Atlanta School Guide Summer-Fall 2022

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Summer/Fall 2022

Atlanta’s Leading Education Resource

LEARNING THAT GOES BEYOND ACADEMICS FINDING THE RIGHT FIT FOR

KIDS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

CHARTER SCHOOL ADVANTAGE

EXPANDING YOUR CHILD’S OPTIONS

FIELD & STU TRIPS DE TOURSNT COVERING: Independent | Boarding | Public | Charter | Early Education | Summer Camps | Field Trips and More




CONTENTS

SUMMER/FALL 2022

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FEATURES

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In Every Issue

Building Character Many Atlanta schools incorporate some form of character education, teaching students to be involved and respect others.

Helping Kids with Learning Disabilities Learn the process for how to select the best special needs school for children with learning difficulties.

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The Charter School Advantage Discover the benefits of a charter school education and why many parents choose this type of public education option for their child.

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6 How to Use This Guide 8 Critical Communication 14 Special Needs Resources 19 Headmaster’s Corner Timothy Wiens of Mount Paran Christian School

34 Independent Schools At a Glance Boarding School Directory 64 74 Public Schools by County 85 Educational Resources Tutoring, summer camps and activities, field trips and more.

90 Advertiser Index



HOW TO

Use This Guide Find an Independent School in

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Metro Atlanta Area Map To search for independent schools by region or neighborhood, turn to page 32 and use the color-coded map to direct you to each region’s page number.

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Education At a Glance

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Region Maps and Listings

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Easy Steps!

Once you’ve selected your region of interest, the charts beginning on page 34 include a comparison of features for each school in that region, along with the page number for each school’s ad.

Divided into regions of Atlanta, the color-coded maps beginning on page 37 provide each school’s location and page number for their ad.

Advertiser Index To find a school or resource by name, turn to the advertiser index on page 90 to find the appropriate page number.

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We gratefully thank our advertisers for their support of Atlanta School Guide. Publisher/President PATRICK KILLAM Editor EVERETT CATTS Marketing & Promotions JEFF THOMPSON Account Directors KRISTY JACOBS KATE HARPER Contributing Writers DANIEL BEAUREGARD, KEVIN FOREST MOREAU, DONNA NEALE

TO ADVERTISE CALL

770-992-0273 Space closing for Winter/Spring 2023 issue: October 10, 2022 Atlanta School Guide, Summer/Fall 2022, Volume 17, Issue 2. Published bi-annually by Killam Publishing, Inc., 200 Market Place, Suite 230, Roswell, GA 30075. Atlanta School Guide assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Information may have changed since press time, so please verify all information when contacting a school or educational resource. Reproduction in whole or in part of any elements of this publication is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. © 2022 Killam Publishing, Inc. For additional copies, further information or advertising, please contact:

KILLAM PUBLISHING, INC. P: 770-992-0273 F: 844-706-1545 info@killampublishing.com AtlantaSchoolGuide.com


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Critical Communication

Trends and Happenings in Georgia Education What You Need to Know to Stay Up to Date With Atlanta and Georgia Education Gwinnett Students Design Games for Kids With Autism Students from the Computer Science Club at Gwinnett County’s Mill Creek High School recently created MakingGS, a series of educational video games for young people with autism. The games are designed to help students with autism work together in a safe and welcoming environment. Woodward Senior Receives Science Honor Woodward Academy senior Samuel Jung was named a top 300 scholar in the 81st annual Regeneron Science Talent Search in January. This 1,900-entrant science and mathematics competition recognizes the country’s most promising high school seniors who are creating scientific solutions to our most pressing challenges. 8

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Ansley School Hosts Fundraising Gala The Ansley School hosted its inaugural Our Kids Gala at Clark Atlanta University on March 26. The event, hosted by Cara Kneer of WXIA-TV’s “Atlanta & Company,” was a fundraiser for the private, tuition-free school, which serves children whose families have experienced homelessness. Atlanta Business Chronicle Lists Top Independent Schools The Atlanta Business Chronicle compiled a list of the city’s 50 largest independent schools in January, based on total enrollment for the 2021-22 school year. Woodward Academy topped the list with an enrollment of 2,525 students. The Westminster Schools, Greater Atlanta Christian, The Lovett School and Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School rounded out the top 5.

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Student Artwork Showcased at the Dogwood Festival The Atlanta High School Art Exhibition showcased nearly 200 works of art from metro Atlanta high school students in early April. The juried exhibition, part of the annual Atlanta Dogwood Festival, received over 700 entries from 84 schools. “Coral,” a work by Riverwood senior Olivia Pryor, won Best of Show. DeKalb Teacher Gets $1,000 Grant Kendall Xides, a STEM teacher at Oak Grove Elementary, is the latest recipient of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Conservation Teacher of the Year Grant. The $1,000 grant will go toward restoring the Birdsong Nature Trail. Mount Paran Unveils Innovation Center Mount Paran Christian School opened its brand-


new Murray Innovation Center in January. The center features more than 23,000 square feet of space designed to encourage learning, testing, collaboration and outside-the-box thinking to help Mount Paran students prepare for careers in the fast-growing field of STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics). Fulton School to Offer “Option B” Diploma McClarin High School in Fulton County is undergoing a $25 million renovation to update classrooms and add lab spaces. It will reopen as a “middle college” offering job training through a technical col-

lege as an alternative way for students to earn a high school diploma. Capstone Featured on Lifetime Channel Capstone Academy, an Atlanta independent school for grades 5-12, was featured in a December episode of Lifetime Channel’s morning show “The Balancing Act.” The school appeared in a local segment spotlighting its untraditional schedule, smaller class sizes and other innovations. Atlanta Earmarks $5M for Early Education Newly elected Atlanta Mayor Andre Dickens recently announced that the

city is investing $5 million in early childhood education to help ensure that children begin school on a level playing field. The mayor challenged Atlanta Public Schools and private philanthropists to match the city’s investment. CIS Atlanta Receives $4 Million Gift Communities in Schools of Atlanta, a nonprofit organization that works to help students overcome learning obstacles, recently received a $4 million gift from philanthropist MacKenzie Scott. The gift will go toward its efforts to improve graduation rates in 62 metro-area public schools.

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Critical Communication

Education 101

Terms to Know in Your Search for the Right Educational Experience for Your Child CHARTER SCHOOL A tax-supported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for parents in the community. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING An educational approach using applied, hands-on methods of learning. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) A specifically designed comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while instilling a global perspective in its students. MAGNET SCHOOL A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability. MONTESSORI A school following the principles developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, self-reliance and independence of children. SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children who have mild to moderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multisensory learning methods.

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ACCREDITATION Official certification that guarantees a school provides an education of a reasonably high quality. Schools must prove levels of quality and maintain continuous standards of improvement. ACT An alternative to the SAT, this national college admissions examination consists of subject area tests in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science, with an optional 40-minute writing test. COLLEGE AND CAREER READY PERFORMANCE INDEX (CCRPI) Georgia’s annual tool for measuring how well its schools, districts, and the state are preparing students for the next educational level.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Education that applies to children from birth to age 8, focusing specifically on their development, including physical, emotional, sensory, communicative, cognitive and social needs. GEORGIA MILESTONES Tests designed to measure how well students in grades 3 through 12 acquire the skills and knowledge outlined in the state-adopted content standards. HOPE SCHOLARSHIP (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) A scholarship in Georgia, funded by the Georgia Lottery, that rewards academically achieving students with financial assistance to attend a degree, diploma, or certificate program at eligible public and private Georgia colleges and universities.

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT (ESSA) A federal law passed in 2015 replacing the No Child Left Behind Act, designed to ensure that all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a quality education and meet state academic proficiency standards. PSAT A standardized test that offers students practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and allows them to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program. SAT This standardized test measures the writing and language, reading and mathematical reasoning skills of students planning to attend college. SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST (SSAT) Assesses the verbal, math, and reading abilities of students seeking to enroll in an independent school.

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Deciphering Associations and Organizations Many local and national organizations work to bring out the best in summer camps and public, private and boarding schools by identifying schools that meet certain standards through accreditation. These groups also set policies, research educational advancements and offer services to the educational communities both in Atlanta and in Georgia. The following are just some of the associations and organizations you should know in your search for the best educational experience for your child. The Association of Boarding Schools (TABS) boardingschools.com This organization of 250 boarding schools serves the professional development needs of boarding schools and provides information to potential students and their families. Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) ami-global.org Recognizes and provides 12

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support, training and development to schools that strongly adhere to Montessori method principles and practices. Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools (AAAIS) aaais.org Promotes the highest standards and best administrative practices for accredited independent schools in the metro Atlanta area.

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Cognia cognia.org Formed from the merger of two organizations (AdvancED and Measured Progress), it advances education excellence through accreditation and school improvement initiatives. Department of Education (DOE) gadoe.org A statewide, policy-driven organization governing the public school system of education in Georgia for grades K-12. Georgia Association of Christian Schools (GACS) gacs.org Uses generally accepted indicators of quality, voluntary self-improvement and peer review to measure Christian schools. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC) gapsec.org This state organization of independent schools for students with learning disabilities maintains a code of ethics and shares information about programs at member schools. Georgia Independent School Association (GISA) gisaschools.org An association of Georgia’s private, independent and parochial schools, dedicated


to serving the professional growth, advocacy and interscholastic needs of member schools. National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) naeyc.org A professional membership organization working to promote high-quality early learning for all young children, birth through age 8, by connecting early childhood practice, policy, and research. National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) nais.org A membership association

providing research, leadership and governance guidance and professional development opportunities for school and board leaders in U.S. independent schools. National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC) napsec.org Represents private specialized education programs by promoting quality programs and services for individuals with disabilities and their families.

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) sacs.org The recognized regional accrediting body for both public and private schools in the 11 U.S. Southern states. Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS) sais.org Provides accreditation services, professional growth opportunities and leadership development programs for 375 independent U.S. schools.

