent more than a decade wrongfully incarcerated in Oklahoma for a 1982 sexual assault and murder. Her work on their civil case was featured in John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, “The Innocent Man.” ‘YOU’VE CROSSED THE LINE’ Morgan and Pilate met by chance at a 2006 luncheon for attorneys assigned to indigent clients. Less than a year later, they combined their practices and launched a firm in Olathe. In 2012, they bought and renovated an old brick building just blocks from

the federal courthouse in downtown Kansas City and transplanted Morgan Pilate to Missouri. “If one thing really distinguishes us from any other firm, I feel like passion bubbles through this place every day,” Pilate said. “Someone is always excited about something they’re working on and is running down the hall to talk to someone else and get an idea or share something interesting or case-changing.” One case that gets them both charged up these days involves the “SWAT-style” raid by heavily armed sheriff’s deputies of Robert and Adlynn Harte’s Leawood home in 2012. Authorities claimed the Hartes were growing marijuana after seeing Robert leave a store that sold hydroponic gardening equipment and finding loose tea leaves in the couple’s household trash, Pilate said. The Hartes’ two young children were home at the time of the raid, which turned up nothing but wilted vegetable plants. “If this can happen to them, then every single person needs to be afraid,” Morgan said. “We all have this idea that the police don’t get it wrong, that they’re just doing their job. And if they’re just doing their job, then it’s OK that Mr. Harte was on the floor in his underwear at gunpoint for two hours in his own home. That’s never OK.” Their federal lawsuit in the case is emblematic of the work Morgan and Pilate do each day to “give life and breath to the Constitution.” “That may sound a bit idealistic, but we feel it deeply,” Pilate said. “Unless we litigate and say, ‘You’ve crossed the line,’ then where the line is becomes increasingly difficult to see. And before you know it, there will be no line.” — Mindie Paget


1950 3% women {

18

525 1960 3% women {

15% women {

16

588

1970 JOHN D. & CATHERINE T. MACARTHUR FOUNDATION

Sarah Deer, L’95 Alumna receives ‘genius grant’ for efforts to curb violence against Native women SARAH DEER HAS BEEN INTERESTED in women’s issues since she was 6 or 7 years old, when she learned that women didn’t have the right to vote in the United States until 1920. “Somehow as a young girl I just couldn’t get my mind wrapped around that,” she said. “I think that sparked the passion that became my career.” It wasn’t until she arrived at KU Law, though, that she made the connection between federal Indian law and a history of injustices against Native women. “Taking Federal Indian Law with Rob Porter the fall of my second year was a pivotal point in my career,” she said. “I suddenly realized, ‘This is my calling.’ Right there in one of the small KU Law seminar rooms, things changed for me.” Her relentless pursuit since then to protect Native women from gender violence recently earned her a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship. Often called

“genius grants,” the fellowships are awarded to individuals who exhibit exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on a track record of significant accomplishment, and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work. Deer was among 21 individuals in the 2014 class of MacArthur Fellows who will receive a no-strings-attached stipend of $625,000 over five years. “The MacArthur Fellowship will change my life in a number of ways, but more importantly it will allow me to do more focused work on the passion that I have for justice for Native women,” Deer said in a video interview with the MacArthur Foundation. A professor at the William Mitchell College of Law and a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, Deer has documented in her scholarship a history of inadequate protection

Louise Wheeler { 1971 becomes KU’s first full-time female law professor.

196

Rebeca Mendoza { 1972 becomes first Hispanic woman to graduate from KU Law.

1125

Marilyn Ainsworth { 1976 becomes first African-American woman on KU Law faculty.

1980 34% women {

577

1136 1990 42% women {

704

988 2000 42% women { Gail Agrawal { 2006 becomes KU Law’s first female dean. She’s now the dean at Iowa Law.

724

997

Source: KU Office of Institutional Research and Planning. Figures represent J.D. degrees awarded by gender per decade.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 17


Up-and-coming Young graduates achieving success early in their careers

LEITA WALKER, L’06 Associate, Faegre Baker Daniels, Minneapolis, MN

LAURA DAKHIL MONAHAN, L’07 Chief Legal Officer, Cancer Center of Kansas, Wichita, KS

A member of her firm’s Intellectual Property Group, Walker splits her practice between dispute resolution and client counseling, focusing on media, advertising and privacy law. She routinely reviews and writes terms of use and privacy policies for the websites of major corporations, works with editors and reporters to reduce litigation risks arising from stories they wish to publish, and counsels major corporations on proposed advertising copy and its compliance with rules of the FTC and industry guidelines. In a highly publicized 2014 trial, Walker defended the estate of former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle against a defamation claim brought by exMinnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura. Her corporate clients include Target, Land O’Lakes, Cargill, The Star Tribune, CNN and CBS. Prior to law school, Walker interned at the Christian Science Monitor and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, and worked at the Lawrence Journal-World. “I really enjoy my practice, which allows me to not only use my journalism background in representing traditional media clients but also to work on cuttingedge privacy- and advertisingrelated issues for a wide variety of companies.”

Monahan transitioned from private practice to in-house counsel in early 2014 when she became chief legal officer at the Cancer Center of Kansas, an oncology and hematology practice with 22 locations in Kansas dedicated to providing the most advanced cancer care available in an atmosphere of caring compassion. She previously practiced law as part of the Hinkle Law Firm’s Business Law and Health Care groups, representing physicians, individuals and businesses in a variety of industries and transactions. She was honored as a part of the Wichita Business Journal’s “40 under 40” Class of 2013 and serves on the boards of the American Heart Association and the Wichita Cancer Foundation. “I’m not only enjoying the work I’m doing now, I’m inspired by the cause. My time in private practice was invaluable and I had a deep passion for assisting my clients, but there is something very unique, gratifying and even inspiring about my position at the Cancer Center of Kansas. I am able to apply my skills and experience as an attorney to directly and greatly impact a place caring for thousands of patients across the state of Kansas.”

18 KU LAW MAGAZINE

TRINIA CAIN, L’09 Regulatory Counsel, Center for Drug Evaluation & Research, Food & Drug Administration, Washington, D.C. Cain writes federal regulations and industry guidance for human drugs and biological products. Her portfolio of projects includes patient drug labeling, biosimilars and abuse-deterrent formulations of opioid medications. She was the lead author of the Accelerated Approval section of the Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions — Drugs and Biologics guidance. These programs provide expedited approval of drugs that treat serious conditions and fill an unmet medical need. A former Army Nurse Corps officer, Cain was commissioned in February 2013 into the U.S. Public Health Service Corps, a force of health care and public health professionals stationed throughout the Department of Health and Human Services who are deployed to handle national public health emergencies. Corps members have helped with the health and social needs of unaccompanied minors at the U.S.-Mexico border and the Ebola epidemic in Liberia. “The work I do now blends my legal and nursing backgrounds nicely. It helps when writing regulations and guidances to keep in mind how they will impact patients’ access to the treatments they need.”


Who inspires you?

JOMANA QADDOUR, L’09 Senior Associate, Caerus Associates, Washington, D.C. Qaddour leads her firm’s research and analysis initiatives focusing on the Middle East and Northern Africa. Prior to joining Caerus, she was a senior research assistant and publications manager for the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World in the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution, where she focused on Syria, Egypt, Palestinian politics, and Islamist movements. Qaddour is also the co-founder of Syria Relief & Development, a humanitarian organization that seeks to provide direct emergency and ongoing humanitarian relief for Syrians who have been affected by violence, poverty, hunger or homelessness since 2011. She has appeared multiple times as a Syria subject-matter specialist on Al Jazeera America, and in August 2013 she was recognized by The Huffington Post as one of the top 10 Muslims who save lives. “At Caerus, I manage our Middle East reporting, specifically our work on Syria regarding humanitarian aid and civilian governance. Despite all the destruction in Syria, the small steps taken in villages and cities to address the services and needs of the locals are what ultimately save the Syrian social fabric from complete annihilation.”

This issue merely scratches the surface when it comes to highlighting the outstanding — sometimes groundbreaking — careers of KU Law alumnae through the years. Who among the league of women KU Law graduates has impressed or inspired you? Drop us a note about an alumna who deserves some time in the spotlight, and we'll include your nomination on the KU Law Blog and in a future issue of KU Law Magazine. Send nominations by Feb. 1, 2015 to mpaget@ku.edu.

Sarah Deer wins genius grant Continued from page 17 for victims of physical and sexual abuse in Indian Country. She has simultaneously worked with grassroots and national organizations to reform federal policies that hinder the ability of tribes to prosecute offenders. Her efforts were instrumental in the passage of the Tribal Law and “The MacArthur Order Act of 2010 and the 2013 reauthorization of the Violence Fellowship will change Against Women Act. Deer earned a bachelor’s in my life in a number women’s studies and philosophy from KU in 1995 and a law degree of ways, but more in 1999. After law school, she worked for three years at the U.S. Department importantly it will of Justice in Washington, D.C., and then became a victim advocacy legal allow me to do more specialist and staff attorney at the Tribal Law and Policy Institute in focused work on the Los Angeles. In 2009, she joined the faculty of the William Mitchell College passion that I have of Law, where she is currently a professor and co-director of the for justice for Native Indian Law Clinic. A native Kansan who grew up women.” in Wichita, Deer maintains loyal ties to KU. She served as the keynote speaker at the 2009 Diversity in Law Banquet and spoke about “Native Women, Violence and Reproductive Justice” at a law school forum in 2012. She described winning a MacArthur Fellowship as “overwhelming” and said she’s still brainstorming how she will use the award to advance her work. One possibility is taking some time off to immerse herself in learning her tribe’s endangered Muscogee language. “I’m particularly interested in how legal concepts and legal norms are reflected in the Muscogee language,” she said. “That’s a project that I’ve been dreaming about for a while, and it might be possible now.” — Mindie Paget

KU LAW MAGAZINE 19


FACULTY NEWS

In the news FACULTY EXPERTS “I’m sure it will spur controversy in the U.S. from folks who think that U.S. companies shouldn’t have to comply with the laws of other countries, in the U.S.” Professor Andrew Torrance provided expertise for a Reuters article exploring the increasing regulatory influence of foreign nations as demonstrated by a Cargill lawsuit over losses incurred as a result of China’s rejection of genetically modified corn.

“Right now I’m feeling frustrated. The law is clear-cut. It would save Kansas taxpayers a lot of money if the state would acknowledge that the law has changed rather than fighting a battle it cannot win.” Adjunct Professor David Brown was the subject of a Kansas City Star article about his lawsuit against the Kansas Department of Revenue, which seeks tax equality for married same-sex couples.

Mr. Yung published a study in March that found that more than 796,000 rapes were not included in the FBI’s tally between 1995 and 2012, partly because of the way the police handled cases in which the person who was assaulted did not meet the department’s definition of a rape victim. Professor Corey Yung’s study on the dramatic underreporting of rape in official FBI statistics was cited in a New York Times article about the challenge of defining rape.

“Everybody’s got a camera now, watching and recording everyone else. And that is, in a way, an unconscious step toward a society where everybody is under surveillance all the time. No one is thinking deeply about that.” Professor Mike Kautsch discussed how rapidly evolving technologies are outpacing existing privacy laws in a Wichita Eagle article about the elusive nature of privacy.

20 KU LAW MAGAZINE

RESEARCH

In SCOTUS oral argument and article, law professor explores original jurisdiction STEPHEN MCALLISTER, THE E.S. & TOM W. HAMPTON Distinguished Professor of Law and solicitor general of Kansas, argued on behalf of the state before the U.S. Supreme Court on Oct. 14 in a dispute about water rights and the Republican River. Lower courts have determined that Nebraska has pumped too much water from the river before it flows into Kansas and that Nebraska should pay Kansas $5.5 million. Nebraska claims that amount is too steep, while Kansas claims the payment should be higher. McAllister wrote an article published this fall in the law journal The Green Bag about original jurisdiction procedures, the process by which disputes between states often are initiated and decided in the Supreme Court. “One of the ways to think of original jurisdiction is as ‘the other civil war,’” McAllister said. “Instead of states taking action against each other, militarily or otherwise, they can go to the Supreme Court and get a resolution of their dispute. Original jurisdiction gives the Supreme Court the chance to keep such disputes from ever reaching the point of violence or other punitive actions between states.” Original jurisdiction was used only sparingly before the Civil War, but since then it has been used frequently to determine all manner of disputes between states over water rights, fishing rights, boundaries and occasionally other issues such as interstate pollution.

law.ku.edu/faculty law.ku.edu/faculty-news


RESEARCH

Debt, bankruptcy arguments similar to onetime debtors prisons WHILE PEOPLE ARE NO LONGER IMPRISONED FOR failing to pay their debts as they were in England a century ago, the legal arguments surrounding debts and bankruptcy have changed little since then. Stephen Ware, professor of law, has authored “A 20th Century Debate About Imprisonment for Debt,” which explores England’s parliamentary debate about imprisoning debtors circa 1909. He notes that current debates surrounding consumer debt in the United States rest on similar arguments. The article was published by the American Journal of Legal History. “Many people who settled in the 13 colonies that became the United States were fleeing debts in England, so it’s no surprise that the U.S. ended debtors’ prisons long before England, which continued to use them well into the 20th century,” Ware said. While the United States has done away with debtors’

prisons, many parallels exist today. Debtors who lose lawsuits can be ordered to answer questions about their income and assets in court. If debtors fail to appear, they can be held in contempt of court, and an arrest warrant will be issued. The debtor can stop the arrest by agreeing to a payment plan, but if the debtor again misses payments, he or she may be arrested. “While technically jailed for contempt of court, not the underlying debt, that distinction may be lost on a struggling debtor who cannot afford a lawyer to explain it and advocate for the debtor,” Ware said.

RESEARCH

Regulation on creation of new life forms should be limited WHEN THE FIRST WIDESPREAD COMPUTER VIRUS WAS born, government didn’t shut down all computer science research. Similarly, now that synthetic biology — a field of science that uses standardized pieces of DNA to build new life forms, medications, industrial processes and biological systems — is growing rapidly, it should not be overregulated at the cost of future innovations, a KU Law professor argues. Andrew Torrance, professor of law and Docking Faculty Scholar, has co-authored a new study on synthetic biology, intellectual property and the standards that govern the field with Linda Kahl of the BioBricks Foundation, the leading synthetic biology institution. It has been published in the Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal, and it is based on a 2012 study the National Academies commissioned Torrance to prepare. Synthetic biology is being used to design new medications

to fight malaria, produce biological computers and create living organisms from organic chemicals. Yet there is also concern that this “dual use” technology could be used with malicious intent to design new forms of disease pathogens or that there could be accidents. “From its founding, the synthetic biology community has been concerned about ensuring safety, health and ethical practices,” said Torrance, who holds a doctorate in biology from Harvard. “The community has explicitly committed itself to uses of the technology that benefit humanity and avoidance of uses that could endanger public safety, especially those with nefarious purposes.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 21


FACULTY NEWS

Appointments FACULTY KUDOS Professor Elizabeth Kronk Warner appointed chair of U.S. Civil Rights committee Professor Elizabeth Kronk Warner has been appointed chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights’ Kansas State Advisory Committee. She started her two-year term in July. “The Kansas Advisory Committee works tirelessly to improve the lives of the people of Kansas,” Kronk Warner said. “I am honored to continue in this proud tradition and look forward to continued great work of the Kansas Advisory Committee.” The committee conducts reviews and produces reports and recommendations concerning local civil rights issues, including justice, voting, discrimination, housing and education. Congress mandates that the federal Commission appoint volunteer members to advisory committees in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Elinor Schroeder elected Fellow of College of Labor and Employment Lawyers Elinor Schroeder, the Paul E. Wilson Distinguished Professor of Law, has been elected a Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers in recognition of her sustained outstanding performance in the profession. Schroeder became only the fourth Fellow in Kansas when she was installed Nov. 8 at the American Bar Association’s Labor and Employment Law Section’s Continuing Legal Education Conference in Los Angeles. “I have had a wonderful career teaching great students in my labor and employment classes, and thinking, speaking, and writing about important issues in these areas,” said Schroeder, who joined the KU Law faculty in 1977. “Election to the College is truly icing on the cake. I am extremely grateful for this recognition.”

