Page 1

M AY 2 0 1 8 · Vo l u m e 1 2 0 : I s s u e 1

Pa g e 10 A d v i s o r s a y s Pe l l G ran ts are n o w a v a i l a b l e f or Spri ng

COV ER: Page 22 Pre si dent Nels o n’s glo bal to ur c o nc ludes in H aw aii

THE LEADER

Page 42 Stephanie Ro berts o n : M o t her, teac her and s tuden t i n o n e


May 2018 • VOLUME 120 • ISSUE 1

ADVISOR Le e A n n Lam ber t MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISTS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Savanna Bachel der COPY EDITORS

Denali Loflin

Brooklyn Redd

Hannah Jones

Antoniette Yee

Emmalee Smith Helam Lau Zeek Cheng Tomson Cheang

VIDEOGRAPHERS Cour t ney Bow Ni el sen ART & GRAPHICS M cKenna Locken

Ally Pack

Brooklyn Redd

Geena De Maio

ART DIRECTOR

Anel Castro Chuer Vic Zhong Dani Castro

Wesl ey Ng MANAGING EDITOR Kev i n Brown

PHOTOGRAPHERS A lvin Vi ncent Dy Ky le G ab Bat ac A dam Case

NEW S CE N T ER BOX 1920 BYUH LAIE, HI 96762 PRINTER P r int Ser vi ces

CONTACT

Email: keal akai @by u h. edu Ad Information: keal akai ads@gmai l . com Phone: (80 8 ) 6 7 5 -3 6 9 4 Fax: (8 0 8 ) 6 7 5 -3 4 9 1

Editorial, photo submissions & distribution inquiries: ke a l a k a i @ by u h . e d u . To s u b s c r i b e t o t h e R S S F E E D o r t o v i e w a d d i t i o n a l a r t i c l e s , go t o ke a l a k a i . by u h . e d u

ON THE COVER: President Russell M. Nelson concluded his global ministry tour during a special fireside in the Cannon Activities Center on April 22. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles also spoke.

ABO UT US

The Ke Alaka‘i began publishing the same year the university, then called Church College of Hawaii, opened. It has continued printing for more than 60 years. The name means “the leader” in Hawaiian. It began as a monthly newsletter, evolved into a weekly newspaper, then a weekly magazine, and is now a monthly news magazine with a website and a social media presence. Today a staff of about 25 students works to provide information for BYU-Hawaii’s campus ohana and Laie’s community.

2

KE ALAK A ‘I


PH OTO SUBMISSIO N Mark Bulos dives into knowledge during his studies in the Joseph F. Smith Library. Photo by Gab Batac

Share your photo with us and we may feature it in our next issue. E-mail us your high-resolution photo with a caption at kealakai@byuh.edu

F O L LO W U S AR O U ND THE WE B

KEA LA KA I.B YUH .EDU Instagram: @KEALAKAINEWS Snapchat: @KEALAKAINEWS Facebook: KE ALAKA‘I YouTube: KE ALAKA‘I NEWS

MAY 2018

3


May 2018 • VOLUME 120 • ISSUE 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

6

Campus Comment: What are your thoughts on gun control?

CAMPUS LIFE

8

Day in the life of exercise and sports science major Kalei Satomi Weller

10

A financial aid advisor gives tips on how to find funds for the new semester

12

Students from all majors are encouraged to join and make music with Shaka Steel

14

Principles of the gospel align with secular learning, say students with differing majors

16

TVA parents discuss the difficulties of raising children while in college

18

A Wave of Change partners with the Kokua Hawaii Foundation

20

Vegans of BYUH explain the benefits of their plant-based diets

COMMUNITY

22

President Nelson ends his global tour during a broadcast fireside in the CAC

26 Local vocalist Joe Ah Quin remembered for sharing his music with the world

4

KE ALAK A ‘I

22


28

Students react to Mark Zuckerberg speaking to Congress about Facebook data use

30

Cultural traditions and facts from countries around the world

32

38

MAY 15

BYUH alumna’s project aims to help children learn more advanced concepts

TUESDAY Devotional with the Executive Board at 11 a.m. in the CAC.

Students clear up misconceptions about Hong Kong

17 - 18

35

FEATURE

38

Senior Feature: Deborah Pui-Yan Kwok graduates with two degrees and 162 credits

40

Sei Kuwahara volunteers with campus SWATT to promote sustainability

42

English Instructor Stephanie Robertson tells of her journey as a mother and student

LIFESTYLE

46

Returned missionaries give advice to those preparing to serve missions

48

Students describe what makes a successful movie date

26

C A L E N D A R

50

Relationship status should not define happiness, say single students

52

Couples share their paths to marriage

54

Students say there is a light at the end of the tunnel after hard breakups

56

THURSDAY-FRIDAY Kahuku Elementary to celebrate May Day in the CAC 150.

22 TUESDAY Devotional with Earl Morris at 11 a.m. in the CAC.

28 MONDAY Memorial Day is observed. There will be no school for this national day of honoring those who have since passed.

June 5 TUESDAY Devotional with Elder Jorg Klebingat at 11 a.m. in the CAC. Elder Klebingat was sustained as a General Authority Seventy on April 5, 2014.

BYUH surfers describe the feeling of walking on water

56

59

Students say there is an art to maintaining friendships MAY 2018

5


Campus Comment:

What are your thoughts on gun control?

B Y DAN I CASTRO / P H OTO S B Y ADAM CASE

TAYLOR TUALA, a junior from California studying ICS and peacebuilding:

“Guns can’t go off by themselves. They need someone on the other side to pull the trigger. Guns in and out of itself are not the problem, but those holding the guns are.”

RANDY OLSON, a junior from California studying finance:

CAMILLE JONES, a sophomore from Utah studying nursing:

“I think there’s a reason for the second amendment. I believe everyone has the right to bear what they want. Also, in my opinion there is no need for advanced weaponry. I think there should be limitations, but if we challenge the second amendment, we could basically throw the bill of rights out the window.”

“I think we should have rules and regulations, but not get rid of all the guns. I think guns are super important, and the people who typically have them are not usually dangerous, and sometimes they can protect you.”

See the full story on gun control on our website: Kealakai.byuh.edu

6

KE ALAK A ‘I

DILLON PETROVICH, a senior SAM LOWRY, a sophomore from California studying from Fiji studying marine international cultural biology: studies and peacebuilding:

“So, in this country we have two sides on gun control. The basic needs of each are to have safety and feel safe, and they both go about it in different ways. I am a gun owner. I believe that there should be tighter restrictions, but there is a need to compromise both sides.”

“Even cars, which are not meant for violence or anything, have regulations that need to be taken into consideration. ... What’s possible is making regulations tighter or stricter, so that mass shooting don’t happen.”


campus life

in this section Day in the life of an exercise and sports science major Kalei Satomi Weller

8

Students with different majors find ties in common religious doctrine

14

Financial advisor and students give tips on how to save money during school

10

TVA families share their struggles of raising children while finishing their degrees

16

Shaka Steel invites all who are interested to come and find their musical talent

12

A Wave of Change partners with Kokua Hawaii Foundation

18

Vegan students share how their lives have changed based on their new diets

20

MAY 2018

7


CA M P US LIF E

Kalei Satomi Weller Exercise Science Major B Y H E L AM L AU Kalei Satomi Weller, a junior from Idaho majoring in exercise sports science with a biomedical track, said she hopes to learn more about the body and how she can make a difference by understanding how it works. “I love my major because it helps me understand little by little how smart and caring God is about us. The body is so complex, but each part is helpful and shows how God truly thought about everything.” Photo by Gab Batac

8

KE ALAK A ‘I


What is your major about? Weller explained there are several tracks for the exercise sports science major that include: biomedical science, business management, health, sport performance, sports and fitness management, and exercise and sports science education. She explained how the “biomedical science track is more emphasized on the personal wellness of people. I will learn about how the body functions.”

Why did you choose EXS? “When I was in high school, I had lots of injuries. I was always in and out of the hospital and had to receive physical therapy, so I want to know how to get better and also help others who are in the same situation as me.”

What do you want to do with it? “The track I am taking in exercise science is biomedical. I want to be a physical therapist and work internationally in that field. I would like to work either in Japan or in the Pacific Islands. Japan is one of my homes, but also people here have affected me so much, so I want to give back to them.”

What are some jobs available for this type of major? “You can become a doctor or physical therapist through taking the biomedical track. The education track leads to a physical education (PE) teacher.You can also become a nutritionist, a personal trainer or coach in high school, or work with college sports teams.”

What advice do you have for someone interested in this major? Weller explained how sometimes she feels others judge her for choosing to major in exercise science. Due to her own experiences, she advised others who may also have a love for this particular major to “just keep going … Studying hard can show others why you chose this major.”