For more information about these and other organizations and associations that ensure quality education among camps and schools, visit the websites of the Georgia Department of Education (gadoe.org) or the U.S. Department of Education (ed.gov).

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Critical Communication

Special Needs

Resources Information on Learning Disabilities, Education Options and More What is a Learning Disability? A learning disability is a neurological disorder that affects how your child processes certain information. Children with learning disabilities are as smart as or even smarter than other children, but may face challenges with reading, writing, spelling, reasoning and other functions. As a result, they often struggle to achieve in traditional classrooms. There are many types of learning disabilities, from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and dyslexia to more serious forms such as autism. 14

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What is a Special Needs School? Special needs schools are those that serve children who struggle with learning disabilities or don’t perform well in a conventional school environment. These schools use alternative approaches to instruction in order to help children learn more effectively and also achieve success in the classroom and in social settings. Other schools don’t specifically target those with learning disabilities, but may teach different kinds of students who have had difficulty learning in a typical class-


room setting. Others may teach average or even above-average learners while also offering additional programs and classes for students with learning differences.

ability, it’s critical to have him or her evaluated by a mental health professional. A diagnosis is necessary in order to address the child’s educational needs.

How to Tell if Your Child Has a Special After a Diagnosis: What’s Next? Needs Situation If your child is diagnosed with a learning disFirst, it’s important to identify your child’s ability and attends public school, talk with specific challenges. Students who exhibit the principal, school counselor or another average or above-average intelligence but administrator about developing an Individuoften seem distracted and don’t peralized Education Program (IEP). All public schools are required to creform well in a traditional classroom setting may be ate an IEP for students with struggling with dyslexia, learning disabilities who Asperger’s syndrome, A professional meet special education requirements. An IEP is a ADHD or some other evaluation is document that specifies disorder that affects their ability to learn effeccrucial in order your child’s learning situatively. Also, disruptive or tion and educational needs to evaluate aggressive children may and outlines a course of be exhibiting frustration action for teachers and your child’s brought on by a learning other professionals to foleducational disability. low to help make sure your child learns to the best of If you suspect your child needs. his or her ability. u may have a learning disatlantaschoolguide.com

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Critical Communication If you feel your local public school isn’t the right environment for your child or simply want to explore all your options, there are many quality independent schools in metro Atlanta devoted to helping children with special needs and learning issues. Visit the Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children’s website (gapsec.org) or our listings for special needs schools on page 90 to help you with your search.

needs education. Independent special needs schools can offer more individualized instruction and a more structured and predictable environment, and are likely to address nonacademic issues such as social skills and self-esteem. As you begin searching for the right school for your child’s situation, here are some questions to keep in mind: • Will your child fare better in a school that focuses on his or her specific learning disability, or would you rather that he or she be able to interact with students with a wide range of learning capabilities? • Does the school serve a specific age range or work with students on all grade levels? Many students with learning disabilities have trouble transitioning to new schools.

How Do I Find the Right School? All special needs schools are not the same. The first step is to identify those schools that can address your child’s specific learning difficulty, and offer the level of special needs instruction that you (and perhaps a professional) feel is best for your child. You may be more comfortable enrolling your child in a school that focuses specifically on his or her needs, or you may want a more diverse environment where he or she can interact with many different kinds of students. Familiarize yourself with the different options offered by each kind of school. Traditional indeIdentify those pendent schools that offer special needs schools that programs as part of a can best larger curriculum can offer that kind of enviaddress your ronment, but may have larger class sizes than child’s specific schools that specialize learning in specific learning disabilities. These kinds of difficulty. schools may also focus more on academics than on the therapeutic aspects of special 16

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Continued on page 18 u


COMMON SPECIAL NEEDS TERMS Asperger’s Syndrome: A developmental disorder on the autism spectrum, characterized by high intelligence, impaired social skills and repetitive patterns of behavior and interest.

Individualized Educational Program (IEP): A written statement that outlines the needs of a public school student with learning disabilities and creates a customized plan for meeting those needs.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): A strain of ADHD (see below) marked by a difficulty maintaining focus or concentration and frequent or consistent fatigue. ADD differs from ADHD in that hyperactivity or impulse-control issues are markedly decreased.

Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): The federal law that governs how states and public education agencies that accept funding under the law address the educational needs of students with disabilities.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A chronic condition that includes hyperactivity, impulsive behavior and difficulty keeping one’s attention focused.

Learning Disability: A neurological condition that affects how one processes information.

Autism: A developmental disorder that affects the ability to communicate and interact with others, accompanied by rigid, repetitive behavior patterns. Dyslexia: A learning disability that impairs one’s ability to read. Georgia Association of Private Schools for Exceptional Children (GAPSEC): An organization of independent schools serving students with learning disabilities and differences. Georgia Special Needs Scholarship (GSNS): A school-choice scholarship program for special needs students being served by an IEP in Georgia public schools.

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Critical Communication • D oes the school offer a variety of extracurricular activities, including arts and sports programs? • Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? • Is the staff certified to instruct special needs children or those with your child’s specific learning difficulty? • Does the school focus more on academics or on addressing the child’s therapeutic needs? Financial Assistance Many independent special needs schools participate in the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship program (GSNS), a school choice program available to special needs students attending Georgia public schools. It offers funds to offset tuition and

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fees at participating private schools authorized by the State Board of Education. According to the Georgia Department of Education, scholarship amounts range from $2,500 to $13,500, with an average amount of around $6,000. The Qualified Education Expense Tax Credit program provides another scholarship option. Donations are made to an organization known as a Georgia Student Scholarship Organization (GaSSO), which uses the money to award scholarships to students in pre-K through grade 12. Many schools also offer their own scholarships or tuition assistance programs as well. Contact individual schools for details. For more information on special needs schools and resources, please see our listings on page 90.


Headmaster’s Corner

Timothy Wiens

Head of School, Mount Paran Christian School

Head of School of MPCS since July 2018, Dr. Timothy Wiens has 28 years of experience as an educator and administrator in K-12 and postsecondary education. He holds a Master’s degree in Education from Bethel University, a Doctorate in Education from Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, and a MBA from the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School in England.

What is your educational philosophy? I believe the purpose of education is to prepare students to flourish in this world. A K-12 education is meant to prepare students broadly, to understand the world around them, to engage the world in its many forms and functions and to understand the complexities of a rapidly changing world. What do you love most about your job? I love being around students and seeing the impact their teachers have upon their thinking and their lives in general. A teacher’s impact is profound and can never be underestimated. How is the field of education changing? Technology has dramatically changed education. I believe education is inherently relational. Educators need to find the right balance between the personal and the technical, knowing both are important, but also understanding the importance of community and relationships.

How can parents best contribute to the education process? The more/better we can engage them in the life of the school and communicate clearly together, the better the education we as a school can provide. What advice would you offer parents about their children’s education? Find a school that meets their children’s particular needs, not simply their desires. Find a school that can truly help your child flourish. THE ESSENTIALS: MOUNT PARAN CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Emphasis: MPCS is a college-preparatory Christian school that seeks to prepare servantleaders to honor God. Year Founded: 1976 Grades: PK3-12 Students: 1,255 Avg. Class Size: 14-20

Tuition Range: $4,378-$22,184 Accreditations or Affiliations: Cognia, SAIS, CESA, NAIS, SACS, GISA, GHSA Location: 1275 Stanley Road, Kennesaw, GA 30152 Contact: 770-578-0182, mtparanschool.com

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CHARACTER EDUCATION CREATING MORE THAN JUST GOOD STUDENTS BY DANIEL BEAUREGARD

For many parents, a good education means much more than academics. While reading, math and science are all important, having their child learn about such values as kindness, respect and empathy for others is just as important, if not more so. Fortunately, most Atlanta-area public and independent schools incorporate some form of character 20

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education in their curricula, placing an emphasis on guiding children to become caring, involved members of society. This is an area in which Georgia has led the way. The state devotes the entire month of September to the importance of character. Ten years ago, a group of students and teachers at Cobb County’s Durham Middle


School wrote their state senator, proposing a “Georgia Day” to honor character and good choices. Gov. Nathan Deal extended the idea to a whole month spotlighting state history and the positive character traits of Georgians past and present. In March 2012, Georgia became the first state to recognize and dedicate an entire month to history and character. Georgia maintains this focus throughout the school year in its public-school curriculum. The Georgia Department of Education mandates character education as part of its Georgia Quality Core Curriculum Standards, required in elementary, middle and high schools throughout the state. This “character curriculum” focuses on citizenship, respect for others and respect for oneself. The citizenship portion stresses the importance of such values as democracy, respect for authority, equality, justice, liberty, patriotism and respect for the natural environment. Students learn to respect others with an emphasis on altruism, honesty and integrity, and are taught to respect themselves through self-esteem, accountability and a strong work ethic. The Cobb County School District boasts its own focus on character development, with a calendar that emphasizes different character traits on a rotating basis throughout the school year, including respect, integrity and responsibility, among others. Instead of students receiving a separate lecture on self-respect, that lesson is incorporated into the regular curriculum, across all disciplines. As students reach high school, a leadership development class called Principled Thinking focuses on developing character-driven skills to enable young adults to become positive leaders in their schools and communities.