22 KU LAW MAGAZINE

RESEARCH

Study: Muslim nations take nuanced approach to ‘haram’ imports NEW RESEARCH FROM a KU Law professor and alumna shows confusion about how Islamic law applies to international trade. Islamic law declares the consumption of certain items such as alcohol, pork and pork products forbidden, or “haram.” Raj Bhala, associate dean for international and comparative law and Rice Distinguished Professor, and Shannon Keating, L’13, authored an article showing that the majority of Islamic nations do not ban the import of those three product groupings, even though World Trade Organization law allows them to do so. The reasons are numerous and nuanced. Bhala and Keating analyzed the tariff schedules of every Islamic country in the world with a majority Muslim population who are members of both the Organization of Islamic Conference and the WTO to see how they handled the importation of the three haram product categories. The findings, published in the International Lawyer, the most widely circulated international law journal in the world, show “diversity within unity.” The unity the researchers found is that all the countries in question identify as Muslim and consider alcohol, pork and pork products haram. The diversity is that most allow their import but employ different kinds of import restrictions. Some nations did not know they could ban the import of such goods when they joined GATT. Many used tariffs to influence how the goods are lawfully brought into their countries.


BOOKS

Professor contextualizes origins of modern legal ethics in new introduction to ‘You Should Not’ AT A TIME WHEN THERE WAS NO formal code of legal ethics and attorneys had been traditionally trained as apprentices, Samuel Wandell, a New York lawyer, judge, and author, wrote the book on what lawyers should and should not do. Part handbook, part cultural artifact, the slim 1896 volume offers advice ranging from the professional (“You should not get the mistaken idea that it pays a lawyer to become noted as sharp and tricky”), to the personal (“You should not have too many confidential and intimate friends”) to the physical (“You should not neglect physical exercise”). Professor Michael H. Hoeflich, John H. and John M. Kane Professor of Law at KU, wrote the introduction to the 2014 edition and sheds light on the book’s historical and cultural context. Hoeflich notes that the post-Civil War era brought profound changes for the legal profession. The rise of large corporations created an unprecedented need for corporate attorneys. Legal education shifted from an apprenticeship model to the university-affiliated law schools we know today. The legal field became stratified — elite corporate lawyers represented business interests, while less elite lawyers represented plaintiffs. The legal elite tended to be educated at formal law schools, were active in professional legal groups and

hailed from established American families. The less elite plaintiffs’ attorneys were more likely from immigrant families and had less access to professional organizations and the benefits they offered. Tension arose between the two groups, prompting some members of the elite to call for ethical standards. A lawyer’s code of ethics was a novel idea at the time — the Alabama Bar introduced the first in 1887, with the American Bar Association following in 1908. Wandell wrote his book during this turning point in the legal profession and American history at large. His guide was not just “a treatise on legal ethics,” Hoeflich writes. Rather than simply highlighting professional responsibilities, the book helped attorneys understand how to adapt to the culture of the Bar. Hoeflich notes that the book is “more than a period piece,” but “a document which reflects both the origins of many of our modern ideas about legal ethics and professional responsibility as well as the changing notions of proper behavior that surfaced in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.” — Emily Sharp

SELECTED CASEBOOKS SPRING-FALL 2014 Employment Law Thomson West, 4th ed. Elinor Schroeder Federal Income Tax Code and Regulations | CCH Martin Dickinson Criminal Procedure in Practice American Bar Association Melanie Wilson Economic Analysis for Lawyers Carolina Academic Press, 3rd ed. Chris Drahozal Criminal Procedure LexisNexis, 8th ed. Melanie Wilson

KU LAW MAGAZINE 23


ALUMNI NEWS 1

5

2

6

3

7

4

8

24 KU LAW MAGAZINE


9

Alumni faces From reunions to homecoming to the revival of Fun Day, occasions since last spring have lured alumni to KU Law events in Lawrence and across the country. We even hosted a swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Supreme Court and a reception that boasted one of the bests views in Washington, D.C. (page 26). Thank you for sharing your time with us! 10

11

1

Anne Cook, L’04, cuts up with friends during the KU Law Homecoming tailgate party in September.

2

Ashlee Yager, L’14, laughs with Dean Stephen Mazza at the Homecoming Reception in September at The Oread.

3

Chuck Marvine, L’96, Melissa Wangemann, L’94, Jared Maag and Professor Joyce Rosenberg, L’96, at the All-Reunion Cocktail Reception in September at Arterra Event Gallery.

4

Joy Wickliffe Root, L’89, catches up with friends during the Homecoming tailgate party.

5

Jonathan Becker, L’89, celebrates his 25-year reunion at the All-Reunion Cocktail Reception.

6

Seanna Higley, L’04, enjoys the company of classmates at the All-Reunion Cocktail Reception in September at Arterra Event Gallery.

7

Anna Landis, L’10, and Anna Schall, L’10, catch up during the Homecoming tailgate party in September.

8

Beau Gould, L’89, left, chats with Chuck Doyle, L’78, and Doyle’s wife, Lydia Beebe, L’77, at the Homecoming Reception in September at The Oread.

9

Robert Williams, L’64, Dudley Smith, L’63, and Robert’s wife, Mary, pause their conversation for a photo during the 50/50+ Reunion Dinner in April at Pachamama’s.

10 John Wilkinson, L’58, Stan Lind, L’48, and his wife, Eleanor, and John’s wife, Marianne, enjoy conversation before the 50/50+ Reunion Dinner in April. 11 Judge G. Joseph Pierron, L’71, dons a whistle and serves as umpire during the Fun Day kickball tournament in May at Broken Arrow Park.

Photos by Earl Richardson (1-8), Steve Puppe (9-10), and Mindie Paget (11). KU LAW MAGAZINE 25


ALUMNI NEWS 1

5

2

6

3

At the high court Twenty KU Law alumni and one professor took part in the school’s Supreme Court swearing-in ceremony June 8-9 in Washington, D.C. Photos by Bill Petros

4

26 KU LAW MAGAZINE

1

Swearing-in candidates pause for a group photo on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court.

2

Skip Kaltenheuser, L’78, Laura Hall, Andrew Shaw, L’09, Dean Stephen Mazza, Ann McMahon and Andrew Yeretsky, L’06, at the June KU Law Alumni Reception on the top floor of the Hay-Adams Hotel in Washington, D.C.

3

Rury Grisham, L’10, Dana Watts, L’10, and Professor Quinton Lucas at the D.C. Alumni Reception at the Hay-Adams Hotel.

4

Richard Zayas, his wife, Ali Zayas, L’09, and her parents joined KU Law for a Potomac River dinner cruise associated with swearing-in activities in D.C.

5

Reception guests enjoy the spectacular view of the Washington Monument from atop the Hay-Adams Hotel.

6

Justice Sonia Sotomayor addresses alumni and their guests before the swearing-in ceremony at the Supreme Court.


TRIO OF JURISTS EARN KU LAW’S HIGHEST HONOR THREE KU LAW ALUMNI with distinguished careers in the judiciary and public service received the Distinguished Alumni Award, the law school’s highest honor, at a May 10 ceremony in Lawrence. The award is presented annually to graduates who have distinguished themselves through exemplary service to the legal profession, their communities, KU and the state or nation. Photo by Steve Puppe

JUDGE MARY MURGUIA, L’85

JUSTICE EDWARD LARSON, L’60

JUDGE JULIE ROBINSON, L’81

Murguia began her legal career with the Wyandotte County District Attorney’s Office in Kansas City, Kansas. From 1990 to 2000, Murguia served in prosecutorial and administrative roles in the Arizona U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Executive Office for United States Attorneys at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. When President Clinton appointed Murguia a U.S. district judge for the District of Arizona in 2000, she became the first Latina on a federal bench for that district. In 2010, she was nominated to the 9th Circuit by President Obama.

A veteran of the U.S. Air Force, Larson practiced law and served as a municipal judge in Hays after law school. In 1987, he was appointed to the Kansas Court of Appeals and then tapped for the Kansas Supreme Court in 1995. He retired in 2002. Larson is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the American Bar Foundation, has served on the Kansas Board of Law Examiners, was president of the Kansas University Law Society, and served as a member of the Governor’s Committee on Children and Families and the Kansas Children’s Cabinet.

Robinson clerked for Chief Bankruptcy Judge Benjamin E. Franklin and then served as an assistant U.S. attorney for 11 years, handling both civil litigation and criminal prosecutions. She served as a U.S. bankruptcy judge from 1994 to 2001, when she was appointed by President Bush to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. Robinson was the first African-American to serve on that court. She is past-president of the KU Law Board of Governors and has taught Trial Advocacy as an adjunct professor at KU Law.

WHO WILL BE NEXT? Submit nominations by January 29 | law.ku.edu/distinguished

WITH DISTINCTION 27


ALUMNI NEWS

ClassNotes

Items were received or collected prior to Nov. 1, 2014. Submit your news by e-mail to nuhler@ku.edu or online at law.ku.edu/keep-touch. KU Law Magazine relies on alumni for the accuracy of information reported.

1967 Bob Green retired from the daily practice of law at the end of 2013. This year, he has been traveling with his wife, Joyce, in their motor coach and riding his Goldwing motorcycle while finishing probate and other cases. He is a board member for Peoples Banks of Kansas and New Mexico. Green began his practice in Ottawa in 1968 as an associate with Wint Winter Sr., and later hired now-retired Judge Thomas Sachse, L’74, with whom he was a partner from 1974 to 1991. 1968 Alan R. Gardner was re-elected to the Board of Governors of the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers during its annual meeting in Chicago. Gardner is owner of Gardner Law Office LLC, practicing workers’ compensation, general liability, and defense employment law. 1972 Stephen M. Joseph, a partner in the Wichita office Joseph, Hollander & Craft, was recognized for excellence in general commercial litigation by Chambers USA 2014. Chambers USA ranks individual lawyers and firms based on pre-eminence in their areas of practice and specific achievements. Joseph is also listed in The Best Lawyers in America 2015. His practice concentrates on the defense of those charged with crimes in federal and state court, including computer crimes, medical and insurance fraud, mail and wire fraud, bank fraud, government procurement fraud, income tax evasion, and securities violations. 1976 Ross A. Hollander, president of Joseph, Hollander & Craft, was recognized for excellence in the labor/employment sector by Chambers USA 2014. Hollander has practiced in Wichita for 35 years in the areas of employment law and business and commercial litigation.

28 KU LAW MAGAZINE

1978 Michael R. Meacham published “From Backpack to Briefcase: Professional Development in Health Administration” (Cengage Learning). The book is intended to help both undergraduate and master’s students in health administration understand the tools they will need to conduct job and fellowship searches. Craig R. Oliver was selected for inclusion in the 2014 edition of The Best Lawyers in America in the practice areas of personal injury litigation-plaintiffs and medical malpractice law-plaintiffs. Oliver is a partner in The Law Offices of Palmer Oliver PC in Springfield, Missouri, where he has represented clients in complex litigation matters for 30 years. 1980 Judy Nelson published an article on Forbes.com about her “encore career” as an executive coach. Nelson started her international coaching and leadership training business eight years ago after serving more than 30 years as a nonprofit CEO. She is married to Dr. James N. Nelson, a graduate of the KU Medical School who continues his full-time practice in psychiatry. The couple lives in Redondo Beach, California. Emily B. Metzger received the Kansas Bar Association’s Distinguished Government Service Award. The award, bestowed Sept. 19 at the Association’s 2014 Awards Luncheon, recognizes a Kansas lawyer who has demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to government service through accomplishments above and beyond those expected from persons engaged in similar government service. Metzger serves as chief of the civil division of the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Kansas. David J. Rebein, of Dodge City, has been selected to serve as 2014-15 treasurer and Eagles Chair for the Kansas Association for Justice. Rebein is a partner in the Rebein

Bangerter Rebein law firm, which has offices in Dodge City and Tampa, Florida. 1981 The Hon. Daniel D. Crabtree was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as a federal judge on the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. Crabtree was formerly a partner at Stinson Leonard Street LLP in Kansas City, Missouri. Stephen Scheve, a partner at Reed Smith LLP in Houston, has been nominated as a Fellow in the Litigation Counsel of America (LCA). Scheve is a member of the firm’s Life Sciences Health Industry Group, where his practice focuses on product liability defense for corporations in the pharmaceutical and chemical sectors. Fellows are selected based on effectiveness and accomplishment in litigation and trial work at the trial and appellate level, along with their superior reputation. Membership is limited to less than one-half of 1 percent of American lawyers. Rosemary (Rosie) O’Leary spent 2014 as an Ian Axford Fellow in Public Policy in New Zealand. She is researching collaboration as a management and leadership strategy. O’Leary is the Edwin O. Stene Distinguished Professor of Public Administration at the University of Kansas. 1982 The Hon. Karen Arnold Burger was a finalist to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Arnold-Burger has been a Kansas Court of Appeals judge since 2011. Previously, she was a municipal judge in Overland Park from 1991 to 1996 and presiding municipal judge from 1996 to 2011. Martha (Marty) M. Snyder was honored with the 2014 Justice Kay McFarland Attorney of Achievement Award by The Women Attorneys Association of Topeka.


The award goes to an individual who has achieved professional excellence in her field and has influenced other women to pursue legal careers; or has opened doors for women lawyers in a variety of job settings that historically were closed to them; or has advanced opportunities for women within a practice area or segment of the profession. Snyder is the assistant attorney general in the civil litigation division for the state of Kansas. The Hon. Steve A. Leben received the William H. Rehnquist Award for Judicial Excellence in November from Chief Justice John Roberts. Leben, who sits on the Kansas Court of Appeals, was chosen to receive the honor by the National Center for State Courts. The award goes to a judge who demonstrates integrity, fairness and knowledge of the law. 1983 Kenneth L. Wagner has been promoted to vice president, general counsel-corporate and chief compliance officer at Peabody Energy Corporation in St. Louis, Missouri. Prior to joining Peabody, Wagner served as associate general counsel for Bank of America. Jeffery A. Mason was re-appointed to the Commission on Judicial Qualifications and serves as its vice-chairman and chairman of its Panel B. Mason’s law firm, Vignery & Mason LLC in Goodland, Kansas, specializes in family rights and property or injury compensation. Cathy A. Reinhardt was elected a trustee on the KU Endowment Board of Trustees in September. She is president of Reinhardt Financial Services Inc. in Lawrence, Kansas. 1986 Holly R. Zane was named employee relations coordinator at the University of Kansas. Prior to working at KU, Zane served as deputy director of human resources at the Kansas Department of Corrections. 1987 Jay N. Selanders is the new managing partner of Kutak Rock LLP’s Kansas City office. Selanders represents clients in commercial credit and lending, and real estate loans and transactions. He also serves as national counsel for several auto finance companies. 1988 Elizabeth A. Schartz was selected for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2015. Schartz is a partner in the Dallas office of Thompson & Knight, where she chairs the firm’s Employment and Labor Practice Group. 1989 Sharon L. Dickgrafe was named one of the 2014 Women in Business by the Wichita Business Journal. Dickgrafe is interim city attorney and director of law for the City of Wichita. Laura J. Bond has been named a Healthcare Advisory Services Principal with the nationally recognized health care consulting firm PYA. Bond brings to the position extensive health care legal experience, having practiced law for 25 years, most recently with Spencer Fane, Britt & Browne LLP. Her areas of

Scholarships make a KU education possible for future leaders Supporting KU with your gift will benefit students for generations. To learn more, please visit giving.farabove.org.