What is a typical day like for in this major? “My major does require a lot of studying. I feel like I have to study to keep building upon the foundation of knowledge that the professors help build. I do this by going to class everyday, I read the materials given by the teacher, do labs and homework, go to the tutors for help, as well as studying with other students who have taken the same classes previously or who are currently taking the classes. I take a lot of science classes: biology, chemistry, and physics.” She said her plans for the summer are to gain more experience and knowledge in her major by volunteering at a physical therapy practice.

Cons: She said one disadvantage of the EXS program at BYUH is the classes are only prerequisites, which is more helpful for those who are planning on applying for further education in the United States. She explained how it is harder to transfer and get credit for classes internationally. She also explained another disadvantage is people’s misconceptions of what the major is really like. “There are many people who don’t understand fully what an EXS student studies. Basically people think it is an easy major and all you do is exercise, but that is wrong. I think maybe if the major had a better name to describe the major more, then students would know what they could be studying for in their future.”

MAY 2018

9


CA M P US LIF E

Financial preparedness for Spring Semester Financial Aid advisor and scholarship counselor urge students to explore all Pell Grant and scholarship opportunities B Y H A NNA H J O NES

S

ince Spring Semester has begun, BYU-Hawaii advisors and counselors recommended eligible students should apply for the new Spring Pell Grant and stay focused on getting their education done in a timely manner. A freshman, Hannah Kelly, who has not experienced Spring Semester, said the shorter semester with the Pell Grant will allow her to not spend as much money on tuition and housing. Tammie Fonoimoana, a Financial Aid advisor for BYUH, said, “Those who are eligible for federal aid, we are introducing the new Spring Pell Grant.” Explaining how Pell Grants are usually only given for fall and winter semesters, she said, “Just this year, federal made an adjustment to offer the Pell Grant in Spring.” Eddy Tsing, the scholarship counselor, added, “There are fewer students who knew about the additional Pell for Spring, and they thought they had to do another FAFSA online. But the FAFSA you did for 2017-2018 is the same and works for Fall, Winter, and Spring.” As for Kelly, a freshman from California majoring in biomedicine, she said she already knew Pell Grants were offered. She explained, “That’s why I filled out my FAFSA information. I’m utilizing the opportunity of the new Pell Grant opportunity.” Tsing said, “When it comes to scholarships [for Spring], the same opportunities are still available. The merit scholarships still work. It’s the same process. Students need to be enrolled in at least nine credits.

10

KE ALAK A ‘I

Departmental scholarships and private donor scholarships, through the academic departments are also still available.” Though these opportunities are still available, there are different requirements for students who move off campus. Tsing said, “If students were to move on campus, those scholarships would still work. But those external scholarships require a 12-credit minimum, and enrollment for Spring is eight, so it’s a little bit more.” Kelly, who planned to move off campus while taking the minimum required credits for Spring Semester, said, “I think Spring will be easier to pay for because it’s shorter.” Likewise, the Spring Pell Grant has further requirements to qualify. Fonoimoana said, “The Pell Grant is based on a 12-credit enrollment. Since Spring is a term and students will only be enrolled in 8-9 credits, the grant will be reduced to those credits, and students will still be able to utilize it this Spring.” She said the amount students can receive is solely based on the amount of credits they enroll in. “The institutional scholarships have always been around for the Spring Semester,” Tsing said to clear up any confusion. He added, “I think the confusion is we went with a new academic calendar, so this is the first time we’re doing it as a shorter semester. But on campus, scholarships have always been around for Spring.” Tsing added, “International students have access to the same scholarships. They have access to departmental scholarships and merit


Graphic by Mckenna Locken

scholarships. They also have access to donor scholarships and those are kind of private, but they work through the department scholarships. Students on the I-WORK Program have access to those same opportunities.” Kelly said, “I know there is financial aid for I-WORK students and for current students who apply for it. There are also scholarships you can apply for.” With that, Kelly also mentioned the ability for students to take out loans and grants. Fonoimoana said, “Student loans are also available, but we try to discourage students from taking out student loans. [However], it is available if they need it.You have to be registered for at least 6 credits for that.” Adding a few opportunities on gaining financial aid for Spring semester, Tsing said students who participate in club presidencies receive money. He explained, “They have to be part of the club presidency to get the presidency-based scholarships.” Fonoimoana added since “the term is shorter, it leaves summer open for you to work for Fall.You may earn less money for Spring Semester, but in the long run, you will be able to earn more to cover future semesters.” In addition to finances, Fonoimoana added staying enrolled each semester will benefit “students because they’ll finish their degrees sooner, and start working like everybody else.”

To students staying for Spring Semester, Tsing said, “We realize the weather is going to get warmer and it’s going to be fun, but save your money.” He further encouraged students to find jobs and start a savings account. Fonoimoana said, “[Students] can come in and talk to any of our counselors because on top of what’s available, we also try to do budget counseling.” She advised students who may not know how to budget to “try to practice what the church teaches about living within your means, making a budget, [and] being self-reliant. So, it’s a good resource. I think the business professors would also be a good resource, [especially] those who teach finance. “Also, parents are an awesome resource. I know a lot of students don’t want to talk to their parents about budgeting, but they’ve been doing it forever. If they want to come in and talk to any of the counselors, we would be happy to sit down with them, but the student needs to come in and initiate that planning,” continued Fonoimoana. Despite the financial needs for Spring, Kelly said with a smile on her face, “I’m excited for Spring because I’ll have more free time, and I’m really ready for better weather.” •

MAY 2018

11


CARMeli P US LIF E g i on

‘Grab a pan’ and join Shaka Steel

Members can learn more about culture, rhythm, and improve their musical talents, says Shaka Steel Director Jennifer Duerden B Y DAN I CAST R O

S

haka Steel is part of the Polynesian Drum Ensemble on campus, and its sound is recognizable in songs such as, “Under the Sea” from The Little Mermaid and “Crank That” by Soulja Boy. Those who are willing to dedicate time and practice are invited to join the Shaka family, said Duerden. “I definitely try to find people and recommend them to do it,” said Jennifer Duerden, a special instructor and director of the Shaka Steel Band. “I go and look for them. There are certain people who gravitate towards that music, but they don’t know about it until they see or hear it.You can tell when you meet someone. Maybe [it’s] the instrument they play, their personality, or different things. “Sometimes I’ll discover a student who is great for steel band, like our student, Megan. I just thought she would be a great fit for steel

12

KE ALAK A ‘I

band, even though she is not a music major. She ended up joining it and being with us for several semesters. She has been fun to be with and fun to watch.” Megan Hansen, a senior from Wyoming studying biomedical science, joined the Shaka Steel Drum Band when she was a freshman. Hansen shared, “A few years ago, I met Sister Duerden in my music theory 101 class. She invited me to be part of the band and I’ve been on tour a couple of times. We’ve gone on tour to Maui and Kauai, and it was totally worth it. They were great experiences and the music is uplifting and cultural, which this university is all about.” Ninoy Kusuma, a senior from Indonesia studying music performance with an emphasis on percussion, explained, “This is my ninth semester with Shaka Steel. I just want people to

know Jennifer Duerden puts a lot of work into this. [The Music Department] is trying so hard to make us better musicians. Every concert we have are the things we want to show people. These are the fruits of our labors. Please enjoy our music that we share. We hope you can feel the spirit while we play.” Duerden said she hoped students with other musical talents could discover new skills in Shaka Steel. She said, “We have a singer in the group right now. She doesn’t play another instrument, and she says playing has really strengthened her rhythm. In Shaka Steel, rhythm is everything. People who have other skills in music even [develop] new skills by participating.” Sarah Knight, a junior from California studying vocal performance, said, “I’m a vocalist, so I’m not used to percussion. It was very


fun getting to know the other side of the Music Department and learning a new instrument. It’s really fun to be able to play something. It’s not easy, but it’s a fun, cultural experience.” Kris Krisanalome, a sophomore from Thailand studying music performance with an emphasis on percussion, said, “We learn to listen to each other. As a drum set major, I learned a new style playing with Shaka Steel. I look forward to sharing this type of music. I hope people who watch us will be interested in joining us and learning about us. “We meet every Monday and Wednesday for two hours. I found that it’s not hard to play if you practice and you take time to become better at it. It’s not hard, and everything you learn is positive. If you feel like you need more practice, grab a pan.” • Above: EIL Professor Perry Christensen plays with students in the Shaka Steel Band at its Winter Semester showcase. Below: Band Director Jennifer Duerden, middle, says she always looking for students who would like to learn the music and culture. Photos by Alvin Dy

MAY 2018

13


CA M P US LIF E

Different knowledge, same gospel truth Students share how their various majors help them understand doctrine better B Y E M M AL E E SM I TH