A LARGER PERSPECTIVE That approach is similar to the one taken by the Atlanta International School (AIS), an independent school in Buckhead that uses the framework of the International Baccalaureate (IB) program to instill positive character traits in its students. At the core of this program is the goal of developing students who will be ready to create a better world through intercultural understanding and respect. At AIS, the foundation is laid early: The Personal Social Education component of its Early Years program gives young learners models, methods and a vocabulary for handling social and emotional issues in a constructive way. As students continue, each grade’s IB program focuses on several distinct traits such as communication, open-mindedness and risk-taking. At the beginning of each year, teachers work these principles into their lesson plans with an eye to shaping students into ideal global citizens

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who will use their knowledge to make a difference in the world and in their community. At McGinnis Woods Country Day School in Alpharetta, which has infants through eighth-graders, students have character education classes with a counselor each week, from pre-kindergarten through the eighth grade. The classes start in pre-K with teaching subjects such as how to be kind, how to resolve an issue and how to deal with others who are not kind, says Principal Mary Johnson. “With our older children … we’ll go into things like digital safety so they will not say things on Twitter or Snapchat that are rude to others or inappropriate, being mindful of those things because they can stay there forever.” she says. “We do things like exploring careers.” The school also promotes character

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education through its morning announcements, which include the character word of the month, and by honoring a student as a Citizen of the Month for exhibiting strong character traits. RESPECTING DIFFERENCES Along with thinking for oneself and learning from failure, learning to respect the viewpoints of others is a key component of character-based education. At AIS, students are exposed to other cultures and different viewpoints, and learn to value others’ opinions, even when they don’t agree with them. Diversity is a core value at other schools, including Woodward Academy in College Park and The Galloway School in Atlanta. LEARNING FROM MISTAKES Lynn Mandelbaum, Galloway’s early learn-


ing program, which includes an ethics component. The program is taught as a separate class in pre-K and the eighth grade (with plans to add a fourth-grade class starting this fall) and integrated into the curriculum of other classes in all other grades. That includes a year-long curriculum as part of a capstone course for the upper school, says Jennifer Knox, Woodward’s director of character education and the Ron M. Brill chair of ethical leadership. The program asks students to look at themselves and try to remain calm in highstress situations. “What’s going on that relates to emotions ... to navigating those emotions? How do we recognize those? How do we respond when an emotion becomes difficult?” Knox says, adding it’s about making informed decisions. ing counselor, says she’s seen a change in the way character education has been taught in the past 10 to 20 years. “There’s much more of a focus on other people’s points of view and diverse thought. Understanding how different people’s cultures will have an impact or express an emotion or how they celebrate and recognize and interact with others,” she says, adding children have more power in today’s program. Galloway’s program focuses on social emotional learning (SEL), the field within education that promotes social and emotional skills as essential to learning and life outcomes, to encourage students to come up with their own ideas and learn from their mistakes. It’s taught in pre-kindergarten through the fourth grade, both through a separate class and embedded into other class curricula. Starting in the fifth grade, it’s included in the school’s advisory program within each class. Woodward takes SEL one step further with its social, emotional and ethical learn-

FOR MORE INFORMATION For a look at the Georgia Department of Education’s Quality Core Curriculum materials, including information on its Character Education program, visit georgiastandards.org/ standards/pages/qcc.aspx. For information on the Georgia Community Foundation’s history of character education in the state’s public schools, visit https://www.georgiacf.org/ educational_freedom/page/ character-education. For more information about the Character.org 11 principles and program, visit the website. atlantaschoolguide.com

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Special Needs School

BY DONNA NEALE

SELECTING THE RIGHT FIT FOR CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES

C

hoosing a school for your child can be a complex process for any family, but it’s especially true if your son or daughter has a learning disability or struggles to learn effectively in a conventional school setting. Identifying the nature of your child’s difficulties and sorting through available educational options can be daunting tasks. Fortunately, the Atlanta area boasts a large number of public and independent schools equipped to address the challenges that these students can face, from specific disabilities such as autism, dyslexia and speech and hearing difficulties to emotional and behavior disorders. 24

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IDENTIFYING THE ISSUE The first step to securing the best education for your struggling child is to pinpoint his or her issues. If your student exhibits average or above-average intelligence but doesn’t perform well in a traditional classroom setting, there may be a diagnosable reason such as dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Asperger’s syndrome or vision or hearing difficulties. Don’t be afraid to request a professional evaluation. If parents and teachers are worried about a smart child who is struggling to learn or gain skills, a psycho-educational evaluation, which can provide a path to discovering what his or her learning disability is,


may be needed. However, “the first thing parents need to do, and surprisingly often don’t do, is have a conversation with their child’s teacher, a very specific conversation to gauge what the teacher is seeing in the classroom,” says Amy Zaring, director of Woodward Academy’s Transition Learning Support Program, which works with grades 2-8 students with complex learning profiles and diagnosed learning differences. “It’s also important to pay attention to their child’s state and standardized test results.” When choosing an evaluator, Catherine Trapani, Ph.D., head of The Piedmont School of Atlanta, advocates thoughtful decision-making. “Take the time to find out about the professional’s credentials, including where the professional received education and training, the kind of childhood disorders they were particularly trained to evaluate, and how long they have been working in the field,” she says. If your child’s testing results in the diagnosis of an eligible special education disability, and your child is currently enrolled in a public school, an Individualized Education Program (IEP) statement will be developed. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires all U.S. public schools to provide an IEP for learning-disabled students who meet special education requirements. Working with the parents, the educational system creates an IEP that details how the child learns, sets measurable goals and outlines what teachers and other professionals can do to help the student learn more successfully.

students with learning disabilities who learn in different ways?” asks Betsy Box, admissions director and director emeritus of The Bedford School. For instance, some schools are tailored to a specific disability. The Schenck School serves students with dyslexia, while Piedmont serves typical and bright children with autism, learning disabilities and attention deficits. Mill Springs Academy and The Howard School cater to students with learning difficulties who plan go to college. The Cottage School focuses on overall adult success, providing a comprehensive collegepreparatory curriculum as well as vocational and special “hands-on” classes for students with mild to moderate learning difficulties. Other schools don’t specifically target those with learning disabilities, but have programs in place to help those students. Woodward, for example, provides a unique learning environment for students with mild to moderate dyslexia, dysgraphia and dyscalculia (among other diagnoses) within a conventional college-preparatory school setting. Its Transition Learning Support Program allows younger students to learn

SEARCHING FOR THE RIGHT SCHOOL When interviewing potential schools, ask questions about learning techniques, environment and focus. “Is the school more geared for students with strong academics and poor social skills, or is it more for atlantaschoolguide.com

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can prove invaluable. “Go deeper and consider the lifelong goals of the family,” says Trapani.

the same curriculum as other Woodward students, but the material is taught in ways that suit their individual needs and learning styles. The program aims to equip these students to merge into the traditional classroom for high school. Parents will want to take other factors into consideration, as well. Are the teachers certified to instruct special education or specialneeds children? Is the school accredited? If so, by which organizations? Does the school offer financial assistance or scholarships? Are there a variety of sports, after-school activities and/or arts programs? Are there summer programs? Does the school serve a specific age range, or work with students on all grade levels? As you begin compiling your short list of potential schools, don’t be shy about consulting with professionals. Your child’s doctor, counselor or specialized tutor may have advice about school programs that relate to your child’s needs. Look into foundations or local support groups for your child’s disabilities and make connections with others who have traveled your path. Their experiences 26

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MAKING A DECISION Visiting the schools you’re interested in is a crucial step, as talking to the staff will give you a sense of how they interact with students. Make an appointment, and come prepared. In addition to the results of a psychological exam or an IEP, bring a sample of the child’s schoolwork and a willingness to candidly discuss your child’s needs. Ask questions. Take notes. See for yourself if the physical setting and overall atmosphere make you and your child feel comfortable. “Parents can tour the school and see the learning taking place,” says Debbi Scarborough, co-founder and headmaster of the Cumberland Academy of Georgia. “They know their child and will get a sense of if the child’s going to fit in.” Zaring agrees. “I believe it’s important for a child to experience the culture of the school while also creating some enthusiasm in the child for the co-curriculars the school offers.” Once parents have done the work and gone through these important steps, the final choice may be easier than they think. “Parents know their children better than anyone,” says Box of The Bedford School. “There may be more than one school that could be appropriate for your child. Go with the school that you think will work best for your child. Go with your gut.” For additional information on learning disabilities and special needs resources, including financial assistance options and a list of schools, please see our Special Needs section on page 14, and a list of special needs advertisers in this issue on page 90.


SPECIAL NEEDS RESOURCES

ABLE KIDS Since 2016, ABLE Kids has been dedicated to helping children with autism Achieve Beyond Life’s Expectations. They primarily serve children between 2 and 6 years old who have been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and need 30 or more hours a

week of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Services. In order to meet all of your child’s needs, they also offer Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and Psychological Evaluation Services. ABLE Kids currently has locations in Roswell, Tucker and Chamblee and is still growing in the Atlanta region. ABLE Kids will walk your family through every step of the journey! Call today for a free consultation: 404-905-7220. For more information visit ablekids.com.

THE SCHENCK SCHOOL

The Schenck School builds a solid educational foundation for students with dyslexia and helps its students develop their rich potential. Founded by David Schenck in 1959, it is regarded as one of the top elementary schools in the U.S. for dyslexic students. The school focuses on accelerated remediation of dyslexia using The Schenck School Reading Model, a highly diagnostic and prescriptive application of the Orton-Gillingham Approach with small group instruction

across all subjects. Critical to student success is a specialized, intensive yet nurturing learning environment for students to take risks, read and succeed. While at the school, students learn to advocate for themselves and to celebrate their dyslexia. The Schenck School is located at 282 Mt. Paran Rd., Atlanta, GA 30327. For more information, call 404-2522591 or visit schenck.org.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

atlantaschoolguide.com

27


OFFERING PARENTS BETTER EDUCATION OPTIONS BY KEVIN FOREST MOREAU

arents searching for a school for their child used to have just two options: independent schools and public schools. While each model has its strengths, many parents found themselves wishing for a third option: one with the flexibility of an independent school, but open to any student, free of charge. These days, parents have more options than ever before. Charter schools are one such option, offering the best of both worlds. These schools are becoming more common throughout Georgia, and they offer a variety of educational approaches to fit a child’s individual learning needs.

WHAT IS A CHARTER SCHOOL, EXACTLY? A charter school is a publicly funded school with the freedom to develop its own curriculum and guidelines. Instead of a local board of education, the school is governed by an independent board, which usually includes parents. Some charter schools operate within a public school district, while others are part of a special charter school district, like City Schools of Decatur or Gainesville City Schools, that operate under a charter between the state board of education and the local school district.