ALUMNI NEWS

expertise include regulatory compliance, hospital-physician relationship structure, and physician compensation strategy. Paul J. Hickman has been appointed by Gov. Sam Brownback to be a judge in the 28th Judicial District, serving Ottawa and Saline counties. He will fill a position vacated by Judge Jerome Hellmer, who is retiring in January. Hickman currently serves as deputy public defender in the Salina Regional Public Defenders Office. 1990 Mark A. Andersen received the Distinguished Graduate Award for 2014 from Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas. The award is given to one recipient annually to recognize outstanding achievement and service to society by a Bethany College graduate. Anderson practices at Barber Emerson in Lawrence, Kansas, in the areas of real estate, banking law, eminent domain, construction law and Section 1031 exchanges. Debra J. Villarreal, partner with the Dallas law firm of Thompson & Knight LLP, was selected for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2015 and the “Who’s Who in Energy” list of leaders in the energy industry by the Dallas Business Journal. Villarreal is an oil and gas attorney who counsels her clients to maximize gains while minimizing risks in joint ventures and the purchase and sale of oil and gas properties. 1992 L. James Berglund II, a partner in the Dallas law firm of Thompson & Knight LLP, was selected for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2015. He represents clients before government agencies and in commercial litigation in federal and state trial courts. He focuses his practice on complex business claims, civil and criminal antitrust litigation, contract issues, fiduciary duty issues, health care fraud investigations, class action litigation, securities litigation, products liability, dram shop liability, and aviation law. 1993 Alan Souter was presented with the Oklahoma Bar Foundation’s President’s Award for his work as the Foundation’s Development Committee co-chair. He was also re-appointed as co-chair of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Professionalism

30 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Committee and a member of its Investment and Awards Committees. He is general counsel and CFO for RECO Construction Company, and a principal with RECO Medical Development Group, both in Tulsa, Oklahoma. 1994 Kim E. Christiansen has joined Kansas Electric Cooperatives in Topeka as manager of government relations. Most recently, she was executive director of the Kansas Corporation Commission, after serving as assistant secretary and chief counsel for the Kansas Department of Agriculture. Eric Mikkelson, a partner in the Corporate Finance Group of Stinson Leonard Street LLP in Kansas City, Missouri, was elected to the City Council of Prairie Village, Kansas. 1995 Jonathan F. Duncan has been installed as the NCAA vice president of enforcement after serving in the interim role for 13 months. Prior to joining the NCAA in March 2013, Duncan worked with the NCAA for 15 years as outside counsel for several areas, including enforcement. As interim vice president of enforcement, he completed a review of department policies and procedures, consulted with membership about what they envisioned for the enforcement department and oversaw staff development. Sal Intagliata, with the Wichita office of Monnat & Spurrier Chartered, has been honored among the region’s most distinguished criminal defense attorneys by Missouri & Kansas Super Lawyers 2014. Intagliata’s practice focuses on criminal, white-collar criminal and DUI offenses and appeals in federal, state and municipal courts throughout Kansas. 1996 Todd A. LaSala, a partner in the Kansas City office of Stinson Leonard Street LLP, has been elected a Fellow of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers (ACREL), the premier organization of real estate practitioners whose members are selected by invitation only after a rigorous screening process. With LaSala's addition,

Stinson Leonard Street has six ACREL Fellows. LaSala is one of only 40 real estate lawyers in the U.S. invited to be an ACREL Fellow in 2014, and he becomes one of only 23 members practicing in the state of Missouri. LaSala is the first new Fellow selected from Missouri since 2009. Casey O. Housley, partner in the Kansas City office of Armstrong Teasdale, has been named to the Kansas City Business Journal’s “Best of the Bar” list of outstanding area lawyers chosen by their peers. Housley is chair of Armstrong Teasdale’s Product Liability Group and focuses his practice as a jury trial lawyer on defending utilities, major property and casualty insurers, product manufacturers, distributers and retailers. Craig Durham is co-counsel for plaintiffs in Latta et al. v. Otter et al., in which U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy W. Dale ruled that Idaho’s ban on marriage for same-sex couples is unconstitutional. The case was on appeal in the 9th Circuit. He practices civil rights law and criminal defense law in Boise, Idaho. 1998 Ann Bittinger was elected to the board of the American Health Lawyer’s Association and will serve a three-year term starting in July. The AHLA is the nation’s largest educational organization devoted to legal issues in the health care field. Bittinger has practiced almost exclusively in health care regulatory and transactional law since 1998. Her practice focuses primarily on representing physicians and physician organizations. The Bittinger Law Firm celebrated its 10th anniversary in March 2014 in Jacksonville, Florida. Manuel “Manny” Ortiz has been appointed to serve on the board of directors for the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, whose mission is to strengthen the Washington metropolitan region by encouraging and supporting effective giving and by providing leadership on critical issues in the community. Ortiz was also appointed to serve on the board of the Washington Tennis & Education Foundation, which is dedicated to building life champions through tennis and academic excellence. Ortiz is a shareholder in the Washington,


D.C., firm of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck and practices in the areas of government relations, financial services, telecommunications and media, and mergers and acquisitions. JoAnna L. Derfelt has been promoted to associate professor and director of the Center for Law & Politics at Missouri Southern State University. The Center connects students, practitioners and the community “at the intersection of theory and practice.” Amy Kiefer Hansen, shareholder in the Denver office of Otten Johnson Robinson Neff & Ragonetti PC, has been honored as Volunteer of the Year by the Downtown Denver Partnership. The award is presented to members who have made significant contributions to programs and initiatives during the previous year. In her practice, Hansen assists real estate owners and developers with their acquisition, development, leasing and sale activities in the Rocky Mountain region. 2000 Jason P. Lacey, partner in the Wichita office of Foulston Siefkin LLP, authored a new three-volume Kansas Corporate Practice and Forms: The Foulston Siefkin Manual, featuring more than 2,162 pages of content and over 314 customizable e-forms. Lacey practices primarily in the areas of income taxation, ERISA, employee benefits, and executive compensation, and assists both taxable and tax-exempt employers with a wide variety of employee benefit and executive compensation issues. Christopher M. Joseph, attorney in the Topeka office of Joseph, Hollander & Craft is listed in The Best Lawyers in America 2015 and was awarded special distinction as the 2015 Topeka Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar Lawyer of the Year. Joseph manages the firm’s Topeka and Lawrence offices, and his practice includes criminal defense and complex civil litigation. The Hon. Caleb Stegall was sworn in as the newest Kansas Supreme Court justice on Dec. 5, 2014. Stegall has been a Kansas Court of Appeals judge since January 2014. Before becoming a judge, he was chief counsel to Gov. Sam Brownback from 2011 to 2014, Jefferson County attorney from 2009 to 2011, and in private practice with Stegall & Associates PA from 2005 to 2011. 2001 Kristen L. Chowning Martin accepted a position as assistant legal counsel for the auditor of the state of Ohio. The Hon. Ryan P. Loewer, of Boulder, Colorado, has been appointed district court magistrate judge for Colorado’s First Judicial District. For the past 12 years, Loewer has been a deputy state public defender in Colorado and has litigated some of the state’s most publicized criminal cases. 2002 Diane L. Bellquist has joined the Topeka office of Joseph, Hollander & Craft, practicing in the areas of professional licensure and civil litigation. She was formerly assistant general counsel for the Kansas Board of Healing Arts and general counsel to the Office of the State Bank Commissioner.

Lt. Comm. Rich Federico (center), of the U.S. Navy serves at the Defense Service Office Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida, with two fellow KU Law officers, Lt. Tadd Blair, L’08 (left), and Lt. Robert Bombard, L’12 (right). The three alumni serve together in an office of 10 judge advocates. Their mission is to represent sailors, marines, and coastguardsmen who are charged with criminal offenses in the military justice system or are being involuntarily separated from the service. They also provide defense counsel services to a larger area that includes Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and several islands. U.S. Rep. Kevin W. Yoder played in the annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity on June 25, 2014. Since 1909, Senate and House members from each party team up to play as a fundraiser for The Washington Literacy Council and The Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington. 2003 Doug M. Tschauder was named managing attorney of Legal Aid of Western Missouri’s St. Joseph office. He started with Legal Aid in 2006 and practices in consumer and family law and federal benefits. Matthew K. Corbin is a vice president at Aon Professional Services, where he consults with Aon’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues. Corbin was previously a partner at Lathrop & Gage LLP in Overland Park. 2004 Molly C. Brown joined the law firm of Dillon & Findley in Anchorage, Alaska. Brown previously clerked for retired Superior Court Judge Larry Weeks in Juneau and worked for eight years as an attorney on a broad range of cases in the areas of employment law, administrative law, oil and gas, and general civil litigation. She has represented clients in arbitrations, in court and before administrative agencies. 2005 Katrina G. Hull became a partner in the Milwaukee firm of Michael Best & Friedrich LLP. Hull’s practice focuses on trademark and copyright law, including enforcement, international and domestic trademark prosecution, trademark clearance searching and licensing, unfair competition and Internet issues. Joel A. Bannister joined a group of attorneys to form the Dallas office of McGuireWoods LLP. Bannister’s practice areas include

KU LAW MAGAZINE 31


ALUMNI NEWS

banking and finance, corporate law, corporate finance, energy law, and private equity and venture capital. On June 12, Bannister and his wife, Diana, welcomed their first child, Benjamin Clark Garcia Bannister. Joseph B. Bain, vice president of Cure & Bain in Goodland, Kansas, was chosen by Gov. Sam Brownback to serve on the Kansas Board of Regents. Bain practices in the areas of civil litigation and alternative dispute resolution, construction, insurance, business organizations, probate, estate planning, real estate, criminal defense, and personal injury. The firm has offices in Goodland and Burlington. Rebekah Gaston began working as an attorney for Kansas Appleseed’s Child Hunger Initiative, focusing on increasing adoption of meal programs for low-income children throughout Kansas. 2006 William H. Moore, senior vice president of strategy and corporate development for Crestwood Midstream Partners LP, has being chosen for the 2014 class of NextGen Leaders by the Kansas City Business Journal. Lacy J. Gilmour has opened Gilmour Law Office in Maize, Kansas. Her practice handles domestic issues, criminal law, and landlord-tenant cases. Leita Walker and her husband, Jason, welcomed a baby girl, Ida Elnora Walker, on March 19, 2014. Ida joins older siblings Hank (6) and Nettie (3). Walker is an associate in the Intellectual Property Group at Faegre Baker Daniels in Minneapolis. 2007 Julie C. Pine joined global financial services firm Mariner Holdings LLC as senior legal counsel. Pine was formerly an equity shareholder at McDowell, Rice, Smith & Buchanan PC in Kansas City, Missouri. Blythe Bradley Glemming moved to Pueblo, Colorado, and opened a solo practice, Pueblo Disability Law Firm. Glemming

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Business Administration with the 2014 Women in Business Champion of the Year Award for the state of Washington. The award recognizes individuals who advocate for and increase business opportunities for women beyond the call of their professional duties. Rachel D. Stahle became a partner with Franke Schultz & Mullen PC in Kansas City, Missouri. She practices primarily in the areas of personal injury, premises liability, and professional liability defense. 2010 Wade L. Whiting has been elected president of the Jefferson and Crook County Bar Association in Oregon. Whiting is a senior deputy district attorney for Jefferson County, Oregon. Justin Hendrix, L'09, Dean Stephen Mazza, and Devin Sikes, L'08. Hendrix and Sikes have both been tapped for clerkships on the Federal Circuit Court.

represents claimants before both the Social Security Administration and Veterans Affairs. Linda J. Shewack has joined Columbia University as associate director of compliance. Shewack previously served as Ombudsman Group team lead at the U.S. Department of Education, Federal Student Aid. 2008 Matthew R. Batzel has been promoted to the position of national executive director for American Majority Inc., a nonprofit, nonpartisan 501(c)(3) political training organization. Devin Sikes has been selected to clerk for Judge Evan J. Wallach on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit beginning in August 2015. Sikes currently works as an attorney in the Office of the Chief Counsel for Trade Enforcement and Compliance at the U.S. Department of Commerce and previously clerked for Judge Judith M. Barzilay on the U.S. Court of International Trade in New York. 2009 Madhu Singh, founder of MK Singh Law in Seattle, was honored by the U.S. Small

2011 Chelsea C. Barnett has joined the Houston office of O’Donnell, Ferebee, Medley & Frazer PC, focusing her practice on business, commercial and real estate ventures. She joined the firm’s Commercial Litigation Group after serving as a criminal prosecutor in Johnson County, Kansas. 2012 Sean T. Foley joined the Kansas City, Missouri, firm of Lathrop & Gage, focusing his practice on personal injury, premises liability, product liability and tortious interference litigation. Foley joins Lathrop & Gage after completing a two-year clerkship with Judge Roberto A. Lange of the U.S. District Court for the District of South Dakota. Alyssa M. Williamson joined the Los Angeles office of Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer PA, where she focuses on the defense of employment law, workers’ compensation and civil litigation matters, as well as counseling for employers. 2013 Samuel Butler IV has joined Stinson Leonard Street’s Labor, Employment and Employee Benefits Division as an associate in the firm’s Kansas City, Missouri office. His practice focuses on a broad range of employee benefits issues. Butler previously served as a government relations analyst for Blank Rome in Washington, D.C. Eric A. Sader was elected to the Kansas National Association of Social Workers


Board of Directors. Sader is a therapeutic case manager with KVC Health Systems. Leslie Shannon Swimmer, a citizen of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, was sworn in as the new clerk of court for the Eastern Band Cherokee Tribal Court. She previously interned with the Office of the Principal Chief and worked with the EBCI Human Resources Department, the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and Harrah’s Cherokee Casino. Kelsey Shaw Petrosky was hired as the communications coordinator for the city of Havelock, North Carolina. Petrosky will handle the city’s community Brownfields grant, help administer its safety program, and handle special administrative projects for various city departments. Torrance Parkins has opened a solo practice, The Law Offices of Torrance R. Parkins LLC, in McPherson, Kansas. He was previously an attorney at Wise & Reber LC. Parkins focuses his practice on real estate, business formation and transactions, agriculture law and employment law. 2014 Cliff T. Brazil has joined the Denver office of Sheridan Ross PC. He advises clients in all areas of patent prosecution, ranging from legal and market analysis of patentability to prior art search, freedom-to-operate opinions, patent applications, strategies and business transactions. David Brock has joined the Topeka law firm of Hamilton, Laughlin, Barker, Johnson & Jones as an associate specializing in the areas of eminent domain and property law. Bradley Freedman co-authored an article in The Journal of Planning and Environment Law titled, “England and the Public Trust Doctrine.” Freedman is a law clerk at the Eugene, Oregon nonprofit Our Children’s Trust, where he coordinates international climate change litigation. Mark Kind joined Morgan Pilate LLC in Kansas City, Missouri, in September as an associate. He focuses his practice on litigation, writing, research and investigation in criminal, civil, appellate and habeas corpus matters, including actions in federal, Missouri and Kansas courts. n