14

KE ALAK A ‘I

Maricar Gonzales, from the Philippines, studies in the Heber J. Grant Buiding. Her major is accounting. Photo by Monique Saenz


W

hile student ‘s majors can range from biology to entrepreneurship and from political science to psychology, BYUHawaii students said the diverse knowledge they have gained in their courses have strengthened their testimonies of the gospel. Adolfo Arellano, a junior political science major from Mexico, said, “I think that learning about the gospel is important in any major … but having knowledge from other sources helps too. They both go together. Every major helps you understand the truth in every way. Not what people think or what a certain person thinks, but the truth.” Kathleen Hawes, a sophomore psychology major from Idaho, who started as an art major, said the knowledge she learned from class, sketches, artwork, and everyday life strengthens her testimony. “It definitely lets me see the beauty that God creates for us.” She said peoples’ different faces, expressions, and the way they acted interested her and so she decided to switch to psychology. Hawes said studying the way people act and the way they see the world helps her to see others the way God sees them. “Everyone’s different. I’m different, you’re different, and so it’s a great way to connect with charity - the attributes of Christ. … It’s definitely helping me become closer to Him and to act the way He acts. I should love everyone just like how Christ does.” Arellano said he has learned in his major that “since the beginning, man has been starting to organize in societies. In every society they have been looking to find a good way of organization and many times they have succeeded in certain things and sometimes they have failed in certain aspects.” He explained they also searched for answers to their purpose and role in life. He said, “[The church] is a perfect organization either organizationally or philosophically. It has thrived. And I think that’s the reason why this organization of the church has been really successful.” Arellano compared God to a watchmaker and the church to a mechanical watch. He said, “Imagine finding a watch on the street and picking it up, looking at it closely, and realizing how complex, intricate and unique it is. Then

someone else with a greater knowledge would have had to make it, because it wasn’t easily created.” Abbie Greenwood, a senior marine biology major from Utah, said she learned about the creation of the earth in her geology and religion class. In her religion class, she emphasized how she learned the creation wasn’t seven days long and it wasn’t 24 hours. It took seven periods of time, not days. Between scientists who don’t believe in God and scientists who do, Greenwood said, “I don’t think there really is a division. I feel like we know about this much,” raising her hands and holding them about a foot apart, “and there’s all of this to learn,” she said as she threw her hands out to show a larger portion. “Who are we to say they don’t coincide? I think there’s a lot more opportunities for similarities. “Religion and science are really similar because they’re both in search of truth. I think what it really comes down to is that we rejoice in truth in all things, so I think that has definitely strengthened my testimony,” Greenwood continued. During her geology class, Greenwood said she learned about how the solar system and earth were formed as well. “After a semester of learning all these intricate things about how the Grand Canyon formed from bottom up, and how it chiseled its way down, you learn a lot of things and you don’t see your surroundings in the same way. Rather, you see it in a way of how much time and how much effort was put into it and how it was all created for us.” In comparison with her major, she said, “We know so little about the ocean, but what we do know is magnificent and it’s enough to cling onto and want to pursue it more.” The gospel is the same way, Greenwood explained. “I don’t know everything about the gospel at all times, but there are a few things I really have a strong testimony of and I can build off of that and then search for more. … Marine biology is the same way.” Alex Moreno, a senior business management major and entrepreneurship minor from Mexico, said, “A lot of people think business is all about making money, being rich, and being happily rich … but that’s not necessarily the case.”

Moreno said his professors have been successful monetarily but also served others. He said he has learned his teacher’s success came from using their businesses and resources to benefit others. Moreno said he attends the Entrepreneur Lecture Series every Thursday at the Willes Center. He said, “[The speakers] recognize that yes, they’ve become successful and they’ve been able to help a lot of people, but they recognize they’ve been able to do all those things because they put their trust in the Lord. I love that they emphasize that. That’s again a testimony for me I can become an instrument in the hand of the Lord just like how they have been.” Louisette Waiane, a junior education major from New Caledonia and Vanuatu, said when she first heard about the education program, she thought it was only about teaching, getting to know students, and learning from them. But now, “what I see with the education program is the more I get closer to [the students], the more I feel like I get closer to my Savior. “[Seeing] the way they learn, the way they speak, and I’m just like, ‘Wow, Heavenly Father is so amazing to be able to bless those students’ ability to learn and grow.’ I just love it. It’s amazing and it helps me to get closer to Heavenly Father and Christ and build that relationship with them, and be able to see in a way the Savior usually sees them as students and children of Heavenly Father,” Waiane continued. Jackson Saga, a freshman hospitality and tourism management major from Malaysia, said the gospel brings happiness to others. He explained his work at the Polynesian Cultural Center is not just for the money, but to make other people happy. “I don’t look at it as a job. I look at as an opportunity for me to serve and make others happy.” Saga explained he read a talk by President Thomas S. Monson that talks about service. He said of the talk, “We have the capacity to serve others. As a member of the church, serving is one of the crucial parts of our responsibility or our calling. It helped my testimony grow and I know … I will be able to help Heavenly Father’s children be happy through it.” •

MAY 2018

15


CA M P US LIF E

Babysitting dilemma TVA couple creates group to help other students parents with finding a balance between taking care of their babies, studying and working B Y V I C ZH O N G M O N GAN

16

KE ALAK A ‘I


n order to help parents find babysitters, student couple István and Réka Bordás have created a local program using Google Docs to coordinate times for other couples to voluntarily babysit. The Bordás, both seniors from Hungary, shared their struggles as parents while in school. István Bordás, a hospitality and tourism major, shared, “Last year when both of us were in school, we had felt that it’s really hard to find someone to take care of our daughter. Moreover, we don’t have family here. We were looking around, and we realized it was basically a struggle for everyone else.” The Bordás family started the babysitting program last year and said the goal was to help the small community of parents in Laie. Réka Bordás, a peacebuilding major, said, “It’s basically a fair babysitting swap. We were able to coordinate with a few families to have them watch our daughter when we were in school. In return, we would watch their sons or daughters when they were in school or at work. We don’t pay each other, and we just want to help each other out since we are in a similar situation.” Réka Bordás shared how the program is a great opportunity for children to have play days. “Kids can improve their social skills if they play with other children. It will affect their lives very positively and help them learn how to behave among their peers” Sister Kathy Edgar, a senior missionary from Utah who is a registered nurse and international board certified lactation counselor, said, “There are so many babysitting needs with the students. Moms are juggling their schedules with their husbands’ work and schooling schedules. Some of the students actually bring their babies to class because there is really not a babysitting plan. “I thought to myself, ‘It would be nice if maybe some of the students who are working

I

on their education degrees, if they could have some type of day care available where they are not just babysitting, but also working on developmental tasks, mental milestones. Perhaps students have some early pre-school education. That would be a nice way to have a day care–to allow students maybe to have some experience working primarily in early childhood education.” When parents choose babysitters, Sister Edgar advised they look for people who are patient, compassionate, don’t get angry or stressed out easily. “I think it’s good if babysitters understand sleep safety,” she said. “They should know how to put babies to sleep on their backs without blankets or pillows that will potentially suffocate the babies. When they are bottle feeding babies, they should hold the babies and not prop the bottle because babies need that close contact with someone when they are bottle fed. I think babysitters also should have had some basic first aid knowledge in case of choking.” Tea Segi, a sophomore from Samoa majoring in social work, said, “I thank them [babysitters] for being willing to take care of my baby. It’s a special job. It’s not easy and it takes lots of responsibility.” According to parents’ comments, they prefer to have people they know take care of their babies. Segi said, “The reason why I picked the babysitters I have now is one of them is my close friend and the other one is a mom who also lives in TVA. It’s different when you have a mom watch your kid. Every baby is different, and there are certain things I was worried people wouldn’t know about my daughter, but a mom has that motherly instinct.” Ashleigh Liu Pu, a junior majoring in elementary education, said parents can be closer with their babysitters by genuinely

extending friendships and being curious about the babysitters’ family backgrounds. Not knowing the babysitters enough is one of the Bordás’ primary concerns as well. István Bordás said he wants to turn the program into an app so more parents can sign up for babysitting and get to know each other through profile sharing. The couple said they are now sharing a Google Doc with other parents to keep track of time, but they hope an app will be done by next year so things can be done automatically. PA R ENTA L H EA LT H

New parents’ physical and mental wellbeings have caught Sister Edgar’s attention. She explained, “New parents have interrupted sleep usually and this will last about six months. Since babies wake up every two hours or so, the parents are lacking sleep. Physically, they are exhausted. Emotionally, they are going through hormone changes that can lead to postpartum depression and anxiety.” Having very little personal time is the biggest challenge for new mothers, said Okalani Cheng, a Taiwanese senior majoring in social work. “They will do homework at midnight, get only a couple of hours of sleep, and wake up at 8 o’clock in the morning to go to class or work.” Cheng said she loves babies and has many years of babysitting experience. She is a good friend to Liu Pu and babysits her baby. Cheng said, “After moms gave birth, they need physical recovery. Therefore, the school should give them longer breaks.” For more information about István and Réka Bordás’ babysitting swap program, contact them at isti17@gmail.com or rekab@ go.byuh.edu. •