“Charter schools are public schools of choice, governed by an autonomous board of directors.” —Tanya Parker, International Charter School of Atlanta

28

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


In fact, one common misconception about charter schools is that they aren’t public schools, says Tanya Parker, executive director of the International Charter School of Atlanta (ICSAtlanta). “Charter schools are public schools of choice, governed by an autonomous board of directors,” she says. Another misconception parents often have is the idea “that there is a cost, or tuition, for students to attend a charter school,” says Lisa Simon, communications director for The Main Street Academy. Charter schools get their name from the fact that they operate according to an agreement, or “charter”—a contract between the school and an entity such as the state or a local school district. As a result, charter schools often feature smaller classroom sizes, and in general provide more personalized instruction and attention that a child might receive in a larger, more traditional public-school setting. “Charter schools are special in that we have greater flexibility to provide a framework appealing to varying educational needs,” says Parker. In return for this freedom, the school takes on more accountability with parents and the school board that authorized the charter. Unlike traditional public schools, if a charter school doesn’t meet the goals stated in its charter, it faces the prospect of its charter not being renewed.

The International Charter School of Atlanta, for example, features a dual-language immersion program. “By operating as a charter school, ICSAtlanta is able to provide students with an immersive curriculum in French, German, Mandarin or Spanish, and English, ensuring students graduate bilingual and biliterate,” says Parker. “We utilize both dual-language and cultural immersion to nurture student curiosity into compassion for others and a commitment to improving our world.” The Main Street Academy in College Park, meanwhile, employs the Renzulli Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM), developed by educational psychologist Joseph Renzulli. “SEM enriches our core curriculum by bringing students in contact with experts and community leaders who explain how education connects to real-life experiences, and by sponsoring student projects that explore how academic research impacts

DIFFERENT WAYS OF LEARNING Choice—having more schools and more ways of learning to choose from—is the core of the charter school concept. A school’s charter gives it more flexibility in how it instructs students. Charter schools can employ different teaching methods and educational formats, including single-gender schooling, project-based learning or Montessori education. atlantaschoolguide.com

29


can thrive,” says Chad Cunningham, parent of an Amana student. “The Expeditionary Learning model is focused on education equity and expects students to reach their full potential.”

the outside world,” says Simon. “The Main Street Academy is one of only a few schools in the Fulton County Schools district that incorporates SEM into its curriculum.” Amana Academy, with a campus in Alpharetta and a new location in Mableton, uses the Harvard-based EL (Expeditionary Learning) Education model, in which students learn by going on “learning expeditions” instead of sitting in a classroom. The school also has a strong focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) instruction. “Amana Academy’s approach to learning has created an environment where my son

GETTING INTO A CHARTER SCHOOL Unlike independent schools, charter schools, since they are public schools, cannot charge tuition, and must follow the same open admission and enrollment standards as other public schools. According to the Georgia Charter Schools Association, a charter school is required to conduct a lottery when there are more applicants than there are seats available in the school. The lottery is conducted through random selection and the results are made public. Open enrollment at The Main Street Academy is held each February. Prospective families must complete and submit an online application found on the school’s website. At ICSAtlanta, “our application process opens in late fall with our information session and tour season,” says Parker. “The applica-

Unlike independent schools, charter schools, since they are public schools, cannot charge tuition, and must follow the same open admission and enrollment standards as other public schools. 30

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


tion is available on our website in early January, with our lottery taking place in early February. We continue admitting and enrolling new students as spaces permit until enrollment closes in late September.” Different schools may have restrictions based on grade levels and where the student lives. The Main Street Academy is open to all K-8 students who are zoned in the Fulton County Schools district, while ICSAtlanta is a statewide charter school open to any Georgia resident, and accepts new student applications for kindergarten and first grade.

IS CHARTER THE RIGHT CHOICE? The decision to place your child in a charter school depends on your goals for your child’s education. If you think your child would benefit from a specific learning style not found in most public schools—or if you think they’re more likely to flourish in an intimate setting with smaller classrooms and more personal interaction between students and teachers—a charter school just may offer the perfect learning experience.

FINDING A CHARTER SCHOOL

The website of the Georgia Charter Schools Association (gacharters.org) has a school locator to help you find charter schools in your area, along with information on each school to help you decide where to start your search.

atlantaschoolguide.com

31


32

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022

5

1

For features of independent schools, turn to Education At a Glance on pg. 34. For public school system information by county, turn to pg. 74.

2 3

REGIONS FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

metro atlanta area map

N


p.50

p.45

p.37

Ansley Park, Athens,Brookhaven, Dacula, Decatur, Midtown, Athens, Bethlehem, Collins Hill, Morningside, Northeast Atlanta Decatur, Loganville, Norcross, Watkinsville

REGION 3: 3: Atlanta Atlanta East East REGION

Alpharetta, Brookhaven, Duluth, Dunwoody, Johns Creek, Peachtree Corners, Roswell

REGION 2: Atlanta North/Northeast

Buckhead, Chastain Park, Crabapple, Holly Springs, Marietta, Roswell

REGION 1: Atlanta North/Northwest

Page | Region | Neighborhoods Eagles Landing, Fairburn, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, McDonough, Metro-Atlanta, Newnan, Sharpsburg/Peachtree City

EGION 4: Atlanta South/ R Southeast/Southwest

Acworth, Buckhead, Kennesaw, Smyrna/Vinings

p.61 REGION 5: Atlanta West

p.56

4

p.85

p.74

p.64

Tutoring, Summer Camps and Activities, Field Trips and Education Programs.

Educational Resources

Public School County Guide

Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas

Boarding Schools

Additional Education Sections

S


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

$26,100 4-12th

25

105

8-10

• Appt. Rolling

$7,500$26,000 $13,000$15,000 Call for Rates $18,200$31,150 $5,800$21,000 $6,675$24,780 $12,500$17,000 $30,160$34,720 $20,476$21,301 $15,500$25,000

40

140

5

Appt. Rolling

81

945

20

The Cottage School

770-641-8688

18

Cumberland Academy of Georgia

404-835-9000

43

Eaton Academy

770-645-2673

2

Fulton Science Academy Private School

678-366-2555

36

Fusion Academy - Alpharetta

470-339-7224

39

The Galloway School

404-252-8389

43

High Meadows School

770-993-2940

5

Holy Spirit Preparatory School

678-761-7992

41

Lyndon Academy

770-926-0166

Pace Academy

404-262-1345 770-594-1313

44

Saint Francis School

770-641-8257

17

The Schenck School

404-252-2591

39

Springmont School

404-252-3910

The Walker School

770-427-2689

42

45

APPLICATION DEADLINE

10

40

Porter Academy

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

360

404-841-3840

$26,7253K-12th $30,510 $27,0003-12th $29,000

3-12th & PG

PK312th

108

3y-8th

6mo12th

PK-12th

PK-12th

750

12

60

350

18

61

450 12-15

25

210

160 1,115

13

17

70

12

K-12th

110

850

14

$39,800 K-6th

50

250

10

42

270

18

180

920 15:1

K-12th PK-8th

$11,550- 18mo$25,000 8th $11,280- PK3$27,170 12th

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

• 15-20 50-80 1:1

6-12th

UNIFORM

47

Atlanta International School

AP/IB COURSES

38

38

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

17

REGION 1: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHWEST

40

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

205 1,319

37

# TEACHERS

# STUDENTS

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

KINDERGARTEN

PHONE

PRESCHOOL

SCHOOL

GRADES/AGES

PAGE

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS *KEY: Religious Affiliation: CC = Catholic C = Christian E = Episcopal J = Jewish JC = Judeo-Christian ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker

Appt. Rolling

Oct.

Jan.

Oct.

Feb.

• CC

12

• Tours Rolling

JC

Dec. Rolling

Oct. March

Oct.

Feb. 1

Appt. Rolling

• •

• Appt. Rolling • Appt. Rolling Appt. Feb. 15

Appt.

Call

REGION 2: ATLANTA NORTH/NORTHEAST

49

Atlanta Academy

678-461-6102

91

Endeavor International School

770-637-4737

92

Endeavor Montessori Dunwoody

770-637-4644

36

Fusion Academy - Buckhead

762-224-0422

Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia McGinnis Woods 46 Country Day School

48

770-814-8001 770-664-7764

47

MJCCA Preschools

678-812-3800

92

Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs

770-205-6277

92

Montessori at Vickery

48 Mount Pisgah Christian School

770-777-9131 678-336-3400

47

Notre Dame Academy

678-387-9385

7

Oak Grove Academy

770-800-6034

34

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

$11,600$25,910 $16,000$17,510 $13,150$19,590 Call for Rates $750$1,495 $11,025$15,575 $5,802$17,528 $9,750$14,800 $12,510$19,380 $17,000$23,900 $12,300$17,310 $13,920$15,600

Nursery8th

7-12th 6wks12y

Summer/Fall 2022

385

16

10

40

20

30

232

20

18

75 Varies

60

400

15

120

480

15

25

276

20

21

175

30

125

975

14

39

314 14-19

20

147

20

ND

Oct. Rolling

• Appt. Rolling • Appt. Rolling

• 15-20 50-80 1:1

K-12th 6wks5y

70

6-12th 8wks6y Infant8th 6wks1st 6wks12y 13mo9yr Infant12th

• •

Appt. Rolling

Call Rolling

• Appt. Rolling J

N/A Rolling

• Appt. Rolling • Appt. Rolling C

CC

Nov.