IN MEMORIAM 1938 Alfred J. Kaiser Sacramento, California November 22, 2013 1949 Robert B. Castor Leawood, Kansas May 20, 2014 1950 Wilbur D. Geeding Wichita, Kansas March 1, 2014 Peter W. Nye Corpus Christi, Texas August 17, 2013

1960 Col. Cecil Wayne Williams, USAF (Retired) Denver, Colorado May 18, 2014 1961 Richard J. Rome Hutchinson, Kansas June 18, 2014 1963 Robert W. Rieger Spring Valley, California December 23, 2013

1970 Wallace W. Underhill Wichita, Kansas June 3, 2014 1971 Fred Goldman III Portland, Oregon November 14, 2013 1973 Blake K. Jensen Austin, Texas August 2, 2013

Charles H. Hostetler Manhattan, Kansas December 9, 2013

1982 Debra J. Arnett Overland Park, Kansas January 1, 2014

1965 Gerald E. Williams Mission Hills, Kansas April 12, 2014

1985 Patrick D. Gaston Overland Park, Kansas April 22, 2014

1953 Jack E. Dalton Dodge City, Kansas January 6, 2014

Frederick J. Petzold Topeka, Kansas February 22, 2014

Steven K. Coffin Overland Park, Kansas March 9, 2014

1954 D. Spencer Yohe Villa Park, California June 2, 2014

1968 Montague E. Davis Tucson, Arizona December 23, 2013

1998 Elizabeth Anne Beary Purkey Topeka, Kansas January 6, 2014

1956 Charles G. Stewart Oakley, Kansas November 18, 2013

1969 James A. Bagley Larkspur, Colorado December 9, 2013

1952 Donald R. Hyten Wichita, Kansas February 9, 2014

1959 Jack R. Reed Overland Park, Kansas July 29, 2014

KU LAW MAGAZINE 33


GIVING NEWS

Terry Arthur, L’69

Beau Gould, L’89

Professor John Head

Pictured with his spouse, Virginia Thomas Arthur

Pictured with his spouse, Julie Pigott Gould

Pictured with his spouse, Lucia Orth Head

Perry D. Warren, L’73

The James Woods Green Medallion

Chevron Products Co.

Leon T. Karelitz Trust

Kansas Women Attorneys Association

Pictured with his spouse, Janet Beebe Warren

Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Accepted by Willard B. Thompson, L’58 & David Seely, L’82 34 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Accepted by Robin Blair

Accepted by Lydia Beebe, L’77 & Charles Doyle, L’78

Accepted by Mira Mdivani


WHY I GIVE

Harry Herington Jr., L’93 Pictured with his spouse, Cindy Herington

KU Law honors its top donors The law school honored recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion at a dinner on May 10 in Lawrence. The medallion, named in honor of the law school’s first dean, recognizes those whose cumulative contributions to the school exceed $25,000. This year’s honorees are pictured here with their medallions. The following recipients were unable to attend the ceremony: n Mark M. Deatherage, L’85 n

n n n n n

Professor David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Lucy E. Mason, L’92 & Cris Sena Madeleine M. McDonough, L’90 Omer G. Voss Jr. Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP Martha S. Warren, L’87

Photos by Steve Puppe

“I received a much-appreciated Rice Scholarship that helped fund my legal education at KU, so my wife and I understand the opportunities scholarships provide. Our hope is that students who benefit from the scholarship fund will emulate Kenton and be prepared to use their knowledge and legal skills to ‘pay it forward’ throughout their careers.” Mike Riggs, L’84, Houston $16,000 in ConocoPhillips stock — to bolster the Kenton J. Mai Memorial Scholarship in memory of his friend and colleague

“I feel like my life has been extremely assisted by what I learned there and the contacts I’ve maintained through the years. I just feel like I owe it to the school.” Constance Achterberg, L’53, Salina, Kansas $120,000 lifetime + $400,000 bequest for Constance M. Achterberg and C.L. Clark Scholarship

KU LAW MAGAZINE 35


DONOR REPORT

WITH SINCERE THANKS TO OUR DONORS Far Above Progress Campaign runs through June 2016. Pledge securely online at kuendowment.org/law $25M

$22,688.390.70 through November 12, 2014 3,305 donors

$20M

$20M GOAL SURPASSED!

$15M

GIFTS $12,588,069.36

$10M

REALIZED* | $1,525,215.63 PLEDGES | $1,445,105.71

$5M

PLANNED GIFTS $7,130,000.00

*Realized bequests and lifetime gifts

36 KU LAW MAGAZINE

JAMES WOODS GREEN MEDALLION HONOREES The James Woods Green Medallion honors donors whose cumulative giving to the University of Kansas School of Law is $25,000 & above. Honorees whose names are italicized are deceased. MOST RECENT HONOREES Terry Arthur, L’69 & Virginia Thomas Arthur Chevron Products Company Mark M. Deatherage, L’85 Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Frederick B. Gould, L’89 & Julie Pigott Gould Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Harry H. Herington Jr., L’93 & Cindy Herington Kansas Women Attorneys Association Leon & Lee T. Karelitz Trust Lucy E. Mason, L’92 & Cris Sena Madeleine M. McDonough, L’90 Omer G. Voss Jr. Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP Martha S. Warren, L’87 Perry D. Warren, L’73 & Janet Beebe Warren PAST HONOREES Constance M. Achterberg, L’53 Frank A. Ackerman, L’80 Donald D. Adams, L’64 & Ann Wees Adams Jennifer Gille Bacon, L’76 J. Eugene Balloun, L’54 Richard A. Barber, L’34 Mrs. Richard A. Barber Barbara Blake Bath, PhD & Thomas D. Bath, PhD Lydia I. Beebe, L’77 & Charles E. Doyle, L’78 Blake A. Biles, L’75 Richard L. Bond, L’60 & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond William F. (Brad) Bradley Jr., L’80 John K. Bremyer, L’46, & Jayne Williamson Bremyer Hon. Clayton Brenner, L’28 Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Max & Mary Brown Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad Barkley Clark Gertrude Clark Peggy A. Clark John D. Conderman, L’69, & Patricia R. Conderman Teresa Blatchley Conkey Mary K. Connell O. J. Connell Jr., L’38 Donald L. Cordes, L’59 Professor Mike Davis & Faye Davis Suzanne M. Decker Michael F. Delaney, L’76, & Kathleen L. Delaney Glen W. Dickinson Professor Martin Dickinson & Sallie Dickinson Carolyn A. Dillon & Richard W. Dillon William R. Docking, L’77, & Judy O. Docking Robert L. Driscoll, L’64 Gary Duncan, L’74, & Adrianna D. Gonzales Duncan Ruth Adair Dyer, L’21 Mildred A. Early David S. Elkouri, L’78 Clem Fairchild Dorothy Feir, PhD

Bruce A. Finzen, L’73 David H. Fisher, L’38 & Mary Frances Fisher Charles L. Frickey, L’69 Loren M. Gensman Roland D. Gidney Jr., L’47 Donald W. Giffin, L’53 & Esther Brown Giffin Ernest J. Goppert, L’17 Brian G. Grace, L’67 Jordan L. Haines, L’57 & Shirley Cundiff Haines Barry D. Halpern, L’73 & Cynthia A. Halpern Kenneth M. Hamilton, L’47 & Ruth Hamilton Roberta B. Harkness Minnie I. Harms Edward J. Healy, L’79 Alvin D. Herrington, L’57 Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Elma A. Holdeman Alice A. Hook Charles H. Hostetler, L’63 & Julie A. Hostetler Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin John E. Hurley Jr., L’62 & Jo Sicking Hurley Elizabeth Ann Hylton Hon. Theodore B. Ice, L’61 & Sue H. Ice Howard M. Immel, L’38 & Sue Immel Balfour & Margaret Jeffrey Arne L. Johnson Family Trust Richard Kane Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Larry E. Keenan, L’54 John M. Kilroy Jr., L’73 Fred C. & Mary Robinson Koch Thomas G. Kokoruda, L’72 Florence M. Kuske Linda S. Legg, L’75 & Hon. Lawrence G. Crahan Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Logan Robert W. Loyd, L’62 & Mary Jo Loyd Lyle D. Lutton Jr., L’50 & De Nell T. Lutton Daniel J. Lyons, L’77 & Maryanne Lyons Glenn E. McCann, L’40 Brian K. McLeod, L’89 Eunice H. Melik Col. Edward A. Metcalf III, L’49 Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Dara Trum Miles, L’87 & Robin J. Miles, L’86 George D. Miner, L’22 John R. Morse, L’75 Jeffrey S. Nelson, L’80 & Lisa K. Nelson Hon. Ronald C. Newman, L’70 Holly Nielsen, L’82 Bernard E. Nordling, L’49 & Barbara A. Nordling Charles H. Oldfather Jr. Hortense Casady Oldfather Bernard V. O’Neill Jr., L’76 & Marion W. O’Neill Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 Marjorie L. Page Robert A. Page, L’53 Mary Louise Parker Diane S. Parrish, L’79 Professor John C. Peck, L’74 & Pamela C. Peck Patrick E. Peery, L’81 William B. Pendleton, L’57 Mary Ruth Watermulder Petefish Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65 & Dee W. Piculell Donald H. Postlethwaite, L’26 & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Raymond F. Rice, L’1908 & Ethel Rice John M. Rounds, L’39 Hon. M. Kay Royse, L’78


Joan R. Ruff, L’73 & Dennis P. Wilbert, L’73 Bill R. Sampson, L’71 Drucilla J. Sampson, L’96 Elizabeth A. Schartz, L’88 Janet Manning Schroeder Kelley D. Sears, L’74 & Jane A. Sears Robert A. Schroeder, L’37 Carolyn Henry Shinkle & J. Frank Shinkle, L’41 Mary Maurine Shurtz Richard L. Sias, L’54 Beatrice Siegel Leo R. Sissel, L’50 Justice Fred N. Six, L’56 & Lilian Six Christopher Smith, L’72 Glee S. Smith Jr., L’47 & Geraldine B. Smith Shannon L. Spangler, L’87 & Michael E. Spangler Frank L. Snell, L’24 Mary Ellen Stadler Roger D. Stanton, L’63, & Judith Duncan Stanton Kate Stephens Hon. Donnan Stephenson, L’48 & Patricia Ledyard Stephenson John D. Stewart, L’40 & Hannah T. Stewart Mikel L. Stout, L’61 & LeAnn R. Stout Peter E. Strand, L’79 & Sheila C. Strand Edna J. Sullivan & James E. Sullivan, L’29 Willard B. Thompson, L’58 Erma B. & Frank E. Tyler Omer G. Voss, L’39 & Annabele K. Voss Katherine Hall Wagstaff & Robert W. Wagstaff Gary A. Waldron, L’79 & Carol A. Foster Charles R. Wall Professor William E. Westerbeke Douglas D. Wheat, L’74 & Laura L. Wheat Houston L. Whiteside Willard G. Widder, L’49 Karl T. Wiedemann Paul L. Wilbert, L’38 Susan Scott Wilner R. Dean Wolfe, L’69 Marie S. Woodbury, L’79 & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD Stanley N. Woodworth, L’78 Robert S. Wunsch, L’58 & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Paul Yde, L’85 & Sarah Elder D. Spencer Yohe, L’54 FIRMS & FOUNDATIONS Barber Emerson LC Foulston & Siefkin LLP Hampton & Royce LC Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite Fanning & Honeyman LLP Lathrop & Gage LLP Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chartered Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC Snell & Wilmer LLP The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC Stinson Morrison Hecker, LLP Wal-Mart Stores Inc. DEANS CLUB AMBASSADORS $10,000 & above Constance M. Achterberg Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams William F. (Brad) Bradley Jr. & Roberta Harding Mitchell C. Chaney & Susan K. Chaney Mary K. Connell Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal

David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Professor David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Frederick B. Gould & Julie Pigott Gould Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy Harry H. Herington Jr. & Cindy Herington Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler Elizabeth Ann Hylton Jennifer Johnson Kinzel Linda S. Legg T. Bradley Manson & Teresa M. Meagher Lucy E. Mason & Cris Sena Madeleine M. McDonough Arthur C. Piculell Jr. Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Michael L. Riggs & Elaine P. Riggs Elizabeth A. Schartz Stephen E. Scheve & Janice R. Scheve Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith Patrick J. Stueve & Janna M. Stueve Omer G. Voss Jr. Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster, PhD Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe Virginia Ann Wright D. Spencer Yohe DEANS CLUB BENEFACTORS $5,000-$9,999 Jennifer Gille Bacon & Charles Bacon Martin W. Bauer & Ann M. Bauer Lydia I. Beebe & Charles E. Doyle R. Steven Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Suzanne A. Holt & John M. Holt Jr. Brad Korell & Justin McNulty Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Dean Stephen W. Mazza Catherine McGuire Christopher K. McKenzie & Manuela Albuquerque Robin J. Miles & Dara Trum Miles Deborah Cawley Moeller & Michael D. Moeller Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Holly Nielsen Bill Sampson & Drucilla Mort Sampson John D. Stewart & Hannah T. Stewart Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail L. Sturdevant H. Steven Walton & Sandra M. Walton Martha S. Warren Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD DEANS CLUB PATRONS $3,000-$4,999 Marshal B. Allshouse & Amy Allshouse J. Eugene Balloun Justice Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Marian Mussatto Burns & Clyde M. Burns Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah M. Casad Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett Timothy A. Glassco Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Brian A. Jackson Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan Brian K. McLeod Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Lori R. Schultz & A. Bradley Bodamer Stephen M. Schutter & Karen Zambri Schutter Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Richard K. Walker

William J. Wochner & Jo E. Wochner DEANS CLUB $1,000-$2,999 Frank A. Ackerman Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman Wayne R. Andersen Orval F. Baldwin II Daniel S. Bangerter & Kirstin R. Bangerter Thomas D. Bath, PhD & Barbara Blake Bath, PhD Daniel A. Belhumeur & Ree A. Belhumuer J. Rod Betts Anne H. Blessing & William R. Blessing John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Tim Connell Gary E. Cooper & Elfriede Cooper Hon. Daniel D. Crabtree & Maureen M. Mahoney Robert R. Crawford & Florence L. Crawford Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran David Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis Mark M. Deatherage Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Daniel H. Diepenbrock & Paula Diepenbrock Michael E. Dill Donald N. Dirks Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Lauren E. Douville Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll David E. Dwyer & Kathryn M. Dwyer Christopher S. Edmonds & Sonnet C. Edmonds Melvin L. Ehrlich & Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Timothy J. Evans & Mary S. Evans Benjamin C. Fields Jane A. Finn, PhD Bruce A. Finzen Hayward D. Fisk & Diane Haxby Fisk Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Foulston Siefkin LLP Myron L. Frans Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey Lynne A. Friedewald Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Teodoro Garcia Jr. Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates M. Katie Gates Calderon & Pedro D. Calderon Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin James R. Gilliland & Karen Gilliland Phillip A. Glenn & Marlene K. Glenn Jeanne Gorman Daniel I. Gottlieb & Shari Gottlieb Kirk J. Goza & Shirley Edmonds Goza Cathy Havener Greer Jonathan H. Gregor Lindsay Robbins Grise & Matthew Grise Edmund S. Gross & Michiko Miyamori Gross Andrew F. Halaby & Ann Marie Halaby Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Nancy Fligg Hampton John E. Hayes III Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Lindsey Morse Heinz & Bradley D. Heinz Alvin D. Herrington Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks James R. Hubbard & Susan B. Hubbard Jo Sicking Hurley Ryan J. Huschka Hon. Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice Roger D. Johnson Kimberly A. Jones

