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BILL ANTON

C Y R U S A F S A RY

S T E V E AT K I N S O N

JULIE BENDER

DAN BODELSON

CARL BRENDERS

S H AW N C A M E R O N

KEN CARLSON

A R T U R O C H AV E Z B R U C E C H E E V E R E L A I N E C O F F E E J E N N E S S C O R T E Z B R E N T C O T T O N S TA N D AV I S J O H N D E M O T T P AT R I C I A D O B S O N R O B E RT D U N C A N J . C . D Y E D E B O R A H F E L L O W S F R E D F E L L O W S D O N N Y F I N L AY L O R I F O R E S T N A N C Y G L A Z I E R V E RY L G O O D N I G H T L A N N Y GRANT

BRAD GREENWOOD

MICHAEL GODFREY

LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE

D AV I D H A L B A C H

JAMES JIANG

R O B E RT J O H N S O N

J O F FA

K E R R F R A N C O I S K O C H C A LV I N L I A N G Z . S . L I A N G H U I H A N L I U M I K E M A L M A D R I A N N O M A N N O C H I A PA U L M A N N B O N N I E M A R R I S D AV I D M AY E R D A N M I E D U C H D A N M C C AW D A N N Y M C C AW H E R B M I G N E RY R O B E RT M O O R E J I M M O R G A N B R E N D A M U R P H Y B I L L N E B E K E R G E O R G E N O RT H U P J I M N O RT O N R A L P H O B E R G A N D R E W P E T E R S

J O A N N P E R A LTA W I L L I A M P H I L L I P S W I L L I A M P I C K E R D J E S S E P O W E L L

C L A R K K E L L E Y P R I C E I A N R A M S AY C Y N T H I A R I G D E N H O WA R D R O G E R S S U E E L L E N R O S S S H E R RY S A N D E R L I N D S AY S C O T T J O H N S E E R E YLESTER

S U Z I E S E E R E Y- L E S T E R

KYLE SIMS

MIAN SITU

ADAM SMITH

DANIEL SMITH

M AT T S M I T H

TUCKER SMITH

GORDON SNIDOW

T I M S O L L I D AY L I N D A S T. C L A I R J O S E P H S U L K O W S K I S C O T T TA L L M A N P O W E R S R I C H A R D T H O M A S K E N T U L L B E R G D U S T I N VA N W E C H E L ALBIN VESELKA BILL ANTON

C U RT WA LT E R S

C Y R U S A F S A RY

MORGAN WEISTLING

S T E V E AT K I N S O N

W I L L I A M W H I TA K E R

JULIE BENDER

K AT H Y W I P F L E R

DAN BODELSON

SARAH WOODS

CARL BRENDERS

GENE ZESCH

S H AW N C A M E R O N

JIE WI ZHOU

KEN CARLSON

A R T U R O C H AV E Z B R U C E C H E E V E R E L A I N E C O F F E E J E N N E S S C O R T E Z B R E N T C O T T O N S TA N D AV I S J O H N D E M O T T P AT R I C I A D O B S O N R O B E RT D U N C A N J . C . D Y E D E B O R A H F E L L O W S F R E D F E L L O W S D O N N Y F I N L AY L O R I F O R E S T N A N C Y G L A Z I E R V E RY L G O O D N I G H T L A N N Y GRANT

BRAD GREENWOOD

MICHAEL GODFREY

LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE

D AV I D H A L B A C H

JAMES JIANG

R O B E RT J O H N S O N

J O F FA

K E R R F R A N C O I S K O C H C A LV I N L I A N G Z . S . L I A N G H U I H A N L I U M I K E M A L M A D R I A N N O M A N N O C H I A PA U L M A N N B O N N I E M A R R I S D AV I D M AY E R D A N M I E D U C H D A N M C C AW D A N N Y M C C AW H E R B M I G N E RY R O B E RT M O O R E J I M M O R G A N B R E N D A M U R P H Y B I L L N E B E K E R G E O R G E N O RT H U P J I M N O RT O N R A L P H O B E R G A N D R E W P E T E R S

J O A N N P E R A LTA W I L L I A M P H I L L I P S W I L L I A M P I C K E R D J E S S E P O W E L L

C L A R K K E L L E Y P R I C E I A N R A M S AY C Y N T H I A R I G D E N H O WA R D R O G E R S S U E E L L E N R O S S S H E R RY S A N D E R L I N D S AY S C O T T J O H N S E E R E YLESTER

S U Z I E S E E R E Y- L E S T E R

KYLE SIMS

MIAN SITU

ADAM SMITH

DANIEL SMITH

M AT T S M I T H

TUCKER SMITH

GORDON SNIDOW

T I M S O L L I D AY L I N D A S T. C L A I R J O S E P H S U L K O W S K I S C O T T TA L L M A N P O W E R S R I C H A R D T H O M A S K E N T U L L B E R G D U S T I N VA N W E C H E L ALBIN VESELKA BILL ANTON

C U RT WA LT E R S

C Y R U S A F S A RY

MORGAN WEISTLING

S T E V E AT K I N S O N

W I L L I A M W H I TA K E R

JULIE BENDER

K AT H Y W I P F L E R

DAN BODELSON

SARAH WOODS

CARL BRENDERS

GENE ZESCH

S H AW N C A M E R O N

JIE WI ZHOU

KEN CARLSON

A R T U R O C H AV E Z B R U C E C H E E V E R E L A I N E C O F F E E J E N N E S S C O R T E Z B R E N T C O T T O N S TA N D AV I S J O H N D E M O T T P AT R I C I A D O B S O N R O B E RT D U N C A N J . C . D Y E D E B O R A H F E L L O W S F R E D F E L L O W S D O N N Y F I N L AY L O R I F O R E S T N A N C Y G L A Z I E R V E RY L G O O D N I G H T L A N N Y GRANT

BRAD GREENWOOD

MICHAEL GODFREY

LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE

D AV I D H A L B A C H

JAMES JIANG

R O B E RT J O H N S O N

J O F FA

K E R R F R A N C O I S K O C H C A LV I N L I A N G Z . S . L I A N G H U I H A N L I U M I K E M A L M A D R I A N N O M A N N O C H I A PA U L M A N N B O N N I E M A R R I S D AV I D M AY E R D A N M I E D U C H D A N M C C AW D A N N Y M C C AW H E R B M I G N E RY R O B E RT M O O R E J I M M O R G A N B R E N D A M U R P H Y B I L L N E B E K E R G E O R G E N O RT H U P J I M N O RT O N R A L P H O B E R G A N D R E W P E T E R S