Nov. Rolling

Call

• Appt. Rolling


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

59

Woodward Academy

404-765-4001

50

Arbor Montessori School

404-321-9304

51

Athens Academy

706-549-9225

Atlanta Montessori International 404-325-6777 School - Cliff Valley Atlanta Montessori International 7 404-500-0501 School - Druid Hills

7

52

Bethlehem Christian Academy

770-307-1574

51

Capstone Academy

404-458-5160

54

The Friends School of Atlanta

404-373-8746

54

Loganville Christian Academy

770-554-9888

55

Oak Meadow Montessori School Still Waters International Academy

770-963-8303 770-449-4125

55 Westminster Christian Academy 706-769-9372

56

The Bedford School

770-774-8001

57

Community Christian School

678-432-0191

58 Counterpane Montessori School

770-461-2304

60

The Heritage School

770-253-9898

11

Our World School

678-782-6089

11

St. Mary’s Academy

770-461-2202

58

Strong Rock Christian School

678-833-1200

60

Trinity Christian School Sharpsburg

770-251-6770

59

Woodward Academy

404-765-4001

62

• Appt. Feb. 28

• C

APPLICATION DEADLINE

5-7

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

21

SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

7

159 1,171 13-20

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION*

AVG. CLASS SIZE

# STUDENTS

# TEACHERS

Sept. Rolling Oct. Jan. 25

18mo8th

36

246

K3-12th

125

925

12

8wks12yr 8wks6yr

39

166

22

Appt. Rolling

20

110

18

Appt. Rolling

PK-12th

130

820

20

20

150

8-10

6:1 2,525 11-13

$11,250$21,790 $9,750$21,685 $16,430$22,656 $15,000$24,000 $5,000$10,000

$12,700 5-12th $16,502$26,140 $6,100$11,950 $1,100$1,400mo $8,000$10,000 $4,400$10,700

22

Nov. Rolling

C

PK3-8th

44

178

11

Q

PK312th 15mo12yr

58

594

15

C

18

160

20

K-12th

7

35

9

C

PK412th

55

370

15

ND

Call Rolling

• Nov. Call

Appt.

Call

Appt.

Call

• Nov. Rolling Appt. Rolling

• Appt. Rolling

Oct. Rolling

REGION 4: ATLANTA SOUTH/SOUTHEAST/SOUTHWEST

57

61

K-HS

$19,460K-12th $27,830 $19,800PK-12th $31,150

REGION 3: ATLANTA EAST

53

53

$28,400

UNIFORM

770-448-7640

AP/IB COURSES

Wesleyan School

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

49

KINDERGARTEN

PHONE

PRESCHOOL

SCHOOL

46 The Piedmont School of Atlanta 404-382-8200

GRADES/AGES

PAGE

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS *KEY: Religious Affiliation: CC = Catholic C = Christian E = Episcopal J = Jewish JC = Judeo-Christian ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker

$20,6501-9th $21,050 $9,324- Infant$12,888 12th PK3$18,000 12th $5,5303-12th $18,950

23

150 10-12

97

600 15-20 ND

8

60

20

60

467

14

• Appt. Rolling •

Jan. Rolling

• Appt. Rolling

7

40

6

50

350

20

CC

93

846

17

C

170 1,550 22

ND

$14,000 K-12th $8,500- PK4$14,300 12th $6,992- PK3$14,975 12th $2,945PK-12th $10,855 $19,800PK-12th $31,150

• Appt. Call

Oct. Feb. 1

Feb. Rolling

• Appt. Call

• Appt. Feb. 28

• Nov. Rolling

6:1 2,525 11-13

Appt. Appt.

REGION 5: ATLANTA WEST The Lovett School

404-262-3032

63

Mount Paran Christian School

62

Omega Private Academy Acworth

770-578-0182 770-792-7431

63

Whitefield Academy

678-305-3000

$28,870$33,500 $4,378$22,184 $11,200$13,600 $18,000$24,000

K-12th PK312th

260 1,640

16

JC

175 1,255

12

C, ND

• 100+ 885 18-20

2-12 PK412th

8

32-40

Oct.

Feb.

• Appt. Call

6 C

• Nov. Feb. 28

Education At-a-Glance Continued on Page 36 u


Education At a Glance This information reflects the latest available data at publication time. Please confirm with each individual school.

423-267-5902

66

Brandon Hall School

770-394-8177

73

The Brook Hill School

903-894-5000

$50,995 8-12th

68

George School

215-579-6547

$46,1009-12th $69,600

70

McCallie School

423-493-5828

$58,350 9-12th

66

Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

706-746-7720

67

Saint Mary’s School

919-424-4000

73

Salem Academy

336-721-2643

65

The Vanguard School

863-676-6091

71

The Webb School

931-380-6003

$10,500$61,500 $31,600$62,850 $26,500$50,500 $25,500$49,000

PK-12th

• •

9-12th

$47,500 7-12th

3414 Peachtree Rd NE Suite 200 Atlanta, GA 30326 678- 335-2382

Summer/Fall 2022

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

24

100

8

Appt. Rolling

84

76

14

C, ND

Appt. Rolling

85

540

14

Q

Oct.

Oct. Rolling

120

946

13

C

90

680

12

P

42

300

13

E

• •

70

8

14

120

6-10

55

405

12

Feb. 1

Oct. Rolling April Jan. 30

20

APPLICATION DEADLINE

13 14

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION* SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAMS

450

AVG. CLASS SIZE

60

118 1,140

6-12th

1:1 Private School Grades 6-12

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

9-12th

10000 Avalon Blvd Suite 150 Alpharetta, Ga 30009 470-339-7224

36

$28,3106-12th $57,340 $29,200- 6-12th $59,150 & PG

OPEN HOUSE BEGINS

Baylor School

UNIFORM

69

AP/IB COURSES

727-384-3474

# STUDENTS

Admiral Farragut Academy

# TEACHERS

8-12th & PG

65

BEFORE/AFTER CARE

$53,200

BOARDING SCHOOLS

KINDERGARTEN

PHONE

64

PRESCHOOL

SCHOOL

GRADES/AGES

PAGE

ANNUAL TUITION

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS *KEY: Religious Affiliation: CC = Catholic C = Christian E = Episcopal J = Jewish JC = Judeo-Christian ND = Non-denominational P = Presbyterian Q = Quaker

Appt. Rolling

Appt. Rolling

Oct.

Dec. 1


1 GION RE

40 43 44 42

43

36 2 40

18 39 5 1739 38 38

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta International School 38 The Cottage School 40 Cumberland Academy of Georgia 18 Eaton Academy 43 Fulton Science Academy Private School 2 Fusion Academy - Alpharetta 36 The Galloway School 39 High Meadows School 43

Holy Spirit Preparatory School Lyndon Academy Pace Academy Porter Academy Saint Francis School The Schenck School Springmont School The Walker School

5 41 38 40 44 17 39 42

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Roswell With its mix of stately neighborhoods and new developments, its quaint downtown area and miles of trails that meander through forests and along the Chattahoochee River, Roswell attracts many families and nature-loving residents to its city limits.

Sandy Springs Newbie, Sandy Springs became its own city in 2005, and multitudes of boutiques, bars and restaurants line Roswell Road, its main thoroughfare. Residents also enjoy the community’s many family-centered events held throughout the year. atlantaschoolguide.com

37

ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHWEST

41


BUCKHEAD 38

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


BUCKHEAD • CHASTAIN PARK Galloway students confidently embrace challenges while developing the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to thrive as enlightened contributors in their chosen pathways.

PRE-K3 – GRADE 12

Schedule your family’s tour at gallowayschool.org atlantaschoolguide.com

39


ROSWELL • CRABAPPLE 40

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


HOLLY SPRINGS


MARIETTA


ROSWELL atlantaschoolguide.com

43


ROSWELL 44

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


ATLANTA NORTH • NORTHEAST

46

49

47

48

48 59

47 49

46

2 GION RE

36

Independent Schools Schools Page Atlanta Academy 49 Fusion Academy - Buckhead 36 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia 48 McGinnis Woods Country Day School 46

MJCCA Preschools Mount Pisgah Christian School Notre Dame Academy The Piedmont School of Atlanta Wesleyan School Woodward Academy

47 48 47 46 49 59

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Norcross Founded in the late 1800s as a resort town for wealthy Atlantans, Norcross is Gwinnett County’s second oldest city. Today, with over 8,000 residents, it is a quiet city filled with upscale yet charming residential and retail developments.

Cumming Called the “Gateway to Leisure Living,” Cumming offers the best of small-town living, but in recent years, it has seen rapid commercial and residential development, attracting many new residents with its prime location near the magnificent Lake Lanier. atlantaschoolguide.com

45


BROOKHAVEN • ALPHARETTA

Serving children in grades Kindergarten to High School with language, learning and social challenges.

Call for a private tour!!! Certified masters-level teachers deliver a regular-education curriculum combining: • Georgia Standards and National Core • Differentiated Instruction • PE, Art, Foreign Language, Theatre and Culinary Arts • Technology in every classroom

Rolling Admissions. Fully Accredited GAC! 2022-2023

46

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


DULUTH • DUNWOODY atlantaschoolguide.com

47


JOHNS CREEK 48

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022


PEACHTREE CORNERS • ROSWELL

Curiosity Sparked. No Limits.

NOW ENROLLING PRESCHOOL8TH GRADE

2000 Holcomb Woods Pkwy. Roswell, GA 30076 678.461.6102 www.atlantaacademy.com

atlantaschoolguide.com

49


ATLANTA EAST

53 52

55

51

BARROW

51

53

ATHENS

WATKINSVILLE

55

54 54

Independent Schools Schools Page Arbor Montessori School 53 Athens Academy 51 Bethlehem Christian Academy 52 Capstone Academy 51

The Friends School of Atlanta Loganville Christian Academy Oak Meadow Montessori School Still Waters International Academy Westminster Christian Academy

54 54 53 55 55

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Stone Mountain More than just a mountain park, Stone Mountain also refers to a charming community of antique shops, art galleries and restaurants. Residents of Stone Mountain enjoy natural scenery and miles of walking and biking paths available in the nearby park. 50

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022

Lawrenceville Strolling the brick-paved sidewalks in the revitalized historic downtown of Lawrenceville, you’ll feel instantly at home. Chartered in 1821, the city has gone through many changes over the years but has maintained its gracious small-town Southern charm.

