Page 1

P O R T RA YAL

n.: A depiction of someone or something in a work of art or literature

Griffin Katzenmeier


4

Lakin Children's Center and Exploration Place

14

KU Academic Pavilion

26

KU Eco Machine

38

Rock Chalk Prairie Acre


Griffin Katzenmeier Contact 1248 E 2000 RD

Eudora, KS 66025 785 979 1373

g130k245@ku.edu

Profile Third Year Student from Kansas Education 2021 2016

Work Experience 2018

2011-Present 2015-2018

Awards & Activities

2016-Present 2016-Present 2016

Sustainable and Community Design Other interests: music, travel, basketball

University of Kansas (Expected) Master of Architecture, Business Minor Eudora High School - Eudora, KS

ARCH 509 Design/Build Studio -Helped design and build an outdoor classroom on KU's campus Bluejacket Crossing Vineyard & Winery - Eudora, KS -Worked under a retired architect/carpenter -Helped build new tasting room and addition to winery Dairy Queen - Eudora, KS -Assistant Manager

KU intramural basketball league KU Strength Club

Voted Most Inspirational Player of high school football team

Hard Skills Revit

Lumion

Bluebeam

Sketchup

Illustrator

Microsoft Suite

Rhino

InDesign

AutoCad

Photoshop

Soft Skills Organization Communication Collaborative Time management Creativity

Problem Solving Curiosity

References Paola Sanguinetti

ARCH 509 Design/Build Prof. paolas@ku.edu

Kandaya Selvan Employer at Bluejacket bluejacketcrossing@gmail.com


Lakin Children’s Center & Exploration Place

2nd Year Spring 2018

Kearny County Hospital Addition

Lakin, KS

To better serve its communities, that have ranged over time and now include primarily immigrant and low-income communities, Lakin Hospital plans to build a 24-hour/7day-a-week daycare facility for children aged 0 - 5 years and older (after school). Based on its primary user group (children) as well as its site location (seen from Route 400 as you enter the Town of Lakin), the Children’s Center could be a key landmark on the Hospital campus and a ‘gateway’ to Lakin, which lacks any iconic architectural presence. Because it is for children, the project demands an expressive iconic and ‘playful’ formal response. Its expressive form, internal spatial quality, and spatial choreography should generate an inspirational and exciting user experience.


40,000 ft2

Emphasis on: •Multi-Cultural •Intergenerational •User experience

5


Multiculturalism The idea of a multi-cultural environment was the most important consideration for me while designing. Creating an environment that was welcoming to all walks of life was vital throughout all stages of the design process .

Inter-generational Creating an intergenerational environment by connecting the nursing home to the children’s center was a key focus of the project. Seniors in the assisted living building have a direct line of site to the daycare units and the outdoor play area. The community park was also designed to allow the seniors to have contact with community members of all ages.

Youthful

Because it’s a children’s center, it was important to design a facility that would be vibrant and engaging. The colors and organic form of the building create an exciting environment for both kids and visitors of all ages.

Villages are made up of huts with modest scales and specific functions. In between the huts create spaces for community gatherings and for children to play.

Form resembles vernacular architecture used worldwide Units are single story and are used for specific functions and activities

Community/Play Spaces

Defined unit spaces

The program is organized in a similar fashion to the way village are organized. Defined units create spaces in the middle for community and play.


1

2

3

Daycare view

The vernacular form was placed on each defined I created grid lines using a set of N/S lines from the space. The daycare tops are tilted away from the Retirement Home, a set of lines parallel to the road courtyard and the Exploration tops are tilted away defining the North side of E/W lines the site and a set of from each other. lines to connect them

7


Daycare 1. Lobby 2. Prayer Room 3. Sick Room 4. Nurse 5. Laundry Room 6. Break Room 7. Office

8. Storage 9. Infants 10. Younger Toddler Nap Room 11. Older Toddler Nap Room 12. Restroom 13. Younger/Older Toddler Activity Room 22