J O A N N P E R A LTA W I L L I A M P H I L L I P S W I L L I A M P I C K E R D J E S S E P O W E L L

C L A R K K E L L E Y P R I C E I A N R A M S AY C Y N T H I A R I G D E N H O WA R D R O G E R S S U E E L L E N R O S S S H E R RY S A N D E R L I N D S AY S C O T T J O H N S E E R E YLESTER

S U Z I E S E E R E Y- L E S T E R

KYLE SIMS

MIAN SITU

ADAM SMITH

DANIEL SMITH

M AT T S M I T H

TUCKER SMITH

GORDON SNIDOW

T I M S O L L I D AY L I N D A S T. C L A I R J O S E P H S U L K O W S K I S C O T T TA L L M A N P O W E R S R I C H A R D T H O M A S K E N T U L L B E R G D U S T I N VA N W E C H E L ALBIN VESELKA BILL ANTON

C U RT WA LT E R S

C Y R U S A F S A RY

MORGAN WEISTLING

S T E V E AT K I N S O N

W I L L I A M W H I TA K E R

JULIE BENDER

K AT H Y W I P F L E R

DAN BODELSON

SARAH WOODS

CARL BRENDERS

GENE ZESCH

S H AW N C A M E R O N

JIE WI ZHOU

KEN CARLSON

A R T U R O C H AV E Z B R U C E C H E E V E R E L A I N E C O F F E E J E N N E S S C O R T E Z B R E N T C O T T O N S TA N D AV I S J O H N D E M O T T P AT R I C I A D O B S O N R O B E RT D U N C A N J . C . D Y E D E B O R A H F E L L O W S F R E D F E L L O W S D O N N Y F I N L AY L O R I F O R E S T N A N C Y G L A Z I E R V E RY L G O O D N I G H T L A N N Y


TRAILSIDE GALLERIES 50TH ANNIVERSARY GALA

AU G U S T 1 9 , 2 0 1 3 - AU G U S T 3 1 , 2 0 1 3 J A C K S O N, W Y O M I N G

A RT I S T S ' R E C E P T I O N : F R I DAY, AU G U S T 2 3 , 2 0 1 3 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM S O L D B Y D R AW AT 6 : 3 0 P M

V I E W A D D I T I O N A L W O R K S B Y T H E S E A RT I S T S A N D O T H E R S AT W W W. T R A I L S I D E G A L L E R I E S . C O M

JACKSON HOLE SCOTTSDALE

130 East Broadway, Jackson, WY 83001 (307) 733.3186 7330 Scottsdale Mall, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945.7751


O

ver the past fifty years, Trailside Galleries has been at the crossroads of western American art. Founded by Dick Flood, Sr., in Idaho five decades ago, Trailside helped birth the enthusiasm for quality western art at a time when representational art received little respect from critics across the country. As the stewardship of the gallery was passed on to Ginger Renner, Ted and Christine Mollring and then to me in 1994, it was clear that western art was not merely a fleeting trend, but a lasting genre that would speak of the country’s heritage for generations to come. Trailside has long been and is widely acknowledged for nurturing and representing only the best, whether it was a legend like the late Harry Jackson or John Clymer, or a fresh new talent just emerging on the art scene. To that end, the gallery’s mission has always remained steadfast: to be a crossroads for both established and new talent. Looking back over my 36 years with the gallery, I could write many superlatives about Trailside’s iconic history and list a virtual Who’s Who of renowned artists whose works have graced our gallery walls. But rather, as we celebrate 50 years of excellence, I would like to take a moment to convey where the gallery is headed as we look forward to the next 50 years! Once upon a time, getting information and images of new artwork to collectors all around the country was a 3-5 day process: photographing the work, waiting for the film to be developed, then mailing it to those prospective buyers. Today, in our digital world, all it takes is the push of the “send” button, and the client has instant gratification: the ability to view an image of a painting or sculpture that has literally, just moments before, been unpacked at the gallery. I am grateful to be surrounded in the gallery by a great team of people who really understand digital technology and outreach, and who have been integral in bringing Trailside into the digital mainstream. From our comprehensive website to our online catalogs and expansion via Social Media, our ability to bring an artist’s finished work to an eager collector has never been so fluid and timely.

representational art. And seven years on, our auction department, the Jackson Hole Art Auction, is positioned to continue its fast pace and growth as one of the country’s leading purveyors of works by both deceased masters and living artists. While advances in modern technology have served the gallery well, it has also made the playing arena a much more competitive one. Today, collectors have many more resources available to them in their pursuit of fine art. In the end, however, the gallery exists to educate collectors and to deliver a quality product made by a person whose ideas and inspiration are conveyed with the highest skills. Trailside is the point of connection between people who make art and people who love it. The gallery would not enjoy its pivotal role in this marketplace without the sound judgment and acumen of my long time friend and gallery partner Roxanne Hofmann, the loyalty and friendship of my gallery Director, Joan Griffith, the love and support of my husband Chuck and the dedication, professionalism and enthusiasm of our wonderful staff. To our longtime and new collectors and to all the artists, past and present, who have been a part of the gallery, I extend my deepest gratitude; for all of you have played a role in defining the very essence of this place we call Trailside Galleries. Please join me and all the Trailside family for our gala event on August 23 at our Jackson location. It promises to be a memorable evening as we celebrate the past and toast to the future of the gallery.

MARYVONNE LESHE

Managing Partner

As we move forward, the gallery continues its expansion into new styles, new artists and broader subject matter, while maintaining our core roots of western

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

3


JAMES MORGAN

JOANN PERALTA

FROM THE NORTH

24 x 36 inches, Oil $21,000

“A wonderful sight--Tundra Swans descending through a November sunset into a western marsh to rest and refuel on their long migration flight from nesting grounds near the Arctic Circle to coastal marshes in the Southwest.”

SOPHIA

30 x 20 inches, Oil $8,500

“A child’s innocence and warmth is captured in this portrait of Sophia. I was inspired by the candle light and flowers she had in hand which seemed to exude the energy and beauty of her spirit.”