István and Réka Bordás discuss family matters with another TVA mother. They created a Google Doc to track swapping babysitting with other student parents. Photo by Gab Batac MAY 2018

17


CA M P US LIF E

Photo by Alvin Dy

A Wave of Change The Kokua Hawai‘i Foundation partners with BYUH club to clean beaches and promote environmentalism B Y GE E N A D E M AI O

18

KE ALAK A ‘I


Kendra Lewis and Mikaela Lawless are co-founders of A Wave of Change. Photos by Alvin Dy

Wave of Change is a BYU-Hawaii club focused on environmental awareness and being stewards of the land, according to Kendra Lewis, president of the club. Lewis, a junior from Utah majoring in painting and graphic design, continued, “We have many club members come to beach clean ups and they are always amazed at how much they can help in such a short amount of time. They can also instantly see the outcome of their work as the pile of trash grows. “We are working to help our community. We have teamed up with the local stake to clean Bikini Beach twice and we had an awesome turn out,” Lewis added. In partnership with the club, the Kokua Hawai‘i Foundation seeks to support environmental education, explained Program Manager Doorae Shin. Shin said, “I moved out here from Philadelphia when I was 18 and it was the first time I ever connected with nature. “I had this new and deep love for nature. I then learned about climate change and pollution, so I channeled all my energy and changed my major to sustainability. I decided to focus all my effort and my whole heart to

A

helping the planet. I became an environmental activist.” Lewis and Mikaela Lawless, a junior studying business management from California, co-founded the association. Lewis said, “We want to stress the importance of helping our community and going forth and serving.” Lawless shared, “Kendra and I have been best friends since freshman year here [at BYUH]. We were at Temple Beach right before Fall Semester of this year talking about how crazy it is that people at our school don’t realize that our beaches are becoming dirtier and dirtier. “I’m from Southern California, so recycling and ocean conservation is really stressed in our community. I was shocked that living in Hawaii, the same duty in keeping our home clean wasn’t as important. After our conversation, we decided to take action and start a club. We want to bring more awareness to college students who come from everywhere around the world, and stress how important it is to be good stewards of the beautiful Earth God gave us. Lawless said they hope that people realize the difference they “can make in doing small acts like cleaning up trash for an hour once

or twice a month. Small acts of service add up and hopefully they will take this newfound appreciation for the Earth to wherever they live in the world.” Lawless said the BYUH club has paired with Kokua Hawai‘i Foundation three times. A Wave of Change has been active for two semesters and has connections with neighbors. Lawless said, “We even had local community members come out. We also worked with a family in Laie who cleans Bikini Beach once a month, which is awesome because we get to work with the Laie community and show how BYUH students are living up to our school motto to go out and serve. “We are planning to partner with an organization named Ocean Defenders for Fall Semester, where they go out on boats to collect large pieces of debris and trash in the ocean. Laie [and] Kahuku is a major accumulation point of trash from the currents in the ocean, so there is always trash.” Lawless said, “We are trying to make BYU-Hawaii an example of an eco-friendly college campus to be a leader to schools around the world.” •

MAY 2018

19


CA M P US LIF E

BEING

BYUH vegans say eating plant-based diet makes them happier and healthier and encourage others to try it B Y H AN N AH J O N E S

B

YU-Hawaii students said they enjoy being vegan because it boosts their mood and helps them feel healthier. They shared their experiences eating a diet without meat and dairy and what students should know about this lifestyle choice. Brionna Reynolds, a junior from Ohio majoring in social work, has been a vegan for almost a year. She said, “I wanted to take a stand for animal rights, promote holistic healing and balance my mind, body, and spirit.” Sui Fan Franky Ho, a senior from Hong Kong majoring in business management has been vegan for the past month and was previously a vegetarian. Ho made this change for her health and said, “I have eczema [and] I feel like my eczema is getting better because of it. Overall I feel I have more energy.” Reynolds explained why she went vegan. She said, “I decided to go vegan for a couple of different reasons. [After] watching countless documentaries, researching, and talking with other vegan friends, I awakened to the horrific truth of animal agriculture. “Big corporations are feeding us lies such as, ‘We need milk for healthy bones’ and ‘Meat is protein’ when in reality plants can provide all of the nutrition, protein, and healthy fats we need to live a sustainable and 20

KE ALAK A ‘I

balanced lifestyle. Over 56 billion farm animals are slaughtered each year for human consumption, and this figure doesn’t even include the fishing industry.” Ho said, “I used to be a meat lover, I love eating meat. But the more I [learned] about how my eating habits affect my own health, the environment, and animals, I started to change.” Natalie Bertha, a senior from California majoring in peace building, was vegetarian before she was vegan and decided to become vegan while serving a mission. Since becoming vegan, Bertha said, “I feel lighter. I feel clearer. I have learned a lot about how to make alternative recipes, and I feel like it’s better for the planet. It takes a really large amount of resources to cultivate a diet that includes meat like carbon admission. Living a plant life is better for the ecosystem.” Reynolds, sharing her personal experience, said, “Going plant based has had incredible impacts in all areas of my life, such as alleviating symptoms of anxiety and depression, clearing up my acne, feeling lighter and more energized, increased critical thinking, improved concentration and discipline in school and work life, eliminating other health concerns, and in a

spiritual sense feeling more grounded with a balanced mind, body and spirit.” Ho is happy about her decision to be vegan and advised others to “make a choice. Give yourself a chance. People do not necessarily have to be vegan, but there are a lot of benefits for eating more veggies and reducing meat.” Reynolds said, “My advice to all those who are thinking about a plant-based lifestyle: Try going vegetarian first [and] see how it goes. Maybe go vegan for a week or two. It’s a transition and it definitely does not happen overnight. The biggest thing to remember is to have fun with it.” Bertha said, “I’m definitely going to be listening to my body. I think it’s important to eat intuitively and be aware of what you’re putting in your body. As of now, it’s working for me, but I’m always open to change when I see a better course open up.” Bertha said, “I love fruits and vegetables and I love colorful foods and putting good wholesome seasonal things in my body.” Reynolds’ favorite part about being vegan is “all the fruits and veggies. I shop locally so I know where my food is coming from. I can reduce my carbon footprint, including eliminating plastic waste. I love, love, love grocery shopping. It’s so exciting when you get a beautiful papaya, and it’s even more beautiful eating it the next morning for breakfast. I really could go on and on about all the things I love about being vegan.” Despite her love for veganism, Reynolds said, “I will strive to maintain a plant-based lifestyle for the rest of this earthly existence. It’s unrealistic of me to say I will never not be vegan. Sometimes I’ll have chocolate or pizza or maybe sometimes I’ll even go to McDonalds and eat those chicken tenders. I do the best I can.” Bertha challenged the assumption that being vegan is too difficult or expensive. “It’s really not that hard. It’s actually less expensive than not being a vegan in my experience… It’s easy and it’s fun, but I think you should eat intuitively according to your body type.” Reynolds added, “Being vegan can be super easy. ...There are tons of vegan supplements and substitutions for dairy and meat. Not all vegans are weird hippies.” •


community

in this section President Nelson and Elder Holland conclude their global tour in Hawaii

22

Students share their cultures and traditions from around the globe

30

Joe Ah Quin is remembered for sharing his musical talents with the world

26

Mother and entrepreneur Cecilia Yiu credits her business to her education at BYUH

32

Students weigh in on Mark Zuckerburg’s appearance to Congress

28

Students clear up common misconceptions about Hong Kong

35

MAY 2018

21


CO MMUNITY

President and Sister Nelson are photographed as they end their world tour in Laie. Photo by Wesley Ng

President Nelson’s

Global Tour ends in Laie, Hawaii Members of the community receive confirmation of President Nelson’s prophetic calling and Elder Holland talks of loneliness B Y DAN I CASTRO

