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HASSELL: URBAN FUTURES HASSELL: DESIGNING PLACES PEOPLE LOVE | BOUTIQUE HOTEL TRANSFORMATION COMBINES OLD WITH THE NEW | A SENSE OF PLACE MOOOI WINGING IT | SCHIAVELLO BASICALLY BRILLIANT | LASVIT BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY | DEDON ISLANDS OF COMFORT

ISSUE

06

JUL - OCT | 2017

SINGAPORE | HONG KONG | MALAYSIA | INDONESIA | THAILAND | VIETNAM

HRDESIGN.ASIA


publisher’s note

MAKING HEADWAY It’s difficult to think about design without bearing the future in mind, for that would be overlooking its divine purpose. Be it purposefully devised urban environments, thoughtfully composed homes or finely crafted objects, designers share a common goal – to give rise to things and places that touch us in different yet profound ways, by changing our lives for the better.

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aunching H+R, the impetus was clear from the start. We vowed to put together a beautiful magazine that would not only offer a hard-sought visual escape from the more colourless aspects of the built environment, but one which would also relentlessly champion progressive design, thereby inspiring and informing our readers in the process. All these ambitions carry new weight in this issue. It’s been such an honour and a privilege to showcase so many distinguished heavyweights in one edition. I’d like to thank HASSELL for working with us and sharing its sublime projects. It’s been a pleasure to learn more about this incredible multidisciplinary studio as well as their empathetic works, which respectively aspire to connect individuals through meaning as well as a strong sense of belonging. Giorgetti and DEDON, who we are chuffed to welcome as an exciting new featuree, also deserve earnest shout-outs, as impressive brands bent on delivering revolutionary designs that enhance how we all live. Last but not least, thank you, dear reader, for the ongoing support. As usual, we couldn’t have done it without you, and can only hope these pages come through as an embodiment of our respect and appreciation. Enjoy the issue… Kenneth Khu k@kennethmedia.asia

MARIPOSA CLUB SOFA by Edward Barber & Jay Osgerby VITRA

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OFFICE CONCEPT V10N2 JULY EDITION 2017

ATLASSIAN STATE OF MIND

ORGANIC JUNGLE WHERE DREAMS ARE MADE OF

HOME AWAY FROM HOME WORKING IN A WOOL SHED HAS NEVER BEEN MORE COMFORTABLE. POSITIVE POSITIONING CREATED SPECIFICALLY WITH THE WELLBEING OF STAFFERS IN MIND, NAVI TEAMISLAND IS A MULTIFACETED OFFICE FURNITURE SYSTEM THAT ENHANCES COLLABORATION THROUGH THOUGHTFUL TOUCHES AND SMART DESIGN.

FREE DIGITAL VERSION OF OC MAGAZINE WHEN YOU SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER AT SUBSCRIBE.OC@KENNETHMEDIA.ASIA.


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90° MINUTO by Adriano Design GIORGETTI HARBOR by Naoto Fukasawa B&B ITALIA

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BITTA by Rodolf Dordoni KETTAL SAHARA by Rossella Pugliatti GIORGETTI


team & partner

editorial MANAGING EDITOR Kenneth Khu DEPUTY EDITOR Pang Yin Ying EDITOR Christine Lee design ART DIRECTOR Eric Phoon SENIOR DESIGNER Sandy Liew contributors WRITERS Adele Chong, Dorothy Lung, Giovanni Lee DESIGN ARCHITECT HASSELL

credits PHOTOS: Except otherwise noted, all photos and drawings are owned by HASSELL. acknowledgement COVER: Sky Central - London, United Kingdom by HASSELL

sales & marketing SENIOR SALES MANAGER Edward Chen SALES EXECUTIVE Kelvin Ong publication PUBLISHER Kenneth Khu enquiries ADVERTISING advertising.hr@kennethmedia.asia SUBMIT EDITORIAL get.featured@kennethmedia.asia CONTRIBUTOR join.us@kennethmedia.asia SUBSCRIPTION subscribe.hr@kennethmedia.asia website www.hrdesign.asia | www.kennethmedia.asia contact KENNETH MEDIA SDN BHD 1002 Block D Tiara Kelana Jalan SS7/19 Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor Malaysia. T: +603 7887 4525 printer PERCETAKAN IMPRINT (M) SDN BHD No.538, Jalan 20 Taman Perindustrian Ehsan Jaya, Kepong 52100 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. permit number KDN PP18850/09/2015(034307) MCI(P) 044/01/2017 magazine H+R | HOSPITALITY+RESIDENTIAL is published three times a year and is circulated throughout the Asia-Pacific region. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily endorsed by the publisher. copyright notice All rights, including copyright, in the content of this publication are owned by Kenneth Media Sdn Bhd, Malaysia. You are not permitted to copy, broadcast, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change any in any way the content of this publication for any other purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of Kenneth Media Sdn Bhd, Malaysia.

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PUBLISHED BY


mélange | product

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TIPPING POINT

FAIR AND SQUARE

QUALITY OVER QUANTITY

Trust Dutch design house Moooi to revel in turning yet another everyday design on its head. Emanating the panache characteristic of a Marcel Wanders’ signature work, the Charleston is a classic sofa tipped precariously on its side to wondrous effect. Featuring dark leather upholstery with embroidered elements, this playful number is at once humorous and timelessly elegant. Its slightly askew position lends itself to the impression of dancing a jig, further doing justice to the sofa’s high-spirited moniker.

The iconic works of Arne Jacobsen have long been celebrated within and beyond the borders of the designer’s native Denmark. Several decades after the designs were first introduced, they continue to be revered for their striking forms and emphasis on details. Though a distinct departure from the soft lines frequently associated with his many works, the Oksen remains audibly sculptural. Brandishing sharp, angular components, this stunning lounge chair – inspired in part by American recliner chairs – brims with style and authority.

Vying for a cosy yet modern chaise that won’t infringe on your modestly sized interiors? This affable sofa from Vitra’s Mariposa Club collection is the perfect pick in our books. Designed in collaboration with designer duo Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, the sofa’s slimline body offers maximum seating comfort without putting a strain on compact living rooms. Its upholstery is remarkably soft, complemented by a wide range of customisable colours and fabrics. A matching armchair sets the stage for an intimate gathering area.

MOOOI.COM

FRITZHANSEN.COM

VITRA.COM

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WINGED WONDER

COOL AND CUDDLY

GETTING IN SHAPE

This lovely armchair and stool set by Giorgetti is, in our humble opinion, enticing enough to brave a desert storm for. Winged and glorious, every inch of Sahara was crafted with enduring relaxation in mind. The hinged sides of its seat and backrest correspond harmoniously to the sitter’s movements while sumptuously padded upholstery softly cushions one’s body. Painted champagne to match the chair’s warm beige hue, the base accommodates gentle rocking movements, allowing for hours of deep repose.

The first thing to note about a Rolf Benz piece is the German furniture brand’s stringent attention to quality materials and craftsmanship. This laidback seat design epitomises exactly that and more while letting users kick back with casual abandon. The chair’s ample cushioning is brought out through its luxuriously pleated upholstery, be it supple leather or soft fabric. Featuring generous dimensions to go with its larger-than-life personality, the 584 triumphs as a dream armchair or a loveseat for two.

Fresh off turning heads at Salone de Mobile, these vibrant textile creations by London-based designers Doshi and Levien instantly instill a newfound appreciation for coordinated colour schemes. Exploring the interplay of different geometries, the designs turn the spotlight on lines and solid colours that come together to create a spatial layered effect as well as tiny rectangular blocks that culminate in a fine mélange. Aptly dubbed Block and Line, the rugs come in two perky sizes.

GIORGETTI.EU

ROLF-BENZ.COM

KETTAL.COM


mélange | product

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VITAL LINK

WIDE RANGE

COMING TO ROOST

Adaptability and elegance reign supreme with this noteworthy chair design by Rolf Benz. The German furniture brand has once again succeeded in creating a piece that exudes equal parts style and substance. Inspired by two intertwined hands, this artfully composed chair comes with an oak or walnut shell and several base options for optimal comfort. A quilted cover in customisable colours, produced in recycled polyester or PVC, caps off the design, making a serious style statement.

The notion of kicking back and relaxing is taken to a head with Jackson, an unusual new swivel chair design by Dutch designer Marcel Wanders. A colossal backrest has been playfully installed as an eye-catching feature, providing a generous surface for repose in the process. Perusing Jackson’s extensive array of upholstery choices, we are particularly in love with the black embroidered leather option, which conveys a posh yet wonderfully eccentric look and feel. Available with matching footstool.

Part of Kettal’s recently launched outdoor furniture range, the Bitta chair gives way to romantic thoughts of wandering through a laidback seaside hamlet. Designed by Rodolfo Dordoni, this fetching chair design, featuring a combination of aluminum frames with braided polyester cords, takes a visual cue from the braiding of the ropes used to moor boats. At once rustic and refined, a lightweight appearance and a subdued palette render Bitta a cozy nest to nestle into.

ROLF-BENZ.COM

MOOOI.COM

KETTAL.COM

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TOP GEAR

BACK ME UP

PORT OF CALL

Sporty and sleek, the Drive collection by Giorgetti is true to its debonair namesake. An aerodynamic feel is conveyed through the collection’s thoughtful arrangement of clean lines and gentle curves. Maintaining its sumptuous shape, the Drive sofa’s flexible multi-density polyurethane padding keeps things simultaneously firm and plush while showcasing the luxurious leather or fabric upholstery. Drive’s winning streak continues with subtly opulent details such as feet made from solid walnut Canaletto wood and paired with bronze-toned inserts.

A good night’s sleep may be the chief impetus, but that isn’t all a bed is useful for. Newbridge is a uniquely devised bed that covers all the bases with respect to living, sleeping and resting. Chock-full of personality, Newbridge’s padded base is framed by a low headboard accompanied by two strategically placed bedside units raised slightly off the ground. As a lavish finishing touch, large reclining pillows lend themselves to uncompromised support while reading or watching television.

Japanese designer Naoto Fukasawa brings his distinct brand of magic to Harbor, a pair of shapely armchairs that endearingly embraces the sitter’s body. Composed of ergonomically developed forms perched atop swivel bases, the two designs - a high back model with headrest and a conversation armchair with a low back – draw respectively on Fukasawa’s ongoing research on upside-down truncated cone shaped seats. Adding to the duo, a charming ottoman with a tray component may be used as an adjoining table or footstool.

GIORGETTI.EU

FLEXFORM.IT

BEBITALIA.COM


mélange | product

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GAME, SET, MATCH

SIDE NOTE

PRETTY PLAITS

A posh table football table might seem like the ultimate contradiction but the playful designers at Giorgetti have gone ahead and made this notion a reality. Fitted with a sensuously curved basin and featuring extra-clear crystal sides, 90 MINUTO is a swanked up version of the pub-style pastime. Available in several different hues and boasting saddle leathercovered wood as well as bronzed aluminum rods, the table’s exquisite make adds a dash of panache to grown-up play areas.

As enchanting as the Italian mushrooms it’s named after, the Porcini collection brings the focus back to beautiful shapes and rich tactility. Coming in three different heights, base styles and two elegant colorways, these winsome side tables make a pretty picture when combined with any DEDON collection. Full of personality, each piece is distinctive in its own right, whether opting for the all-ceramic model, one brandishing woven weatherproof DEDON fibre or a shorter example featuring a hidden basket storage.

A combination of transparent and light surfaces, the Cala collection’s diverse materiality makes it truly one of a kind. Colourful textiles and bold forms dominate its aesthetic, resulting in a striking visual presence sure to perk up any living space. The woven, latticed rope backrest gives way to large curves as well as a net-like formation – airy and lightweight, this feature also makes Cala pieces, such as this charming sofa, a practical choice in warmer climates with high humidity.

GIORGETTI.EU

DEDON.DE

KETTAL.COM

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INDUSTRIAL CHIC

LINE ‘EM UP

SERVES YOU RIGHT

The progressive French metalworker, designer and engineer Jean Prouvé worked with the belief that modern technology would not compromise the aesthetic of design – rather, he surmised that the former would succeed in informing the latter. Innovative creations from his workshop, including the Chair Standard, proved him right. A variant of this design, the Standard SR’s lightweight make owes a debt to Prouvé’s expertise in managing static weight loads, culminating in a streamlined piece with a future-forward outlook.