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T R A ILS I D E GA L L E R I E S 5 0TH AN N IV ERS ARY


CURT WALTERS

MORGAN WEISTLING

CLEARING ON THE KAIBAB

28 x 22 inches, Oil $24,000

“Last March, I made a painting trip to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. With spring well under way, I was surprised to see a deep fluffy snow that covered most of Northern Arizona. Snow will rarely fall in the lower elevations of the Grand Canyon. This contrast of color and textures appeals to me. As the cold front started to move east and the sky opened, I eagerly welcomed the sun, as did the hikers on the Kaibab trail that winds down the edge of O’Neil Butte, located in the center of this painting. I did not finish my field painting that day, but enough of the moment remained for me to create this studio painting based on that experience. There is nothing more magical than new snow on the rim of Grand Canyon.”

THE FLORIST

25 x 24 inches, Oil $35,000

“I was inspired to create a scene where the viewer feels as though they were peering in on this girl’s activities and interrupting her flower arranging. Her name is Diana and her sweet disposition was a joy to capture.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

5


KEN CARLSON

FRANCOIS KOCH

TENDER TOUCH

MORNING ON THE BIG WOOD

23 x 24 inches, Oil $28,000

36 x 48 inches, Oil $32,000

“This is a summer moment in the life of a mother moose and her calf. After the first few weeks the calf travels about with its mother. The late spring babies stay close to their protective mothers as they are easy prey for hungry predators. The mother and calf are nearly inseparable for a year until her next calf is born.”

6

T R A ILS I D E GA L L E R I E S 5 0TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“A Sunday morning on the Big Wood has something special. Peace and stillness is what I experienced and tried to capture in this landscape.”


CARL BRENDERS

DANIEL SMITH

THE SHELL GAME

A TIME TO FEAST

21 x 31 inches, Gouache Watercolor $42,000

24 x 20 inches, Acrylic $12,000

“I did extensive fieldwork at a California game farm where they train animals for movies. The models for these little wolves were up and coming stars. The turtle provides the action, although in slow motion! Obviously, these three pups have never seen a turtle before. The den’s recreation grounds, denuded of all vegetation and enhanced by light and shadows, were a challenging subject for gouache watercolor rendition.”

“The annual salmon run attracts a multitude of wildlife. Grizzly bears feast on salmon as opportunistic gulls function as the cleanup crew. The complexity and efficiency of Mother Nature continues to entertain and amaze me. I am very fortunate and blessed to refer to these experiences as part of my job.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

7


STAN DAVIS PATRICIA DOBSON

ACOMA JEWELS

24 x 30 inches, Oil $14,500

A-PA-NI, WIFE OF BRAVE EAGLE

40 x 30 inches, Oil $15,800

“The impetus for the painting was a photo in one of my research volumes on the Blackfoot People. The photo was of a group of women attending the annual sun dance (Okan) during the early reservation period. While dressed in all their finery, they also wore the various headdresses of their husbands. I was struck by the interesting contrast and melding of the feminine dress and masculine headgear. I made all of the costume pieces you see in the painting.”

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T R A ILS I D E GA L L E R I E S 5 0TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“I was privileged to photograph this outstanding four-colored polychrome along with the entire collection of the late Richard Howard. Nearly 19 inches in diameter, it took my breath away. Unbroken jewels from 19th century Acoma Pueblo~The Sky City. Masterpieces of Southwestern pottery, they were carried down from the city on the top of the potter’s head and in her hands to a waiting horse and wagon below.”


BILL ANTON

HERB MIGNERY

RIVER RUNNERS

FLANK ATTACK

36 x 48 inches, Oil $40,000

14 x 11 x 10 inches, Bronze, Edition of 9 $5,500

“What is it about the streams and rivers that tumble out of the northern Rockies that is so compelling? Color, texture variation, composition, mood....they seem to embody the very elements of painting. Packing into undisturbed country ribboned by wild water makes one imagine what Eden must have looked like.’’

“Whether on the range with aggressive animals or in the wilderness on a hunting expedition, one must expect the possibility of trouble from any direction.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

9


FRED FELLOWS

J.C. DYE

EARLY MORNING LIGHT

19 x 21 x 14 inches Bronze, Edition of 24 $6,500

ABOVE THE ASPENS

24 x 36 inches, Oil $24,000

“This is a painting of Jerry Bygren packing out the elk he shot in the Swan Valley on the Swan River east of Bigfork, Montana. It had snowed two days before and the valley was silent, with the ripples of the river being the only sound. I rode my horse across the river and got a good photograph of Jerry in the early morning light. I couldn’t wait to get back to the studio to start a painting based on the photo. Jerry is riding his horse Squirrel and leading my pack horse Honkey.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“Last fall, while on a research trip in Yellowstone to sketch and photograph elk, I followed the sounds of a deep and guttural bugle. As I ascended above the aspens directly ahead of me, I heard the sound again. With the sun in my eyes and not enough time to circle above them, I decided to crawl to a vantage point where I could maybe get some photos and just get to see these magnificent animals. Unable to shoot any photos because of the blinding sun, I watched, put my memory in gear and made a few quick sketches. While disappointed that I had no photos, I had a clear vision of the mannerism of both the cow and this huge bull.“


JOHN DEMOTT

RICHARD D. THOMAS

MOUNTAIN MONARCH

MOVING TO SUMMER PASTURE

24 x 20 inches, Oil $9,500

44 x 70 inches, Oil $48,000

“This was a wonderful large bull that I was lucky enough to have had the chance to photograph in Teton National Park several years in a row. He was simply iconic.”

“The Montana Horse Ranch has long been the home of the “Montana Invitational Horse Stampede” - the last great American Horse Drive. Over the past several years things get started with the Annual Spring Horse Roundup and Drive near Willow Creek in the Southern part of Montana. During that period of about 3 days, approximately 350-400 horses are moved from there, through the town of Three Forks, to their summer pastures. This painting is a depiction of that final morning of the drive, as the wranglers were just getting the herd up and moving after their last night outside of Three Forks.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

11


LANNY GRANT

VERYL GOODNIGHT

WILD HAVEN

18 x 24 inches, Oil $5,600 CASCADE CANYON SHADOWS

41 x 48 inches, Oil $19,500

“Late June in Grand Teton National Park brings a profusion of wildflowers to the valley including scarlet gilia, buckwheat, penstemon and lupine blooming among the sage. Evening light filters down Cascade Canyon, accenting the rugged forms of the Cathedral Group; Teewinot, Grand Teton and Mount. Owen.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“In preparation for the 50th anniversary of Trailside, I visited the Spring Creek Wild Horse Management area in Disappointment Valley, just two hours from my home. It is amazing that the horses can not only survive, but actually thrive in this harsh land. Sundance, the white stallion in the painting was particularly stunning with his long, tangled, mane and tail. The bay mare’s foal has been named Haven, thus the title of the painting Wild Haven - representing both the foal’s name and the hope that this piece of land will continue to be a haven in years to come for the few remaining mustangs.”