Members lined up hours before the event. Photo by Monique Saenz 22

KE ALAK A ‘I

Laie Hawaii North Stake Youth Choir sings. Photo by Wesley Ng


Attendees stand for the prophet in the CAC. Photo by Wesley Ng

Sister and President Nelson greeting keikis. Photo by Monique Saenz

Elder Holland accompanied President Nelson. Photo by Wesley Ng Continued on Page 24

resident Russell M. Nelson, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, spoke about the importance of temples at a fireside in the Cannon Activities Center in Laie on April 22 at the conclusion of a trip around the world. “Our message to you tonight is the same as the message we’ve given to others, that God lives, that Jesus is the Christ, that this is His Church restored in its fullness,” said President Nelson. “Really everything we’ve done in these last few days together circling the globe could be summed up in two words—the temple. “In Jerusalem we talked about the temple Jesus loved. And in several cities, we talked about the temple that is going to come to their place, and here in the shadows of the temple in Hawaii, we talked about temples again.” Preparing to leave on his mission soon, Landon Hullinger, a freshman from Utah studying business, said testimony was increased by the opportunity to hear the prophet’s own testimony about Christ, and temples, and everything he does. Hullinger said, “I don’t think I’ll ever forget how the prophet emphasized the

P

importance of temples. How everywhere on his journey, he went to different temples and places where there will be temples in the future. I’m excited for the other temples around the world. Just hearing the prophet talk was just a great testimony builder.” The fireside was streamed to all LDS meeting houses in Hawaii and was the last stop of the global tour that started in Jerusalem, and continued on to England, Africa, India, Thailand, and China. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, also went on the world tour and was at the fireside in Laie. They were accompanied by their wives, Sister Wendy Nelson and Sister Patricia Holland, and several other general authorities such as Relief Society General President Sister Jean B. Bingham, accompanied by her husband Bruce Bingham, President and Sister Bekker of the Hawaii Honolulu Mission, President and Sister Kealoha of the Laie Hawaii Temple, President and Sister Okura of the Kona Hawaii Temple, President and Sister Tanner of BYUHawaii, and conducting the fireside was Elder Aley K. Auna Jr. of the Seventy accompanied by

his wife, Danelle Auna, sitting in the stand. The fireside began with the Laie Hawaii North Stake Youth Choir singing “I Know that My Savior Loves Me.” Moved by the music, Sister Patricia Holland said, “My beautiful children, we do know the Savior loves you. Thank you, for helping us feel and know that the Savior loves us as well... We all love the Savior. It’s hard for us to communicate all the feelings of our heart, but these children did it for us tonight. I’m so grateful for the way they sung this song… We loved it and it was the most lifting thing we could listen to before we go home.” Elder Holland described his experience on the global tour, “As we come to the close of something that will never come again, we want you to know how grateful we are and that we count our blessings and do not take them for granted. We’ve met multitudes. We have met as many people as can get into venues… We got the biggest venue possible in those cities and filled them, and still there were people who didn’t get the chance to participate. We have been wonderfully, lovingly overwhelmed with numbers. MAY 2018

23


CO MMUNITY

Continued from Page 23

Elder Holland continued, “I bear witness of President Nelson’s foreordination, literally, foreordained however many thousands of thousands of years that was ago, before the foundations of the earth, to be the prophet of the earth this hour of the last dispensation, and Sister Nelson was, equally, fore designated, prepared, set apart, in the sense identified to be by the prophet’s side at this time.” According to Mormon Newsroom, Hawaii is home to more than 74,000 Mormons who are part of 141 congregations. The first converts were baptized in Hawaii in 1851. This was only the second church gathering that Anela Apo, an investigator from Kailua, had attended besides her regular church meetings. She said, “I just love everyone’s energy here. It was so positive, and seeing the prophet in person, and this being only my second church gathering ever, I felt like this was a huge honor to be here. “I’ve never listened to them before. All my friends who are part of the church and the missionaries have spoken to me about what it’s like, but it’s nothing like hearing it yourself. It definitely has grown my testimony.” Kieiki Pouha, a local from Kahuku, said the experience was “hard to describe. I received 24

KE ALAK A ‘I

President and Sister Nelson seated on the stand. Photo by Monique Saenz

a personal confirmation that President Nelson is a prophet of God, that he was foreordained, and he was sent here to share with us God’s love, and the love of our Savior, Jesus Christ, specifically here on the islands.” Members of the audience, such as Elder Grant Johnson, a missionary from Idaho, gained answers to their personal prayers. He said, “Since the death of President Monson, I’ve been praying a lot for a stronger testimony of President Nelson’s divine calling. I received an answer to that prayer tonight. Gain a testimony for yourself. Keep growing.” Tuione Longolongo, a Laie local, said, “You know, it’s so amazing how we can feel his love and dedication to this work that is being called to be a prophet of God. It’s amazing to feel that and to witness his spirit. It is overwhelming to sit in front of him and see him in person and feel the love he has for the Savior.” Sister Holland said she thought it was fitting how the tour ended in Laie because of the spirit that exists here. She shared, “It’s because of your faith, because of the faith that has always existed among the people of the islands of the sea. It’s perfect faith because of the love and aloha, all of the titles of love and greetings they want to give their brothers and sisters.

“I truly believe the Savior is here tonight. He is with our dear prophet, and he certainly is with these beautiful, innocent, sweet children. “The Savior loved the meek and lowly of heart… When we join this church, and covenant with our Father in Heaven that we will follow Jesus Christ, we are going to have many opportunities to acquire that virtue. We’ll have sorrow and have sadness and sickness, but we’ll have joy and gladness and warmth and peace because we’ll know the Savior’s with us.” Longolongo said he was amazed by the President Nelson’s ability to do so much. He said, “For a 93 year old to do such things, to fly around the world in short periods of time, it’s amazing. He’s a truly chosen one of God.” Ever since President Nelson became prophet, his wife, Sister Wendy Nelson, describes the change she sees in him. She said, “I can only tell you at age 93 and a half, my husband is becoming more and more of his true self every day, and why wouldn’t he be? He is now doing what he was foreordained to do. I can take any witness, stand in any nation on earth and testify I know President Russell Marion Nelson has been called by God to be the living prophet of the Lord on the earth today.


President Nelson waves to the thousands in attendance upon his arrival. Photo by Monique Saenz

“Many days, after the end of a rigorous day, for him, of meetings and decisions at headquarters, the man I greet at the end of the day is just a little different from the man I kissed goodbye in the morning. I can’t really articulate what those differences are. During this world tour, I have seen him change, right at this pulpit, become more clear in professing certain doctrine, to using phrases I’ve never heard him use in 12 years. I’ve seen him ever look younger right at the pulpit, on the spot, when delivering the message.” Warren Wilson describes his experience of hearing Sister Nelson testify of her husband. He said, “The most amazing thing to me was to hear the prophet’s wife testify of the mantle of prophet on him and to hear the experiences from that solidified for me that if she believes he is a prophet, then I believe he is a prophet. My teenage son announced to me he sat through an hour and a half of church without falling asleep or going on his phone, so to me is a testament of the power that happened in that room.” As President Nelson spoke with his cheerful demeanor, he caused laughter to erupt from the audience. Rebekah Ollis, a freshman from Hawaii studying intercultural peacebuilding,

said, “President Nelson’s talk was really funny. Joke after joke. That’s what I remember the most. President Nelson is a prophet of God. He is truly ordained to be the prophet at this time, and he is here to carry forth the work of the Lord in a way that no one else can.” Elder Holland counseled the congregation of Saints, “Sometimes, at moments in our lives, we may feel terribly, terribly very much alone.” He said for whatever reason people may feel they are walking a path alone, they aren’t alone. “I want to testify of the Lord, Jesus Christ’s ministry to you, when you are alone. When you are, as it were, the only one, maybe the only one in your family, maybe the only one in your dorm, maybe the only one at work, maybe the only one at school, or wherever, or in your heart, some loneliness of spirit, I want you to know the Savior understands that and reached out and followed a course that took him not only to you, but especially to you.” Ollis said she really enjoyed what Elder Holland said. She shared her own thoughts. “Even Christ was never alone, he just had to experience loneliness so he could truly experience everything we will experience in this life. Heavenly Father is literally just waiting there for us to talk to him. I really did love that.”