Christopher M. Joseph & Jaime Marie Joseph Scott D. Kaiser Kansas Women Attorneys Association Calvin J. Karlin & Hon. Janice Miller Karlin Leon & Lee T. Karelitz Trust Christopher J. Kaufman & Allison Draffan Kaufman Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Robert F. Kethcart & Stephanie A. Kethcart Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD Peter C. Knops & Barbara A. Knops Patricia A. Konopka Shirley Williamson Kovar & Linn S. Kovar, PhD Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Hon. Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Hon. Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Linda L. Lee Travis D. Lenkner & Erin Delaney Donald A. Low & Diane C. Low Mon Yin Lung & Dr. Wai-Yim Ching Hon. John W. Lungstrum & Linda E. Lungstrum Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Crystal Whitebread Mai Col. Karen E. Mayberry Barbara L. McCloud Brian C. McCormally Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Elizabeth A. Meekins S. Lee Meigs Taylor Professor Emeritus Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Michael T. Mills & Leonor D. Mills Adam R. Moore & Jennifer Stackhouse John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Nathan J. Muyskens John C. Nettels Jr. Andrew J. Nolan & Sheryl Griffith Nolan Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson Hon. James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Polsinelli PC J. Michael Porter & Ruth Merz Ann J. Premer & Rich Federico Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Joseph M. Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Jack R. Reed The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Douglas R. Richmond James A. Riedy Hon. Julie A. Robinson Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Ross Foundation Hon. Gerald L. Rushfelt & Debbie Rushfelt Stephanie S. Sankar Kari S. Schmidt & Jeffrey R. Emerson Professor Elinor P. Schroeder Angela M. Seaton David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely William H. Seiler Jr. J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD & Professor James A. Sherman Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson Hon. David H. Sivright Jr. & Kathleen Sivright Stephen N. Six & Professor Elizabeth Brand Six Holly Pauling Smith Paul D. Snyder & Karen Elizabeth Snyder Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., PhD

KU LAW MAGAZINE 37


DONOR REPORT Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson. Jeffrey L. Stowell & Carol A. Stowell Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Scott B. Strohm & Tracy Strohm Jon A. Strongman Robert C. Sturgeon & Linda Ann Sturgeon Hon. Louis E. Sturns Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans Professor Ellen E. Sward Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Kristen V. Toner & Ryan M. Toner United States District Court Bar Registration Mauricio A. Uribe & Cynthia Briggs Uribe Mark A. Van Blaricum & Jackie DeSouza Van Blaricum Thomas E. Vaughn Roger K. Viola & Karen S. Viola Kenneth L. Wagner & Lida McNearney Wagner Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Professor William E. Westerbeke Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson David L. Wing & Kristin D. Wing Bruce H. Wingerd Winton A. Winter Jr. & Mary Boyd Winter Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Stephen L. Young Jonathan N. Zerger & Heather S. Zerger CAMPANILE CLUB $500-$999 Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Corey D. Babington & Tyra C. Babington John F. Baird II & Julie A. Baird Victor A. Bergman & Susan D. Bergman, MD Jane F. Bonk Jason B. Brinkley Anne E. Burke J. Craig Cartwright & Angela Power Cartwright Patricia J. Castellano & Frank F. Castellano Donald E. Chambers Christopher P. Colyer Melissa L. Conboy & William E. Mountford II Staci L. Cooper Robert W. Coykendall Shelli Crow-Johnson & Lyndon M. Johnson Paul F. DeBauge & Janice B. DeBauge Bryan J. Didier & Jeremy Wilkins Didier John D. Dunbar & Karin M. Dunbar Pauline Peppercorn Dye Robert R. Eisenhauer Anne Murray Emert & Mark T. Emert Kent R. Erickson & Lisa R. Erickson Parthenia B. Evans & Dan T. Evans Patrick X. Fowler & Susan J. Fowler Adam J. Gasper & Kathryn O’Hara Gasper C. Peter Goplerud III & Mariette Brodeur Edward H. Graham & Julia N. Graham Blake T. Hardwick Daniel M. Harkins & Caroline B. Harkins Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, PhD Elizabeth A. Harris

38 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven David R. Hederstedt & Valerie Hederstedt Molly Westering Hunter & Mark Hunter Joy Noakes Isaacs Blythe Ridenour Jones & Christopher R. Jones Ramona K. Kantack Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, MD Jason P. Lacey & Skye D. Lacey Steven K. Linscheid Michael W. Mahaffey Terry L. Malone & Monica S. Malone Thomas P. Maltese Professor Joyce Rosenberg Marvine & Charles D. Marvine Carolyn L. Matthews & William P. Matthews Lori Connors McGroder Douglas C. McKenna & Nina Schloesser McKenna J. Nolan McWilliams Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney Professor Lumen N. Mulligan & Emily Vrabac Mulligan Jane Porter Murphy & Barry L. Murphy, MD Donald L. Norman Jr. Darin A. Nugent Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Chris Robe & Debra A. Robe Ryan J. Schletzbaum Matthew T. Schoonover Keith C. Sevedge & Jan M. Sevedge Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge Lebert D. Shultz & Merrily Tribble Shultz James J. Sienicki & Chirl Ann Sienicki Elizabeth McJimsey Souder & Wallace W. Souder Jr. Jeffrey S. Southard John H. Stauffer Jr. & Kathy Stauffer Diana C. Theologou & Miltiadis N. Theologou Earl D. Tjaden & Shirley A. Tjaden John A. Vetter Michael L. Walden & Chasitie Burgess Walden James R. Walters & Mary Clayton Walters Daniel L. Watkins & Phyllis Watkins Sara E. Welch Kent H. Weltmer Douglas B. Westerhaus & Victoria R. Westerhaus Susan Krehbiel William Aaron A. Wilson Jr. Rebecca A. Winterscheidt & Robert J. Werner Cynthia S. Woelk Jason M. Zager & Kristie Zager CRIMSON & BLUE CLUB $300-$499 David C. All & Priscilla A. All Ernest C. Ballweg Larry J. Bingham & Ann H. Bingham Robin C. Blair & Deborah M. Blair Laura J. Bond & Fred L. Bond III Michael S. Boohar & Jennifer J. Boohar Margaret M. Breinholt Lawrence J. Brennan Timothy E. Congrove Victor A. Davis Jr. & Jocelyn Ann Davis Paula E. Drungole Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Justin D. Elkouri & Mica Elkouri

Jonathan E. Frank & Christine Frank Gregory L. Franken Hon. Linda Powell Gilmore & Darin Gilmore Sharon E. Greenfield Toni J. Hanretta Thomas W. Harris & Pamela S. Harris, MD Joe A. Harter Catherine S. Hauber & David W. Hauber William D. Haught Ryan C. Hudson Bruce R. Jeide Topper Johntz & Linda D. Johntz Heather A. Jones John A. Koepke Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Hon. Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin William M. Mills III & Alice Cash Mills Ryan J. Mize Paul T. Moxley James P. Muehlberger & Jayme Klein Muehlberger Tamara L. Niles & R. Lance Niles Michael F. Norton & Susan Roffman Norton Melissa M. Plunkett Larry G. Rapp & Dianne J. Rapp Brenda Petrie Register & Benton W. Register Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. & Tiffany L. Rhodes Hon. Janice D. Russell Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW David E. Shay & Kimberly R. Shay Amanda C. Sheridan Robert D. Shutts & Diane Jones Shutts Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six John L. Snyder & Diane P. Snyder Ann G. Soderberg & Mark A. Soderberg Randolph W. Starr Melanie L. Trump & Timothy T. Trump Hon. Marcia K. Walsh Robert E. Williams & Mary L. Williams Katherine Bollig Zogleman 1865 CLUB $100-$299 Gail B. Agrawal, JD & Naurang M. Agrawal, MD Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Deana Morford Allen Joshua K. Allen & Katherine Benson Allen Patrick H. Allen Deana Morford Allen Collin B. Altieri & Dana M. Altieri Mark A. Andersen & Susan E. Andersen David W. Andreas Angela S. Armenta Gavin W. Armstrong & Christine J. Armstrong Craig A. Arnold Christina Arnone & Michael Arnone John G. Atherton John M. Avondet Katherine J. Bailes, JD, PhD Doyle Baker Sarah Emile Lynn Baltzell & Brian P. Baltzell Frank S. Bangs Jr. Mark C. Bannister & Melanie R. Bannister Jon R. Barbee W. F. Barber Jr. Thomas J. Bath Jr. & Tricia Ann Bath Maj. Michele Stackhouse Bayless Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal Stephen J. Bednar William B. Beeson Dale W. Bell & Linda L. Bell Clarence Bender Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele L. Jed Berliner

F. Richard Bernasek & Regina Y. Bernasek Terry D. Bertholf & Linda Beebe Bertholf William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Elizabeth Blake Barbara D. Bleisch Lawrence W. Blickhan David A. Blutcher Alice Boler Bolin Carly Farrell Boothe & Benjamin D. Boothe Karen L. Borell & Barbara R. Stein, PhD Edward M. Boyle Ryan C. Brunton & Mariam Moussa Brunton Anthony Dante Burgin Brad Burke & Robin D. Burke Hon. Michael B. Buser & Holly L. Buser Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Jo Ann Butaud Jan Fink Call Terrence J. Campbell & Kristin S. Campbell Molly S. Carella & Franklyn R. Carella Stephen C. Chambers Amy Chang Steven Chang Christopher S. Cole Kenneth L. Cole Michael E. Collins & Janice K. Collins John D. & Patricia R, Conderman Christopher C. Confer & Allison Ross Confer Noreen L. Connolly & Robert G. Cohen Chad B. Cook & Jill S. Cook Crissa A.S. Cook & Jerald J. Cook Timothy R. Cork & Janice Irwin Cork David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss Carolyn W. Coulson Brent N. Coverdale & Michel Coverdale Richard L. Cram Alec Creighton & Christine H. Creighton Roy G. Crooks Peter F. Davidson John P. DeCoursey Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Julia Michelle Mahaffey Desrosiers & Michael Desrosiers Hon. Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Diana L. Dietrich Kathleen A. Dillon R. Stanley Ditus Philip V. diZerega Brian T. Docking & Emily Cassell Docking Michael A. Doll Darcy Domoney & Jill Weiss Domoney Ed W. Dosh Richard R. Eads & Joann Howell Eads Charles P. & Patti L. Efflandt Rick J. Eichor John R. Eichstadt Regent Timothy R. Emert & Barbara Meitner Emert Elaine M. Esparza Charles A. Etherington & Joni Walk Etherington Alfred S. Farha, JD Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Richard E. Felton Edwin H. & Aramide Fields Bradley R. Finkeldei Jon P. Fleenor Perry L. Franklin Jonathan M. Freed & Jeni Przytula Freed Jana Patterson Gagner & David W. Gagner John J. Gates & Carolyn K. Gates Jon W. Gilchrist Hon. Kenton T. Gleason & Angela M. Gleason Keith A. Goehring & Carol Goehring Mark S. Goldman & Sandra Goldman William E. Goss Marcus S. Gottlieb Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough


Steven D. Gough & Lisa A. Gough Leon B. Graves Larry Greenbaum Timothy J. Grillot & Janette K. Grillot Robert I. Guenthner & Susan S. Guenthner Marian S. Hamilton Frank R. Hampton & Isabelle A. Richard-Hampton John L. Hampton & Carol Fagre Hampton Gary H. Hanson & Jeanne M. Hanson Nathan C. Harbur & Kim B. Harbur James P. Harrington Anne Fleishel Harris Patricia O’Neil Hattaway Katharine Milberger Haynes Kristian E. Hedine & Kathy Hedine Jay E. Heidrick & Melissa M. Heidrick S. Andrew Heidrick Amber Gonzalez Heineman Col. Steven C. Henricks William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess Bernard J. Hickert John C. Hickey & Cynthia L. Hickey Seanna L. Higley N. William Hines Jr. & Jean S. Hines Wyatt A. Hoch & Mary Ann Hoch Michael H. Hoeflich Ross A. Hollander James D. Holt & Karen T. Holt Charlene Holzmeister Tedrick A. Housh III Robert D. Hovey John W. Huey Ralph R. Inman & Sandra Wood Inman Hon. J.C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin Beau A. Jackson & Laura Sutton Jackson Donald D. Jarrett Milos J. Jekic Wendy M. Jenkins Michael T. Jilka James M. Johnson & Heather M. Johnson Karen I. Johnson Shannon Cohorst Johnson Andrew T. Jones Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Gina Kaiser William A. Kassebaum & Jennifer M. Kassebaum Michael R. Keenan Amy Waltz Keusch Rachel J. Kibler-Melby Alicia M. Kirkpatrick Brenda Roberts Kissam Celeste Holder Kling & Robert W. Kling, PhD Erika K. Knopp & Ryan C. Knopp, MD Stuart M. Kowalski Robert E. Krehbiel & Janice B. Krehbiel Philip C. Lacey & Nancy Owens Lacey Sara J. Lechtenberg-Kasten Larry D. Leonard Sarah T. Lepak Robert L. Lesh Jeffrey Li Mary Ellen Loftus Robert R. Lohse Jr., DDS & Kathy J. Lohse Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love David H. Luce & Debi Luce Maren K. Ludwig Barbara A. Lundin & Lawrence P. Daniels Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach Richard A. Macias Hon. William J. Madden III & Mary Kubicz Madden Helen A. Mahurin Sheila C. Maksimowicz & John N. Maksimowicz Hon. Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee

Hon. Michael D. Mance Coy M. Martin Daniel J. Martin, EdD David R. Maslen Brian R. Matula Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Ryan M. B. McAteer Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Patricia Anne McDonald & Robert J. Wilshire Ann McElhenny Sean M. McGivern Bettina Toisan McGriggler Christopher M. McHugh & Jennifer K. McHugh Chris McNeil, PhD & L. Camille Hebert Parag M. Mehta S. Richard Mellinger Eric B. Metz R. B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Rebecca E. Miller Hon. Scott J. Miller Benjamin T. Miller-Coleman Shala Mills Kevin F. Mitchelson & Frances Mitchelson William M. Modrcin Jr. Paul J. Mohr Judith A. Moler & Donald L. Moler Jr. Laura Dakhil Monahan & Bradley M. Monahan J. Donel Moore & Polly S. Moore William H. Moore & Kristin Brulez Krista E. Morgan Stephen R. Morgan & Paula M. Morgan Jeffery B. Morris Daphne Nan Muchnic Robert B. Neill & Margaret E. Neill N. Royce Nelson & Linda L. Nelson Owen K. Newman Carlos J. Nolla Bert Nunley S. Patrick O’Bryan & Shannon Kerr O’Bryan John D. Osborn & Sarah P. Osborn Jean C. Owen & Marsha Golub Owen Gary W. Owens & Holly A. Dyer Kyungjoo Park Carolyn Boettcher Parmer & David A. Parmer Charles A. Peckham & Connie Peckham Jeffrey D. Peier William T. Pendergrass John G. Peryam Kathryn Pruessner Peters Peter L. Peterson & Rita E. Peterson Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, PhD Thomas K. Pratt & Sharon A. Pratt R. Kent Pringle & Cathy M. Pringle Hon. James A. Pusateri & Jacqueline A. Pusateri Erica Ramsey & Eric Ramsey Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Bernard D. Reams Jr., PhD Benjamin A. Reed Hal C. Reed Ronald S. Reuter Christie F. Reynolds & David O. Reynolds Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Lauren E. Roberts Hon. Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Hon. Trish Rose Devin K. Ross Duane K. Ross Leon E. Roulier & Barbara Hauck Roulier Karen Ruckert Richard H. Rumsey & Lori Dudley Rumsey