SHERRY SANDER

KYLE SIMS

MUSSELSHELL VALLEY

PARTY CRASHER

Bronze, Edition of 35, 17 x 15 x 8 inches $3,400

34 x 50 inches, Oil $17,000

“In South Central Montana lies the Musselshell Valley. In the distant past, it was the wintering grounds of the Crow, Blackfeet, and the Gros Ventre. The game is still plentiful aided by an environment of pines bordering meadows of tall grass and outcroppings of sandstone formations through which runs the Musselshell River. In this place on an early Fall day, my husband Loren and I saw a big bull, saddled up with a couple satellite bulls, and 20-30 cows and calves. This elk, with his head aloft, caught wind of us, turned on his haunch and bolted for the Ponderosas.”

“A couple of years ago I spent some time backpacking with friends through the northwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park. We ended up going over a nice pass that had been burned many years ago. As I was walking through this burn patch, I knew immediately that it was going to present some nice opportunities for painting ideas. There were so many diagonals created by the deadfall and interesting openings that were just begging for focal points. So for this scene, I couldn’t help but picture an elk emerging into it and it grew from there. It’s one of those classic examples about how life goes on.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

13


TUCKER SMITH

KENT ULLBERG

PRONGHORN PYRAMID

LOST EAGLE PEAK

16 x 20 inches, Oil $16,000

´The location of this painting, Slide Lake, is one of the 4000 lakes in the Wind River range. Many of them are unnamed. Most of them are memorable. This painting is from my pack trip last summer.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

14 1/2 inches high, Bronze, Edition of 20 $5,200

“When I first came to the United States in 1972 from Africa, my colleagues at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science brought me out on the prairie where I encountered the Pronghorn Antelope for the first time in my life. I had known about them of course, but it was an exciting experience to actually see this iconic animal, unique to the North American Great Plains. Since that time I have spent many hours observing them and in this pyramidal design I attempt to capture their swiftness and elegance.”


ADAM SMITH

ROBERT DUNCAN

CLOSING IN

26 x 36 inches, Acrylic $12,000

“I have painted more cats than any other subject. So much can be said with the look in their eyes. This lion has his eye on something and he means business.”

THE PROVIDER

36 x 48 inches, Oil $25,000

“My painting The Provider depicts a lone brave out on a clear winter day hunting the river bottoms where elk, deer and moose might winter. Even on a cold, bright winter day when it would be much better to stay by a warm fire, the search must go on for the provisions needed for a hungry family. I tried to capture the beauty of winter and of someone in harmony with his world.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

15


BRUCE CHEEVER

Z.S.LIANG

RETURNING HUNTERS - GREEN RIVER, WYOMING

22 x 36 inches, Oil $11,000

“After a long day of pursuing antelope and other small game, Shoshone hunters return to their camp along the Green River. The sun, low on the horizon casts an illuminating glow on the cliffs of the Palisades. There may be rain tonight.”

36 x 24 inches, Oil $23,000

“He is a fearless fighter and a great leader. He is determined to preserve the traditional ways of life for his people. The powerful war medicine he possesses is indicated on his grizzly bear claw necklace and on his war shield.” 16

T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY


LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE

TIM SOLLIDAY

GATHERING

40 x 60 inches, Oil $25,000

“This piece was inspired by the light found in the deserts of the American Southwest. The late afternoon is one of my favorite times to paint. The color of the sunlight turns into a golden hue and affects everything in its path. I was also attracted to this scene by the pattern of the blankets and other patterns in this picture. Trying to put just the right amount of information in the painting without overdoing it is a big undertaking. This piece challenged me on many levels, which is what I hope for with each painting.”

THE BLANKET

30 x 24 inches, Oil $12,500

“In this painting, I was taken by the idea of the great amount of design you find in the American Indian’s costumes. By combining the outdoor light and the interaction of the individuals in the scene, it has a feeling of musical balance and harmony. I also like to combine design in nature with design in costume. In this case, I put a butterfly in to accent these good combinations.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

17


WILLIAM PHILLIPS

BRAD GREENWOOD

MANIFEST DESTINY

39 x 65 x 27 inches, Black & English Walnut, Elm, Mulberry, Eucalyptus, White Oak Twigs, Wood Engraving Reprint, Antique Pulls & Hardware $19,500

LATE SEASON MONSOON

36 x 36 inches, Oil $36,000

“When asked to be a Resident Artist at the Grand Canyon in September/October of 2007, I had the opportunity to witness several of these beautiful storms as they formed late in the afternoon. On one occasion, not only did I observe the beautiful golden Aspen, but also the crashing of thunder followed by three inches of fluffy white snow. It was a delightful combination of three seasons in one storm.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“The Manifest Destiny desk combines a striking array of hardwoods with traditional Old World joinery and historical design. From the carved “bark look” edging to the featured wildlife carving, every detail is meticulously transpired. The proficiency of precision joinery, composition, use of materials, and depth of concept mark the artist’s skills. Other hand made aspects include a light switch integrated into a decorative molding, a peeled buckthorn bark shade lamp, and a unique secret compartment that opens with a hidden dual mechanism. The center drawer is lined with a reprint of an 1871 wood engraving.”


JENNESS CORTEZ

WILLIAM WHITAKER

THE BOOK ROOM

UNION DRUMMER

30 x 40 inches, Acrylic $120,000

24 x 18 inches, Oil $15,000

“Every painting begins with a vision seen in the artist’s mind. Sometimes the finished piece appears in the mind full-blown, and at other times it is amorphous––yet with some beguiling character that begs to be developed. In either case, between that first inspiration and the finished painting lie hours of research, thousands of choices and, of course, the great joy of painting. The process is organic. Even with a well conceived composition in place, the painting has a life of its own and the best ones surprise even the artist with twists and turns that outshine the most clever of plans. It’s as if the creative spirit insinuates itself into the work, wanting to serve its own best interest with solutions that far exceed the artist’s original, limited vision.”