Contrary to what the name insinuates, it’s often impossible to truly relegate sideboards to the side, given their expansive presence. Rolf Benz’s CUBO begs to differ with its purist, non-intrusive aesthetic. Stylishly pared back, the design of this handsomely crafted piece is aptly reflective of the German furniture maker’s ultra-modern approach and feeling for craftsmanship. Made up of 20 boxes that can be arranged in a multiplicity of ways, this versatile sideboard celebrates minimalist pragmatism to the fullest.

Though we simply can’t get enough of Cabaré’s romantic-sounding moniker, we love the design of this gorgeous Flexform side table even more. Proving that function can indeed be sexy, this sensibly devised number oozes Italian-style elegance while literally serving up the goods. Fitted with two overlapping shelves and a sleek metal tray on the upper level, the latter can also be removed and used as a standalone serving tray, doing justice to Flexform’s reputation for adaptable, high-quality wares.

VITRA.COM

ROLF-BENZ.COM

FLEXFORM.IT


mĂŠlange | lighting

WINGING IT If you are looking for a delightfully original way of bringing a feeling of the outdoors into your home, what could be better than a poetic bird hanging lamp-cum-sculpture? Sensitively crafted by London-based architect and designer Umut Yamac for Moooi, the Perch Light Branch features a series of folded paper birds rendered aglow on an elegant brass rod. Gently mobile, the birds swing at the slightest touch, captivating the viewer with a sense of grace and motion.

MOOOI.COM

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mélange | plastic shell chair

BASICALLY BRILLIANT A REFRESHED TAKE ON A TRIED AND TRUSTED CLASSIC, SCHIAVELLO’S NEWEST BESTSELLER MAKES A SPLASH BY TAKING THE QUINTESSENTIAL SHELL CHAIR TO BOLD NEW HEIGHTS.

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THIS PICTURE: Melding timeless design with state-of-the-art materials, MR Chair encompasses the best of the past and the present.


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TOP: Lightweight and stackable, the steel tube base option is especially ideal for training environments.

BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: The chair’s versatile look and feel renders it an asset in the home or at the workplace.


“MR CHAIR’S SUITE OF OPTIONS FOR THE FRAME, THE CUSHIONING AND THE SHELL COLOUR ADD UP TO 75 POSSIBLE VARIANTS THROUGH WHICH DESIGNERS CAN RESPOND TO THE PARTICULAR FUNCTIONAL AND STYLISTIC REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR PROJECT.” MARIO RUIZ, DESIGNER

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onceived by award-winning Spanish designer Mario Ruiz, the MR Chair drew direct inspiration from Ruiz’s fascination with nostalgia and his desire to reinterpret products or objects that have made an impact on modern-day culture. MR Chair’s unassuming veneer is ultimate proof that appearances can be deceiving. While the MR Chair may look fairly conventional at first glance, its humble shell alone represents three years’ worth of painstaking trial and error. In view of a piece that would accommodate just the right amount of flex and stability in the seatback while staying true to the chair’s iconic form, the experts at Schiavello developed a special mineral fibre filled plastic that would allow for uncompromised support and comfort while seated. Surpassing the strength and durability of normal plastics, MR Chair’s shell is also lightweight to boot, making it a cinch to transport. What makes MR Chair truly unique is the option to customise the chair according to users’ preferences. Referencing an MR Chair menu, one is free to choose from a range of shell options as well as a selection of five different base types, culminating in 75 possible design variants. Available in plastic, fabric, leather and vinyl applied as a fully upholstered chair or slip on cover and slip pad, the shell comes in a multiplicity of shapes and forms. The base is similarly varied; in addition to a canister-equipped option, steel tube, cantilever or sled legs are also on offer as stackable alternatives. Remarkably multifaceted, MR Chair’s understated appearance belies the intricate process behind its realisation, becoming part and parcel of its charm.

TOP: The MR Chair menu offers a variety of appealing add-ons, including a seat pad option for an extra luxe touch.

BOTTOM: The MR Chair’s shell is made from mineral fibre filled plastic, which gives way to ample flex and support.

SCHIAVELLO.COM


mélange | lighting architecture

ILLUMINATING A COASTAL JEWEL 30

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ILLUMINATE LIGHTING DESIGN ROSE TO THE CHALLENGE OF LIGHTING THE SHANGRI-LA RESORT AND SPA AT HAMBANTOTA, A SECLUDED LUXURY PROPERTY ALONG THE PRISTINE SOUTHERN COASTLINE OF SRI LANKA. WITH SENSITIVITY AND SINCERITY TO CREATE A MAGICAL EXPERIENCE, THE LIGHTING DESIGNERS CRAFTED A GEM THAT GLOWS ENCHANTINGLY IN THE EVENING. THIS PICTURE: The heart of the resort is prominently lit to welcome travelers and give a sense of arrival.


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THIS PICTURE: Paying homage to local craftsmanship, light bathes art sculpture and enhances the beauty of the place. In this photo, the elephant sculpture was lit to look like it glows from within.


Text: Illuminate Lighting Design

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ased out of Singapore, Illuminate Lighting Design created fun, dramatic but complementary lighting schemes to the architecture and landscape of The Shangri-La Resorts and Spa at Hambantota. The team creatively and successfully brought out the soulful side of the charming tropical architecture for all that visit the resort. Spanning across 56 hectare, the resort itself comprised a main building, a few man-made lagoons, coastal areas, a natural lake and a golf course. It was a spectacular sight during the day, but in the evening darkness called for lighting designers to be imaginative in setting the scenes and playing up the possible scenarios to entice travellers. Beyond lighting performance, the task was really to create a memorable experience. Claire Riley, associate and lead lighting designer for the project said, “Given that the site was so remote and expansive, one of the main challenges was to balance the lighting design for safety, visual interests and rhythm of place to match the quiet darkness surrounding the development at night time. All too often in landscape lighting the contrast levels are too great and one needed to find the balance of accent and infill in order to create a spectacular vista and to find a unity and cohesiveness between spaces.� She found that the impressive lagoon pools in the resort could be used to great advantage by illuminating the pools effectively at night so that they took on a special role within the nightscape and became a vast

TOP: Point of interests and focal areas that encourage discovery in the interior and landscape of The Shangri-La Resort and Spa at Hambantota


“ULTIMATELY, I BELIEVE A RESORT LIGHTING SCHEME SHOULD BE MAGICAL IN CREATING THAT SENSE OF ESCAPISM BY ENCOURAGING EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY AT NIGHT TIME.” CLAIRE RILEY, ASSOCIATE ILLUMINATE LIGHTING DESIGN

ambient lanterns for the external vista. By introducing ‘Moonlighting’ to this landscape, picture a dappling silhouette unfolded between the pools to dramatic effect, which provided pathways and routes throughout the exterior. This landscape lighting effect established a sense of wonder and discovery along pathways, leading towards focal points and architectural destinations. The night time arrival at the resort treated guests to a spectacle of wonder. From the entrance gates to the main reception building, a meandering tree-lined journey was led by strings of suspended rattan lanterns that hung rhythmically between coconut trees. These lanterns were specially designed by Illuminate and constructed with ambient festoon lighting within a rattan enclosure, which highlighted the envelope of

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TOP: At the outdoor private dining area low level lighting create pools of light that invite guests to view further into the landscape.

the lantern whilst integrating a suspended can downlight that gave ethereal pools of light to the driveway. The usage and materiality of the lanterns echoed the landscape lighting language adopted elsewhere. This amazing welcome evening scene set the stage and built a level of anticipation at the adventure waiting inside this beautiful property. These arrival lanterns were explored further in various shapes and forms and were used to a great effect to create a cohesive language throughout the resort. A lantern hierarchy was created along the pedestrian pathways, entertainment and activity zones, which created pockets of contemplation and destination, announcing private balcony gardens and nodal intersections. For instance, lighting for the smaller pathways took the fun form of artisanal


THIS PICTURE: Lighting from the lanterns above and along the perimeter of the deck give illumination the Al Fresco Dining Area and create a festive mood.


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THIS PICTURE: The different colour temperature used in the lagoon pool and the waterfall create an interesting sight, blending atmospherically with the view of sunset during the golden hour.


“WE FOUND THAT THE IMPRESSIVE LAGOON POOLS COULD BE USED TO A GREAT ADVANTAGE BY ILLUMINATING THESE EECTIVELY AT NIGHT SO THAT THEY TOOK ON A SPECIAL ROLE WITHIN THE NIGHTSCAPE AND BECAME A VAST AMBIENT LANTERNS FOR THE EXTERNAL VISTA.” CLAIRE RILEY, ASSOCIATE ILLUMINATE LIGHTING DESIGN

woven basket bollards that grounded the look with local aesthetics whilst projected dramatic patterns on the floor. Tikki torcheres were also used to frame key vistas and added a sense of warmth and texture to the landscape environment. This journey of discovery continued into the interior, where lighting embellished the design finishes and structures by paying homage to the many sculptural elephant collections and highlighted the tropical architectural features. “We paid close attention to the art collections because it tells a story about the place. By bringing these pieces to life through lighting, we directed the gaze and added another layer of interest to the visual experience. What was so exciting about this collection in particular was the many varied materials that each sculpture incorporated and how different lighting effects and treatments brought out the most dramatic effects. A fabulous example of this was at the lobby where the impressive wire mesh elephant was lit to look like it literally glowed with light,” said Riley. In the evening, the interior radiated warmth and comfort that extended all the way to the guestrooms as invitation for guests to relax and unwind. There were also alfresco dining areas that featured candle lights and candlelit lighting effects, creating an intimate ambiance as the perfect backdrop to watch the setting sun. “Ultimately, I believe a resort lighting scheme should be magical in creating that sense of escapism by encouraging exploration and discovery at night time. It was the cohesiveness of all these elements that set The Shangri-La Resorts and Spa at Hambantota apart and resulted in a conducive and atmospheric stage for all to enjoy; one in which I personally look forward to return to.’’

ILLUMINATELD.COM


showcase | hassell - profile

DESIGNING PLACES PEOPLE LOVE CREATING PLACES PEOPLE LOVE DRIVES THE TEAM AT INTERNATIONAL DESIGN PRACTICE HASSELL. ESTABLISHED IN 1938 IN AUSTRALIA, HASSELL HAS DRAWN ON THIS PHILOSOPHY TO BECOME ONE OF THE MOST SOUGHT-AFTER DESIGN PARTNERS INTERNATIONALLY WITH STUDIOS IN CHINA, SOUTH EAST ASIA, AUSTRALIA, THE UNITED KINGDOM AND MOST RECENTLY, SAN FRANCISCO, USA.

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BOTTOM LEFT TO RIGHT: The design for The Great Room Offices in Singapore strikes a balance between contemporary luxury and timeless professionalism, appealing to those who are increasingly choosing a mobile, flexible work life.