Bradley S. Russell & Mary Frances Russell Irma Stephens Russell & Thomas L. Russell Jr., PhD Rebecca A. Ryan William H. Sanders Jr. John O. Sanderson & Joann L. Sanderson William K. Sauck Jr. Nancy Racunas Saugstad & Lee Saugstad Ralph L. L. Schmidt CPA Brian J. Schulman & Jami Levine Schulman Steven D. Selbe Veronica R. Sellers & Jere D. Sellers Amy Miller Seymour & Thomas P. Seymour Bhavi A. Shah & Thomas Horn Andrew R. Shaw Bethany C. Shelton Hon. Lawrence E. Sheppard Eldon J. Shields & Bonnie Shields Adam M. Siebers Devin S. Sikes & Sheebani S. Patel Rachel Emig Simek Xavier Simonsen Diane W. Simpson Amy Verschoor Skinner Frederick K. Slicker Amy Logan Sliva Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith Christopher P. Sobba Christine K. Solso & Robert J. Huber Carl E. Stallard Edwin A. Stene & Sally L. Stene Darin D. Stowell Marie Strahan Michael L. Sullivan Hon. Linda L. Sybrant Erin E. Syring Tristan C. Tafolla Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, PhD Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson Kathryn Marie Timm Tom Triplett & Christie Triplett Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle Kimberley H. Tyson Kirk Underwood Julie L. Unruh Thomas M. Van Cleave III James D. Van Pelt Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III Christopher B. Wells & Gaynelle Vansandt Wells John C. Wesley & Millicent Hunt Wesley Cheryl L. Whelan Mark J. White & Margaret A. Justus Gaylen R. Williams Gordon J. Williams Jane L. Williams & Randy K. Williams Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Wyatt M. Wright & Pamela J. Wright Hon. Wendel W. Wurst & Rhonda Wurst William M. Yanek II Jean M. Younger & Brig. Gen. Scott A. Dold JAYHAWK CLUB $10-$99 Michael J. Allen & Heidi A. Allen James B. Arnett & Nancy VanLerberg Arnett David P. Atkins & Emilie Guyot Atkins Robert H. Backus Grant D. Bannister & Stephanie J. Bannister John W. Barbian & Donna R. Barbian Capt. Brandon O. Bean Aaron S. Bennett Carol Y. Berns & Jeffrey P. Berns Clifford L. Bertholf

Carolyn McMinn Blakemore & David L. Blakemore Harvey S. Bodker Thomas L. Bright & Dian Seetin Bright Michael D. Burrichter Mary A. Cabrera Sean T. Carver & Samantha N. Bennett George L. Catt & Sherrill Lynn Catt Laurence A. Clement Jr. & Lynn Ewanow Clement John D. Corse & Andrea Markl Corse, MD Antonio R. Cortest Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, EdD Clark H. Cummins Daniel A. Cunningham William C. Daniels Jr. Thomas A. Darner & Mary M. Darner Danielle N. Davey David W. Davis & Rhona Thorington Davis Le Roy Lewis De Nooyer Jerry W. Dickson James A. Donley & Sarah Mayberry Donley Thomas J. Drees Matthew M. Dwyer Andrew D. Ellis Sparkle Ellison, JD, PhD Tyler J. Emerson Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Garry B. Gammon Vera M. Gannaway & Stephen A. Gannaway Robert A. Garrity & Barbara J. Garrity Peggy Glazzard, EdD, JD Krista B. Goering & Lauren E. Goering Michael R. Gould Steven W. Grieb Scott C. Gyllenborg & Hon. Christina Dunn Gyllenborg G. William Hankins Burton M. Harding David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Beth Horth Robert C. Howard & Isabel Howard Chris E. Howell Julie D. Hower Liyue Huang-Sigle Randall J. Hubert Gordon A. Jones John W. Jordan & Dee Dee Jordan Derele W. Knepper Tricia M. Knoll Quentin E. Kurtz & Linda S. Kurtz Julie M. Larson Stephen J. Lautz Mary W. Lehoczky & John Lehoczky III Leilani R. Leighton Brett D. Leopold Zachary A. Lerner Clayton D. Lewis Robert D. Lewis Bob Londerholm & Bev Londerholm Lauren E. Luhrs Michael P. Martin Charles A. Marvin & Betsy Wilson Marvin Tricia Marsee Maxfield & Joshua H. Maxfield Michael F. McElhinney Robert R. McQuain Nancy L. Mitchell & David W. Mitchell, PhD Lt. Col. Susan E. Mitchell Rick G. Morris David P. Mudrick & Mary Walker Mudrick Kristina B. Murphree & Jacob I. Murphree Sally Tinker Murphy Doris K. Nagel Ganesh Nair Chad S. Nelson Sarah Jeter Newell Steven J. Obermeier & Lisa Stoner Obermeier

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DONOR REPORT Aaron B. Oleen Alphonse B. Perkins C. J. Poirier Hon. Michael F. Powers & Judith F. Powers Danielle Duncan Rider George E. Rider & Jeannene E. Rider Lloyd E. Rigney Leland E. Rolfs Virginia M. Rupp Darry G. Sands & Charlotte A. Sands Michael V. Schaefer Malinda Bronfman Schoeb & Kurt A. Schoeb Kathryn A. Seeberger & James T. Seeberger Annie W. Shank Todd A. Sheppard Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake Courtney Pedersen Sipe & Adam J. Sipe G. Sid Smith Col. Russell A. Stanley Christopher L. Steadham & Shanna C. Steadham Col. Andrew D. Stewart Robert E. C. Stites Naomi L. Stuart Cathy S. Stueckemann & Daniel L. Stueckemann Teresa R. Temme-Dietz Gerald A. Thorpe & Patti H. Thorpe J. Margaret Tretbar Jennifer Vath Larry S. Vernon & Jill A. Casado George Voss Amanda G. Voth & Anthony J. Voth Patrick R. Watkins Dana L. Watts Kevin D. Weakley Jeffrey J. Williams Edward V. Wilson & Kristin McDowell Wilson John R. Wine Jr. & Ellen Sue Wine Gregory J. Wohlleber Jenifer Yaneris George W. Yarnevich & Margaret E. Yarnevich Elaine Oser Zingg & Otto M. Zingg Daniel R. Zmijewski Cathy Gerlinger Zumbehl & Glenn E. Zumbehl NEW FUNDS CONSTANCE M. ACHTERBERG & C.L. CLARK SCHOLARSHIP was established by Constance M. Achterberg, L’53, and will provide scholarships. HARRY HERINGTON LAW ENFORCEMENT SCHOLARSHIP was established by Harry H. Herington Jr., L’93, and Cindy Herington. This fund will provide financial support to students who are spouses or children of law enforcement officers who died as a result of injuries sustained in the line of duty, law enforcement officers who were disabled as a result of injuries sustained in the line of duty, and former law enforcement officers. KWAA JENNIE MITCHELL KELLOGG SCHOLARSHIP FUND was changed from an expendable fund to an endowed fund thanks to a gift from the Kansas Women Attorneys Association commemorating its 25th anniversary. This fund provides scholarships for second-year students in the top half of the class, with preference given to women with financial need.

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GOULD FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by Beau Gould, L’89, and Julie Gould and will provide scholarships. DAVID & RITA GOTTLIEB FAMILY FUND was established by Professor Emeritus David Gottlieb and Rita Gottlieb and will provide support for clinical opportunities at KU Law that benefit indigent clients, including support for postgraduate fellowship programs that support clinical activities. JOHN W. HEAD INTERNATIONAL LAW RESEARCH FUND was established to support faculty research of international law matters. ELIZABETH M. GALLUP, MD, JD, MLP FELLOWSHIP was established by Madeleine M. McDonough, L’90. This fund will support a fellowship position with the Medical-Legal Partnership Clinic to assist clients with mental health needs, to create greater awareness of mental health legal needs, and to advance mental health law. PETER A. MANVILLE FAMILY LAW SCHOLARSHIP will provide scholarships for members of the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy. CHARLIE & JULIE HOSTETLER PRE-LAW DINNER FUND was established by Charlie Hostetler, L’63, and Julie Hostetler to host an annual dinner for the top students in the pre-law program at Kansas State University who are interested in attending the University of Kansas School of Law. STEPHEN AND JANICE SCHEVE LAW SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by Stephen E. Scheve, L’81, and Janice Scheve. This fund will provide scholarships to academically qualified students, with preference for those who attended high school in Lyon County, Kansas, or Washington County, Texas. CLEM W. FAIRCHILD LAW FUND was established through a deferred gift from Clement W. Fairchild and will provide support for the technological needs of KU’s Wheat Law Library. EARL B. SHURTZ LAW PROFESSORSHIP was established through a gift by Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65, and his late wife, Dee Wagner Piculell, and will provide faculty support. LIBRARY SUPPORT FUNDS Hazel A. Anderson Law Library Fund Louise Ahlstedt Beebe & Jack E. Beebe Law Library Fund Thomas W. Boone Law School Library Fund Ruth Adair Dyer Law Library Fund Friends of the University of Kansas Law Library Arthur W. Hershberger Memorial Law Book Fund Frank G. Hodge Memorial Library Fund KU Law Library Unrestricted Fund Kate McKay Memorial Book Fund Evart Mills Memorial Book Fund Douglas D. & Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund

LAW FIRM, CORPORATE & FOUNDATION GIFTS Arthur-Green LLP Asian American Bar Association of Kansas City Baird Holm LLP Barber Emerson LC Belin Foundation Bever Dye Foundation The Center for American & International Law Cerner Corporation Clark, Mize & Linville, Chartered Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Foulston Siefkin LLP Anne & Howard Gottlieb Family Foundation Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Hinkle Law Firm LLC Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Jeter Law Firm LLP Arne L. Johnson Family Trust Kansas Athletics Inc. Kansas Bar Association Kansas Bar Foundation Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association Kansas Women Attorneys Association Leon & Lee T. Karelitz Trust KU Public Interest Law Society Lathrop & Gage LLP Law School Admission Council Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace & Bauer LLP The Mitchelson Foundation Inc. New York Community Trust Payne & Jones, Chartered Polsinelli PC The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation Ross Foundation Shilo Management Corporation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Kate Stephens Trust Stinson Leonard Street LLP Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans Thomson Reuters Trevino & Rockwell LLC UMB Bank NA United States District Court Bar Registration Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Wichita Bar Association MATCHING GIFTS Aetna Foundation Inc. The Bank of America Foundation The Boeing Company Chevron Humankind Matching Gift Program Deloitte Foundation EPR Properties Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Faegre Baker Daniels Foundation Hallmark Corporate Foundation Kansas City Southern Kansas University Endowment Association Kinder Morgan Foundation Macy’s Foundation Northern Trust Matching Gift Program ONEOK Foundation Phillips 66 Company Seigfreid Bingham PC Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Snell & Wilmer LLP Sprint Foundation Thompson & Knight Foundation Thomson Reuters

Union Pacific Corporation Wal-Mart Foundation Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale & Dorr LLP WPX Energy Inc. GIFTS RECEIVED IN HONOR OF Andrew D. Carpenter, L’94 John W. Crow & June F. Crow Daniel A. Cunningham, L’86 Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. David J. Gottlieb Scott D. Kaiser, L’03 Hon. James K. Logan Linda E. Lungstrum & Hon. John W. Lungstrum, L’70 Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 GIFTS RECEIVED IN MEMORY OF Robert F. Bennett, L’52 John Emerson Blake Sr. Peggy A. Clark C. Frederick Ice, L’24 Mildred Branine Ice Dan G. Jackson III, L’63 Professor Emeritus William A. Kelly, L’49 Philip C. Kissam Philip C. Lacey, L’74 Kenton J. Mai, L’89 Hon. Nelson Timothy Stephens Charlotte P. Thayer Frederick L. Ward, L’87 Harvey A. Tretbar Jr. OTHER FUNDS Beebe/Doyle Family Classroom Fund Richard L. & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Fund Walter Brauer Faculty Support Fund Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Elder Law Fund Robert C. Casad Comparative Law Lectureship Class of 1971 Fund Donald L. Cordes School of Law Opportunity Fund Charles L. Decker Fund Dean Martin Dickinson Tax Policy Lecture Mary Ann Mize Dickinson Memorial Garden Fund G. Gary Duncan Fund Elder Law Program Fund David H. Fisher Law Fund Loren M. Gensman Fund GUF/Law School Unrestricted Jordan L. & Shirley Haines Law Faculty Fellowship Kenneth M. & Ruth Elizabeth Hamilton Law Fund Ed & Helen Healy Law School Opportunity Fund Hinkle Elkouri Conference Room Fund Humphrey School of Law Discretionary Fund Ice Family Fund Joy M. Johnson Trust for the School of Law Leon Karelitz Charitable Trust Medical-Legal Clinic at the Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care Clinic Kansas Defender Project Kansas Law Review Law School Building Fund Law School Dean’s Discretionary Account Law School Media, Law & Policy Program Legal Aid Clinic Fund Linda S. Legg & Lawrence G. Crahan Professionalism Fund James K. Logan Fund Fred B. Lovitch & Michael J. Davis Law Fund Jana Mackey Support for Public Advocacy Fund Robert B. McKay Memorial Fund


Richard F. Mullins Moot Court Competition Fund John A. Naill School of Law Fund Judge Edmund L. Page Jurist-in-Residence Program Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Fund Don & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Fund Public Interest Law Fund William O. Rice Law Fund Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellowship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy Shughart, Thomson & Kilroy Fund Fred N. & Lilian Six Unrestricted Law School Fund James Barclay Smith Fund Snell & Wilmer Courtroom Renovation Fund Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lecture Stephenson Lectures in Law & Government Fund Stinson Morrison Hecker Fund Tax Certificate Program Fund Tribal Law & Government Center Fund Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster Law School Dean Discretionary Fund Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster Law School Fund Douglas D. & Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund Houston Whiteside Fund Dennis P. Wilbert & Joan R. Ruff Fund Paul L. & Florine T. Wilbert Fund Wolfe Family Moot Court Assistance Fund Paul Yde Law & Economics Fund PRIZES & AWARDS Barber Emerson LC Blue Book Relays Robert F. Bennett Student Award Fund William L. Burdick Prize Mary Anne Chambers Service Award G. Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Robert E. Edmonds Prize for Corporation & Securities Law Family Fund Robert C. Foulston & George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Hinkle Law Firm Tax Procedure Award W. Ross Hutton Prize Howard M. & Sue Immel Annual Teaching Award Lloyd M. Kagey Leadership Award Law Class of 1949 Leadership Award Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Fund Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership & Service Award James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Dean Frederick J. Moreau Faculty Award Larry R. O’Neal/Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Fund Payne & Jones Lawyering Program Award Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Sonnenschein Scholars Program C. C. Stewart Award Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Fund UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award PROFESSORSHIPS Centennial Teaching Professorship Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law E. S. & Tom Hampton Professorship John H. & John M. Kane Distinguished