Homage to: Frederic Remington 1861-1909, “A Dash for Timber,” “The Stampede,” Carl Rungius 1869-1959, “On Yukon Waters (On the Lakeshore), George Catlin 1796-1872, “STU-MICK-O-SÚCKS (Buffalo Bull’s Back Fat)” Head Chief, Blood Tribe, James Earle Fraser 1876-1953, “End of the Trail,” Pot, Nicolosa Pena Montoya and Maria Martinez 1912, Pot, Santo Domingo jar c. 1920 Agular sisters Storage jar, Kiua, c. 1800, American clock, Ansonia c. 1880, Western Apache basket, c. 1900, Edward S. Curtis 1868-1952 self portrait, 1899, Frederic Remington (on mantel) Annie Oakley (Phoebe Ann Moses), Frederic Remington (in open book)

“The painting is a bit of Americana - a drummer boy of the American Civil War wearing an overcoat over his regulation musician’s frock coat. The device attached to the white sling around is neck is a drumstick holder. We are celebrating the sesquicentennial of the War Between the States.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

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RALPH OBERG

JULIE BENDER

THE GUARDIAN

16 x 19 inches, Pyrography $3,200

THE MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS

32 x 48 inches, Oil $23,000

“The Mountain Climbers depicts a summer group of Bighorn rams hanging out high above treeline to escape the ewes and lambs, heat, bugs and people. They revel in the freedom of the hills, wandering over ridges and summits with their keen eyes aware of any danger from below. It’s a temporarily egalitarian group of mature males which quickly changes into a fierce competition for dominance every October.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“My portrayal of The Guardian is based on observation of the 2012 rut in the foothills of Colorado. This handsome mature ram had decidedly proven himself most able among his competitors. Having established the prize title, he perched himself in a large grassy area among the rocks and struck an imposing stance, just long enough for those around him to acknowledge and respect his high stature. Pyrography on watercolor paper provided an excellent medium and backdrop in showcasing this strong muscular animal with its natural dark and light sepia tones.”


DAVID MAYER

JOHN SEEREY-LESTER

THE GRAND TETON AT DELTA LAKE

36 x 36 inches, Oil $8,750

“While most glacial lakes are a pristine, bold blue, Delta Lake is a brilliant turquoise color, fed directly by Teton Glacier which carries minerals into the lake. The Grand Teton peak dominates the lake, offering as close of a view as you can get without climbing it.”

CROSSING THE DIVIDE

60 x 36 inches, Oil $67,000

“Bison cross a body of water amidst lily pads, as a morning mist shrouds the scene. I saw this on a visit to Yellowstone National Park, near the Continental Divide. The contrast between the two elements, the masculine bison and the feminine flowers, appealed to me.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

21


MIAN SITU

SCOTT TALLMAN POWERS

DAY LABOR

30 x 27 inches, Oil $9,500

A MARKET DAY IN CANGYUAN

34 x 50 inches, Oil $60,000

“This scene is a market place in Yunnan Province in Southwest China. Most of the people in the painting are from the Wa tribe. In China, Wa people live near the border with Myanmar. They like very bright colors for their costumes and head dress. The local market is a place where people from the vicinity gather together for trading their farm products. It is normally held twice in ten days. Friends and relatives also make it a social gathering.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“I was walking through a small Mexican town and saw a man leaning against a wall with a make-shift backpack slung over his shoulder with tools inside. I could see the miles he had on his hands and the experience in his eyes. His day had just begun as he was picked up and taken to his job. I am sure it would be many hours and little light left when his day would come to an end.”


MATT SMITH

HUIHAN LIU

AT THE FOOT OF THE MINARETS

26 x 16 inches, Oil $7,200

“The Minarets are a landmark in the Sierras west of Mammoth, California. It is an area of surreal beauty. The view depicted in this painting is just south of where we camped.”

40 x 30 inches, Oil $31,000

“Tibetan people dress up in beautiful costumes during a New Year celebration. This painting was inspired by witnessing a Tibetan New Year celebration in the northern region of Gansu and Qinghai province.” W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

23


JOSEPH SULKOWSKI

LINDSAY SCOTT

GUNS AND TROPHIES

50 x 60 inches, Oil $100,000

”As a sporting artist, I have always been fascinated by the exotic nature of the African safari. The vintage guns and trophies of a friend’s collection inspired this painting. I wanted to create an arrangement through color, pattern and texture that would evoke the essence of an age-old sporting tradition and bring it to life in a way that others might find interesting and perhaps a little provocative.”

SILENT DESCENT

42 x 18 inches, Oil $18,500

“As evening approached, the female leopard we had been watching all day silently slipped out of the tree, disappearing into the grass like a shadow, off on a night’s hunting. Capturing the soft evening light and colors made this a very exciting piece for me to paint.” 24

T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY


JIE WEI ZHOU

JAMES JIANG

THE TOY DOCTOR

LITTLE GOOSE GIRL

30 x 40 inches, Oil $20,000

30 x 24 inches, Oil $9,000

“On a typical afternoon in rural China, a grandfather sits on a straw mat, fixing a wooden toy for his grandchildren. His youngest granddaughter eagerly watches his every move while clutching a teddy bear. The grandson perched on a wooden bicycle, stops to see what is happening. The grandfather’s other granddaughter eagerly looks over his shoulder while stringing together a basket of red peppers. Even the family dog stands close by to join in on the action.”

“Trailside Galleries has always been a wondrous place for artists and collectors. I am honored to be a part in celebrating its 50th anniversary, which in fact, brought back the joyous memories of my childhood. This piece is reflective of the happiness that children experience by the simple pleasure of goose watching. The child and the goose are enjoying each other’s company in nature’s purest form.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

25


MIKE MALM

BRENT COTTON

PLEASANT AFTERNOON

WARM AUTUMN EVENING

40 x 48 inches, Oil $14,000

32 x 40 inches, Oil $12,500

“This painting is in harmony with one of my favorite subjects to paint: figures placed in an outdoor setting. I find solace and peace in the beauty of the outdoors. The painting is a reflection of this attitude.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“This piece was inspired by a recent trip to west Virginia during the peak of the fall colors. It depicts Otter Creek in the Otter Creek Wilderness area, a very rugged and beautiful place in the Monongahela National Forest.”


DONNY FINLEY

ROBERT MOORE

HER WEDDING RING

SPRING MEMORIES

14 x 18 inches, Egg Tempera $8,000

30 x 40 inches, Oil $8,000

“My grandmother sits facing away from the viewer lost in her thoughts. She grasps her hands feeling for the ring lost long ago. Behind on her small bed is the quilt she made for my wife and me as a wedding present. The design of the quilt is a wedding ring pattern. The quilt has now been passed on to my first-born daughter who loves hearing the stories of her great grandmother.”