ATLANTA EAST

3 GION RE


ATHENS • BROOKHAVEN atlantaschoolguide.com

51


BETHLEHEM


COLLINS HILL • DECATUR atlantaschoolguide.com

53


LOGANVILLE • DECATUR

Educating for Peace and Justice Since 1991

PREK3- 8TH GRADE

An exceptional, values-based academic program in small diverse classes. 862 Columbia Dr., Decatur

54

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022

friendsschoolatlanta.org


NORCROSS • WATKINSVILLE atlantaschoolguide.com

55


ATLANTA SOUTH • SOUTHEAST • SOUTHWEST

4 GION RE

EAST POINT

59

DEKALB

Carrolton

11 58

57

11 57

60

58 60

Independent Schools Schools Page The Bedford School 57 Community Christian School 57 Counterpane Montessori School 58 The Heritage School 60

Our World School St. Mary’s Academy Strong Rock Christian School Trinity Christian School - Sharpsburg Woodward Academy

11 11 58 60 59

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Newnan Established in 1828 and home to more than 30,000 residents, Newnan is one of the fastest-growing cities in Georgia. It has many new residential developments and boasts six historic districts on the national register filled with stately Southern homes. 56

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

Summer/Fall 2022

College Park College Park is home to a small-town main street and the busiest airport in the world—Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The city is attracting young professionals and families by combining the historic elements with new developments.


EAGLES LANDING • FAIRBURN

57

atlantaschoolguide.com


LOCUST GROVE • FAYETTEVILLE 58

ATLANTA SCHOOL GUIDE

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METRO-ATLANTA


SHARPSBURG/PEACHTREE CITY • NEWNAN

Preparing today’s student to impact tomorrow’s world

always forward

Firm Christian Foundation Academic Excellence Athletics Programs Visual Arts & Performing Arts Programs Limited Class Sizes Affordable Tuition Clubs & Student-led Activities

Experience the Trinity Difference. Schedule a tour today. Scan for more information!

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admissions@tcslions.org (770) 251-6770 8817 Highway 54 West, Sharpsburg, GA

tcslions.org


BARTOW

ATLANTA WEST

5 GION RE

63 62

63 62

FULTON

Independent Schools Schools Page The Lovett School 62 Mount Paran Christian School 63

Omega Private Academy - Acworth Whitefield Academy

62 63

NEIGHBORHOODS OF NOTE Kennesaw Home to the popular Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, the city of Kennesaw takes pride in its excellent recreation opportunities and parks, rich history and thriving downtown. Kennesaw State University is well known for academic programs in business, education, and nursing.

Smyrna With its unique charm, the city of Smyrna offers many fresh, trendy lifestyle options, and the Market Village plays host to numerous restaurants, bars and upscale shops. Known as the “Jonquil City,” because of the thousands of jonquils that flourish in gardens and along the streets in early spring.

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BUCKHEAD • ACWORTH 62

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KENNESAW • SMYRNA/VININGS

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BOARDING SCHOOL DIRECTORY

T

here are many benefits of a boarding school education. Boarding schools are an option for students seeking a more independent learning experience. Because students generally live on campus, learning takes place in and out of the classroom almost on a 24-hour basis. When selecting a boarding school, it is important to visit the school campus, but representatives from many boarding schools visit Metro Atlanta throughout the year—contact each school for specific dates.

Boarding Schools Schools Page Admiral Farragut Academy 65 Baylor School 69 Brandon Hall 66 The Brook Hill School 73 George School 68

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McCallie School 70 Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School 66 Saint Mary's School 67 Salem Academy 73 The Vanguard School 65 The Webb School 71 & 72


FLORIDA atlantaschoolguide.com

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GEORGIA 66

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NORTH CAROLINA


PENNSYLVANIA

TOP BOARDING SCHOOLS

GEORGE SCHOOL Newtown, PA

A global school with local roots, George School is a Quaker, co-ed boarding and day high school in Newtown, Pennsylvania. Convenient to New York City and Philadelphia, the school is located on a picturesque campus of open lawns and beautiful woods. George students treasure learning for its own sake and use it to benefit a diverse world. Students are immersed in learning across all disciplines through a Signature Academic Program that is customizable to each student, where they are encouraged to pursue their passions and discover new talents. Students participate in 25 different team sports and take physical wellness classes in state-of-theart facilities. George is also one of a few US boarding schools offering the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program. George graduates attend the most selective

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colleges and universities worldwide, and become confident and capable leaders rooted in self-awareness, self-sufficiency and the ability to listen deeply to others. At the school, students learn about the world from peers who hail from more than 40 countries and 20 states and learn to “let their lives speak.” For more information, call 215-5796547 or visit georgeschool.org.

SPECIAL PROMOTION


TENNESSEE


TENNESSEE


TENNESSEE


TENNESSEE

TOP BOARDING SCHOOLS

THE WEBB SCHOOL Bell Buckle, TN

Guided by core values of honor, integrity and civility, the goal of The Webb School is to motivate young men and women to fulfill their promise. The community of 405 students is small by design, to create lifelong connections while fostering greater involvement and individual growth. WHAT IS THE WEBB DIFFERENCE? Honor and Character The hallmark of a Webb education is its emphasis on honor and personal integrity. Its 152 year-old Honor Code, the inspiration for the Honor Code at Princeton, is the framework in which students grow into principled young adults. Webb’s students take pride in upholding this tradition by signing the pledge book each year and electing members of a studentled Honor Council. Emerging Voices Program Writing across the curriculum and public speaking are major emphases at Webb. Through its Emerging Voices Program, students learn to create original ideas, assemble a body of research and communicate those

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ideas effectively through writing and public speaking. Students showcase their skills each year by performing declamations, orations, performance creations and senior paper presentations. These exhibitions are developed and completed under the mentorship of the students' advisors and other members of the community. The school’s goal is to create confident contributors in the classroom and beyond. WILD Outdoor Program Webb’s Outerlimits and Wilderness Instruction and Leadership Development (WILD) programs combine the classroom with the outdoors. Its 150-acre campus is thriving with the spirit of a well-rounded education. Students develop leadership skills and confidence as they navigate the high ropes course and lead trips into the surrounding area. Rock climbing, caving, backpacking, kayaking and rafting are just some of the activities students can master during their tenure at Webb. Webb offers more than $4 million in financial aid and scholarships each year, and 60% of its student body receives an award. The school encourages children and their parents to experience The Webb School Difference for themselves. To schedule a campus tour, call 931-389-6003. For more information, visit thewebbschool.com.

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SPOTLIGHT ON METRO ATLANTA’S SCHOOL SYSTEMS

A

variety of improvements and innovative programs in Georgia’s public school systems have resulted in many stellar elementary, middle and high schools across the metro area. Different school systems feature specialized programs and academic opportunities, such as magnet, charter, vocational or alternative schools, to suit their respective students, parents and communities. However, despite variations in programming and academic offerings, all public schools must offer the core curriculum as determined by the Georgia Board of Education. Here is a county-by-county guide to metro Atlanta’s public school systems. For more information about the Georgia Department of Education, call 404-656-2800 or visit gadoe.org. u 74

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CHARTER SCHOOLS


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TOP CHARTER SCHOOLS

THE MAIN STREET ACADEMY College Park, GA

Established in 2010, The Main Street Academy (TMSA) is a longstanding, tuitionfree Fulton County Schools public charter school that serves and educates students in grades K-8. The school’s mission focuses on providing a challenging and enriching curriculum that centers on developing the whole child—intellectual, artistic, character, and health. Led by highly qualified teachers, students receive a unique and rigorous learning curriculum. TMSA’s innovative project-based learning approach with an integrated STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) framework helps its diverse base of students become 21st-century leaders. TMSA is also a community for committed families who want their students to be grounded in character and inspired by academic

advancements to thrive in a competitive, evolving world. Nestled in a historic College Park neighborhood amongst tall oak and magnolia trees, TMSA’s 28-acre campus encompasses a 110,000-square-foot educational building with a media center, art and music rooms, and a gymnasium. A newly expanded STEAM educational center for students opens in June. TMSA is currently accepting applications for the 2022-23 school year. For additional information, visit tmsa.org or call 404-768-0081.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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BARTOW ADAIRSVILLE WHITE

BARTOW CARTERSVILLE EMERSON

Board of Education 770-606-5800 bartow.k12.ga.us

CHEROKEE CHEROKEE

Number of Schools Elementary 12 Middle 4 High 3 Career Academy 1 Virtual Academy 1

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 493 (M) 512 5th: (ELA) 511 (M) 512 8th: (ELA) 508 (M) 508

Total # of Students: 12,849 Student Spending: $10,399

Top 3 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Woodland 1062 Adairsville High 1057 Cass High 1043

What’s New: Three Bartow County seniors have been named 2022 Georgia Scholars by the Georgia Department of Education: Ashton Phillips and Mark Brunson of Adairsville High School and Rylee Evans of Woodland High. Only 216 graduating seniors from across the state were awarded this prestigious title. Number of Schools Elementary 23 Middle 7 High 6 Alternative 1 Centers 5 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 40,807 Student Spending: $10,215

Board of Education 770-479-1871 cherokeek12.net

CLAYTON

CLAYTON

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2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 515 (M) 533 5th: (ELA) 519 (M) 532 8th: (ELA) 521 (M) 518 2021 Average SAT: 1125 Top 6 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score River Ridge High 1140 Sequoyah High 1134 Woodstock High 1127 Etowah High 1121 Cherokee High 1116 Creekview High 1116

What’s New: The Georgia School Boards Association has awarded the Cherokee County Board of Education its Leading Edge Award in the Culture, Climate & Organizational Efficacy category. Number of Schools Elementary 34 Primary 2 Middle 14 High 9 Alternative 1 Performing Arts Center 1 Adult Education 1 Charter 2 Magnet 5 Open Campus 1 Total # of Students: 51,407 Student Spending: $10,080