8

14. Preschool 15. After School 16. Courtyard 17. Game Area 18. Kitchen

20. Conference Room 21. Gallery 22. Loading Dock

Exploration Center 19. Multi-Purpose Room/ Tornado Shelter

Basement 23. Mechanical Room 24. Janitor's Closet 25. Electrical Room

23

25

A

24

1

22

12

6

21 7

Section A

7

12

6

17

4 5

9

19

20

3

8

6

18

B

2

16

15 12

14

12

10 11

13

Floor Plan


Outside 9" x 3" Glulam Perforated Aluminum Skin Bar to hold skin Knife Plate Insulated Glass Mullion Inside 4"x12" Glulam 2" Diameter Steel Tube

1

2

3

Concrete Vapor Barrier Rigid Insulation

Section B

Detail Drawing (Plan)

Detail Drawing (Section)

9


Site Plan

1

3

2


1

2

1

3

Lobby View

Gallery Room

11


Reflection In past projects, I was designing with a more utilitarian purpose, trying to design sustainability with a conceptual scheme. This project made me realize that architecture is for the people. Throughout this project I tried to keep in mind who I was designing for. And although the center is primarily for kids, I was designing a center that would be engaging and inspiring for everyone. I wanted to create an environment that someone from any background would be comfortable in. I also wanted to engage the community by creating a green buffer space between the senior center and children's center. I also wanted to engage the neighboring seniors in the senior center. The lively and dynamic form, along with all the visitors to the children's center creates an exciting atmosphere that they are able to take part in.

View from View Courtyard inside courtyard


1

3

View from senior center

1

3

2

13


KU School of Architecture & Design Academic Pavilion

2nd Year Fall 2017

On-campus addition

Between Marvin & Lindley

The School of Architecture and Design has the need for additional space for design reviews, presentations and public displays of work on the campus. As a condition of the commission, the installation and its function must serve an educational purpose by demonstrating to the public how the installation works and what benefits it provides. The School has asked you to design a building/landscape scheme to provide for this year-round operation and educational function. They want it to be placed in a highly visible place on campus, easily seen by passing pedestrians and accessible to groups arriving from off campus. It is to be a part of KU’s “didactic landscape”.


1,400 ft2

Emphasis on: •Order •Overall Synthesis •Sustainability

15


Panel System

Using panels as the main piece of structure allowed for a unique design. The spaces between each panel were human scale and perfect for review nooks. The panels also act as vertical louvers that modulate sunlight.

Parabolic Form

Creating a parabolic shape from a series of linear objects was also a focal point while designing this project. This created a dynamic environment that allowed for interesting design opportunities throughout the rest of the project.

Light Modulation

Light modulation maybe the most important aspect of the project. By combining the paneled structural system, plant covering over glazed surfaces and the parabolic louver system, a unique light modulation system similar to the one used for Renzo Piano’s Menil Collection emerged.

Site Integration

The site design of this project is integral to the design as a whole because it shares features with the pavilion. The site is organized based off of the five foot spacing of the panels. The cut stone gives the appearance that the panels were drug through the site and the northern part of the site uses the five foot intervals as a guide.

A paneled bay system emerged as a way to create a open and interesting interior.

Each panels opening was altered to create a unique form that also gave way to the parabolic curve theme.

Louvers were added to the panels in order to modulate sunlight. The louvers also reinforce the parabolic theme.

The two wings are staggered to create space in front and behind each wing. The tower mirrors the language of the Campanile Tower on KU’s campus and reinforces the curved theme.


1

2

Menil Collection (Louver Inspiration)

House in Muko by Fujiwara-Muro Architects (Panel Inspiration) Campanile Tower at KU (Tower Inspiration)

Cut Stone Landscape (Landscape Inspiration)

3

4

Entry View

2 2

1

4

17


Section and Floor Plan Combo

1


Louver Exploded Axon

1

2

1

3

3

4

19


Ventilation

The spiraling tower reflects the movement of the air up through it and also reinforces the parabolic concept.

Winter

2

West Wing 3

Summer


1

2

3

3

2

3

4

4

Site Plan

The diagrams below show that all direct sunlight is blocked creating a shaded, comfortable environment in the gallery spaces.

Winter

East Wing 3

Summer

21


In the gallery spaces, each bay is the right size to allow for private review spaces. Each space has rotating cork panels to both maximize display space and to also further block any sunlight coming in at a low angle.