“Beauty is in the subtleties, not the extremes. If you are just using pure yellow and pure violet you have not said anything. There is no relationship, no conversation. The beautiful colors are not going to be in the pure yellow and the pure violet. They are going to be in the twenty steps in between.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

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ARTURO CHAVEZ

DUSTIN VAN WECHEL

BEARBLY COOL WATER

30 x 40 inches, Oil $7,500 CHIRICAHUA SUNRISE

40 x 67 inches, Oil $38,000

“The Chiricahua National Monument is the ideal location for a hideout. Amidst the giant desert boulders and endless crags and crevices, one can imagine the great Apache warriors, Cochise and Geronimo, holding out in safety for years.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“The idea for this painting came to me while spending time in Alaska. Although I might not enjoy crossing the cold waters of a glacial-fed stream, black bear find it completely ‘bearable’.”


GORDON SNIDOW

BILL NEBEKER

COME RAIN OR SHINE, A COWBOY’S WORK IS NEVER DONE

15 x 27 inches, Gouache $28,000

“When raising cattle, the cowboy is at the mercy of the weather. It is always muddy or dusty. As such, Come Rain or Shine, A Cowboy’s Work is Never Done.”

HORSES COME FIRST

28 x 17 x 12 inches, Bronze, Edition of 30 $6,800

“Everyone raised on a ranch or farm learns at an early age that the animals’ needs ALWAYS come before your own. In good weather or bad, Horses Come First.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

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CLARK KELLEY PRICE

CYNTHIA RIGDEN

LULLABY

11 x 18 x 11 inches, Bronze, Edition of 15 $3,500

OUTLAWS

24 x 36 inches, Oil $15,000

“During old time open range trail drives, night guards were required to keep the cattle settled. Singing, whistling, humming or playing a harmonica had a soothing effect on the cattle. This painting depicts the night guard playing his harmonica to help put the cattle to sleep.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“In the early days of ranching, some of the cattle became feral. They were known as outlaws. The only way to gather them was to rope and lead them in to the ranch headquarters. It took a special breed of both men and horses to do this.”


JIM NORTON

CYRUS AFSARY

TRADITION

14 x 18 inches, Oil $12,000

EARLY WINTER

30 x 40 inches, Oil $38,000

“He is looking at you with a proud strong gaze and his thoughts are serious behind the expression in his eyes. Perhaps he is thinking of the preservation of the tribal traditions which need to continue by teaching the children. There are many tribes and each follows their own set of beliefs. It is a culture deeply steeped in centuries old traditions and these are important to preserve for the longevity as a people.”

“It’s an early winter’s day and these hunters are following moose tracks along the fresh snow.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

31


STEVE ATKINSON

DAN BODELSON

NO MORE BEANS

30 x 30 inches, Oil $7,200 “For the 50th Anniversary show, I wanted to do an image that would have a positive and uplifting message. I couldn’t think of one that would be more uplifting than these two old prospectors winning the gold lottery. Happy 50th anniversary Trailside. I’m proud to be represented by such a special and well respected gallery.”

WORK GEAR

30 x 24 inches, Oil, $14,000

“I love to paint burros. I use my burro Mia for a lot of the posing and detail. I change her into lots of different burros. I loved the rigging of this one and made it into a portrait.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY


DEBORAH FELLOWS

HOWARD ROGERS

WILD COW CATCHER

HEADING FOR WINTER PASTURE

35 x 28 x 10 inches, Bronze, Edition of 15 $14,500

30 x 48 inches, Oil $25,000

“In the vast reaches of the American west there are ranches where cattle graze in high and rugged country. During the roundup each spring and fall some livestock are invariably missed. These cattle manage on their own, becoming wild and most times dangerous. There is a special breed of cowboy and horse that have the experience and fortitude necessary to catch these strays. This is the most dangerous job a cowboy can have. Among the ranks of working cowboys, the Wild Cow Catcher is held in the highest regard.”

“After rounding-up three thousand cows from the mountains north of the Bridgers, they were held at the ranch for a week to settle. After the rest, with fifteen cowboys and me and my camera, we set out on a two day, fifty mile drive to winter pasture west of Three Forks , Montana and west of the freezing Madison River. That November on horseback was the coldest I have ever been in my life, but it was a wonderful experience I will cherish for ever.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

33


LORI FOREST

KATHY WIPFLER

AUTUMN’S FIRE

30 x 40 inches, Oil $9,000

“Summer is ending and the “fires” of autumn are in the air. Following ancient rhythms, the elk move down from the high country into the sheltered valleys as the “rut” begins. This bull heads down from Milner Pass in Rocky Mountain National Park to the battlegrounds of the lower elevations.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

SPIRIT OF THE ARID WEST

40 x 50 inches, Oil $16,000

“The stallion is ever watchful of his band of mares. They live by their wit and their wisdom of the ways of the arid west, and can gallop off in an instant.”


GEORGE NORTHUP

ANDREW PETERS

GODS RIVER BROOK TROUT

FLYFISHING THE SNAKE

32 x 22 x 11 inches, Bronze, Edition of 50 $9,000

24 x 30 inches, Oil $9,800

“Gods River Brook Trout is the most recent in the editions of North American Trout Species. The incorporation of trout into a lamp format featuring a hand made copper shade and sculpted finial is unique to my work. My inspiration has been fostered by years as a river and fishing guide and life near aquatic subjects.”

“The Snake River in autumn curves beneath the Tetons toward sunset. Mother Nature has put on her jewelry and a pretty dress for the occasion. The flyrodder wades and casts to rising Cutts but misses the takes, gaping dumbstruck at the beauty wrapped round him.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

35


NANCY GLAZIER

WILLIAM PICKERD

PUEBLO SERIES #13

9 x 19 1/2 inches, Agata Italian Alabaster, African Blackwood, S.S., Fossilized Mammoth Ivory, Kingman Turqouise , Coral & Desert Ironwood $16,000

WEATHERTOP

32 x 36 inches, Oil $19,500

“My idea for this painting was all about freedom and motion; motion of the horses rising up to meet the motion of the sky.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“This vessel, sculpted in Agata Alabaster, is the latest development in an ambitious project titled The Pueblo Series. The series is a tribute to the mysterious Southwest desert dwellers and their ability to adapt to their environment in such a beautiful and harmonious way. The vessel shape is a sweeping metaphor for the various cultures of the desert southwest. The rim design, inspired by the work of the great Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma, represents desert dwellings in their natural beauty. The silver wire is a symbol of the strength and tenacity of the people. The band of texture represents everyday life.”