Board of Education 770-473-2700 clayton.k12.ga.us

2021 Average SAT: 1053

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 459 (M) 473 5th: (ELA) 478 (M) 460 8th: (ELA) 485 (M) 466 2021 Average SAT: 946 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Elite Scholars Academy 1085 Morrow High School 1056 M. E. Stilwell School of the Arts 1014 North Clayton High School 963 Lovejoy High School 948

What’s New: Clayton County Public Schools (CCPS) has been selected to benefit from a new education equity initiative funded by Georgia Power. Summer/Fall 2022


COBB

Board of Education 770-426-3300 cobbk12.org

COWETA COWETA

Number of Schools Elementary 65 Primary 2 Middle 25 6th Grade Academy 1 High 10 Magnet High Schools 6 Charter 1 Learning Centers 1 Adult Education Center 1 Special Education Centers 2 Virtual Academies 1 Total # of Students: 106,549 Student Spending: $10,855

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 509 (M) 515 5th: (ELA) 518 (M) 510 8th: (ELA) 517 (M) 513 2021 Average SAT: 1150 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Walton High School 1275 Wheeler High School 1233 Alan C. Pope High School 1205 Lassiter High School 1176 Sprayberry High School 1104

What’s New: Brumby Elementary and the district partnered with Paint Love and Muhammad Yungui on a retaining wall project. Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 7 High 3 Charter & Career Academy 2 Alternative 2 Centre for Performing and Visual Arts 1 Special Education 1 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 21,693 Student Spending: $9,943

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 513 (M) 522 5th: (ELA) 517 (M) 510 8th: (ELA) 515 (M) 501 2021 Average SAT: 1110 Top 3 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Northgate High 1129 Newnan High 1112 East Coweta High 1095

Board of Education 770-254-2800 cowetaschools.net

What’s New: The Senoia City Council approved an agreement between the city and Coweta Charter Academy to appoint a school resource officer.

DEKALB

Number of Schools Elementary 69 Middle 17 High 19 Charter 5 Magnet 3 Centers, Special Education and Alternative 24

DEKALB

Board of Education 678-676-1200 dekalbschoolsga.org

Total # of Students: 90,899 Student Spending: $13,002

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 476 (M) 487 5th: (ELA) 492 (M) 474 8th: (ELA) 495 (M) 482 2021 Average SAT: 1037 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score DeKalb Early College Academy 1249 Chamblee Charter High 1208 DeKalb School of the Arts 1203 Lakeside High 1189 Dunwoody High 1182

What’s New: The DeKalb County School District has partnered with the Latin American Association (LAA) of Atlanta to open a new learning hub at LAA. It’s equipped with computers, information about postsecondary schools and more. atlantaschoolguide.com

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COBB


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

DOUGLAS

DOUGLAS

Board of Education 770-651-2000 dcssga.org

FAYETTE FAYETTE

Number of Schools Elementary 20 Middle 8 High 5 Centers 3 Charter 1 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 25,685 Student Spending: $10,216

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 490 (M) 499 5th: (ELA) 508 (M) 494 8th: (ELA) 510 (M) 493 2021 Average SAT: 1036 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Douglas County High 1070 Chapel Hill High 1061 Alexander High 1044 New Manchester High 971 Lithia Springs High 960

What’s New: At New Manchester High, juniors and seniors in the Advancement Via Individual Determination program took personal responsibility for the costs of taking their SAT and ACT tests. They sold baking mixes to family, friends and teachers, earning over $900. Number of Schools Elementary 14 Middle 5 High 5 Alternative 1 Open Campus 1 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 19,552 Student Spending: $11,687

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 531 (M) 536 5th: (ELA) 532 (M) 530 8th: (ELA) 544 (M) 540 2021 Average SAT: 1152 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score McIntosh High 1226 Starr’s Mill High 1156 Whitewater High 1152 Sandy Creek High 1066 Fayette County High 1042

Board of Education 770-460-3990 fcboe.org

What’s New: Flat Rock Middle School’s STEAM Careers students researched, designed, planned, and installed a pollinator habitat for butterflies at the Flat Rock Food Forest.

FORSYTH

Number of Schools Elementary 22 Middle 11 High 7 Non-Traditional 2 Virtual 1 Charter/Evening 1 Career Academy 1

FORSYTH

Total # of Students: 50,712 Student Spending: $9,458

Board of Education 770-887-2461 forsyth.k12.ga.us

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2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 537 (M) 552 5th: (ELA) 542 (M) 558 8th: (ELA) 539 (M) 534 2021 Average SAT: 1193 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Lambert High 1251 South Forsyth High 1241 Alliance Academy 1226 Denmark High 1205 Forsyth Central 1152

What’s New: Whitlow Elementary’s fourth- and fifth-graders are the first in the Forsyth County School District to use Unruly Splats, programmable floor buttons that students can code to create games like relay races and whack-a-mole, to combine PE and STEM learning activities. Summer/Fall 2022


ATLANTA

Number of Schools Elementary 59 Middle 19 High 20 Charter 10 Alternative Schools 3 Virtual Campus 2 Total # of Students: 88,390 Student Spending: $11,746

FULTON

Board of Education 470-254-3600 fultonschools.org

GRIFFINSPALDING

Board of Education 770-229-3700 spalding.k12.ga.us

GWINNETT

GWINNETT

2021 Average SAT: 1128 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Northview High 1301 Alpharetta High 1265 Chattahoochee High 1249 Johns Creek High 1241 Milton High 1201

What’s New: The United Way’s Bridge pre-apprenticeship program has been relaunched. It is facilitated by Fulton County Schools Career, Technical and Agriculture Education (CTAE) Work-Based Learning staff. Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 2 Alternative 2 Career Academy 1

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 458 (M) 479 5th: (ELA) 480 (M) 470 8th: (ELA) 488 (M) 474

Total # of Students: 9,284 Student Spending: $11,022

Top 2 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Spalding High 1040 Griffin High 931

2021 Average SAT: 983

What’s New: The Griffin-Spalding County School System (GSCS) Nutrition Department has received $100,000 in grant funding to help feed more children in the community. GSCS has 18 foodservice sites that provide healthy and nutritious meals to 9,500 students at no cost. The grant funds will allow the district to replace kitchen equipment and buy new nutrition software. Number of Schools Elementary 80 Middle 29 High 21 Alternative 4 Charter 2 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 1 Special Education 2 Center 1 Career/Technical 4 Total # of Students: 176,358 Student Spending: $9,932

Board of Education 678-301-6000 gcpsk12.org

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 527 (M) 535 5th: (ELA) 530 (M) 526 8th: (ELA) 521 (M) 519

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 511 (M) 520 5th: (ELA) 518 (M) 514 8th: (ELA) 509 (M) 504 2021 Average SAT: 1132 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology 1378 North Gwinnett High 1210 Peachtree Ridge High 1155 Brookwood High 1152 Parkview High 1142

What’s New: Brookwood High’s School’s Stella Kwon has been named a 2022 Coca-Cola Scholar. Kwon is one of 150 Scholars who will receive a $20,000 college scholarship. atlantaschoolguide.com

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FULTON


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

HALL HALL

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 6 High 6 Magnet 12 Alternative 1 Career 2 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 26,558 Student Spending: $9,934

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 492 (M) 507 5th: (ELA) 504 (M) 497 8th: (ELA) 499 (M) 501 2021 Average SAT: 1086 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Flowery Branch High 1123 Chestatee High 1121 North Hall High 1116 Johnson High 1087 East Hall High 1042

Board of Education 770-534-1080 hallco.org

What’s New: Hall Country School District Superintendent Will Schofield has obtained $2.5 million from the state to help fund a meat processing plant at the district’s Agribusiness Center.

HENRY

Number of Schools Elementary 26 Middle 11 High 10 Charter 2 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Virtual School 1

HENRY

Total # of Students: 42,048 Student Spending: $9,638

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 489 (M) 501 5th: (ELA) 502 (M) 490 8th: (ELA) 511 (M) 496 2021 Average SAT: 1029 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Union Grove High 1097 Ola High 1086 Eagles Landing High 1053 Dutchtown High 1033 Locust Grove High 1027

Board of Education What’s New: The Henry County Board of Education has approved 770-957-6601 the site for Henry County Schools’ first STEM high school. The schoolwires.henry.k12.ga.us campus will sit adjacent to the current Stockbridge Elementary.

PAULDING PAULDING BRASWELL

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Board of Education 770-443-8000 paulding.k12.ga.us

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Number of Schools Elementary 19 Middle 9 High 5 Alternative 1 Career 1

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 512 (M) 522 5th: (ELA) 513 (M) 514 8th: (ELA) 520 (M) 509

Total # of Students: 29,735 Student Spending: $9,898

Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Paulding County High 1078 North Paulding High 1077 East Paulding High 1034 Hiram High 1030 South Paulding High 1024

2021 Average SAT: 1053

What’s New: The Paulding County Board of Education has voted unanimously to confirm Steve Barnette as superintendent of the Paulding County School District. Barnette has been interim superintendent since June 2021, and was previously the school district’s CFO. Before serving in public education, he was a senior leader with several industry-leading technology companies. Summer/Fall 2022


LE RO CK DA

Board of Education 770-483-4713 rockdaleschools.org

ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Number of Schools Elementary 11 Middle 4 High 3 Alternative 1 Career Academy 1 Magnet 1 Open Campus 1 Virtual School 2 Total # of Students: 15,334 Student Spending: $11,236

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 481 (M) 486 5th: (ELA) 494 (M) 471 8th: (ELA) 509 (M) 482 2021 Average SAT: 1057 Top 3 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Rockdale High 1106 Heritage High 1019 Salem High 998

What’s New: Rockdale County Public Schools and Tutor.com have partnered to provide live, online tutoring services for its students. Services will help quarantined students in grades 6-12 and on-campus students in grades K-12.