Professorship Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professorship in Law John M. Rounds Distinguished Professorship in Law Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professorship Earl B. Shurtz Law Professorship J. B. Smith Distinguished Professorship in Constitutional Law Frank E. Tyler Professorship in Law Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professorship in Law Paul E. Wilson Professorship in Law SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS Mark H. Adams Sr. Memorial Scholarship Warren D. Andreas Scholarship in Law Association of Corporate Council Mid-America Chapter Scholarship Richard A. Barber Scholarship Beebe/Doyle Family Scholarship Judge Willard M. & Lucile H. Benton Memorial Scholarship Berkley Memorial Scholarship in Law Bever Dye Scholarship John Emerson Blake Memorial Scholarship Book Exchange Scholarships Bremyer Summer Intern Scholarship Fund Judge Clayton & Cecile Goforth Brenner Scholarship in Law Claude E. Chalfant Memorial Scholarship John W. & Gertrude Clark Scholarship Claude O. Conkey Memorial Scholarship O.J. Connell Jr. Law Scholarship Glen W. Dickinson Scholarship in Law William & Judy Docking Law School Scholarship Port & Mildred Early Scholarship Judge A. M. Ebright Memorial Scholarship Elkouri Family Expendable Scholarship Fund Ethics for Good Scholarship Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Scholarship Foulston Siefkin 2L Scholarships Foulston Siefkin Diversity Scholarship Foulston & Siefkin Law Review Scholarship Jordan & Shirley Haines Scholarship Thomas H. Harkness KU Law School Scholarship Sally Harris Scholarship Aldie Haver Memorial Scholarship in Law The Help of Our Lord & Saviour Jesus Christ Scholarship Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Law Scholarship Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Scholarship Michael H. Hoeflich & Karen J. Nordheden Scholarship in Law Enos A. Hook Memorial Scholarship Oliver H. Hughes Memorial Scholarship A. Bryce Huguenin School of Law Scholarship Judge Walter A. Huxman Scholarship Arthur M. Jackson Memorial Scholarship Elmer C. Jackson Jr. Scholarship in Law for Black Americans Margaret S. Jeffrey Scholarship Grant in Law Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Scholarship Fund KC Lesbian, Gay & Allied Lawyers (KC LEGAL) Scholarship Kansas Women Attorneys Association Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Scholarship Calvin & Janice Karlin Annual Scholarship Andrew Keenan Memorial Scholarship Kirk Family School of Law Dorothy Arlene Bates Kirk Scholarship Law Class of 1953 Scholarship Law School Class of 1925 Scholarship

Law School Scholarship Fund Linda Legg KU Law Scholarship Robert W. Loyd Scholarship in Law Frank A. Lutz Memorial Scholarship Kenton Mai Memorial Scholarship Minorities in Law Scholarships Harriet & Mancel Mitchell Scholarship in Law John R. Morse Law School Scholarship Ronald C. Newman Scholarship Major Eugene H. Nirdlinger Memorial Scholarship Bernard E. Nordling Scholarship Gary Olson Scholarship Judge Earl E. & Jean Ann O’Connor Memorial Scholarship Charles H. Oldfather Scholarship Joseph O. & Mary Louise Parker Scholarship Peery Family Law Scholarship Olin K. & Mary Ruth Petefish School of Law Scholarship Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Diversity Scholarship Polsinelli Shughart Scholarship Public Interest Summer Stipends Charles B. Randall Memorial Scholarship Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Scholarships Rice Scholar Legacy Ross Foundation Law School Scholarship Judge M. Kay Royse Scholarship in Law Judge J. C. Ruppenthal Memorial Scholarship Richard & Vivian Schmidt Law Scholarship Robert A. & Janet Manning Schroeder Scholarships in Law Elisha Scott Memorial Scholarship Professor William R. Scott Scholarship Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee Law Scholarship J. Frank & Carolyn Henry Shinkle Memorial Scholarship J. Frank Shinkle Student Aid Fund Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholarships Prof. Earl B. & Mary Maurine Shurtz Tribal Lawyer Scholarship Clarine Smissman JD & Edward Smissman PhD Scholarship in Law Carl T. Smith Memorial Scholarship Glee & Geraldine Smith Law Scholarship Snell & Wilmer Alumni Law School Scholarship William C. Spangler Memorial Scholarship Judge Robert F. Stadler Memorial Scholarship Evelyn, Richard & Blanche Thompson Scholarship Leslie T. Tupy Scholarship Suzanne Valdez & Stephen McAllister Scholarship Voss Kansas Law Scholarship Wal-Mart Legal Diversity Scholarship Frederick L. Ward Memorial Scholarship J. L. Weigand Jr. Notre Dame Legal Education Trust Scholarship Willard G. Widder Scholarship Karl T. Wiedemann Scholarship in Law Paul R. Wunsch Scholarship

1950 William B. Beeson Aaron A. Wilson Jr.

CLASSES 1940 John D. Stewart & Hannah T. Stewart

1961 Lawrence J. Brennan Pauline Peppercorn Dye Alfred S. Farha, JD N. William Hines Jr. & Jean S. Hines Hon. Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout

1947 Hon. Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers 1948 W. F. Barber Jr. 1949 Robert L. Lesh

1951 Richard C. Harris Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy 1952 William E. Goss Col. Russell A. Stanley USAF, retired 1953 Constance M. Achterberg John G. Atherton Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin Frank W. Hursh & Mary Walker Hursh J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson 1954 J. Eugene Balloun Marian Mussatto Burns Robert D. Hovey Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan D. Spencer Yohe 1955 Donald N. Dirks Bob Londerholm & Bev Londerholm George Voss 1956 Robert A. Garrity & Barbara J. Garrity Hon. James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Carl E. Stallard John C. Wesley & Millicent Hunt Wesley 1957 R. Stanley Ditus Alvin D. Herrington Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall 1958 Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Robert C. Howard & Isabel Howard Richard H. Rumsey & Lori Dudley Rumsey Hon. Gerald L. Rushfelt & Debbie Rushfelt James D. Van Pelt Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch 1959 Aaron S. Bennett John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Clyde M. Burns Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Jack R. Reed Edwin A. & Sally L. Stene 1960 Edward H. & Julia N. Graham Hon. Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer

1962 Richard R. Eads & Joann Howell Eads Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail Sturdevant

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DONOR REPORT 1963 Lawrence W. Blickhan Gary E. Cooper & Elfriede Cooper Robert R. Crawford & Florence L. Crawford Paul F. DeBauge & Janice B. DeBauge Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler John W. Jordan & Dee Dee Jordan Michael T. Mills & Leonor D. Mills Charles E. Wetzler Bruce H. Wingerd 1964 Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Patrick H. Allen Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll William D. Haught Tom Triplett & Christie Triplett Robert E. Williams & Mary L. Williams 1965 Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman David C. All & Priscilla A. All Edward M. Boyle Regent Timothy R. Emert & Barbara Meitner Emert Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, EdD David R. Hederstedt & Valerie Hederstedt Karen I. Johnson Topper Johntz & Linda D. Johntz Arthur C. Piculell Jr. 1966 Stephen C. Chambers Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Hon. Lawrence E. Sheppard Thomas M. Van Cleave III 1967 Jerry W. Dickson John D. Dunbar & Karin M. Dunbar Robert I. Guenthner & Susan S. Guenthner Hon. J.C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin Roger D. Johnson William M. Mills III & Alice Cash Mills William T. Pendergrass Duane K. Ross Ralph L. L. Schmidt, CPA Lebert D. Shultz & Merrily Tribble Shultz Thomas M. Tuggle & Suzanne F. Tuggle 1968 Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal George L. Catt & Sherrill Lynn Catt Thomas A. Darner & Mary M. Darner Peter F. Davidson Hayward D. Fisk & Diane Haxby Fisk James R. Hubbard & Susan B. Hubbard Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson C. J. Poirier Frederick K. Slicker 1969 Gavin W. Armstrong & Christine J. Armstrong Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Ernest C. Ballweg John D. Conderman & Patricia R. Conderman Timothy J. Evans & Mary S. Evans Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey John D. Osborn & Sarah P. Osborn Ronald S. Reuter Hon. David H. Sivright Jr. & Kathleen Sivright R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe

42 KU LAW MAGAZINE

1970 Frank S. Bangs Jr. William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Rick J. Eichor Philip C. Lacey & Nancy Owens Lacey John W. Lungstrum & Linda E. Lungstrum Michael P. Martin Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post G. Sid Smith 1971 Margaret M. Breinholt Michael E. Collins & Janice K. Collins Victor A. Davis Jr. & Jocelyn Ann Davis John L. Hampton & Carol Fagre Hampton Jean C. Owen & Marsha Golub Owen Peter L. Peterson & Rita E. Peterson Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike Bill Sampson 1972 Jon R. Barbee F. Richard Bernasek & Regina Y. Bernasek Le Roy Lewis De Nooyer James R. Gilliland & Karen Gilliland John W. Huey Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Hon. Michael D. Mance R. B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Jane P. Murphy & Barry L. Murphy, MD N. Royce Nelson & Linda L. Nelson Bernard D. Reams Jr., PhD Chris Robe & Debra A. Robe Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith George W. Yarnevich & Margaret E. Yarnevich 1973 Terry D. Bertholf & Linda Beebe Bertholf Clifford L. Bertholf Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Bruce A. Finzen Garry B. Gammon Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Joe A. Harter William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Bruce R. Jeide Gordon A. Jones Robert E. Krehbiel & Janice B. Krehbiel Linda L. Lee Catherine McGuire Douglas C. McKenna Paul T. Moxley John O. Sanderson & Joann L. Sanderson Michael V. Schaefer Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Randolph W. Starr Hon. Louis E. Sturns Hon. Marcia K. Walsh Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Christopher B. Wells & Gaynelle Vansandt Wells Kent H. Weltmer 1974 Stephen J. Bednar Thomas L. Bright & Dian Seetin Bright David W. Davis & Rhona Thorington Davis Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Melvin L. Ehrlich John R. Eichstadt Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates C. Peter Goplerud III & Mariette Brodeur Daniel M. Harkins & Caroline B. Harkins James P. Harrington

Shirley Williamson Kovar & Linn S. Kovar, PhD Larry D. Leonard Stephen R. Morgan & Paula M. Morgan John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Hal C. Reed Darry G. Sands & Charlotte A. Sands William H. Seiler Jr. Eldon J. Shields & Bonnie Shields Robert D. Shutts & Diane Jones Shutts Michael L. Sullivan Larry S. Vernon Roger K. Viola & Karen S. Viola Gaylen R. Williams Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat Elaine Oser Zingg & Otto M. Zingg 1975 Martin W. Bauer & Ann M. Bauer Victor A. Bergman & Susan D. Bergman, MD Leon B. Graves Linda S. Legg Donald A. Low & Diane C. Low Barbara A. Lundin & Lawrence P. Daniels Michael W. Mahaffey S. Richard Mellinger John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Naomi L. Stuart Earl D. Tjaden & Shirley A. Tjaden Kirk Underwood Richard K. Walker James R. Walters & Mary Clayton Walters Daniel L. Watkins & Phyllis Watkins 1976 Jennifer Gille Bacon & Charles Bacon Jill A. Casado Antonio R. Cortest Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Charles P. Efflandt & Patti L. Efflandt Elaine M. Esparza Steven D. Gough & Lisa A. Gough Cathy Havener Greer Ross A. Hollander Donald D. Jarrett Gina Kaiser John A. Koepke David P. Mudrick & Mary Walker Mudrick Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, PhD Leland E. Rolfs Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge Gerald A. Thorpe & Patti H. Thorpe Douglas B. Westerhaus & Victoria R. Westerhaus 1977 Lydia I. Beebe L. Jed Berliner Robin C. Blair & Deborah M. Blair Alice Boler Bolin Karen L. Borell & Barbara R. Stein, PhD Justice Michael B. Buser & Holly L. Buser David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Ed W. Dosh Jane A. Finn, PhD Nathan C. Harbur & Kim B. Harbur Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven Calvin J. Karlin Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Kathryn Pruessner Peters Brenda Petrie Register & Benton W. Register James A. Riedy Hon. Janice D. Russell

William H. Sanders Jr. J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD & James A. Sherman Robert C. Sturgeon & Linda Ann Sturgeon John A. Vetter Cynthia S. Woelk 1978 Tim Connell Timothy R. Cork & Janice Irwin Cork R. Steven Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Charles E. Doyle David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Lynne A. Friedewald Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Jeanne Gorman Elizabeth A. Harris Jennifer Johnson Kinzel T. Bradley Manson William M. Modrcin Jr. George E. Rider & Jeannene E. Rider Hon. Trish Rose Jeffrey S. Southard Col. Andrew D. Stewart, retired Thomas E. Vaughn Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III John R. Wine Jr. & Ellen Sue Wine David L. Wing & Kristin D. Wing Winton A. Winter Jr. & Mary Boyd Winter Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Cathy Gerlinger Zumbehl & Glenn E. Zumbehl 1979 Dale W. Bell & Linda L. Bell Anne H. Blessing & William R. Blessing Robert W. Coykendall Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, PhD Edward J. Healy & Helen B. Healy John C. Hickey & Cynthia L. Hickey Teresa M. Meagher Paul J. Mohr Larry G. Rapp & Dianne J. Rapp Malinda Bronfman Schoeb Kurt A. Schoeb Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand John H. Stauffer Jr. & Kathy Stauffer Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster, PhD Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD 1980 Frank A. Ackerman David W. Andreas Orval F. Baldwin II Carol Y. Berns & Jeffrey P. Berns William F. Bradley Jr. & Roberta Harding Kathleen A. Dillon Edmund S. Gross & Michiko Miyamori Gross Bernard J. Hickert Ralph R. Inman & Sandra Wood Inman Hon. Janice Miller Karlin Hon. William J. Madden III & Mary Kubicz Madden Sheila C. Maksimowicz & John N. Maksimowicz Hon. Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Ann McElhenny Carolyn McMinn Blakemore David L. Blakemore Hon. Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Eric B. Metz


Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson Charles A. Peckham & Connie Peckham Hon. Michael F. Powers & Judith F. Powers R. Kent Pringle & Cathy M. Pringle Irma Stephens Russell & Thomas L. Russell Jr., PhD Hon. Linda L. Sybrant Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Hon. Wendel W. Wurst & Rhonda Wurst 1981 J. Rod Betts Anne E. Burke Jo Ann Butaud Mitchell C. Chaney & Susan K. Chaney Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett Hon. Daniel D. Crabtree John P. DeCoursey Hon. Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Darcy Domoney & Jill Weiss Domoney Robert R. Eisenhauer Ramona K. Kantack Stuart M. Kowalski Mary Ellen Loftus Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach David R. Maslen Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Nina Schloesser McKenna Chris McNeil, PhD Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney J. Donel Moore & Polly S. Moore Daphne Nan Muchnic Hon. Julie A. Robinson Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Stephen E. Scheve & Janice R. Scheve Christine Kay Solso & Robert J. Huber 1982 Kenneth L. Cole Roy G. Crooks Parthenia B. Evans & Dan T. Evans Kirk J. Goza Shirley Edmonds Goza Timothy J. Grillot & Janette K. Grillot G. William Hankins Gary H. Hanson & Jeanne M. Hanson L. Camille Hebert Kristian E. Hedine & Kathy Hedine Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Wendy M. Jenkins Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD Hon. Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Terry L. Malone & Monica S. Malone Brian C. McCormally Patricia Anne McDonald & Robert J. Wilshire Christopher K. McKenzie & Manuela Albuquerque Kevin F. Mitchelson & Frances Mitchelson James P. Muehlberger & Jayme Klein Muehlberger Holly Nielsen William K. Sauck Jr. David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely S. Lee Meigs Taylor Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, PhD Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson Mary W. Lehoczky & John Lehoczky III 1983 Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Richard L. Cram Michael A. Doll Myron L. Frans