President Nelson remarked, “I’m a father. I’m a father of 10 children, and I know what it is like to have your children say, ‘Good morning,’ and ‘Good Evening.’” I know how dreadful it is when they forget… How our loving Heavenly Father wants that brief word of communication, good morning, good night, thanks for helping me, thanks for blessing me, thanks for helping me through my travails.’” Apo said her favorite comment was “what President Nelson said about a child saying good morning or good night to their parents, and how that means a lot to them showing that appreciation and acknowledgement. It was so simple and easy to do, but so important.” Longolongo said he couldn’t stop watching. The experience was too special to miss. He said, “You don’t know what it means to me. It’s something I’m going to treasure. To be here within a couple weeks from conference, addressing and counseling us and pronouncing a blessing upon us, especially here in Hawaii in the city of Laie, it’s a wonderful time to be a part of this great work.” •

MAY 2018

25


CO MMUNITY

Remembering Uncle Joe Ah Quin Local boy was in ‘Johnny Lingo’ and sang all over the world BY LEEA NN L AM B E RT Joseph Ah Quin is described by family and friends as one who sang with the spirit of aloha. He passed away on March 15. Photos by Monique Saenz

hether he was performing professionally on stages around the world or rehearsing his wide repertoire of music over and over again until it was perfected while tending to the plants in his yard in Laie, friends and family remembered Joseph Waioha Ah Quin, as a man who sang with aloha and shared his aloha with everyone. “No matter who he sang to or where he sang,” said his daughter Kahala Wilson at his services in Laie on April 14, “he sang with love, sang from his heart and sang with aloha.” Born in Laie on March 10, 1935, Ah Quin passed on March 15, 2018. Preceded in death by his wife, Mary Keolalani Nakaahiki Ah Quin, Uncle Joe was beloved by the local community on the North Shore as well as those he met as a professional singer throughout his career. Known for singing “Behold Laie,” “Aloha Oe” and more whenever he was asked, fellow Kahuku High School alumnae and lifelong friend Lokelani Lindsey said at Ah Quin’s service that he lost his voice a few times. She said he prayed, and prayed, and prayed the Lord would give it back to him. When he got his voice back, she said, Ah Quin promised the

W

26

KE ALAK A ‘I

Lord he would never charge for his singing and would share his talents whenever he was asked to because God gave it back to him. Ah Quin grew up with a mother who also sang as she worked in her yard. Wilson said she read her dad’s journals and he wrote about his mother, Eunice Ah Quin, singing to her plants and orchids. When she would sing to them, her dad wrote, they would all blossom and bear fruit. “Dad loved plants too,” Wilson said. “My dad was the same. He loved his plants and yard.” Ah Quin started singing in high school, said Lindsey. “He sang, ‘Old Man River’ and all the girls used to swoon over him singing. He loved it.” Lindsey said he also played football in high school. He attended BYU in Provo along with longtime friend Dorothy Mooso before Church College of Hawaii, now BYU-Hawaii was built. Mooso said at Ah Quin’s service they were in a performing group at BYU where they would go out and entertain and share different cultures. “He was a good singer,” Mooso recalled, but over the years as he practiced and took les-

sons, his voice just got better and better. Traveling on the bus all those years ago, she said everyone was trying to sleep but Ah Quin took that time to practice singing scales. “Thank goodness he did because it developed his voice,” she said, and his children and grandchildren have also inherited the ability to sing. Wilson said the same thing about her father’s famous voice. She said it matured as he aged and got better because he sang from his heart. Lindsey said she and Ah Quin met up again at CCH and started performing together. She said he organized a Polynesian play in the Old Gym that had all the different Polynesian dances included in it. Lindsey said Ah Quin had true pitch and went onto sing at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City and also at hotels in Waikiki. Ah Quin’s son, Adam, said he went to the iconic Don Ho Show in Waikiki and went back stage afterward to Ho’s dressing room to take pictures and get autographs. Ho spotted him and asked who his father was. When Adam responded it was Joe Ah Quin, Ho said, “I know your father and I know


In behalf of a local community event celebrating Laie’s history on May, 7 2015, Joe Ah Quin performed the final song, “Behold Laie” with Kahuku High School choral teacher Jacosa Ainuu and other members of the community. Photos by Monique Saenz

and going to the temple to do baptisms for the him well. When you see him, give him my took longer than planned because he would run dead. While waiting in the temple, they would aloha.” into people and talk to them. always watch “Johnny Lingo.” Later on his mis Adam shared another experience in the While he was serving his mission in sion, a member in one of the wards where he 1990s when he went to the Brothers Cazimero Oregon, he said he had an appendicitis and his served started making jokes about the movie. Show with his uncle. Robert Cazimero came grandfather got permission from his mission Ah You said, “Just so you know, all my family up to talk to his uncle and also asked him if Joe president to come visit him. They went out was in that movie.” The guy who made the Ah Quin was his father. Cazimero said when he to eat at Denny’s and he thought for sure his was young, they used to walk along grandfather wouldn’t know anyone in the beach and sneak into his father’s Oregon. But a family Ah Quin knew shows in Waikiki. who used to live in Hawaii recognized He also too told Adam to him and they ended up talking with send his aloha to his father. “These them for more than an hour. “He performers had nothing but love and proved me wrong,” said Ah Quin’s respect for our dad,” said Adam. grandson. “He knew everybody.” Adam also talked about one of While singing was important the many times his father sang “Aloha to Ah Quin, his grandson continued, Oe” at church meetings or funerals. the gospel of Jesus Christ was more He said there was a meeting in important. “Papa was strong in the the Cannon Activities Center in 2003 church,” he said, and added his grandwith President Gordon B. Hinckley in father always asked them if they were attendance. President Hinckley sugreading their scriptures, saying their gested someone sing “Aloha Oe” and prayers, and if they were worthy of out of the audience came Joe Ah Quin holding the priesthood. “It was living Photo of a letter to Ah Quin from President Gordon B. Hinckley the gospel daily,” he said, “that’s what to lead the group. Later President Hinckley wrote a person- comments was so embarrassed, Ah You conthe Lord expects of us. That’s the most imporal letter to Ah Quin expressing his joy at seeing tinued, but it all worked out well because the tant thing.” guy’s family owned a restaurant “so we always him again and that he was still performing. He said knowing his grandfather did “all ate good.” Ah Quin is also remembered for playing he could to do live the gospel” means “we will One of Ah Quin’s grandsons talked about the role of Mahana’s father in the LDS Churchall be able to live with him again. I am grateful how his grandfather either knew somebody made film “Johnny Lingo.” for that.” • everywhere he went or someone knew him. He Laie Hawaii North Stake President Kingsaid going places with his grandfather always sley Ah You recalled growing up as a teenager

MAY 2018

27


CO MMUNITY

Wanted: Facebook Congress questions Facebook’s data protection policies, and public figures question senators’ knowledge of social media B Y VI C ZH O N G

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees in Washington on April 10 about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. AP photo by Alex Brandon

28

KE ALAK A ‘I


“If you are willing to put something on the internet, then you are willing to let the world know,” said Jun Liew, a sophomore from Malaysia majoring in business management, on social media privacy and personal data. On Tuesday and Wednesday, April 10 to 11, Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared on Capitol Hill to answer questions from elected officials about Cambridge Analytica’s Facebook data abuse. “It’s clear now we didn’t do enough to prevent these tools from being used for harm as well. And that goes for fake news, foreign interference for election and hate speech, as well as developers and data privacy. We didn’t take a broad view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake,” Zuckerberg apologized. Jacob Chapman, a senior from Utah majoring in anthropology, said, “The ‘wisdom of the crowd’ effect only works when people are not polarized, and they are free to think rationally.” The wisdom of the crowd is the collective opinion of a group of individuals rather than that of a single expert. Chapman continued, “Frankly, I think any form of political advertisement should be illegal. They are annoying, and they only serve to reinforce the base and superstructure.” Greg Walden, the House Energy and Commerce Committee chair, spoke to the reporters as the representative after the hearing. He said, “Facebook was the focus on today’s hearing, but the issue we dug into applied to many other companies as well. We will keep moving down this path and widen our lens to examine the entire tech industry. Determining the right balance between ad-based services and the maintenance of personal privacy will be one of the challenges of our time.” Liew said Facebook is harvesting people’s data, but for a good reason. “I feel like Facebook is doing it just to help the users have a better experience. It’s part of the improvement process. “Facebook is constantly trying to improve, and the way they improve is by knowing what the users are doing with Facebook. Therefore, by harvesting our data and by seeing what we search at a specific time helps enrich our experience using Facebook.” Chapman commented, “The amount of data they have is extremely powerful. They could solve world hunger and world peace by connecting the right people. It is not obvious whether or not they are doing that however. What we do know is that they are making a lot of money from the data.”