“URBANISATION, GLOBALISATION AND RAPIDLY EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY ARE IMPACTING ON THE WAY WE LIVE, LEARN, WORK AND PLAY. IN THE CURRENT ‘AGE OF EXPERIENCE’ THE CONSTANT AND INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT FACTOR IS THAT SPACES MUST BE DESIGNED FROM THE INDIVIDUAL USERS’ PERSPECTIVE TO REMAIN ATTRACTIVE, COMPETITIVE AND PRODUCTIVE – IT’S ABOUT UNLOCKING THE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL VALUE FOR OUR CLIENTS AND THEIR END USERS.” GERARD CORCORAN, HASSELL CEO

IMAGE CREDIT: > WAM - HASSELL + OMA (Renders by Bloomimages) > The Great Room - EK Yap

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he multidisciplinary practice, which spans architecture, interiors, urban design, landscape architecture and user experience design, has a long list of city-shaping projects across a broad range of sectors. These include commercial and workplace, transport, health, education, urban design, art and culture, retail, hospitality, and sport and entertainment. HASSELL CEO Gerard Corcoran says HASSELL is continuously looking beyond the traditional boundaries of architecture and design, developing new and innovative ways to continually deliver value to both clients and the people who use the spaces. “Our recent merger with UK-based global user experience agency FreeState, who work globally and have collaborated with some of the world’s largest brands including Sony, Nokia and Virgin Atlantic, has added to our overall offering for clients,” Gerard said. “Urbanisation, globalisation and rapidly evolving technology are impacting on the way we live, learn, work and play. In the current ‘age of experience’ the constant and increasingly important factor is that spaces must be designed from the individual users’ perspective to remain attractive, competitive and productive – it’s about unlocking the social, economic and cultural value for our clients and their end users,” he said. HASSELL Managing Director Steve Coster says a primary focus for HASSELL is designing places that enable engaging, memorable experiences that attract and involve people - sparking an emotional connection. “With a vision to design the world’s best places

and working with FreeState’s proprietary Experience Master Planning methodology we put people at the centre, imagining their ideal journey and experience, moment by moment, as the basis for creating engaging, meaningful and memorable experiences, buildings and places,” Steve said. “This process, which we often employ at the outset of our research-based design process, is highly powerful in connecting brands, places and spaces to transform them into extraordinary curated experiences, and delivers a competitive advantage for our clients,” he said. Recent city-shaping projects designed by HASSELL include the high profile Hongkou North Bund Waterfront Masterplan in Shanghai, Perth Stadium and the New Museum for Western Australia (a joint venture with OMA) in Perth, Australia and ICC Sydney in the city’s iconic Darling Harbour, where HASSELL was joint venture partners with Populous for the design of the new convention, exhibition and entertainment venues, in addition to the masterplan and public realm. HASSELL has also delivered a number of significant global headquarters in recent times, including the award-winning Sky Central in London, Lend Lease Headquarters in Sydney’s prominent Barangaroo development, pharmaceutical giant GSK’s Asian headquarters in Singapore and China Resources Group headquarters, as well as a host of sophisticated co-working spaces including The Working Capitol and The Great Room Offices, both in Singapore.

TOP LEFT TO RIGHT: The New Museum for Western Australia will create a civic place for everyone, an interesting mix of heritage and contemporary architecture that helps revitalise the Perth Cultural Centre while celebrating the culture of Western Australia on the world stage.

HASSELLSTUDIO.COM


showcase | hassell - mixed use

IMAGE CREDIT: > HASSELL/Doug & Wolf

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

97 FRANKLIN STREET

GOLD RESIDENTIAL TOWER DESIGNED TO BE A MELBOURNE LANDMARK A 62-STOREY TOWER THAT TWISTS 210M INTO THE SKY WITH APARTMENTS, COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL OPPORTUNITIES IS A CONCEPT WHICH, IF REALISED, WILL BECOME AN IMMEDIATE LANDMARK ON THE MELBOURNE CITY SKYLINE, ACCORDING TO INTERNATIONAL DESIGN PRACTICE, HASSELL. LEFT: Gold grids and slender profiles add a fine grain to the building’s appearance.

RIGHT: The tower features three distinct stacked and rotated elements.


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esigned for Holder East, the mixed use tower at 97 Franklin Street features three distinct elements – a podium, low-rise section and high rise tower which will be placed on top of each other with each element rotated to maximise city views and lightflow. With a bold and distinctive façade of gold grids and slender profiles that add a fine grain to the building’s appearance, HASSELL Principal Ben Duckworth says the tower will have a unique identity and take full advantage of the site. “The generous proportions of the site make it possible to rotate the elements and create elbow room between this project and its neighbours,” he says. “The podium is set back from Franklin St and will house the lobby, a restaurant, café, around 140 serviced apartments and a ground level forecourt that includes an urban forest accessible to the general public, and a new pedestrian connection through a proposed laneway on the site’s western boundary.”

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TOP: The tower’s unique identity would take full advantage of its prominent Flinders Street location.


THIS PICTURE: Rotated elements maximise city views and light flow.


“THE GENEROUS PROPORTIONS OF THE SITE MAKE IT POSSIBLE TO ROTATE THE ELEMENTS AND CREATE ELBOW ROOM BETWEEN THIS PROJECT AND ITS NEIGHBOURS.” BEN DUCKWORTH, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

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THIS PICTURE: A forecourt offers public access to an urban forest and new pedestrian connections.


THIS PICTURE: 62 storeys of mixed use 210 metres into the sky.


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THIS PICTURE: The midrise section atop the podium maximises exposure to the sun.


Sitting atop the podium is the mid-rise section, which will be perpendicular to the street to capture sunlight from the north and draw it all the way into the site. The tower’s 360-plus residential apartments will be contained in the high-rise tower, rotated 90 degrees from the low-rise element to maximise exposure to the sun. “Orienting the southern face of the tower along the city grid will capture morning and afternoon sun and give residents northerly views of the city as well as vistas to the south of Melbourne’s CBD,” Ben said. “They’ll also share communal lounge and dining facilities which sit at the tower’s rotation point and extend into the terraces on top of the central volume. “This is a high-rise residential tower that will offer great homes, give back to the city with a unique identity and behave like a good neighbour.” He said.

TOP: 97 Franklin St will become a landmark in Melbourne’s CBD.


showcase | hassell - hospitality

BOUTIQUE HOTEL TRANSFORMATION COMBINES OLD WITH THE NEW AN ICONIC 1900S COLONIAL HERITAGE BUILDING IN ONE OF SINGAPORE’S BUSIEST AREAS IS READY FOR ITS NEXT CHAPTER THANKS TO A REFURBISHMENT THAT’S SENSITIVE TO ITS HISTORY AND EMBRACES ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD’S CURRENT INCARNATION.

IMAGE CREDIT: > EK Yap

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SINGAPORE

THE CLUB

THIS PICTURE: The Club design draws on the 1900s colonial heritage building.


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THIS PICTURE: Curated artworks, understated luxury and warm materials feature throughout The Club.


“WITH ALL BARS AND RESTAURANTS UNDER THE ONE ROOF, GUESTS CAN WHILE AWAY A DAY OR TWO WITHOUT HAVING TO LEAVE. THE BARS AND RESTAURANTS EXCEED STANDARD HOTEL OFFERINGS, EACH FEATURING A DISTINCT PERSONALITY AND TARGETED TO DIFFERENT TIMES OF THE DAY.” PAUL SEMPLE, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

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he Club, designed by Singapore design studio Distillery, now part of HASSELL, is a boutique hotel owned by Harry’s International, which occupies three historic corner shophouses on Singapore’s Ann Siang Road. Reimagined as a collection of five food and beverage venues and 20 guest rooms – each with their own unique style – The Club is a venue that immediately fits into its setting within the vibrant Club Street dining and nightlife precinct. Paul Semple, HASSELL Principal and global head of hospitality, says the philosophy behind The Club’s design was to ensure it was as welcoming as a members club, while providing the familiarity of home. “It’s about creating a sense of belonging,” Paul said. “With all bars and restaurants under the one roof, guests can while away a day or two without having to leave. The bars and restaurants exceed standard hotel offerings, each featuring a distinct personality and targeted to different times of the day.”

TOP: Bold art and use of colour in the corridors complement the heritage panelled walls and features.


Paul says in order to accommodate the expanded hospitality venues, the number of guest rooms were reconfigured, allowing The Club to offer more generously proportioned rooms in addition to suites. “By reducing the number of rooms, we’ve introduced more natural light into the corridors. There’s now a sense of discovery as guests make their way along passageways layered with paintings, sculptures and mementos,” Paul said. “Furthermore, no two guestrooms are the same, but the feeling that guests have been invited into someone’s home is consistent across all the guestrooms. A layered design approach combines specially curated and unique artworks, understated luxury and warm materials to complement the building’s heritage.” Paul says The Club’s heritage building setting makes an impact. “Singapore conservation guidelines ensure we’ve retained and respected the original façade, and painting the original timber shutters a vibrant red connects it further to its Chinatown location. And by drawing the public from Club Street’s bars, restaurants and clubs into Ann Siang Road, The Club extends the precinct and increases the buzz into the street’s upper side,” he said. “The Club has successfully breathed new life into an under-utilised establishment in the neighborhood.”

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TOP: Generously proportioned rooms are designed to give guests the feeling of being invited into someone’s home.

BOTTOM: No two guest rooms are the same.


“BY REDUCING THE NUMBER OF ROOMS, WE’VE INTRODUCED MORE NATURAL LIGHT INTO THE CORRIDORS. THERE’S NOW A SENSE OF DISCOVERY AS GUESTS MAKE THEIR WAY ALONG PASSAGEWAYS LAYERED WITH PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES AND MEMENTOS.” PAUL SEMPLE, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

THIS PICTURE: Carefully curated mementos and sculptures in common areas add to its distinct style.


showcase | hassell - hospitality

REDEFINING THE BRICK AND MORTAR RETAIL EXPERIENCE THE PROOF FLAT ANSWERS THE CHALLENGE NOW FACING BRICK AND MORTAR RETAILING – CREATING A UNIQUE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE THAT ONE-DIMENSIONAL ONLINE RETAILING CAN’T MATCH.

IMAGE CREDIT: > EK Yap

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SINGAPORE

THE PROOF FLAT

THIS PICTURE: Visitors are invited to browse through the library featuring hand-picked titles on spirits and cocktail making.


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he first foray into retail for Proof & Company Spirits, renowned in Singapore for its awardwinning bar concepts 28 HongKong Street and Manhattan Bar, the apartment salon concept was created by Crafty and realised by HASSELL. HASSELL Principal Matthew Shang says The Proof Flat is presented as a home to a fictitious advocate for extraordinary spirits, E.C Proof, to deliver a truly unique retail and brand experience. “The challenge now for retail is to harness the potential of its ‘software’ by offering consumers intimate and tactile experiences that the digital world can’t match,”. Matthew said. “Warmth and a spirit of hospitality can become true drawcards for brick and mortar retailers.” Situated on the second floor of a 1940s’ Singapore shop house, Matthew says the design for The Proof Flat sought to balance the contemporary with the traditional, referencing the context of the building and Hong Kong Street itself. “The Proof Flat infuses the highest standards of hospitality and place making to create a fictional world of privilege and luxury - a highly personalised

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environment far removed from the usual retail experience,” he said. “The apartment was imagined as a place where E.C. Proof would host friends and together, they would relax with bartenders and distillers. The customer needed to feel like they were being welcomed into someone’s home – the home of a connoisseur of artisan spirits.” At the apartment, visitors can purchase from the curated bottle collection or browse through the library which stocks a range of hand-picked titles about spirits and cocktail making. Guests may even be invited to explore EC’s hidden vault of spirits. While resembling a small and exclusively appointed apartment, The Proof Flat has also been designed to host small functions, workshops and training sessions by visiting international spirit makers and bar experts. “Every part of the design enables the master distillers and bartenders to showcase their craft,” Matthew said. “The design brief was about taking a whole new approach to retail, with a focus on creating an experience and a destination in its own right. This discreet

TOP: The Proof Flat delivers a truly unique retail and brand experience.


“THE PROOF FLAT INFUSES THE HIGHEST STANDARDS OF HOSPITALITY AND PLACE MAKING TO CREATE A FICTIONAL WORLD OF PRIVILEGE AND LUXURY - A HIGHLY PERSONALISED ENVIRONMENT FAR REMOVED FROM THE USUAL RETAIL EXPERIENCE.” MATTHEW SHANG, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

THIS PICTURE: The apartment salon design concept strives to create a sense of intrigue and mystery through its furnishings.


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TOP: Customised furniture pieces from Indonesia sit comfortably against the blue teal spelling.

BOTTOM: Despite its resemblance to a discreet flat in Hong Kong Street, the space also doubles as an intimate event space.


“EVERY PART OF THE DESIGN ENABLES THE MASTER DISTILLERS AND BARTENDERS TO SHOWCASE THEIR CRAFT.” MATTHEW SHANG, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

style of retail reminds me of the Comme De Garcons guerrilla stores that appeared during the 1990s in somewhat obscure sites around a city.” The styling of the space is based on E.C Proof’s personality, striving to create a sense of mystery and prompt questions about the origin of furnishings. “For instance, an oriental rug from Turkey, reindeer pelts and real portraits of now fictionalised characters create a playful narrative between the real and the imagined,” said Matthew. “Customised artworks reflect the distillers and partners that Proof works with. “We were imagining who E.C. Proof would be, what was his background, and what would be his relationship with this curious, discreet flat in Hong Kong Street, Singapore.” A neutral palette of whites and marble floors complements rich glossy cabinetry and panelling of teal blue with burgundy contrasts. Customised furniture pieces from Indonesia are crafted in champagne gold stainless steel and dark timbers. The result is a delighted client. “Our longtime Collaborators in Chief, Matt Shang and Paul Semple, translated our vision perfectly, and the results show: nearly every visitor to the space comments passionately about it,” said Proof & Co founder and owner, Spencer Forhart. “The design not only achieved its purpose, it generates an organic, authentic, impact. This is what design and architecture is supposed to do.”