The pavilion breaks up the lawn between Marvin and Lindley, but leaves plenty of both paved and grassy usable outdoor space.

Interior View


1

3

2

1

3

4

View from Lindley

2

3

23


Reflection Going into this project, I wanted to design something unique and recognizable. There were very few restraints coming into this project which left me a lot of opportunity to explore some unique and recognizable ideas and forms. I used a lot of precedents throughout this project to understand what architects did before me and help bring my ideas to life. Because the function of the building is to showcase student work, I wanted to showcase the way the building functioned. I accomplished this by using cut stone in the site to demonstrate the organization of the building, using a spiraled tower to denote the stack ventilation and utilizing a shifting louver system among other things

3

4


2

25


The University of Kansas Eco Machine 2nd Year Fall 2017

On-campus addition

Between Wescoe and Budig

4,400 ft2

Emphasis on: •Order •Overall Synthesis •Sustainability

The University of Kansas has been awarded a grant to install an eco machine (aka “living machine”®) on the campus. As a condition of the grant, the installation and its function must serve an educational purpose by demonstrating to the public how the installation works and what benefits it provides. They want it to be placed in a highly visible place on campus – on or near Jayhawk Blvd., easily seen by passing pedestrians and accessible to groups arriving from off-campus. The operation of the eco machine will be similar to that shown in the diagram below (with sewage coming from a/some nearby building(s) and the pavilion’s own toilets, urinals, drinking fountains and sinks) with one exception – the final use of the purified water will not only be the flushing of the pavilion’s toilets, but also the irrigation of the nearby landscape (including an adjacent water garden). The building itself will also serve a didactic function. It should be in-formed by simple principles of rain water collection, daylighting, natural ventilation and passive solar energy modulation. The eco machine will process sewage coming from nearby buildings and the pavilion's own toilets, urinals, drinking fountains and sinks by purifying using the indoor planters. The final use of the purified water will be flushing the pavilion's toilets and irrigating the landscape.


27


Stair Step

Plan-Section congruency using a stair step pattern was a key idea in this design. In plan view, the stair step allows for usable space in front of and behind each module while also creating a strong circulatory system around the building. In a front view, the stair step creates space underneath the top module and on top of the bottom module.

Sustainability

In this project, sustainable design was crucial. There are several key aspects of the design that are employed with the intention of creating a comfortable internal environment. These include geothermal cooling by putting the bottom module partially underground, using a water wall to cool the air, and using the glass boxes to create stack ventilation and harvest plenty of daylight.

Site Integration

Given the complexity of the site with it’s steep grade, heavy traffic and elongated shape, I found it vital to incorporate the same strategies used to design the building when it came to site design. This created a strong site context, building to site relationship and also an indoor to outdoor ambiguity.

Campus Context

Considering that the project was to be apart of the "Jayhawk Trail", I found it appropriate to incorporate language found throughout campus into the Eco Machine project. The exterior finish matches the color palette of other buildings on campus and the overall design fits in with several of the other projects completed in recent years.

4

2

1

3

Aerial View


1

A linear organizational pattern configured on a grid was the perfect layout for the long and narrow site between Budig and Wescoe Hall

Each module was staggered to maximize outdoor, negative space, allowing for a clear path of circulation that follows the stair-step motif

2

3

4

The modules were then offset vertically to further maximize outdoor space allowing access under the top module and on top of the bottom module. This added to the stair-step motif from a front view

Glass boxes were added to the top of each module to allow for natural lighting and to create a greenhouse effect that would cool the module.

Lastly, the glass boxes and the ends of the modules were truncated to face directly south in order to emphasize the off axis tilt of Jayhawk Blvd. 29


The site section clearly demonstrates the stair-step motif. The stair step up is clear in the building and the stair step down is in the site. This also emphasizes the strong relationship between the building and site. The site plan shows the stair step in both the organization of the building and in the staggering of the terraced platforms in the site.

Site Section

2

4 1


1

2

3

1

4

2

Site and Floor Plan Combo

3

31


Water Reclaimed storm and sewage water is stored below the “living� (top) module so it can be used as irrigation for the planters and site or filtered and reused to flush toilets

Ventilation The glass boxes are used to create a greenhouse effect, catching sunlight and heating the boxed area. This in turn creates a pressure difference pulling air upwards and maximizing natural ventilation.