Angel Wong, a senior from China majoring in elementary education, said, “Social media doesn’t require membership fees, so most of the social media companies’ income is from gathering our data. It’s not only Facebook who does that, but also Google, Baidu and any other websites.” During the hearing, Zuckerberg gave out a statement on his company model. He said, “Facebook is [an] idealistic and optimistic company. For most of our existence, we focus on all the good that connecting people can do. Just recently, I have seen the Me Too movement and the March for Our Lives organized at least in part of Facebook. After Hurricane Harvey, people came together to raise more than 20 million dollars for relief. And more than 70 million small businesses use Facebook to create jobs and growth.” Liew said, “I get news and information mostly from Facebook. I don’t really have time to get myself updated on what’s happening around the world. That’s why I rely a lot on Facebook to tell me what’s going on.” Wong said Facebook is useful “within the school community because I see my friends’ updates on it. I also subscribed to some church official accounts, and I actually read most of the church articles and announcements on Facebook.” When asked if he thinks social media being weaponized, Chapman agreed, “Everything can be monetized or weaponized. Facebook is just the flavor of the day.You can predict a whole swath of information based on someone’s Facebook likes. The only way to really prevent this is to not let yourself be predictive. Pay attention, be unique and don’t ever stop learning. You should develop sensible opinions and be true to yourself.” Because of political reasons, social media became the scapegoat for the government, Wong shared. She said bullying and terrorist attacks can happen without social media. According to social media posts, some people think the hearing appeared to be insignificant and the senators didn’t know how Facebook works. Using phrases and words, such as “Zuckerberg dodged” or “Congress grilled,” public figures tweeted and shared their opinions about the hearing through social media. Jon Lovett, Obama’s former speechwriter, wrote, “This hearing is embarrassing.” Howard Daniel Pfeiffer, a former senior advisor to President Barack Obama for strategy and communications, tweeted, “It would be cool to see Zuckerberg [being] questioned by people who know how Facebook works.” •

MAY 2018

29


COM MUNITY

EXPLORING CULTURE Students explain traditions from their homelands

CA NA DA - G EO MA R LO

A sophomore from Canada majoring in biochemistry, said, “Canadians wear shorts and T-shirts to shovel snow during winter mornings. “We say ‘Eh’ a lot at the conclusion of our sentences.”

PA N A M A - A N E L CA N TO

A freshman majoring in computer science, said, “A very important part of Panama’s culture is that whenever there are vacations or some free time, we go to the countryside to somewhere where our ancestors came from.”

BR A ZI L - A N A CA RO NE

An alumna said, “In Brazil, many students go to multiple schools at the same time. For example, I went to normal school, English school, math school, and conservatory including music and arts.”

30

KE ALAK A ‘I

G H A NA - P R INCE O WUSU A senior majoring in political science, said, “If you go to Ghana, you need to respect your elders because we see them as a link between our present and the future. We see their lifestyle as a reflection of who we can become in the future.”


KOREA - A L E X TA E H E E LE E

A senior majoring in hotel management, said, “Korea calculates age differently. Newborn babies are 1-year-old, not 0. Secondly, everyone [is] a year older at the same time on Lunar New Year, instead of [on their] birthdays. The Korean age system basically adds one or two years to your actual age.” “We have over 200 types of Kimchi, which is a staple in Korean cuisine made from fermented cabbage and radish.”

JA PA N - NO R IKA Z U KA NEKO

A senior majoring in business, said, “Japanese people are very aware of their surroundings and others around them. They call this, ‘Reading the air.”

SA MOA - DEL SA MA NAO

TAIWA N - A L I SA C H E N

A freshman from Taiwan majoring in elementary education, said, “Scooters are everywhere in Taiwan. It is the main transportation used by Taiwanese for school and work.”

A freshman majoring in elementary education, said, “The pupil of the guy’s eyes is their sister.’ It is a saying in Samoa reflecting women’s high social position in their culture. Girls are like princesses there, and boys do the chores like cooking and cleaning. For the boys, it is nothing more than an extra chore or responsibility. It is more like an honor given to their sisters.” “Girls in Samoa eat first, and then boys eat the left-overs as a respect towards women. Boys are skinny, however, some girls leave more food for their brothers so they can eat more.”

TONGA - CA R O LY N I TA A E H AU

A senior majoring in psychology, said, “The older sister in the family is like the boss over their siblings in their family. For example, [the] dad’s older sister can boss his kids around and tell them what to do.”

TA H IT I - H EIA R II A L EXA NDR E L EE CH IP S AO

A sophomore from Tahiti majoring in psychology, said, “If you go to school in Tahiti, you have to learn paddling.” He said paddling is the No. 1 sport in Tahiti, and if you are good at it, then you are guaranteed a job. “All the Tahitians at least know the basics of paddling.”

MAY 2018

31


CO MMUNITY

Discover Wonders Talking Books

Mother and entrepreneur Cecilia Yiu applies experiences from BYU-Hawaii to develop books to teach children advanced educational topics B Y H E L AM L AU

TO LEARN

MORE

Go to google and search Discover Wonders: Brain Boosting STEM Talking Books

Cecilia Yiu is pictured with her family. Photo courtesy of Discover Wonders

32

KE ALAK A ‘I


Continued on Page 34

W

ith her success story recently featured in the Deseret News, along with a variety of media outlets including Geeky Gadgets and Trend Hunt, Cecilia Yiu, a BYU-Hawaii alumna from Hong Kong, recently launched a Kickstarter project called Discover Wonders Talking Books. Her project has raised $32,501 by about 270 backers, which exceeded her goal by $30,000. The company is based in Dallas, Texas, supplying a set of 12 different Discover Wonders Talking Books aimed towards boosting young children’s curiosity and encouraging them to think like innovators. According to the project’s Kickstarter, each book is presented in scenes relevant to children. Everyday items are used as the starting point to examine different aspects of the world and to encourage children to learn more about science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and other fields. The Discover Talking Pen, which reads out loud when pointed at the words, is another feature included with the book series. Cecilia Yiu explained, “The core idea of what I’m promoting is not the Talking Pen. It’s a book series that teaches children to think across dimensions.” While attending BYUH, she said she studied psychology as her major with a focus on organizational behavior and applied statistics. Her sister, Alice Yiu, said, “Cecilia has always emphasized how BYUH has played an invaluable role in her success in education, career, and family.” In response to her sister’s comment, Cecilia Yiu shared, “Because of its small class size, BYUH provided the best environment for me to acquire top-notch skills with close mentorship from professors, one of which was Dr. Ronald Miller. “He was my psychology professor, and I was leading some of his consulting projects with over 10 student researchers. I

was exposed to management consulting, various statistical tools, and management skills at a very young age.” Cecilia Yiu explained how billion-dollar companies adopted her company’s strategy. “These leadership and learning opportunities are definitely hard to come by as an undergraduate student. I am forever grateful for the skills and experience I received because of BYUH.” She expressed how the university also helped her gain a new perspective between raising a family and working as a successful businesswoman. “BYUH fundamentally changed my perspective of how my religion, family, and career can be closely knitted together. Growing up in Hong Kong, I expected my career to be separate and possibly harmful to my family. “Seeing how my professors were able to have a successful career and happy family life changed my understanding... That eventually helped me make the decision to jump into entrepreneurship to fulfill my role as a mother. “I am the most proud of the fact that, despite all the challenges we have faced in our lives in the past few years, our family shares a strong bond. My husband and I are extremely busy right now, but we only grew to be more appreciative of the sacrifices we are making on a daily basis for each other.” Regarding how the idea of the Discover Wonders Talking Book was developed, Cecilia Yiu referred to her own daughters. “Specifically back to Brielle, starting at age 3, she has been asking me hard questions. I had to look up answers all the time. I came to realize she was the most excited to learn when I made her lessons relevant to her favorite things. “For example, once I introduced buoyancy during her bath time, evaporation while we watched the clouds, and solubility of salt when we cooked together. Brielle kept making new discoveries relating to water. If Newton just simply ate the apple when it fell, we would have had to wait for Continued on Page 34 MAY 2018

33


CO MMUNITY Continued from Page 33

gravity to be discovered. So I want to encourage children to think across dimensions and outside of the box.” Cecilia Yiu shared how parents can maximize their children’s natural curiosity about the world. “If school material is introduced at the point when curiosity is at its peak and at a level the child can understand, children will genuinely enjoy it and be able to digest what we deem as ‘advanced educational topics.’ Discover Wonders aims to do exactly that. “Children’s brains are actively connecting different things they have observed between ages 3 to 6. Parents’ availability and the child’s vocabularies sometimes limit their quest for knowledge. The Talking Pen is a means to bridge this gap when parents need a moment to take care of their obligations such as cooking, cleaning, or taking care of other children. This is not designed to replace parent-child reading time. “In fact, we built the company around strengthening family relationships. That is why we built in recording features so young children can still [connect with] remote relatives like grandparents, aunts, and uncles without constantly relying on screens.”

Kit Ming Lau, who is also a BYUH alumna from Hong Kong, said she is a good friend of Yiu. “Cecilia is intelligent, hardworking and humble. She is the type of person who once she sets a goal, nothing can stop her from achieving it.” Lau explained how being a mother of two young children, the Talking Pen and the books are great tools for educating families. “They help motivate children to learn while keeping them away from spending too much time in front of a screen. I especially love the recording stickers, which allows remote relatives and friends to record their own voice for the children to hear. “Reading with my children is part of our daily family routine. Children learn extremely fast, and what is better than reading a series of books that are interesting for both the grown ups and the little ones? I was lucky enough to experience the Discover Book first hand. It’s not an early literacy book, and instead, they are books that encourage high level critical thinking.” Lau described Cecilia Yiu’s contributions and business a success. “She wants to make the world a better place, and she is doing it by sharing her talents with the world selflessly.” •

Cecilia Yiu uses the Talking Pen with her children. Photo courtesy of Discover Wonders 34

KE ALAK A ‘I


Hong Kong

as a special administrative region Students explain the differences and similarities between Hong Kong and China B Y TO M S O N CH E AN G / GRAP H I C B Y W E SL E Y N G

MAY 2018

35


CO MMUNITY

he question of whether Hong Kong is a country and the relationship between China, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom can be confusing to foreigners, so students from China and Hong Kong explained the differences they share including Chinese characters, and Cantonese and Mandarin languages.