THIS PICTURE: A curated bottle collection is showcased.


showcase | hassell - retail

“HASSELL BROUGHT A DEEP UNDERSTANDING OF THE TRADITIONAL HAKKA CULTURE TO THE PROJECT, AND BECAUSE OF THIS WAS ABLE TO SUCCESSFULLY BLEND A MODERN DESIGN LANGUAGE AND TRADITIONAL ELEMENTS. THE CENTRE WILL GIVE VISITORS A UNIQUE JOURNEY AND UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHILOSOPHY THAT PEARL RED ALWAYS ENDEAVOURS TO DELIVER THROUGH OUR PRODUCTS.” YUNLONG ZHANG, PEARL RED OWNER AND DIRECTOR

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THIS PICTURE: Tasting bar lounge for guests to sample Pearl Red products after touring the distillery and exhibition halls.


XINGNING, CHINA

PEARL RED EXPERIENCE CENTRE AND HEADQUARTERS

CONTEMPORARY DESIGN MEETS CHINESE TRADITION

IMAGE CREDIT: > HASSELL

HAKKA HUANGJIU IS A TYPE OF YELLOW CHINESE RICE WINE THAT HAS BEEN IN PRODUCTION FOR OVER A THOUSAND YEARS AND IS PART OF THE MIJIU RICE WINE FAMILY. ITS UNIQUE BREWING TECHNIQUE HAS BEEN PRESERVED IN SOUTHERN CHINA AND THE BRANDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE WINES ARE ALSO TYPICALLY TRADITIONAL. TOP: Private dining room.


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earl Red has been making Hakka huangjiu the traditional way for over 60 years. But more recent generations – represented by Yunlong and Shishi Zhang – decided it was time to forge a new path when they took over the Pearl Red family business. They wanted to revitalise their brand, connect more deeply with their customers and draw in an untapped younger audience at the same time. At the site of their new manufacturing plant, Yunlong and Shishi wanted to create a brand and visitor centre where people could go on a ‘mijiu journey’, experiencing the history and craft behind its production firsthand. Designing for a brand rooted no other projects have subs In a rapidly changing country, the Pearl Red Experience Centre in Xingning celebrates and preserves the culture and traditions unique to this Hakka huangjiuproducing region. HASSELL created the interior concepts for the complex, which includes the experience centre as well as a restaurant, bar, cafe, tasting room, lounge and workplace for Pearl Red staff.

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TOP: Reception and gift shop.

BOTTOM: Tasting bar overlooking the adjacent tea plantation.


“HASSELL CREATED THE INTERIOR CONCEPTS FOR THE COMPLEX, WHICH INCLUDES THE EXPERIENCE CENTRE AS WELL AS A RESTAURANT, BAR, CAFE, TASTING ROOM, LOUNGE AND WORKPLACE FOR PEARL RED STAFF.”

BOTTOM: Exhibition hall (Level 1) demonstrating the history of Pearl Red.


“ONE OF THE WAYS WE DID THIS WAS BY INCORPORATING ONE OF THE ICONIC ELEMENTS OF HAKKA CULTURE - WEILONGWU. THEY ARE ENCLOSED, SEMICIRCULAR WALLED STRUCTURES WITH PONDS THAT TOGETHER FORM A CIRCULAR SHAPE. WE WERE GUIDED BY MANY OF THE FENG SHUI PRINCIPLES TYPICAL OF THIS STYLE OF HOUSING AND ALSO USED A NATURAL MATERIALS PALETTE OFTEN FOUND IN THEM.” TOM HERRON, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

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THIS PICTURE: Restaurant.


HASSELL Principal Tom Herron says the design honoured the Zhang family’s desire to position themselves as a modern Chinese brand rooted in traditional Chinese culture – particularly the Hakka culture in southern China. “One of the ways we did this was by incorporating one of the iconic elements of Hakka culture - weilongwu, also known as a ‘circular dragon’s house,” he said. “They are enclosed, semicircular walled structures with ponds which together form a circular shape. We were guided by many of the feng shui principles typical of this style of housing and also used a natural materials palette often found in them.” The complex – located in the middle of the scenic Huangfengwo Tea Mountain – has spectacular views out to the tea plantations immediately surrounding it as well as vistas to the rolling hills. HASSELL applied angles and diagonal lines throughout the interiors to echo these defining features of the landscape. “We also went beyond the brief, using the process of producing huangjiu rice wine as a rich source of inspiration for the fixtures, textures and materials within the space,” Tom said. “Ancient ceramics, traditional weaves, tapestries and timber carvings – all sourced from the local area – have been re-interpreted within this contemporary context. This all helps reflect the transition this brand is making from the traditions of the past to a contemporary, vibrant and accessible future.”

TOP: Group tasting room.

BOTTOM: Exhibition hall (Level 2) demonstrating the process of distilling Baijiu.


showcase | hassell - retail

IMAGE CREDIT: > Owen Raggett

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HONG KONG

THE WOOL RESOURCE CENTRE

FLEXIBLE SPACE SHOWCASES AUSTRALIAN WOOL THE WOOLMARK LOGO IS ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST RECOGNISED AND RESPECTED BRANDS, PROVIDING ASSURANCE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY, AND REPRESENTING PIONEERING EXCELLENCE AND INNOVATION FROM FARM THROUGH TO FINISHED PRODUCT. THIS PICTURE: The Wool Resource Centre offers uninterrupted views of Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour.


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THIS PICTURE: Black and white tones together with natural timber textures create impactful and sophisticated space.


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he Woolmark Company sought a multi-functional space to act as a global hub for all things wool, allowing visitors to discover the wonders and versatility of the fibre while presenting new opportunities for
Hong Kong’s textile industry. Woolmark chose HASSELL as its interior design partner for The Wool Resource Centre, located in Kowloon Tower Landmark East building in Hong Kong. Spanning 280 square metres, the
highly contemporary space comprises six separate zones including open-plan workspaces, a meeting room and an auditorium, in addition to a library, showroom and event space for visitors to develop and enhance their education on wool. The uninterrupted views of Victoria Harbour are fully-utilised by the open space planning. The combination of black and white tones and natural timber textures creates an impactful and sophisticated space. The Centre features innovative furniture and multi-use design components to provide a blank canvas that can evolve and adapt according
to the

TOP: Innovative furniture provides a blank canvas that can evolve and adapt according to the needs of an event, such as this table that can be used as a catwalk.


needs of an event, while the raw nature of the floor material brings resonance to the natural wool products Woolmark promote. The Woolmark Company Managing Director Stuart McCullough says The Wool Resource Centre is a multi-functional space dedicated to product and process innovation to be used by all our partners throughout the supply chain. The Woolmark Company is a subsidiary of notfor-profit enterprise Australian Wool Innovation, which is owned by more than 24,000 wool growers and invests in research, development and marketing along the worldwide supply chain for Australian wool.

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TOP: Six separate zones include open-plan workspaces, a meeting room and an auditorium.


THE UNINTERRUPTED VIEWS OF VICTORIA HARBOUR ARE FULLY-UTILISED BY THE OPEN SPACE PLANNING. THE COMBINATION OF BLACK AND WHITE TONES AND NATURAL TIMBER TEXTURES CREATES IMPACTFUL AND SOPHISTICATED SPACE.

THIS PICTURE: The multi-use space includes an auditorium .


showcase | hassell - retail

IMAGE CREDIT: > HASSELL

“GREE COAST IS CREATING A DISTINCT IDENTITY WHICH REFLECTS THE NATURAL BEAUTY OF THE ISLANDS THAT DOT THE CITY’S COASTLINE AND IT’S ATTRACTING PEOPLE WHO WANT TO LIVE AND WORK IN A MORE RELAXED, LAIDBACK ENVIRONMENT.” CARRIE HO, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

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TOP: Gree Coast Mall is designed for flexibility.


ZHUHAI, CHINA

GREE COAST

MALL DESIGN INSPIRED BY RUGGED ISLAND COASTLINE THE NATURAL COASTLINE AND LAIDBACK NATURE OF SEASIDE LIVING WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THE BOUTIQUE LIFESTYLE HUB OF ZHUHAI’S EMERGING RESIDENTIAL PRECINCT GREE COAST.

BOTTOM: As a new retail destination, Gree Coast Mall offers a mix of retail, entertainment, an exhibition centre, casual and formal dining and a rooftop bar.


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ASSELL was charged with developing the retail concept and retail programming strategy for the 10,000 sqm Gree Coast Mall, the centrepiece of what is fast becoming one of Zhuhai’s premier lifestyle destinations. “Gree Coast is creating a distinct identity which reflects the natural beauty of the islands that dot the city’s coastline and it’s attracting people who want to live and work in a more relaxed, laidback environment,” says HASSELL Principal Carrie Ho. “So for Gree Coast Mall, we wanted to create a place that naturally extends from its waterfront location to offer a boutique, leisure-focused complex filled with great spaces for relaxing and socialising.” Known as the city of a hundred islands, Zhuhai’s coastline is defined by rugged, rocky islands, and Carrie said these rock-like forms are suggested by the mall’s architecture - dark, grounded and angular – and translated into the interior through monolithic mass, sculptural and fragmented forms, and multilayered materials. “The natural elements of rocks and waves act as contrasting forces within the space, each with its own distinct language and materiality,” Carrie said.

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TOP: The mall’s architecture took inspiration from Gree Coast’s rugged, rocky islands.

The new retail destination includes a host of independent retail offerings, cinemas, an exhibition centre, gourmet grocer, casual and fine dining options and a rooftop bar with sea views. An entire level of the mall is occupied by a custom-designed bookstore where people can shop or simply sit back, relax and enjoy browsing through the titles. The rooftop bar takes its cue from yachting culture, utilising nautical elements and lending itself to a relaxed, resort-like feel - understated but refined. Carrie said Gree Coast Mall reflected a dramatic shift from ‘big box’ retail to a more destinationoriented development that is curated, individual and social in nature. “Designing for flexibility is key to our retail design process and strategy,” she said. “Placing people and connections at the heart of commercial developments is vital these days. It’s all about the experience, and giving people the space and environment to gather and socialise, something we have successfully delivered at Gree Coast Mall.”


“THE NATURAL ELEMENTS OF ROCKS AND WAVES ACT AS CONTRASTING FORCES WITHIN THE SPACE, EACH WITH ITS OWN DISTINCT LANGUAGE AND MATERIALITY.” CARRIE HO, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

TOP: Spaces filled with natural light and materials provide areas for relaxing and socialising.

BOTTOM: A rooftop bar takes advantage of its seaside setting.


showcase | hassell - commercial and workplace

MAJOR NEW CO-WORKING AND LIFESTYLE HUB DEVELOPMENT THE WORKING CAPITOL, KNOWN FOR ITS FOCUS ON CREATING ‘PEOPLE FIRST’ CO-WORKING SPACES THAT SPARK CREATIVITY AND NEW IDEAS, HAS JUST LAUNCHED A SECOND, 11-FLOOR SITE AT 140 ROBINSON ROAD IN THE HEART OF SINGAPORE’S CBD TO ACCOMMODATE BUSINESSES EMPLOYING UP TO 200 STAFF. 76

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SINGAPORE

THE WORKING CAPITOL

IMAGE CREDITS: > EK Yap

THIS PICTURE: Forbes magazine has named The Working Capitol one of Asia’s top co-working spaces.


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THIS PICTURE: Communal areas suitable for individual working and large group work.