SUZIE SEEREY-LESTER

SARAH WOODS

WINTER WHITES

18 x 28 inches, Oil $3,500

MOUNTAIN MAJESTY

“One of the most beautiful of all western wildlife is the Trumpeter Swan. Their form is fluid and graceful. When you add the white on white of the mist and the snow it becomes a portrait of simple elegance.”

24 x 36 inches, Oil $15,000

“The American White Pelican is one of the largest birds in North America, with a wing span up to 10 feet. These large white birds have black wing tips, which are often seen only during their graceful flights. Flocks of White Pelicans migrate through Wyoming, often enjoying stops in the lakes and ponds in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park. I wanted to show the majesty of these beautiful birds against the splendor of the Tetons as they fly by.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

37


JOFFA KERR

LINDA ST. CLAIR

RIVER RUN

24 x 48 inches, Oil $5,800

“A little over a year ago I had the wonderful opportunity to go to Katmai, Alaska to view and photograph the grizzly bears. It was the experience of a lifetime. This painting was inspired by this one grizzly that had such beautiful color and form. He really knew how to catch those salmon, too!”

ONE FUN BUN-LARGE

36 inches high, Bronze, Edition of 20 $9,000

“This rabbit is strictly for laughing with a great, good belly laugh. I do these for the fun it provides me as well as kids everywhere (no matter what age).”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY


ALBIN VESELKA

MICHAEL GODFREY

SPRING IN FULL BLOOM

COOL ASPEN SHADOWS

49 x 34 inches, Oil $9,500

40 x 30 inches, Oil $16,000

“I have always been easily moved by nature; the change of the seasons fills me with such inspiration that I find it hard to express in words. Without the more pure form of communication I find in my brush, I’m afraid my feelings would go unexpressed. As my beautiful family retreated to our favorite apple orchard to celebrate spring in full bloom, I found a common theme in my work; the beauty of human interaction with nature, resurrecting itself in this painting. There is so much to feel gratitude for in the people we love and the splendor of the world in which we live.”

“I was on a hike to a canyon area to paint. While stopping to rest in an aspen grove, I realized that I had found what I was looking for. I never made it to the canyon.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

39


ELAINE COFFEE

SUEELLEN ROSS

PRELUDE TO THE 6TH

SYNCHRONIZED SPANIELS

20 x 30 inches, Oil $7,900

13 x 18 inches, Mixed Media $4,500

“This is the paddock during the summer horse race season at Saratoga Race Track, Saratoga, NY. Before each race, owners, trainers and other aficionados gather as horses are saddled and led to the track, a very interesting gathering of people. And it is one of the oldest and most iconic tracks in the country.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are sporty little dogs. Here, three Cavaliers are in hot pursuit of an unseen object-- in unison. Every fiber in their bodies is committed to the task. It is that level of commitment that is the theme of Synchronized Spaniels.”


JESSE POWELL

IAN RAMSAY

GRAYS HARBOR, ABERDEEN, WASHINGTON

18 x 24 inches, Watercolor $2,600

THE BIGWOOD RIVER, IDAHO

40 x 50 inches, Oil $17,000

“I have spent a lot of time in and around Grays Harbor (a bay in Washington state) and especially near the town of Aberdeen. The bay has a great lumbering and shipping history that adds to the interest of the small harbors around its shores. This is one of many scenes that have caught my eye along the Pacific Northwest coast, which is my favorite place to paint.”

“I did the study for this painting on a recent trip to Ketchum, Idaho, where the Bigwood River flows. I was really drawn to the beautiful shapes of the cottonwoods on this meandering river, as well as the variety of greens in the foliage. And the fishing was good that day, which made it even better!”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

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DAN MCCAW

PARIS CAFE

CAFE

53 x 36 inches, Oil $24,000

36 x 24 inches, Oil $8,200

“This painting was an effort to express the solitude and isolation that exists within all of us. Her face is undefined as to represent how little we really know of ourselves let alone others. She sits alone waiting, vulnerable to my projections…. A lover, a friend, a dream unfulfilled or just memories. I am just the waiter and soon someone else will come and sit, falling pray to my imagination.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

DANNY MCCAW

“My work not only deals with the visual but also the subconscious, almost that of a dream like state. The subjects are left ambiguous and vague to let the viewer have their own engagement with the paintings. Within my work, there is an ebb and flow between abstraction and reality.”


CALVIN LIANG

ROBERT JOHNSON

PEONIES

VENICE

24 x 36 inches, Oil $7,600

“Venice may be somewhat of a tourist trap, but it is beautiful to the eye. This scene is surrounded by colorful buildings and dramatic water reflections.”

18 x 34 inches, Oil $5,500

“Peonies have long been one of my favorite flowers to paint. They have all the things that painters love; strong color, interesting shapes, noticeable weight, inspiring variety and lively gestures. I included some of my favorite vessels to create the painting: an antique silver chocolate pot, an old flow blue faceted vase, an Amish salt glazed pot and a 19th century Chinese ginger jar. All were placed on one of my favorite oriental rugs. I loved the challenge of trying to capture all of beauty with just a brush, canvas and paint.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

43


DAVID HALBACH

BONNIE MARRIS

STICKS AND STONES PONY RAIDERS

18 1/2 x 15 inches, Watercolor $15,000

“This scene depicts members of a Sioux tribe quietly following along a river bank in South Dakota. They are approaching an enemy camp, hoping to steal horses.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

24 x 48 inches, Oil $18,000

“Nothing is more enjoyable for me than watching and then painting wolves having fun. They play with sticks, bones and each others’ tails at times.”


DAN MIEDUCH

PAUL MANN

WITHIN THE SHADOWS

20 x 40 inches, Oil $7,000

SOLDIER TRACKS

“Traveling alone, a couple of traders find themselves in a bad situation with hostiles hot on their tails. They make a mad dash for the rocks hoping to find the shelter that could save their necks. Will luck be on their side?”

24 x 36 inches, Oil $18,000

“The presence of the army in the ancestral land of the Plains tribes foreshadowed the arrival of hordes of white settlers, people who would seek ownership of the land and desecrate it with mineral mines, ranches and settlements. It was the harbinger of the end of the horse culture as a way of life.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

45


SHAWN CAMERON

BRENDA MURPHY

A MEETING OF THE MINDS

11 x 16 inches, Pencil $4,500 UNDER AUTUMN SKIES

30 x 40 inches, Oil $11,300

“The biggest fall event on ranches is roundup. Intense weeks are spent gathering pastures in preparation for sorting calves off and shipping. It’s pay day. Weather is always a factor in these important activities, particularly Under Autumn Skies.”