Board of Education 404-802-3500 atlantapublicschools.us

Number of Schools Elementary 42 Intermediate 4 Middle 10 High 10 Charter 19 Alternative 4 Virtual 1 Total # of Students: 49,811 Student Spending: $17,725

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 490 (M) 497 5th: (ELA) 500 (M) 488 8th: (ELA) 502 (M) 489 2021 Average SAT: 927 Top 5 Schools by Average 2021 SAT Score Midtown High 1082 Atlanta Classical Academy 1068 KIPP Atlanta Collegiate Academy 1034 North Atlanta High 1021 Charles R. Drew Charter High 946

What’s New: The foreign language program at Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy got a boost when the consul general of Japan in Atlanta donated $30,000 to help bolster its Japanese language program. The funds will be used to support a Japanese teacher’s salary.

BUFORD CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-945-5035 bufordcityschools.org Number of Schools Elementary (K-1) 1st-3rd Grade Academy 4th-5th Grade Academy Middle High

Total # of Students: 5,447 Student Spending: $11,241 1 1 1 1 1

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 543 (M) 556 5th: (ELA) 531 (M) 536 8th: (ELA) 554 (M) 558 2021 Average SAT: 1162

What’s New: Construction projects over the next three years are geared to meet growing student body needs. Projects at Buford Middle include a visitor’s fieldhouse at Tom Riden Stadium and renovations providing 20 new classrooms. atlantaschoolguide.com

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ROCKDALE


PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNTY GUIDE

CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

Board of Education 404-371-3601 csdecatur.net Number of Schools Elementary 5 Middle 1 3rd-5th Grade Academy 1 4th & 5th Grade Academy 1 High 1 Early Learning Center 1 Virtual 1

Total # of Students: 5,620 Student Spending: $14,521 2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 550 (M) 550 5th: (ELA) 547 (M) 543 8th: (ELA) 547 (M) 530 2021 Average SAT: 1227

What’s New: The PAGE Student Teacher Achievement Recognition (STAR) program honors Georgia’s highest achieving high school seniors and the teachers who have been most instrumental in their academic development. Decatur High senior Lydia Witter has been honored as a 2022 STAR Student, and her STAR Teacher is Shelby Coffin.

GAINESVILLE CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-536-5275 gcssk12.net Number of Schools Elementary Middle High Virtual

Total # of Students: 7,469 Student Spending: $10,842 6 2 1 1

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 470 (M) 500 5th: (ELA) 494 (M) 495 8th: (ELA) 496 (M) 494 2021 Average SAT: 1055

What’s New: The new Gainesville Middle School West is scheduled to open for the 2022-23 school year, and Gainesville High School can expect to begin using its new Student Activities Center as well. As these projects come to completion, the district looks ahead to future projects, including full-sized gymnasiums at three elementary schools that don’t have them — Centennial, Gainesville and New Holland.

MARIETTA CITY SCHOOLS

Board of Education 770-422-3500 marietta-city.org Number of Schools Elementary Sixth Grade Middle High Alternative Magnet Early Learning

Total # of Students: 8,471 Student Spending: $13,426 7 1 1 1 1 1 1

2021 Mean Georgia Milestone Scores: 3rd: (ELA) 503 (M) 517 5th: (ELA) 517 (M) 512 8th: (ELA) 507 (M) 509 2021 Average SAT: 1073

What’s New: Marietta City Schools will not offer a full-time virtual schooling option in the 2022-23 school year. Students can make use, however, of a state-run virtual option for grades 6-12, Georgia Virtual, an online school program through the Georgia Department of Education.

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EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Ways to Enhance your Child’s or Student’s Learning

Index

Tutoring & Study Skills Summer Camps & Activities Field Trips & Education Programs

86 86 87

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES • TUTORING

TUTORING IN YOUR OWN HOME!

all subjects, all gr ades

hand-picked tutors

no contract, no registra on fee

ADHD "homework coach" program SAT/ACT, Georgia Milestones test prep

770-645-8750

inhometutors.com

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SUMMER CAMPS & ACTIVITIES • FIELD TRIPS

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FIELD TRIPS & EDUCATION PROGRAMS


TOP FIELD TRIPS

THE CENTER FOR PUPPETRY ARTS

PHOTOS: (top) courtesy Center for Puppetry Arts; (bottom) courtesy of Tanglewood Marionettes

Atlanta, GA

The Center for Puppetry Arts has been part of the Atlanta community for over 40 years, providing families and schools with curriculum-based, arts-infused educational programming. It understands the need to address learning loss and the emotional impact of COVID-19, and it believes puppetry can be an invaluable teaching tool for parents and educators. In addition to summer shows, the center is offering Puppet Theatre Camp for ages 10-12. In this immersive, weeklong camp, children design, build, write for and perform with their own puppets. Brand new this year is Puppet Discovery Camp for ages 8 and 9. Students explore a wide variety of puppetry styles and cultural traditions, receive guided tours of the center and its museum exhibitions and see live puppetry. This season's performances include the world premiere of Tesla vs. Edison, focusing on the life and work of two legendary inventors

with very different visions of the future. Family Series performances this season feature classics like Charlotte’s Web and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer along with a tapestry of cross-cultural storytelling including the bilingual La Cucarachita Martina (Martina, the Little Roach), The Dragon King, Animal Amigos and the center’s award-winning production of Duke Ellington’s Cat. A Family Series performance ticket for families includes admission to the performance, admission to Worlds of Puppetry Museum and entry into the Create-A-Puppet Workshop. While a visit to the center offers the most immersive experience for students, it offers other ways to use puppetry as a teaching tool. Through its outreach and digital learning programs, the center can come to you—physically or digitally. Outreach programs available in one’s classroom are customizable for one’s needs. The center’s award-winning digital learning team, with 20-plus years of online teaching experience, offers educational workshops and puppet shows that are both live AND interactive with one’s students. The center is confident that if one chooses a field trip, educational outreach, or digital learning program, using puppetry as a teaching tool will enrich and enhance the learning experience for one’s students. For more information, call 404-873-3391 or visit puppet.org.

SPECIAL PROMOTION

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ADVERTISER INDEX Boarding Schools

Admiral Farragut Academy................................65 Brandon Hall.......................................................66 The Brook Hill School.........................................73 Baylor School......................................................69 George School....................................................68 McCallie School..................................................70 Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School.........................66 Saint Mary’s School.............................................67 Salem Academy..................................................73 The Vanguard School.........................................65 The Webb School...............................................71

Charter Schools

Brookhaven Innovation Academy.....................76 Georgia Cyber Academy...................................75 International Charter School of Atlanta............76 The Main Street Academy.................................77

Early Education

Arbor Montessori School...................................53 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.............46 MJCCA Preschools.............................................47 Oak Grove Academy............................................7 The Suzuki School...............................................36

Field Trips & Education Programs

Atlanta History Center........................................88 Center For Puppetry Arts.....................................3 Interactive Neighborhood for Kids (INK)..........87 The Southern Museum.......................................87

Independent Schools

Arbor Montessori School...................................53 Athens Academy.................................................51 Atlanta Academy................................................49 Atlanta International School..............................38 Atlanta Montessori International Schools Cliff Valley Campus...............................................7 Atlanta Montessori International Schools Druid Hills Campus...............................................7 The Bedford School...........................................57 Bethlehem Christian Academy..........................52 Capstone Academy............................................51 Community Christian School.............................57 The Cottage School...........................................40 Counterpane Montessori School......................58 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................18 Eaton Academy..................................................43 Endeavor International School..................IBC, 91 Endeavor Montessori - Dunwoody............BC, 92 The Friends School of Atlanta...........................54 Fulton Science Academy Private School.... IFC, 2 Fusion Academy.................................................36 The Galloway School .........................................39 The Heritage School...........................................60 High Meadows School.......................................43 Holy Spirit Preparatory School............................5 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia....48 Loganville Christian Academy...........................54

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Summer/Fall 2022

The Lovett School...............................................62 Lyndon Academy................................................41 McGinnis Woods Country Day School.............46 MJCCA Preschools.............................................47 Mount Paran Christian School...........................63 Mount Pisgah Christian School........................ 48 Notre Dame Academy.......................................47 Oak Grove Academy............................................7 Oak Meadow Montessori School......................53 Omega Private Academy - Acworth.................62 Our World School...............................................11 Pace Academy....................................................38 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................46 Porter Academy..................................................40 Saint Francis School...........................................44 The Schenck School...........................................17 Springmont School.............................................39 St. Mary’s Academy............................................11 Still Waters International Academy...................55 Strong Rock Christian School............................58 The Suzuki School...............................................36 Trinity Christian School - Sharpsburg................60 The Walker School..............................................42 Wesleyan School.................................................49 Westminster Christian Academy.......................55 Whitefield Academy...........................................63 Woodward Academy..........................................59

Montessori Schools

Arbor Montessori School...................................53 Atlanta Montessori International Schools..........7 Counterpane Montessori School......................58 Endeavor International School..................IBC, 91 Endeavor Montessori - Dunwoody............BC, 92 Johns Creek Montessori School of Georgia......48 Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs.....BC, 92 Montessori at Vickery..................................BC, 92 Oak Meadow Montessori School......................53 Springmont School.............................................39

Resources & Services

ABLE Kids............................................................13 Dynamo Swim School.........................................31

Special Needs & Learning Difficulties

ABLE Kids............................................................13 The Bedford School...........................................57 The Cottage School...........................................40 Cumberland Academy of Georgia....................18 Our World School...............................................11 The Piedmont School of Atlanta.......................46 Porter Academy..................................................40 The Schenck School...........................................17

Summer Camps & Activities

Squirrel Hollow Day Camp.................................86 Zoo Atlanta..........................................................87

Tutoring & Study Skills

In-Home Tutors of Atlanta.................................86