“THE BEST IDEAS CAN LIVE AND GROW IF THE IMMEDIATE SURROUNDINGS PUT PEOPLE FIRST…IT’S WHAT ALL OUR SPACES HAVE IN COMMON.” SARANTA GATTIE, THE WORKING CAPITOL CO-FOUNDER AND CHIEF CULTURE OFFICER

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nternational design practice HASSELL has evolved the co-working concept for The Working Capitol on Robinson with a design aimed at turning the cubicle inside out to unlock innovation, support cross-industry networks and promote professional growth and personal wellbeing. The first site, on Keong Saik Road in Chinatown, was created in Singapore in 2014 as a co-working space, lifestyle provider and food and beverage destination. It is currently home to more than 70 companies, from start-ups to SMEs and multinationals. “The best ideas can live and grow if the immediate surroundings put people first…It’s what all our spaces have in common,” says Saranta Gattie, The Working Capitol Co-Founder and Chief Culture Officer. The HASSELL design team focused on understanding the drivers to the first site’s success to create a tailor-made destination for business. The result is a range of collaborative workspaces, quiet areas, private offices and duplex penthouses, complemented by a rich blend of food and beverage services, a 20-metre outdoor lap pool and gym space, sky garden, bar and member’s lounge.

TOP: Clever use of plywood and timber structures feature throughout.

BOTTOM: Quiet areas and private offices.


“PLAYFUL GRAPHIC FORMS AND COLOURS ARE FUNDAMENTAL TO THE DESIGN, CREATING A POLISHED AND URBAN EXPERIENCE THAT WILL SET THE WORKING CAPITOL APART FROM THE CROWD.” PAUL SEMPLE, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

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TOP: One of many meeting rooms available.

BOTTOM: Individual workspaces are complemented by quiet spaces, meeting rooms and private offices.


HASSELL Principal Paul Semple says the design for Robinson Road “responds to the original Working Capitol and speaks to all the things that people love about the brand and what it stands for”. “This has helped to shape the design concept – we’ve given a tailored edge to the raw,” he said. “Playful graphic forms and colours are fundamental to the design, creating a polished and urban experience that will set The Working Capitol apart from the crowd.” In fitting out the building’s concrete shell, HASSELL has employed exposed walls, plywood features and rubber floors to allow the new co-working space to sit lightly within the concrete shell of the building, covering – but not concealing – the existing structure like a second skin. The hub has already received attention across the globe with Forbes magazine naming it one of Asia’s top co-working spaces.

TOP: Plywood features and rubber floors allow the space to sit lightly within the building’s concrete shell.

BOTTOM: Playful graphic forms and colours feature.


showcase | hassell - commercial and workplace

HASSELL CREATES FUTURE-FOCUSED HEADQUARTERS FOR SKY IMAGE CREDIT: > Mark Cocksedge/Hufton and Crow

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN PRACTICE HASSELL PARTNERED WITH GLOBAL MEDIA FIRM SKY FOR THE WORKPLACE DESIGN OF ITS INSPIRING 37,000 SQM NIA OFFICE SPACE, SKY CENTRAL, LAUNCHED IN 2016. THE NEW UK HEADQUARTERS UNITES MORE THAN 3,500 EMPLOYEES ACROSS THREE LEVELS AS THEY WORK TOGETHER TO DELIVER WORLD-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT TO MILLIONS OF CUSTOMERS. 82

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LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

SKY CENTRAL

THIS PICTURE: HASSELL worked closely with individual teams to understand how they work and their requirements for the space.


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he original brief from Sky to the high-profile design team, including HASSELL, AL_A, PLP Architecture, Mace and Arup, was to “create a unique building and activity-based workplace that would be responsive, inspiring, intuitive and amenityrich for 3,5000 people – catering to the energetic, fast-paced Sky way of working”. Sky wanted to encourage the flow of people and ideas around the business, and to nourish their greatest asset – existing and future talent. In response, HASSELL has created one of the UK’s largest activity-based workplaces within the new HQ, where each floor averages 11,500 sqm – the equivalent width of three jumbo jets. Designed for flexibility and the future, Sky Central’s interior has been strategically fitted out as a demountable kit of parts, offering full mobility for Sky’s staff and organisation. HASSELL Principal Felicity Roocke said the vast scale of the workplace required careful consideration to create a sense of connection and intimacy for the Sky team.

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TOP: Lounge areas are one of a variety of spaces available for teams or individuals to utilise.

MIDDLE: Breakout spaces on every level are key to the activity-based workplace.


“WE WORKED CLOSELY WITH INDIVIDUAL TEAMS TO UNDERSTAND HOW THEY WORK AND THEIR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SPACE. WE WANTED TO GIVE PEOPLE A SENSE OF OWNERSHIP AND BELONGING OVER THEIR WORKPLACE, AND FOR THEM TO FEEL A GENUINE SENSE OF CONNECTION WITH THE ORGANISATION THEY WORK FOR.” FELICITY ROOCKE, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

THIS PICTURE: Playful elements such as these coloured ropes have been used to differentiate zones and add visual interest.


“We worked closely with individual teams to understand how they work and their requirements for the space. We wanted to give people a sense of ownership and belonging over their workplace, and for them to feel a genuine sense of connection with the organisation they work for,” Felicity said. This has been achieved with the introduction of 18 versatile ‘neighbourhoods’ each housing around 200 people. The neighbourhoods include a range of individual and team settings, from interactive to focused, to suit every type of activity. The neighbourhoods are supported by ‘home zones’ – arrival spaces that include small kitchens, meeting tables, and casual sitting areas. These ‘residential’ settings blur the boundaries between work and home and bring an intimate, human scale to Sky’s expansive space. The home zone area is one of many key landmarks strategically designed by HASSELL to further breakdown the expansive floorplates. Likewise, bespoke

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TOP: Ample natural light and connection is created through voids.

BOTTOM: The auditorium area doubles as a casual seating space.


THIS PICTURE: 18 versatile neighbourhoods each house up to 200 people.


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THIS PICTURE: A range of interactive and focused work settings are featured within each neighbourhood.


meeting structures made from metal framing, mesh, coloured ropes, trees and plants are placed at 20-metre intervals to create points of interest as you move through the space. These elements help shape quiet spaces for individual working, without breaking the sense of connection to the more vibrant, active spaces. Sky Central also boasts the UK’s first ever completely cashless supermarket, six different places to eat and drink, including a pop-up bar at Sky Cinema – the 200-seat, Dolby Atmos sound, 4K Sky Cinema, a Tech Central “genius lounge”, and services such as shoe repairs, dry cleaning, postal service, cash machines and train ticket machines. Sky’s Workplace Director, Neil Usher, said “We’ve created a workplace that brings Sky colleagues together and enables them to do the very best work of their careers. It’s beautiful, functional, intuitive and inspiring, and marks a major step in our workplace journey.”

TOP: Arrival spaces include a small kitchen, casual seating and meeting tables.

MIDDLE: Meeting room.


showcase | hassell - commercial and workplace

IMAGE CREDIT: > Nicole England

WESTPAC KOGORAH BLURS THE LINES

LIKE MANY LARGE, ESTABLISHED ORGANISATIONS, WESTPAC WANTS TO BE MORE AGILE TO ANTICIPATE RAPID CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY, CUSTOMER SERVICE AND THE BUSINESS LANDSCAPE. AS THE BANK PUT IT IN 2015, IT IS FOCUSED ON “OPERATING LIKE A 200-YEAR-OLD START UP”. 90

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THIS PICTURE: A range of settings for larger groups are incorporated into the design including collaboration lounges, team tables and workshop spaces.


SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

WESTPAC KOGARAH


IT WAS DESIGNED AS A HUB TO ATTRACT THE LOCAL COMMUNITY, BUSINESSES AND WESTPAC PARTNERS, GIVING THEM A SPACE THAT’S STIMULATING – LIKE THE HIVE WITHIN THE BUILDING – AND SUPPORTS A VARIETY OF USES.

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THIS PICTURE: Breakout zones complement traditional working spaces.


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ASSELL worked closely with Westpac and Lendlease on its Interior Design and Landscape Architecture to create something unexpected for a bank. They revitalised its 30,000 square metre St George Bank headquarters in Kogarah, Australia as an open, dynamic workplace and innovation hub to inspire fresh ideas. It’s the kind of place you’d be more likely to find in Silicon Valley than the southern suburbs of Sydney. One of the project’s standout features is the innovation hub, dubbed The Hive for the striking, honeycomb design of its ceiling and the activity that buzzes within. Rotating teams from across Westpac and its partners can access The Hive to develop and test new products and services for the bank’s 12 million-plus customers. The open-plan configuration is highly flexible. Sliding walls, movable furniture, and concealed digital displays support fast-paced, creative group work like brainstorming, experimenting and pitching new ideas. The Hive also inspired the design for the rest of the workplace – making innovation and interaction part of the building’s DNA.

TOP: The Hive is an innovation hub featuring a honeycomb ceiling design.

BOTTOM: Innovation and interaction are part of the building’s DNA.


“KOGARAH WILL BE THE INNOVATION EXEMPLAR OF THE GROUP – FOR OUR PEOPLE, CUSTOMERS, PARTNERS AND THE BROADER COMMUNITY. IT WILL BE A POWERFUL ACCELERANT OF CHANGE IN MINDSET AND CULTURE. ” JOHN ARTHUR, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, WESTPAC

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TOP: Among Westpac’s key drivers was to blur the line between the bank and the community.

One challenge was doing this while also increasing the site’s capacity from 1,000 to 3,000 people. The solution by HASSELL was to incorporate a range of settings for larger groups, including collaboration lounges, team tables and workshop spaces. These are supplemented by smaller, quiet zones for focused work. Importantly, we also designed a wellness centre where staff can recharge and return to work ready to come up with more of the ideas and products that set Westpac apart from its competitors. Westpac wanted to remove the boundaries between the bank and the community and make the building more accessible and inviting to neighbours, including a hospital and college. HASSELL achieved this by recreating the atrium as a light, bright ‘laneway’ that is better connected to the street. It was designed as a hub to attract the local community, businesses and Westpac partners, giving them a space that’s stimulating – like The Hive within the building – and supports a variety of uses. The atrium includes a refurbished auditorium that is now easier to access, as well as a ‘grandstand’ that’s the perfect spot to share new ideas. It makes the innovation process visible and engaging to both Westpac and their visitors.

BOTTOM: Smaller, quiet zones for focused work.


THIS PICTURE: The Grandstand.


showcase | hassell - masterplan & public realm

HONGKOU NORTH BUND WATERFRONT

THE HUANGPU RIVER IS THE BEATING HEART OF SHANGHAI, AND THE BUND WATERFRONT THAT RUNS ALONGSIDE ITS EDGE IS ONE OF THE CITY’S MOST POPULAR DESTINATIONS FOR LOCALS AND VISITORS.

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IMAGE CREDIT: > HASSELL


SHANGHAI, CHINA

HONGKOU NORTH BUND WATERFRONT

THIS PICTURE: Hongkou North Bund Waterfront will help to reactivate a historic area in Shanghai.


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“THE HASSELL VISION WAS TO STITCH TOGETHER THE MANY PARTS OF THE SITE THROUGH A GARDEN WATERFRONT TO UNLOCK THE NORTH BUND’S POTENTIAL AND RESTORE ITS UNIQUE GREEN HISTORIC IDENTITY – OVERLOOKING THE HUANGPU RIVER FROM HONGKOU DISTRICT.” ANDREW WILKINSON, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

THIS PICTURE: The design maximises its waterfront location.


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he North Bund area within Hongkou District is one of the city’s key historical precincts and is currently being revitalised into a lifestyle hub, with over seven million square metres of office buildings, restaurants and shopping malls under construction or recently completed. And at the same time, a larger vision by the Shanghai Municipal Committee and Government is underway to open up public access to many parts of both sides of the river waterfront and create connections through all of its districts and unify the various renewal efforts. The Hongkou District Planning and Land Authority engaged International design practice HASSELL to undertake the North Bund Waterfront masterplan in an effort to open up public access to both visitors and local residents of the district. HASSELL was asked to connect sites located along the waterfront, as well as connect to multiple sites under renewal within the district down to the water – and activate key sites with public programming. The HASSELL vision was to stitch together the many parts of the site through a garden waterfront to unlock the North Bund’s potential and restore its unique green historic identity – overlooking the Huangpu River from Hongkou district. Once again,

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TOP: Public access will be opened up to visitors and locals through the masterplan.


“SET IN THE PARKLAND IS THE INTRODUCTION OF A GARDEN WALK – A LIGHT-FILLED, COVERED PEDESTRIAN THOROUGHFARE THROUGH DENSE GREENERY, LINKING THE DISTRICT’S MANY HOTELS ALONG NORTH BUND AND CREATING A SCENIC PROMENADE THAT CONNECTS VISITORS TO BOTH THE CITY AND ITS RIVER EDGE.” ANDREW WILKINSON, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

THIS PICTURE: The design will stitch together the many parts of the unique site.