Daylighting

The glasses boxes are also used to maximize daylight in the living module in order to keep the plants strong. The transition module employs louvers to reduce glare in the common space.


1

2

2

3

4

Interior Entrance View

View from Jayhawk Boulevard

2

1

4

33


2

4


2

1

2

1

3

4

OSB Sheathing

Cavity Insulation Vapor Barrier

Rigid Insulation House Wrap Air Space

Panel Clips Panel

35


Reflection Given that this was my first project exploring the design process, I was pleased with the final outcome. This project taught me the importance of creating a strong concept and using the concept to inform all parts of the design. A strong language used throughout the project and final design created a building and project that is easy to navigate for users and reviewers. Going into the project, the site posed a challenge that I was unsure of how to handle, but eventually gave way to an interesting form that I felt both maximized usable space and also created an inviting environment for students and visitors alike. The building-site relationship is a key part of the eco machine project. I felt that the stair step motif was a very strong solution to both the steep slope of the site and the building-site relationship that was so vital to this project. It is constantly becoming more clear that architecture needs to become more sustainable. Understanding how sustainable features work and impact the built environment was also a key takeaway from this project. Going forward I will use what I learned about creating a strong language and concept, site integration and the importance of sustainability in other projects. This project had a unique program that allowed me to explore a lot of different possibilities when trying to solve problems related to those things.


4

2

3

37


Rock Chalk Prairie Acre

3rd Year Fall 2018

On-campus addition

Prairie Acres Behind Watson

The KU Center for Sustainability wants an outdoor classroom located near Prairie Acre, just east of the Chancellor's house and south of Watson library. The previous years Design/Build studio created the "Ribbon Classroom" made of gabion wall seating. The objective of our studio was to create an information pavilion and a more practical ground condition that incorporated the themes of the existing ribbon wall. Through material exploration and prototyping we came up with a design that was within the budget and enhanced the ribbon experience.


1,500 ft2

Emphasis on: •User Experience •Constructibility •Team Design


The radial pattern derived from the pavilion effectively divided up the ribbon wall in a geometric way which contrasted the organic ribbon creating an interesting visual effect. The planting area on the bottom left was meant to be the same shape as the pavilion's foundation creating a strong relationship through the whole site.

1st Site Iteration

2nd Site Iteration

In the second iteration I decided to use a border band that would create a definitive break between the two sides of the ribbon wall and be a more cohesive pattern. The R.C.P.A. letters were angled at the front to be used as bike racks.


Concrete band Section

Final Site Plan

41


2nd Plan Iteration Perspective

Finished Project, View inside classroom


As the design process unfolded, unexpected timing and financial issues forced us to simplify the concrete pattern. Instead of a band that wrapped around the ribbon a brought the pattern full circle, we went with a more basic band pattern. The above perspective to the left was the final proposal for the site. The picture below it is the finished project with the simplified band pattern.

Finishing Construction

43


Reflection This design/build studio was a unique experience. Every step of the way I was learning something new. From learning about material exploration through prototyping to dealing with a budget and working within financial constraints, there was something to be learned form start to finish. I also picked up some valuable team design and construction skills that will be vital going forward. Although I didn't design the canopy, I was able to do my part by designing and planning the site and helping with construction on all facets of the project. Both the class and the clients were very pleased with the outcome of the project and I know that KU students will be able to use the Rock Chalk Prairie Acre classroom for years to come.

Screeding Concrete Band


Finished Project, View from sidewalk


Architects have to dream. We have to search for our Atlantises, to be explorers, adventurers, and yet to build responsibly and well. Renzo Piano

Profile for Griffin Katzenmeier

Portrayal - Griffin Katzenmeier  

My undergraduate architectural portfolio featuring works from my first two and a half semesters at KU. New project coming soon.

Portrayal - Griffin Katzenmeier  

My undergraduate architectural portfolio featuring works from my first two and a half semesters at KU. New project coming soon.

Profile for ku537
Advertisement