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T R A IL S I D E G A L L E R I E S 50TH AN N IV ERS ARY

“At most ranches, springtime is branding time. At the Saunder’s Ranch in Weatherford, TX, three flankers gather during a pause in the routine. It’s a welcome break from the sun that allows just enough time to share a fast story or solve the world’s problems. Whatever the conversation was about, it must have had a humorous twist.”


GENE ZESCH

ADRIANO MANOCHIA

WELL, IS THE GRASS ANY GREENER ON THIS SIDE

9 x 14 x 8 inches, Woodcarving $9,000

“This carving represents the same tragic- comic situations that I have carved during the past 50 years. I was born during the great depression which was followed by the worst drought ever recorded in Texas history. The carvings tell of the stubborn ranchers who still exist, although barely.”

ALMOST THE SEASON

12 x 9 inches, Oil $1,850

“While rummaging through dusty old magazines in an antique store, I came across this illustration that caught my interest. It spoke of Wild West cowboys’ chases in pursuit of elusive preys. The old creased mule deer photo, already in my collection, and the ornate bit a friend let me borrow, well complimented the story I wanted to tell with my brushes, while the rough wood planks of the rustic barn offered a contrasting texture and added warmth to the still life.”

W W W. T R A ILSIDEGA LLER IES . C O M

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T

ed and I are pleased to have been asked to participate in Trailside Galleries 50th Anniversary celebrations. We were privileged to own, operate and expand the galleries from 1971-1994 and to be on the cusp of the Western Art movement in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and Scottsdale, Arizona. We opened a gallery in the Scottsdale Mall in 1975, realizing the need for year round business. At that time, Trailside in Jackson Hole was just a seasonal four month operation. Several of the top artists we represented during our stewardship of the gallery are sadly no longer with us; however, they are remembered as true American Master Artists. They include such luminaries as John Clymer, Robert Lougheed, Tom Lovell, R. Brownell McGrew, Carl Roters, Reynold Brown, Charlie Dye, Bill Owen, John Hampton, Rod Goebel and Harry Jackson. To Trailside’s credit, many artists who began their careers at the gallery, continue to be represented, including Robert Duncan, Veryl Goodnight, Bill Nebeker, Fred Fellows, Jim Norton, Curt Walters and Gene Zesch to name a few. Our daughter, Jennifer Mollring Sands, joined the gallery while still in college and was a great help to us. In 1976, we began publishing an annual catalog “The Artists of Trailside Galleries” which we continued to produce for a decade with her help. Jennifer also set up and managed our satellite gallery in Terminal III of the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, which at that time was the first fine arts gallery in an airport anywhere in the world. In those days, we worked diligently to stay in constant touch with our artists and help them when needed. Ted and I viewed the gallery artists as extended family, and to this day, they are dear friends. We are so pleased to see them continue to gain national and international recognition, fame and success. Trailside Galleries is fortunate to have Maryvonne Leshe at the helm. Maryvonne worked with us for seventeen years and continues to operate the gallery in the same tradition of excellence. We have many fond memories of our days at the galleries and to this day, we always get so much enjoyment when we visit the Jackson and Scottsdale locations. Congratulations to everyone that has lent so much to the growth and success of Trailside Galleries over the past fifty years.

CHRISTINE MOLLRING

ARTIST INDEX

DAVID HALBACH, 44

IAN RAMSAY, 41

JAMES JIANG, 25

CYNTHIA RIGDEN, 30

BILL ANTON, 9

ROBERT JOHNSON, 43

HOWARD ROGERS, 33

CYRUS AFSARY, 31

JOFFA KERR, 38

SUEELLEN ROSS, 40

STEVE ATKINSON, 32

FRANCOIS KOCH, 6

SHERRY SANDER, 13

JULIE BENDER, 20

CALVIN LIANG, 43

LINDSAY SCOTT, 24

DAN BODELSON, 32

Z.S.LIANG, 16

JOHN SEEREY-LESTER, 21

CARL BRENDERS, 7

HUIHAN LIU, 23

SUZIE SEEREY-LESTER, 37

SHAWN CAMERON, 46

MIKE MALM, 26

KYLE SIMS, 13

KEN CARLSON, 6

ADRIANO MANOCHIA, 47

MIAN SITU, 22

ARTURO CHAVEZ, 28

PAUL MANN, 45

ADAM SMITH, 15

BRUCE CHEEVER, 16

BONNIE MARRIS, 44

DANIEL SMITH, 7

ELAINE COFFEE, 40

DAVID MAYER, 21

MATT SMITH, 23

JENNESS CORTEZ, 19

DAN MIEDUCH, 45

TUCKER SMITH, 14

BRENT COTTON, 26

DAN MCCAW, 42

GORDON SNIDOW, 29

STAN DAVIS, 8

DANNY MCCAW, 42

TIM SOLLIDAY, 17

JOHN DEMOTT, 11

HERB MIGNERY, 9

LINDA ST. CLAIR, 38

PATRICIA DOBSON, 8

ROBERT MOORE, 27

JOSEPH SULKOWSKI, 24

ROBERT DUNCAN, 15

JAMES MORGAN, 4

SCOTT TALLMAN POWERS, 22

J.C. DYE, 10

BRENDA MURPHY, 46

RICHARD D. THOMAS, 11

DEBORAH FELLOWS, 33

BILL NEBEKER, 29

KENT ULLBERG, 14

FRED FELLOWS, 10

GEORGE NORTHUP, 35

DUSTIN VAN WECHEL, 28

DONNY FINLEY, 27

JIM NORTON, 31

ALBIN VESELKA, 39

LORI FOREST, 34

RALPH OBERG, 20

CURT WALTERS, 5

NANCY GLAZIER, 36

ANDREW PETERS, 35

MORGAN WEISTLING, 5

VERYL GOODNIGHT, 12

JOANN PERALTA, 4

WILLIAM WHITAKER, 19

LANNY GRANT, 12

WILLIAM PHILLIPS, 18

KATHY WIPFLER, 34

BRAD GREENWOOD, 18

WILLIAM PICKERD, 36

SARAH WOODS, 37

MICHAEL GODFREY, 39

JESSE POWELL, 41

GENE ZESCH, 47

LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE, 17

CLARK KELLEY PRICE, 30

JIE WEI ZHOU, 25


Profile for Kimberly Fletcher

Trailside Galleries-50th Anniversary Catalog-September 2013  

Trailside Galleries-50th Anniversary Catalog-September 2013  

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