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THIS PICTURE: Key to achieving the joint vision is to create a continuous waterfront area with active parts.


residents will be connected to the Huangpu River and the district will be valued as a place for people. With this vision in mind, HASSELL employed a number of key strategies at a variety of landscape scales to address the current issues hampering the site’s future potential. “The North Bund contains a variety of architecturally historic areas, and we looked to build places of unique character around Hongkou’s existing heritage assets within the site, including the former Japanese Consulate to Shanghai,” HASSELL Principal Andrew Wilkinson said. “Key to achieving our vision has been to create a continuous waterfront area with active paths. People will be able to walk, cycle or jog along 2.5km of the Huangpu River, with previously disjointed areas being connected up.” “Set in the parkland is the introduction of a Garden Walk – a light-filled, covered pedestrian thoroughfare

through dense greenery, linking the district’s many hotels along North Bund and creating a scenic promenade that connects visitors to both the city and its river edge,” he said. HASSELL layered a site-­wide strategy of event programming within the design response for the riverfront focused on using the new range of green riverside spaces as community amenities for cultural and entertainment activities throughout the year. Implementation of the HASSELL masterplan and landscape architectural design for the waterfront promenade works has begun through engagement with existing district stakeholders. The Hongkou North Bund project was a direct commission to HASSELL, following the participation by HASSELL in the Huangpu East Bank Urban Forest competition in mid-­2016.

TOP: People will be able to walk, cycle or jog along 2.5 kilometres of the Huangpu River along previously disjointed areas.


showcase | hassell - culture and the arts

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THIS PICTURE: ICC Sydney Theatre’s expansive shape is designed for rock concerts and other large entertainment events.


SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

ICC SYDNEY

ICC SYDNEY UNLOCKS DARLING HARBOUR AND SHOWCASES SYDNEY TO THE WORLD SPREAD OVER 250,000 SQUARE METRES IN THE HEART OF SYDNEY, INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE SYDNEY AT DARLING HARBOUR IS A NEW GLOBAL BENCHMARK IN EXHIBITION AND CONVENTION VENUES AND AN IMPORTANT CITY-SHAPING PROJECT SET TO TRANSFORM SYDNEY. IMAGE CREDIT: > Guy Wilkinson Photography > Brett Boardman Photography


“WHEN DARLING HARBOUR WAS ORIGINALLY CONCEIVED IT WAS VERY INWARD LOOKING; THIS PROJECT NOT ONLY RENEWS THE DARLING HARBOUR SITE BUT PROVIDES IMPORTANT NEW CONNECTIONS, FROM CENTRAL TO THE HARBOUR, AND FROM THE CBD TO THE NEIGHBOURING SUBURBS OF PYRMONT AND ULTIMO.” KEN MAHER, HASSELL FELLOW & PROJECT DESIGN DIRECTOR

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BOTTOM: The crystaline glass facade of the International Convention Centre Sydney reflects the light and sparkle of the water.


J

oint venture partners HASSELL + Populous worked together to design the new convention, exhibition and entertainment venues for Sydney, with inspiration from the site’s spectacular city and harbour surrounds as well as Cockle Bay’s history. HASSELL Fellow and Project Design Director, Ken Maher, believes the project’s significance extends beyond the Darling Harbour site. “I think architecture has a role, if not a responsibility, particularly in a project of this size, to think beyond the project itself to bring a whole new dynamic quality and reputation to the broader city, and that’s what this project will do, perhaps more than any other project in the last generation,” Ken said. “When Darling Harbour was originally conceived it was very inward looking; this project not only renews the Darling Harbour site but provides important new connections, from central to the harbour, and from

the CBD to the neighbouring suburbs of Pyrmont and Ultimo.” With particular expertise in the design of convention and exhibition centres, Populous Senior Principal and Joint Architecture Director Richard Breslin said the team was inspired by the natural beauty of the Sydney context to challenge traditional design for convention and exhibition buildings and capitalise on ICC Sydney’s unique setting. “Sydney was very much our driver: the natural beauty, the built beauty, but also the people and culture of Sydney,” Richard said. “Convention and exhibition buildings have a tendency to be introverted by their very nature, but we worked to ensure that the line between the outside and the inside was blurred – so visitors coming to any of the venues could engage with the natural and built beauty of this city.”

THIS PICTURE: The stacked nature of the exhibition halls capitalises on the venue’s inner city location but the immense scale of the venue is dramatically reduced by being integrated into the terraced park surrounds.


“CONVENTION AND EXHIBITION BUILDINGS HAVE A TENDENCY TO BE INTROVERTED BY THEIR VERY NATURE, BUT WE WORKED TO ENSURE THAT THE LINE BETWEEN THE OUTSIDE AND THE INSIDE WAS BLURRED – SO VISITORS COMING TO ANY OF THE VENUES COULD ENGAGE WITH THE NATURAL AND BUILT BEAUTY OF THIS CITY.” RICHARD BRESLIN, POPULOUS SENIOR PRINCIPAL & JOINT ARCHITECTURE DIRECTOR

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TOP: ICC Sydney Exhibition Centre is Australia’s first multi-storey exhibition space and the largest exhibition space in Australia.

“The NSW Government’s goal was to have the best convention and exhibition centre in the world and they’ve certainly got it,” he said. HASSELL Principal and Joint Architecture Director Glenn Scott explained how the precinct was designed as a whole – not three individual buildings – to achieve the overall vision of a connected public place for all of Sydney to enjoy that also reflects and celebrates aspects of Sydney in its design. “While the design creates a cohesive whole, there was a conscious decision to design three distinctive buildings, each with their own character and identity, informed by their use and their context in the landscape: the boldness and robustness of the ICC Theatre, close to Chinatown and the city’s nightlife; the warm, earthy tones of the ICC Exhibition set in the parklands; and the reflective, crystalline ICC Convention on the harbour’s edge. In return each building connects with its immediate context physically and visually, taking in the differing views, to ensure that it is not only an internal experience but one that embraces the uniqueness of its Sydney environment,” he said.


THIS PICTURE: A fan shaped vertical seating layout in the 8,000 seat theatre ensures an optimal view from every seat in the house.


showcase | hassell - culture and the arts

A SENSE OF PLACE THIS PROJECT PRESENTED A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO DESIGN A TRULY DISTINCTIVE, SELF-SUSTAINING OFFICE DEVELOPMENT IN ONE OF BEIJING’S RARE GREEN AREAS.

IMAGE CREDIT: > HASSELL

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BEIJING, CHINA

BEIJING ART CENTURY OFFICES

THIS PICTURE: With the elliptical-shaped art gallery and the green area as the key contexts, the office buildings nest into the site to create a sense of place.


T

he Chaoyang art and industrial district is one of the fastest growing areas in Beijing – and HASSELL was invited to collaborate on the commercial component of one of its exciting new sites. A SITE RESPONSIVE DESIGN The masterplan of the site is anchored by an ellipticalshaped art gallery designed by world-renowned architect Tadao Ando. Beijing Art Century sought to create a commercial development that would truly complement the landmark gallery, ‘speaking to’ its architectural form. Through intensive collaboration with the client during the design process, HASSELL created a responsive, experiential-based design for two office buildings spanning 45,000 square metres, joined through a central plaza that follows the radiating geometry of the gallery.

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LEFT: The two office buildings create different characters of ‘places’; the north and south being ‘of the place’ and the central area being the ‘address’.


Set in a beautiful tree-filled environment, one building is directly adjacent to the art gallery, while the other sits to the north of the site. CREATING A SENSE OF PLACE AND ARRIVAL HASSELL Principal John Pauline, the project’s lead, says Beijing Art Century wanted the new development to have a strong sense of place, while also offering a seamless experience across the site’s zones. “This was achieved through a ‘rippling’ form derived from the art gallery and mirrored this effect to create a central focus for the masterplan by designing two office buildings,” John said. “Drawing on Beijing’s tradition as a city defined by symmetry, we also designed a connecting plaza between the two buildings to create a central ‘address’ for both offices, adding to the sense of arrival. “The landscape between the two buildings has

been compressed to reveal two extra commercial floors within the development. Atrium spaces, voids and outdoor terraces are part of the entry experience, maximising visual connections and natural light. Also featured are expansive roof decks so the landscaped experience continues for tenants and guests,” John said. UNCOVERING THE SITE’S POTENTIAL THROUGH CLEVER SOLUTIONS A tight site boundary required a clever solution to maximise the length of the buildings, so HASSELL broke the elevation into smaller proportions through massing steps. “This solution deliberately disrupts the visual length and height of the design, and the curved forms in the plan make it a more engaging and landscape-focused experience, John said.

TOP: The facade and landscape both respond to the characters of ‘places’.

BOTTOM: The pure stepping glass facade reflects the surrounding.


“A half-sunken entrance meets the required above-ground area as well as strict height limits, but it also allows in abundant natural light.” HASSELL also responded to the site and Beijing’s climate by designing a vertically stepping facade. Its radiating patterns help block the high sun in summertime. The multiple outdoor plazas within the scheme include a mix of scales and orientations, allowing for use throughout the seasons – including the cold Beijing winter when direct sunlight is in high demand. The dense existing forest of tall trees around the site also provides a buffer from the winds and plenty of shaded outdoor areas. FLEXIBLE OFFICE DESIGN The office space needed to be highly flexible, in order to respond to the ever-changing market, so HASSELL designed optimal 20-metre-wide floorplates of

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varying length. These can accommodate large anchor tenants or be broken down into smaller workplaces for multiple tenants. Also, regardless of the size, each tenant will have maximum daylight and through ventilation. John said the concept drew inspiration from the Hutong brick walls of Beijing, with the use of stone materials throughout the development for the continuity of form, function and materials. “The simple stone fins facing the central plaza have been aligned for optimal spacing of workstations inside,” he said. “The fins also house hidden services, including an embedded operable panel system for fresh air, ensuring that the offices will support health and wellbeing.” It is anticipated the project will be complete in 2018.


“THE LANDSCAPE BETWEEN THE TWO BUILDINGS HAS BEEN COMPRESSED TO REVEAL TWO EXTRA COMMERCIAL FLOORS WITHIN THE DEVELOPMENT. ATRIUM SPACES, VOIDS AND OUTDOOR TERRACES ARE PART OF THE ENTRY EXPERIENCE, MAXIMISING VISUAL CONNECTIONS AND NATURAL LIGHT. ALSO FEATURED ARE EXPANSIVE ROOF DECKS SO THE LANDSCAPED EXPERIENCE CONTINUES FOR TENANTS AND GUESTS.” JOHN PAULINE, HASSELL PRINCIPAL

THIS PICTURE: The concept drew inspiration from the Hutong brick walls of Beijing, with the use of stone materials throughout the development for the continuity of form, function and materials.


> LIGHTING SCULPTURES BY LASVIT > BRIXX BY DEDON > ESSENCE BY GROHE > GRAND LÀ BY NIRO GRANITE > WHOLE EARTH™ BY INTERFACE

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BRIXX by Lorenza Bozzoli DEDON

DEDON.DE


goods | lasvit - project

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY PRINCE MAHIDOL HALL AT THE MAHIDOL UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, SERVES AS A CONCERT HALL, AUDITORIUM, CEREMONIAL HALL AND EVENTS VENUE. ITS ICONIC AWARD-WINNING DESIGN BY A49 ARCHITECTS RECEIVED A NEW ADDITION IN THE FORM OF A DYNAMICALLY LIT GLASS LIGHTING SCULPTURE PRODUCED IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC BY LASVIT. USING ADVANCED LED TECHNOLOGY, THE SCULPTURE WELCOMES VISITORS WITH VARIABLE LIGHTING THAT IS PROGRAMMED TO RESPOND TO MUSIC.

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THIS PICTURE: Lasvit’s lighting sculpture for the 2,000-seat Prince Mahidol Hall on the campus of Mahidol University at Salaya in Thailand, responds to the music played inside with varied light sequences and colours, turning rhythms and melodies into visual experiences..