Catherine S. Hauber David W. Hauber Wyatt A. Hoch & Mary Ann Hoch Quentin E. Kurtz & Linda S. Kurtz Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien Jeffrey D. Peier Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Kari S. Schmidt Keith C. Sevedge & Jan M. Sevedge James J. Sienicki & Chirl Ann Sienicki Xavier Simonsen Diane W. Simpson Amy Logan Sliva Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., PhD Melanie L. Trump Timothy T. Trump Kenneth L. Wagner & Lida McNearney Wagner H. Steven Walton & Sandra M. Walton Rebecca A. Winterscheidt Robert J. Werner 1984 Barbara D. Bleisch Gregory L. Franken Keith A. Goehring & Carol Goehring Larry Greenbaum Suzanne A. Holt John M. Holt Jr. Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan Celeste Holder Kling & Robert W. Kling, PhD Richard A. Macias Maureen M. Mahoney Bettina Toisan McGriggler Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Michael L. Riggs & Elaine P. Riggs Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Stephen L. Young 1985 Robert H. Backus Hon. Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Michael S. Boohar & Jennifer J. Boohar Melissa L. Conboy & William E. Mountford II Mark M. Deatherage Daniel H. Diepenbrock & Paula Diepenbrock Diana L. Dietrich Charles A. Etherington & Joni Walk Etherington Peggy Glazzard, EdD, JD Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Nancy L. Mitchell & David W. Mitchell, PhD Judith A. Moler Donald L. Moler Jr. Rick G. Morris John C. Nettels Jr. Joseph M. Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Lauren E. Roberts John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson Mark J. White & Margaret A. Justus 1986 Thomas J. Bath Jr. Daniel A. Cunningham Paula E. Drungole Mark S. Goldman & Sandra Goldman Anne Fleishel Harris Thomas W. Harris & Pamela S. Harris, MD Randall J. Hubert Steven K. Linscheid David H. Luce & Debi Luce Col. Karen E. Mayberry Robin J. Miles

Kristina B. Murphree & Jacob I. Murphree Donald L. Norman Jr. Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Kathryn Marie Timm Gregory J. Wohlleber 1987 David A. Blutcher Carolyn Boettcher Parmer & David A. Parmer Jan Fink Call John D. Corse & Andrea Markl Corse, MD James D. Holt & Karen T. Holt Dara Trum Miles Bert Nunley Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Lori R. Schultz & A. Bradley Bodamer Steven D. Selbe David E. Shay & Kimberly R. Shay Marie Strahan Patrick J. Stueve & Janna M. Stueve Kimberley H. Tyson Martha S. Warren 1988 Katherine J. Bailes, JD, PhD Mark C. Bannister & Melanie R. Bannister Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss Clark H. Cummins William C. Daniels Jr. Jon P. Fleenor Patrick X. Fowler & Susan J. Fowler Perry L. Franklin Jana Patterson Gagner & David W. Gagner Jon W. Gilchrist Phillip A. Glenn & Marlene K. Glenn Frederick B. Gould & Julie Pigott Gould Scott C. Gyllenborg S. Andrew Heidrick Charlene Holzmeister Michael T. Jilka William A. Kassebaum Rebecca E. Miller Shala Mills Sally Tinker Murphy Doris K. Nagel Michael F. Norton Bradley S. Russell & Mary Frances Russell Elizabeth A. Schartz Kathryn A. Seeberger & James T. Seeberger Steven P. Smith & Deborah J. Smith Cathy S. Stueckemann & Daniel L. Stueckemann 1989 Laura J. Bond & Fred L. Bond III Alec Creighton Christine H. Creighton Thomas J. Drees Jennifer M. Kassebaum Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Lori Connors McGroder Brian K. McLeod Susan Roffman Norton Alphonse B. Perkins Douglas R. Richmond 1990 Mark A. Andersen & Susan E. Andersen David P. Atkins Emilie Guyot Atkins John W. Barbian & Donna R. Barbian Shelli Crow-Johnson & Lyndon M. Johnson Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Kent R. Erickson & Lisa R. Erickson

Richard E. Felton Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Beth Horth Crystal Whitebread Mai Madeleine M. McDonough Paul D. Snyder Teresa R. Temme-Dietz Cheryl L. Whelan Susan Krehbiel William Jean M. Younger 1991 Doyle Baker Daniel S. Bangerter & Kirstin R. Bangerter Deborah Cawley Moeller Michael D. Moeller Brig. Gen. Scott A. Dold Frank R. Hampton & Isabelle A. Richard-Hampton John E. Hayes III Tedrick A. Housh III Brian R. Matula Amy Verschoor Skinner Karen Elizabeth Snyder 1992 Mary A. Cabrera Laurence A. Clement Jr. & Lynn Ewanow Clement Timothy E. Congrove Col. Steven C. Henricks Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, MD Amy Waltz Keusch Peter C. Knops Barbara A. Knops Lucy E. Mason & Cris Sena Michael F. McElhinney Robert B. Neill & Margaret E. Neill Thomas K. Pratt & Sharon A. Pratt Ann G. Soderberg & Mark A. Soderberg Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD 1993 Staci L. Cooper Jonathan H. Gregor Toni J. Hanretta Harry H. Herington Jr. & Cindy Herington Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love Daniel J. Martin, EdD Elizabeth McJimsey Souder & Wallace W. Souder Jr. Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Carlos J. Nolla Gary W. Owens Brian J. Schulman Jami Levine Schulman Veronica R. Sellers Jere D. Sellers Stephen N. Six & Elizabeth Brand Six Todd A. Sheppard 1994 Michael D. Burrichter Christopher S. Cole Holly A. Dyer Vera M. Gannaway & Stephen A. Gannaway Hon. Linda Powell Gilmore & Darin Gilmore Hon. Kenton T. Gleason & Angela M. Gleason Hon. Christina Dunn Gyllenborg Kimberly A. Jones Patricia A. Konopka Hon. Scott J. Miller Lt. Col. Susan E. Mitchell Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Stephen M. Schutter

KU LAW MAGAZINE 43


DONOR REPORT Karen Zambri Schutter John L. Snyder & Diane P. Snyder Erin E. Syring J. Margaret Tretbar Kevin D. Weakley Gordon J. Williams 1995 Patricia J. Castellano & Frank F. Castellano Jeffrey R. Emerson Tricia M. Knoll Coy M. Martin Nathan J. Muyskens, Esq. Scott B. Strohm & Tracy Strohm Jennifer Vath

Christopher M. Joseph & Jaime Marie Joseph Jason P. Lacey & Skye D. Lacey Stephen J. Lautz Robert D. Lewis Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Christopher M. McHugh & Jennifer K. McHugh Adam R. Moore Chad S. Nelson J. Michael Porter & Ruth Merz Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. & Tiffany L. Rhodes Bhavi A. Shah & Thomas Horn Jennifer Stackhouse Edward V. Wilson & Kristin McDowell Wilson

1996 J. Craig Cartwright & Angela Power Cartwright Julia Michelle Mahaffey Desrosiers & Michael Desrosiers James A. Donley Andrew F. Halaby & Ann Marie Halaby Sara J. Lechtenberg-Kasten, JD, LLM Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Rebecca A. Ryan Dru Mort Sampson Nancy Racunas Saugstad & Lee Saugstad Julie L. Unruh

2001 Collin B. Altieri & Dana M. Altieri Corey D. Babington & Tyra C. Babington Maj. Michele Stackhouse Bayless Brad Burke & Robin D. Burke Chad B. Cook & Jill S. Cook Erika K. Knopp & Ryan C. Knopp, MD Tamara L. Niles & R. Lance Niles Karen Ruckert Christopher P. Sobba Jeffrey L. Stowell & Carol A. Stowell Michael L. Walden Jane L. Williams & Randy K. Williams William M. Yanek II

1997 Deana Morford Allen Grant D. Bannister & Stephanie J. Bannister Tricia Ann Bath Terrence J. Campbell & Kristin S. Campbell Edwin H. Fields & Aramide Fields Michael R. Gould Sharon E. Greenfield Brad Korell & Justin McNulty Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews Lloyd E. Rigney

2002 Joshua K. Allen Katherine Benson Allen Ryan C. Brunton Rich Federico Jonathan M. Freed & Jeni Przytula Freed Timothy A. Glassco Krista B. Goering & Lauren E. Goering Jay E. Heidrick & Melissa M. Heidrick Molly Westering Hunter & Mark Hunter Blythe Ridenour Jones Christopher R. Jones Scott D. Kaiser Mon Yin Lung & Dr. Wai-Yim Ching Carrie A. McAtee Krista E. Morgan Ann J. Premer Rachel Emig Simek Jon A. Strongman Chasitie Burgess Walden

1998 Brent N. Coverdale & Michel Coverdale Sarah Mayberry Donley Teodoro Garcia Jr. Brian A. Jackson Tricia Marsee Maxfield Barbara L. McCloud Andrew J. Nolan & Sheryl Griffith Nolan Angela M. Seaton Mauricio A. Uribe 1999 Marshal B. Allshouse & Amy Allshouse John F. Baird II & Julie A. Baird Anthony Dante Burgin Noreen L. Connolly & Robert G. Cohen Bradley R. Finkeldei Jonathan E. Frank & Christine Frank Amber Gonzalez Heineman Joshua H. Maxfield Sarah Jeter Newell Darin A. Nugent Holly Pauling Smith Diana C. Theologou Miltiadis N. Theologou Cynthia Briggs Uribe 2000 James B. Arnett & Nancy VanLerberg Arnett John J. Gates & Carolyn K. Gates Julie D. Hower Heather A. Jones

44 KU LAW MAGAZINE

2003 Mariam Moussa Brunton Scott D. Kaiser Amy Miller Seymour & Thomas P. Seymour Jenifer Yaneris Daniel R. Zmijewski Katherine Bollig Zogleman 2004 Molly S. Carella Franklyn R. Carella Christopher C. Confer Bryan J. Didier & Jeremy Wilkins Didier Seanna L. Higley James M. Johnson & Heather M. Johnson Andrew T. Jones Jeffrey Li Jeffery B. Morris Owen K. Newman John G. Peryam Christopher L. Steadham & Shanna C. Steadham Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson Darin D. Stowell Jonathan N. Zerger & Heather S. Zerger

2005 Michael J. Allen & Heidi A. Allen Elizabeth Blake Allison Ross Confer Carolyn W. Coulson Anne Murray Emert Mark T. Emert Philip V. diZerega Brian T. Docking Emily Cassell Docking Benjamin C. Fields Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough Ryan C. Hudson Robert F. Kethcart & Stephanie A. Kethcart Travis D. Lenkner & Erin Delaney Sarah T. Lepak Clayton D. Lewis Elizabeth A. Meekins Katharine Milberger Haynes S. Patrick O’Bryan Shannon Kerr O’Bryan Kyungjoo Park 2006 John M. Avondet Carly Farrell Boothe & Benjamin D. Boothe Steven Chang Matthew M. Dwyer William H. Moore & Kristin Brulez Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara Benjamin A. Reed Kristen V. Toner & Ryan M. Toner Jason M. Zager & Kristie Zager 2007 Angela S. Armenta M. Katie Gates Calderon Pedro D. Calderon Crissa A.S. Cook Steven W. Grieb Ryan J. Huschka Shannon Cohorst Johnson Sean M. McGivern Laura Dakhil Monahan & Bradley M. Monahan Aaron B. Oleen Amanda G. Voth & Anthony J. Voth 2008 Sarah Emile Lynn Baltzell Brian P. Baltzell Daniel A. Belhumeur & Ree A. Belhumeur Sean T. Carver & Samantha N. Bennett Justin D. Elkouri & Mica Elkouri Adam J. Gasper Kathryn O’Hara Gasper Zachary A. Lerner Maren K. Ludwig Thomas P. Maltese J. Nolan McWilliams, Esq. Stephanie S. Sankar Devin S. Sikes & Sheebani S. Patel Jeffrey J. Williams 2009 Christina Arnone & Michael Arnone Capt. Brandon O. Bean Christopher P. Colyer Jerald J. Cook Danielle N. Davey Michael E. Dill Burton M. Harding Lindsey Morse Heinz & Bradley D. Heinz Beau A. Jackson & Laura S. Jackson Rachel J. Kibler-Melby Alicia M. Kirkpatrick Julie M. Larson Danielle Duncan Rider Devin K. Ross

Annie W. Shank Andrew R. Shaw Bethany C. Shelton Amanda C. Sheridan Patrick R. Watkins 2010 Jason B. Brinkley Blake T. Hardwick Christopher J. Kaufman & Allison Draffan Kaufman Parag M. Mehta Benjamin T. Miller-Coleman Erica Ramsey & Eric Ramsey Ryan J. Schletzbaum Matthew T. Schoonover Adam M. Siebers Tristan C. Tafolla Dana L. Watts 2011 Andrew D. Ellis Lindsay Robbins Grise & Matthew Grise Milos J. Jekic Ryan M. B. McAteer Courtney Pedersen Sipe & Adam J. Sipe Melissa M. Plunkett 2012 Amy Chang Lauren E. Douville Sparkle Ellison, JD, PhD Leilani R. Leighton Ryan J. Mize Ganesh Nair 2013 Tyler J. Emerson Liyue Huang-Sigle Joy Noakes Isaacs Michael R. Keenan Lauren E. Luhrs Robert E. C. Stites

This donor report covers fiscal year 2014, which ran from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014. Please bring omissions or errors to the attention of Noelle Uhler: nuhler@ku.edu 785-864-9281


Reid Day, L’16 “Coming from a public service background and now clerking for a distinguished jurist, I appreciate KU Law’s emphasis on writing, speaking and negotiating — even in 1L courses. These are skills that everyone needs, but are tough to develop and perfect. KU Law addresses them early and often to prepare students for their first internship or job.” Summer internship: Judge Carlos Murguia, U.S. District Court, Kansas

KU LAWYERS:

Ready to work Graduates of KU Law enter the legal profession with the ideal balance of intellectual depth, practical knowledge, and real-world experience.

They learn under the guidance of top faculty with leading national reputations. They develop

the craft of the working lawyer through deposition, expert witness and other skills courses. They then bring those talents to bear in the real world through our extensive clinical programs, giving them opportunities to represent real clients with challenging issues.

Simply put: When KU Lawyers join your organization, they are ready to think, act and work

as lawyers from day one.

Contact us to hire a KU Lawyer: carservlaw@ku.edu | law.ku.edu/careers


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Green Hall 1535 W. 15th Street Lawrence, KS 66045-7608

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COMING SOON JANUARY 15 Kansas City Alumni Reception

FEBRUARY 20 Law Journal Symposium 27 Women in Law Pub Night

MARCH 06 Diversity in Law Banquet 13 Tribal Law & Government Conference

APRIL 10 Patent Law Conference 11 Patent Law Conference 11 50/50+ Reunion 17 Return to Green CLE

MAY 02 Board of Governors Meeting 02 Deans Club/Medallion Dinner 16 Hooding Ceremony 28 Recent Developments in the Law CLE 29 Recent Developments in the Law CLE

PHOTO BY KELSEY KIMBERLIN / KU MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS Printed on paper that contains at least 10% post-consumer recycled content

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KU Law Magazine | Fall 2014  

A magazine for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. From pioneers to up-and-comers, KU Law alumnae are changing the...

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