“PRINCE MAHIDOL HALL IS ONE OF THE BEST AUDITORIUMS IN SOUTHEAST ASIA AND I THINK IT WILL BECOME A SYMBOL OF THE 21ST CENTURY ARCHITECTURE IN THAILAND. WE ARE VERY PROUD TO HAVE A LIGHTING INSTALLATION FROM LASVIT.” ASSOC. PROF. DR. SUGREE CHAROENSOOK, MAHIDOL UNIVERSITY

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TOP: The illuminating Lasvit installation is engineered using advanced LED technology inside hand-made artistic glass components.

BOTTOM: Neurons’ high-tech design and programming are supported by the meticulous craft of master glassmakers, building on a tradition of Czech glassmaking dating back nearly a 1,000 years.


P

rince Mahidol Hall was completed in 2014 and drew well deserved attention. It’s a world-class facility with a 2,000 seat theater designed specifically with natural acoustics for opera and symphony orchestras. The architects referenced organic structures as well as the pitch form often found in traditional Thai architecture. The double-layer roof is designed to eliminate exterior noise, while the lobby and corridors along the exterior glazed walls provide stunning views. The College of Music, Mahidol University manages the Hall on behalf of the University since January 2015. The College of Music chose Lasvit to create a custom piece for the Prince Mahidol Hall. In collaboration with A49 architects, Lasvit created a lighting sculpture titled Neurons, responding to music played in the concert hall with varied light sequences and colors, turning rhythms and melodies into visual experiences. Its high-tech design and programming are supported by the meticulous craft of master glassmakers, building on a tradition of Czech glassmaking dating back nearly a thousand years. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sugree Charoensook from Mahidol University says, “Prince Mahidol Hall is one of the best auditoriums in Southeast Asia and I think it will become a symbol of the 21st century architecture in Thailand. We are very proud to have a lighting installation from Lasvit.” Lasvit designer Jana Ružicková explains the design concept, “The design is directly inspired by the motto of the Mahidol University – the Wisdom of the Land. Our goal was to deliver a timeless design that would fit into the building’s contemporary Thai architecture. The individual elements of the installation resemble neurons that carry our sensory information. Just as Universities are the bearing points of progress, education and

TOP: Seemingly random and loose, Neuron’s overall composition remains harmonious within the rules of symmetry.

BOTTOM: The installation Neurons, created by Lasvit designer Jana Ružicková, greets visitors with a system of lights controlled and programmed by the emitted music.


“THE INDIVIDUAL ELEMENTS OF THE INSTALLATION RESEMBLE NEURONS THAT CARRY OUR SENSORY INFORMATION. JUST AS UNIVERSITIES ARE THE BEARING POINTS OF PROGRESS, EDUCATION AND ENLIGHTENMENT WHEREVER THEY EXIST IN THE WORLD, A NEURON IS A CARRIER OF INFORMATION, THOUGHTS AND LIGHT WITHIN A HUMAN BODY.” JANA RUŽICKOVÁ, LASVIT DESIGNER

enlightenment wherever they exist in the world, a neuron is a carrier of information, thoughts and light within a human body.” The building’s ribbed-beam structure is conceptually based upon the human skeleton as well as the ribs of a leaf. Lasvit enhanced this organic aesthetic with their reference to neurons and our sensory experiences. “We’ve worked very closely with Lasvit to create this stunning feature that puts the brain, the spirit and the light into the hall of the university,” adds Richard A. Ralphs, College of Music, Mahidol University. Although loose and seemingly random, Neuron’s overall composition remains harmonious within the rules of symmetry. Its structure is a visual counterpart to the inner conventions of music that produce harmony, regardless of occasionally playful and seemingly random notes. This dynamic sculpture uses advanced LED bulbs inside hand-made artistic glass components to create an illusion of movement controlled by a musical performance that brings the installation to life.

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TOP: Prince Mahidol Hall takes its cue from the organic structures as well as the pitch form typically found in traditional Thai architecture.

BOTTOM: Touted as one of the best auditoriums in Southeast Asia, Prince Mahidol Hall stands poised to become a symbol of 21st-century architecture in Thailand.


THIS PICTURE: Nuerons’ timeless design harmonizes with the building’s contemporary Thai architecture.

LASVIT.COM


goods | dedon

ISLANDS OF COMFORT CHIC AND WINSOME, DEDON’S SOPHISTICATED NEW MODULAR OUTDOOR COLLECTION OFFERS USERS UNRESTRAINED FLEXIBILITY AND ACCESS, CHANGING UP THE NOTION OF PLAYING AND RELAXING AT HOME.

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THIS PICTURE: BRIXX’s flexible and supportive layout brings a new level of comfort and interaction to friendly get-together sessions.


“THE COMBINATION OF MY FASHION BACKGROUND AND THE EXTRAORDINARY EXPERTISE OF THESE MASTER CRAFTSMEN HAS RESULTED IN UPHOLSTERED OUTDOOR FURNITURE UNLIKE ANYTHING CREATED BEFORE. IN TERMS OF QUALITY, BRIXX RIVALS THE MOST LUXURIOUS OF INDOOR SYSTEMS.” LORENZA BOZZOLI

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THIS PICTURE: A matching triangular side table is an appealing link between connecting modules.


W

ith 25 years of experience in the fine art of luxury outdoor designs, German brand DEDON definitely knows a thing or two about putting together a nice lounge area with premium leisure in mind. Working with the world’s most talented designers, the brand has pledged itself to producing high-end woven furniture using a sophisticated synthetic fibre, thereby giving rise to weather-resistant and aesthetically refined products that continue to set it apart as a pioneering industry heavyweight. Its vision is simple yet profound: the creation of outdoor living rooms that change the way we live and thrive amid the elements. The newly launched BRIXX was crafted with all of DEDON’s core values in mind. Envisioned by Italian designer Lorenza Bozzoli, the brand’s first fully upholstered outdoor collection has been conceived as all-encompassing modules of comfort and versatility. Fit for hours whiled away under the open skies or stylish indoor spaces, BRIXX’s playful yet palpably fashionable layout brings people together in a memorable new way. Its resilience owes a debt to DEDON’s signature outdoor-ready and water-repellent Dune fabric, produced in 50-percent recycled post-industrial fibres in a variety of colours. Whether BRIXX’s selection of square and rectangular modules are clad in red-tinged shore, blueish cove or a fetching amalgamation of these unique shades, Dune’s stunning natural appearance lends depth to the collection. Lastly, a triangular side table featuring detachable teak legs comes as a charming complement.

TOP: Evocative of sun-drenched holidays, the collection’s laidback palette hints at long luxurious periods of leisure. Matching backrests with a weighted core and anti-slip pads put tired limbs instantly at ease.

BOTTOM: Lovely details are part of BRIXX’s allure, from Dedon’s signature Dune fabric to the detachable teak legs propping up the side table.

DEDON.DE


goods | grohe

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THIS PICTURE: The expanded Essence range of faucets offers 10 possible combinations of sumptuous colors and innovative finishes, from Cool Sunrise to Warm Sunset and Hard Graphite to Nickel, in either elegantly brushed or highly polished finish.


GROHE WITH THE FLOW

GROHE Essence – variety at a glance

THE EMBODIMENT OF DESIGN ARTISTRY AND INNOVATION, THE ESSENCE SERIES OF CLASSICALLY ELEGANT FAUCETS HAS BEEN ENHANCED TO UP THE BLISS FACTOR IN THE BATHROOM. COOL SUNRISE

WARM SUNSET

T

he once-inconspicuous bathroom faucet is now anything but, if the newly revamped range of Essence faucets unveiled by German bathroom fittings company Grohe is anything to go by. In a fitting nod to a global trend toward individuality, the new Essence series is touted as the veritable toolbox that gives designers the flexibility to achieve unique visions that speak to their customers’ personal sense of style. Clean and classic with a streamlined and sleek silhouette, the Essence faucets are designed expressly to deliver a sense of timelessness. Offered in 10 classy color combinations and innovative finishes, from Cool Sunrise to Warm Sunset and Hard Graphite to Nickel, the faucets come either with an elegantly brushed or highly polished finish, allowing the sink area to match any individual taste and bathroom décor. Staying true to the tagline “Freedom of Choice,” the Essence range is also available in SuperSteel and chrome.

Supremely consistent in design, every spout and lever is almost identical across all product types. From the luxurious free standing shower to the floor mounted bath mixer or premium basin mixer, they come in sizes from S to XL, and can be matched with deluxe accessories such as towel rails or soap dishes. Chalk up another plus for the Essence series: cost-efficiency. The Essence series bears the durable GROHE quality and features the latest cutting-edge technology with innovations such as GROHE AquaGuide – an adjustable mousseur which can be slanted at an angle to deliver water at an optimal position – and the GROHE SilkMove® cartridge that offers a delicately precise control of water flow and temperature. The result is a faucet line that embodies the best in both functionality and style – with the sturdiness and solidity of a genuinely German design.

TOP: The new design bears slightly softened and humanised transitions and geometry of the classic Essence range.

RIGHT: The Essence faucets feature a subtly tapered handle, delivering a sensual user experience of precision control.

HARD GRAPHITE

NICKEL

SUPERSTEEL

GROHE.MY

CHROME


goods | niro granite

MARBLE MARVEL ENRICH YOUR LIVING SPACE WITH THE ROMANCE, GLAMOUR AND GRANDEUR OF THE GRAND LÀ COLLECTION OF PORCELAIN MARBLE LOOK-ALIKES.

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BOTTOM: Add a seamless, modern feel to the bedroom with large-format white tiles that off-set the warm wood elements and contribute to a decidedly clean, airy space.


THIS PICTURE: Large format tiles laid at a 45-degree angle with accent pieces between them along with the different tones create a gorgeously luxurious bathroom that is both subtle and arresting.


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THIS PICTURE: The different variety of patterns and tonalities of the Grand LĂ collection opens up endless creative possibilities as the tiles can be mixed and matched to create a multitude of laying patterns.


I

t’s easy to see why marble is having a major moment. From the palest white to the more subtle greys to deepest blacks, all swirling with soft grey, brown and gold veining, it’s a timeless material that easily lends an air of opulence with a touch of toughness to any living space. And if you are twitching with longing for the sumptuous stone but can’t stretch to cladding a floor or wall in it, Niro Granite’s newly-unveiled Grand Là collection may well mollify your marble malady, thanks to developments in digital printing technology. The Grand Là’s dazzling array of high-quality porcelain tiles mimic marble’s luminous beauty without the upkeep and cost. Stain and moisture resistant, the tiles are easy to maintain and to install, and keep their looks for many years to come. Offered in 80x80cm, 60x120cm and 100x100cm sizes, the large-format tiles are developed with the open space in mind, as they easily cover any large expanses quickly while keeping grout joints to a minimum. Moreover, these marble-effect tiles lend themselves well to a trend towards interiors that are less faddish as we don’t want to spend money on something not knowing if it will still look relevant five years down the road. Pick from an assemblage of 20 different marble veining and natural stone designs: from honey- and sand-colored tiles to impart that warm, organic and restful ambience to the bathroom to the all-white ones that add a sense of luxe and airy spaciousness to your bedroom, the versatile Grand Là collection allows you to accomplish the look you want on your floors and walls — without any of the problems that comes with real marble.

TOP LEFT: Contrasting colours for the flooring, walls and other elements of this spacious dining lounge create an appeal that is both inviting and mesmerizing.

TOP: A creative fusion that nudges up the neutrals of wood and glossy tiles results in a sleek and unique look in a modern showroom.

NIROGRANITE.COM


goods | interface

THE OLD AND THE NEW

INTERFACE BRINGS ITS RANGE OF DYNAMIC CARPETS TO A CONSERVATION PROJECT FOR THE SAGE HOTEL, IN WEST PERTH, AUSTRALIA.

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“AS WEST PERTH UNDERGOES REGENERATION AND RENEWAL, DESIGNERS AND ARCHITECTS MUST DO THEIR PART TO CONSERVE LOCAL HERITAGE. STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN OLD AND NEW, MATTHEWS & SCAVALLI ARCHITECTS DEVELOPED A CANTILEVERED TOWER BOX TO COMPLIMENT THE HISTORICAL WALSH FAMILY RESIDENCE OF 1902, CREATING THE SAGE HOTEL.”

LEFT: The modern facade of the Sage Hotel.

THIS PICTURE: The lobby features sharp clean lines against a mix of distressed stone and wood textures.


“TO FIT ALL THE REQUIRED AMENITIES FOR THE HOTEL INTO A TIGHT FOOTPRINT WAS A CHALLENGE. WE HAD TO WORK CLOSELY WITH THE CONSULTANT TEAMS THROUGH A SERIES OF WORKSHOPS.” STEEG BANHAM, OWNER, BANHAM ARCHITECTS

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LEFT & RIGHT: Organic patterns from Interface’s Whole Earth carpet collection introduce a sense of nature into the guest rooms.


T

he key goals for the Sage Hotel were to build sustainably whilst maintaining the integrity of the Walsh house. By pushing boundaries in the design of the tower, many parts of the original house were saved and restored. Steeg Banham of Banham Architects, the project lead for the interior, explains: “Fitting all the required amenities for the hotel into a tight footprint was a challenge. We had to work closely with the consultant teams through a series of workshops.” Our flexible and sustainable products were an integral part of the project, and Matthew Lai of owners SilverNeedle Hospitality was enthusiastic about the entire working relationship with Interface: “The partnership has been outstanding; we have similar values on sustainability, and the enthusiasm of the APAC Team was unmatched. The completed interior feels exactly as it should”. Working with Brianna Lilly of Precision Carpets, a mixture of collections was chosen for the corridor and guestrooms, covering 3,000 square meters. The Whole EarthTM Collection is used in the guestrooms; its intricate grasslike patterns contrast with the simple design of the rooms – adding a natural, comfortable feel and making the luxurious flooring the first thing guests notice when they enter. Now that the renovations are completed and the rooms are fitted and furnished, the Sage Hotel is open for business. Full of unique character and stylish contemporary design, the old and new sections complement one another to create a hotel that’s a big hit with guests and conservationists.

INTERFACE.COM


atelier | ode to art

INSTALLATION ART FEATURE Determination 91.5cm x 20cm x 167cm H

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THIS PICTURE: Y Indra Wahyu - Juvenile In Last Supper, acrylic on canvas, 150x250cm


O

ver the past half century, Installation Art has revolutionised art as we know it. Although the term is fairly recent, the roots of installation art can be traced back to Allan Kaprow’s Environments of the 1950s, and even further to Marcel Duchamp, the so-called father of conceptual art. More often than not, these works are large scale and occupy entire rooms and gallery spaces. They moved beyond traditional methods of painting and sculpture to encompass industrial methods and unconventional materials. Artists were given a free rein for innovation and continue to push acceptable limits. In line with this freedom, contemporary installation art has expanded tremendously; public, permanent, temporary, time-

based, mixed media, site-specific, interactive, the list goes on. However, the most crucial is arguably the experience that installation art engenders. At times, viewers even become participants and engage with the work by entering these spaces, signifying a paramount shift from viewing art from a distance to being within art itself. Although the field is immensely diverse with practitioners all over the world, let’s delve into the work of five contemporary installation artists represented by one of Singapore’s longest-running established galleries, Ode To Art.

Rainer Lagemann sculptures installed at Capri by Fraser at Changi City

Schadenfreude 122cm x 25cm x 117cm H

RAINER LAGEMANN German sculptor Rainer Lagemann is renowned for his sculptural installations of human figures, usually found scaling walls or suspended mid-air. Lagemann uses a network of 1-inch stainless steel squares to form a large metal mesh, with which he uses to mould his signature life-size human figures. Although the figures feel full and massive, the porous square mesh allows us to see through these volumes, creating a striking visual contrast between its weight and surface. This juxtaposition makes Lagemann’s figures simultaneously strong yet delicate, echoing the resilience and weakness of the human condition and body. Lagemann has described the squares as symbols for the trials and tribulations of life, whereas the four corners represent the intellectual, emotional, physical and spiritual facets of a human being. Lagemann’s oeuvre can be described as a rigorous exploration of the human form, a timeless subject which has captivated artists from time immemorial. His works closely examine the human body and reinterpret classical sculpture with modern methods. By utilising a see-through network of stainless steel squares, Lagemann removes all superficial details, reducing the figures to their essential form while creating an air of abstraction and mystique. Sculpted as a perfect freeze-frame, his metal figures are dynamically posed, often captured in the moment of climbing, running or jumping. These faceless figures create new narratives in different locations, altering our perception of the space. Like many sculptural installations, lighting adds a whole new dimension to Lagemann’s work. His figures are adaptive and cast unique shadows in different spaces.

Diver Adrian 160cm x 172cm x 33cm H


DAVID KRACOV American artist David Kracov’s body of works span sculpture, installation, animation and illustration. He is famous for his colourful metal wall installations which though strikingly beautiful, respond to global tragedies such as the September 11 terrorist attacks and the Holocaust. His metal wall installation “Reflections” pays tribute to the victims of the 9/11 attacks. Parted horizontally in the middle, it depicts dual versions of the New York City skyline. In the skyline above, a colourful cloud of butterflies soar from where the Twin Towers once stood, commemorating the victims of the attack. Butterflies are a signature motif in Kracov’s work. They symbolise a child’s life — delicate, fleeting and undeniably beautiful. Instead of mourning the tragic loss of lives with dark and grim imagery, Kracov chooses to celebrate these lives with colour and vigour. The vibrant palette and energetic forms never fail to uplift viewers. With a keen eye for detail, Kracov hand-cuts these wall installations from single sheets of steel before finishing them with high-quality acrylic polymer paint. Their intricacy resembles the art of paper cut and stands in contrast to the sturdy metal material. David Kracov graduated from the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design and is the youngest artist ever exhibited in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. His works are collected by many celebrated Hollywood artists and directors including Steven Spielberg, Matt Damon, Whoopi Goldberg and Joel Silver. Kracov has also worked with several acclaimed animation studios on much loved projects such as The Lion King and Aladdin.

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Reflections, 183 x 152 x 13cm

Passing with Flying Colours, 198cm

Book of Life, 44 x 28 x 41cm


Lush, 150 x 13.8 x 150cm

NEMO JANTZEN Dutch artist Nemo Jantzen creates stunning mixed media portraits which centre around narrative, privacy and voyeurism in our contemporary imagesaturated environment. Exuding a film noir quality, these images are highly intimate; subjects often gaze directly at the viewer and are shot up close in red and pink flesh tones. From afar, these contemporary portraits appear blurry and consist of hundreds of coloured circles. The indistinct whole begs for closer inspection, only for viewers to discover strategically placed images encapsulated within resin semi-spheres. Jantzen creates a stark visual juxtaposition between the larger pixelated portrait and the smaller, seemingly unrelated images. Viewers are invited to form their own connections between images, creating potentially infinite alternate realities. Jantzen’s body of works explore voyeurism and privacy, topics which have become increasingly pertinent in our era of data and surveillance. They also reflect on the power of the image in conveying narrative and meaning. Furthermore, Jantzen reinvigorates the classical subject of portraiture by expertly playing with focus, depth and multiple images. He dissects a portrait down to its essential tones before reassembling it with smaller elements, reminiscent of both Neo-Pointilism and Chuck Close’s mature style. Mixed media installations like The Closer You Get are almost paradoxical, blending hyperrealism, distortion and illusion, reaffirming the ironic adage of the closer you look, the less you see.

The Closer You Get, 125 x 12.8 x 142cm

If Only 132x182cm


PARK SEUNG MO Brooklyn-based South Korean artist Park Seung Mo is renowned for his wire mesh sculptural installations. With a high contrast monochromatic colour scheme, these emotive portraits dominate the space and mesmerize viewers. Park’s large scale installation works are often suspended in the air and comprise a dense mass of intricately layered wire mesh. Using a subtractive technique and superimposition, Park painstakingly shaves off each layer of wire mesh to create a photorealistic composite image. Gaps between each subsequent layer create depth and add volume to his works, transforming these flat twodimensional planes into a three-dimensional form. Viewers gain a more comprehensive understanding of his work by walking around and viewing his figures from different perspectives. Heavily influenced by Zen principles and meditation, Park’s practice often contemplates the human existence. Although the works are photorealistic, the figures remain ethereal and illusory. Slight shifts by the viewer generates great movement in the images as the layers of mesh intersect. Park also creates portraits of icons and famous figures using his signature wire mesh technique. This includes portraits of Lee Kuan Yew, the late founding father of Singapore, and the posthumously celebrated artist Vincent Van Gogh. As with Park’s larger installations, these porous freestanding works can be viewed from either side.

Self Portrait with Bandaged Ear and Pipe, Stainless Steel Wire Mesh, 161 x 145 cm

Lee Kuan Yew, Stainless Steel Wire Mesh, 103 x 9.5 x 152.5cm

Untitled, Stainless Steel Wire Mesh Maya Monaliza, Stainless Steel Wire Mesh, 920 x 1070mm

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Ran Hwang at Becoming Again; Coming Together (2017) at the Asian Civilisation Museum

Untitled, Buttons and Pins on Wood Panel

Ran Hwang Ran Hwang is a mixed media artist from South Korea. Appropriating methods of the fashion industry, she creates large-scale installations using buttons, beads, pins and thread. Her works reinvent classical East Asian motifs and methods such as floral landscape and embroidery, while exploring universal concepts of life and death. Hwang’s production process is highly laborious and repetitive, requiring long hours and immense concentration. The painstaking process of creating these intricate embroidered installations reflects the artist’s meditative spirit and discipline. These works are captivating and overwhelming, filling our field of vision. The buttons are held up against a wall by pins which constrict their movement. These material gestures signify the lives of ordinary people, bound by social constraints, yet yearning for freedom. Hwang also often uses threads as a metaphor for the complexity of human relations. Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) recently commissioned Hwang to create Becoming Again; Coming Together as part of the museum’s Korea’s Joseon dynasty exhibition. Inspired by Korea’s Joseon Dynasty, the mixed media, digital installation features two woven phoenixes, video projections of a bride and groom dressed in traditional garments and thousands of pins and buttons, offering visitors a glimpse into the Joseon period. As a temporary work, Becoming Again; Coming Together also reflects the ephemerality of installation art which is set up and taken down within months, only to survive in documentation and viewer’s hearts. CONCLUSION These five installation artists originate from different countries and have very diverse practices. However, they all share a spirit of contemporary innovation, adopting unconventional methods to materialize their creative visions. They seek to construct art experiences which uplift, provoke and compel viewers to reflect upon universal values inherent to the human condition.

Close up of buttons and pins

ODETOART.COM


event | niro granite

theme:

Niro Granite Unveils Large Porcelain Tiles

venue:

Niro Ceramic Group’s headquarters

website:

nirogranite.com


choice | ode to art

A STATE OF FLUX A

truly interdisciplinary artist, Rebecca Pierce’s body of work spans fine art, painting, fashion and design. Her paintings often reinterpret classical subjects such as still life and landscape with an innovative and contemporary aesthetic sense. In White Heat at Clontarf, Pierce captures the quintessential Australian ‘day at the beach’, evoking feelings of play, warmth and summertime nostalgia. She employs a cool, high key colour scheme to depict this leisurely day at Clontarf beach in Queensland, Australia. Using her signature acrylic impasto technique, Pierce overlaps scales of paint to sculpt the seascape. This creates an exceptionally crisp and textured paint surface. The long horizontal composition fills our field of vision, engulfing the viewer in a sea of blue. Instead of having a central focal point, the viewer’s gaze flits around the scene, taking in both the minute details and collective mass. The individual figures are miniaturised and assimilated into the whole, indistinguishable from sea and sand. This manifests the artist’s belief of humility before nature’s vastness and might. Pierce often applies contrasting colours side by side, creating a frenetic visual contrast reminiscent of nineteenth century Pointillism. Movement is a consistent element in Pierce’s oeuvre, where she often explores concepts of flux, evolution, tension and resistance. The undulating and rocky paint textures, coupled with the sudden switches from cool to warm hues, reflects an intentional and intensified state of change — a fundamental part of life and creation.

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THIS PICTURE: White Heat at Clontarf (2017), 66 x 169cm, Acrylic Impasto, Ink and Resin by Rebecca Pierce

ODETOART.COM


H+R Issue 06 | Hospitality & Residential - Architect | Design | Interiors  

HASSELL: URBAN FUTURES

H+R Issue 06 | Hospitality & Residential - Architect | Design | Interiors  

HASSELL: URBAN FUTURES

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