T

A COLONY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM According to “The History of Modern China,” the First Opium War was fought between the United Kingdom and the Qing Dynasty of China from 1839 to 1842. The Qing Dynasty was defeated and as a result, Hong Kong Island was ceded to the United Kingdom. Since then, Hong Kong had become a colony of the United Kingdom until 1997, excluding the Japanese occupation during World War II. ONE COUNTRY, TWO SYSTEMS According to “Modern History of Hong Kong,” in 1997, British Hong Kong was returned to China. The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China was established. The autonomous government of Hong Kong was founded. While socialism is implemented across China, the capitalist system in Hong Kong remained the same. Nowadays, Hong Kong remains an autonomous state. Although Hong Kong is part of China’s territory, Hong Kong and China have different governments, laws and even different passports. CANTONESE AND MANDARIN The official languages of Hong Kong are Chinese and English, according to the Hong Kong Basic Law. The most common language used in Hong Kong is Cantonese Chinese, which is spoken differently from Mandarin, according to BYUH students from Hong Kong. Students from mainland China said they can’t understand Cantonese most of the time. Kiki Yao, a senior majoring in hospitality and tourism management from China, said, “The pronunciation of few words are similar. So when Hong Kongers say some simple phrases such as ‘Let’s eat,’ I can understand. But for longer sentences and conversation, I can’t.” In Hong Kong, students in primary school are required to study the Mandarin language. However, most students from

36

KE ALAK A ‘I

Hong Kong who were interviewed said they could understand Mandarin, but they seldom used it throughout the day or in their conversations with friends. Monkey Yau, a Hong Konger sophomore majoring in TESOL education, explained, “We’re really out of practice. When talking to people from China, sometimes there are even words we don’t know how to say in Mandarin and we need to use English.” TRADITIONAL AND SIMPLIFIED CHINESE CHARACTERS Traditional Chinese characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and some overseas Chinese communities. They can also be found in Honolulu Chinatown. Simplified Chinese characters are mainly used in mainland China, Singapore and Malaysia. Due to the continuous wars in China during the 19th and 20th centuries, Chinese citizens from poor classes didn’t get the chance to receive an education. In 1949 when the People’s Republic of China was founded by the Communist Party of China, the percentage of literate population in China was higher than 80 percent, according to guancha.cn. In the 1950s, the Chinese character Simplification Scheme was enforced in China to decrease the difficulty of studying characters for Chinese people. Simplified Chinese characters were therefore created, according to gov.cn. The policy of simplifying traditional Chinese characters didn’t affect Hong Kong because it was under the United Kingdom’s administration at that time. The use of traditional characters in Hong Kong still remains today, while simplified characters have already become the official characters of China, according to the Law of the People’s Republic of China on the Standard Spoken and Written Chinese Language. Students from China said they can read most traditional characters.Yao explained, “Afterall, traditional and simplified characters still look similar. I think the only traditional characters that I really can’t read is less than 10 percent, those are some uncommon ones.” Jojo Chan, a freshman majoring in TESOL from Hong Kong, said she sometimes wrote simplified characters to increase her writing speed. “I used simplified characters in exams. Exams are all about speed. I used simplified characters for writing homework too.” •


feature

in this section Senior Feature: Deborah Pui-Yan Kwok graduates with 162 credits

38

Sei Kuwahara volunteers with BYUH SWATT to make an impact in the world

40

Stephanie Robertson juggles life, family and education all at once

MAY 2018

42

37


F EAT R eli gURE i on

Senior Feature

Deborah Pui-Yan Kwok says getting up early, planning ahead, honoring the Sabbath Day and making time to build relationships, helped her be successful and happy B Y H E L AM L AU


Deborah Pui-Yan Kwok and her husband, Mike Cheng, graduated together and say they will take with them their memories of Hawaii. Photo by Alvin Dy

ong Kong student Deborah Pui-Yan Kwok recently graduated Starting each day off early helped Kwok get everything done as with her husband, Mike Cheng, after Winter Semester. Kwok, a double major, a 19-hour part-time worker, and a loving girlfriend. a double-major in psychology and finance, said she graduated “When I was still dating my husband, I woke up early at around 4 a.m. with a 3.98 GPA and a total of 162 credits. According to Kwok, 120 to prepare all the meals of the day for both of us, and then I started my credits are the minimum requirement for graduating. study.” Kwok originally thought about transferring to BYU in Provo dur She also shared how planning ahead on what has to be done for speing her first semester at BYU-Hawaii. She said, “I ended up staying here cific times and having the determination to stick with the schedule were mostly because I met my husband during my first semester.” She said she her ways of being productive. now loves Hawaii. Kwok said ever since high school she was committed to not study She shared how the best part of Hawaii is the relationships she deon the Sabbath Day. “I’d rather go to sleep early on Sunday and wake up veloped with other people. She gave her workplace as an example. “You early, like at 3 a.m. on Monday. Heavenly Father helped me stay focused go to work not just for finishing up the work.” She said while she worked, and I spent less time to finish my work.” she was also developing relationships with others. She said her biggest achievements while attending BYUH were get “People here know how to truly enjoy life. That is something Hong ting married and being able to figure out her ultimate career goal from Kong people lack.” She said she noticed how people in Hawaii are more taking one of the psychology classes. Eventually, she wants to become a likely to take time to get to know and talk with colleagues. “They had parenting counselor. parties. They know how to entertain themselves, but they still get things Concluding her time spent in Hawaii, she said she feels like she has done.” made the most out of it. “I have been to many places in Hawaii. I have With the extra 20 credits that are non-major related, Kwok said great friendships.” she took different classes in order to explore what she liked such as: Kwok’s sister, Zipporah Kwok, a sophomore from Hong Kong beginning Hula, Hawaiian cultural studies, ukulele, video marketing, majoring in graphic design, said regarding her sister, “I admire how she’s Spanish, calculus, and student development. She said, “I wanted to learn able to balance her work, school, family, and church calling and still do the Hawaiian culture before I leave, so I can share it when I am back in such a great job in all these aspects. Hong Kong.” “She has a full scholarship every semester. As an older sister, she Kwok said she worked while in college to pay for her living exstill takes care of me during her busy life, likes to cook for me, reminds pense and maintained a high GPA in order to get a full scholarship. She me to eat, has me over for dinner with them, lets me stay with them was able to provide for herself and was able to maintain a good balance in when I have no place to stay, and takes the same classes with me.” • her life by taking good care of her family and the people around her. She shared what has helped her to achieve it.

H

MAY 2018

39


R eli g i on F EAT URE

One mechanic, several impacts Previous diesel mechanic, Sei Kuwahara, volunteers with BYUH SWATT to convert organic waste into renewable gas B Y E M M AL E E SM I TH

Sei Kuwahara builds a biogas digester in hopes of providing other countries with reliable resources. Photo by Gab Batac.

40

KE ALAK A ‘I


hrough skills gained as a mechanic, Sei Kuwahara, a business major from Japan, built Daisi, a biogas digester to help save money and resources for countries and businesses. According to Kuwahara, Daisi is used to make methane from any organic material including, human and animal waste. His project won third place in the social category of BYUHawaii’s Great Ideas Competition last Fall. Kuwahara said, “I just want to jump into opportunities ... I love serving others. That’s why Daisi is a perfect model because I can sell it, and at the same time, I can support their lives too.” Kuwahara said he used to work as a diesel mechanic for three years back in Japan before figuring out it wasn’t profitable. He said he usually made less than $2,000 a month and he found out his coworker made $100 more than him even though his coworker had worked there for 10 more years. In comparison, Kuwahara explained his father’s income was $70,000 a year as an elementary teacher and his mother had to work as well to support their family with four children. Kuwahara said he quit his job and volunteered to help with relief efforts. During this time, he met business owners who had enough money and time to support others and decided he wanted to be able to do that too so he came to BYU-Hawaii to study business. Les Harper, the director of BYU-Hawaii’s Sustainable World Action and Technology Team, said, “He is our master mechanic at SWATT. He’s the first person I talk to about anything we have that’s mechanical.” Harper, who has been working with Kuwahara for a year now, said, “[Kuwahara] has an amazing mechanical ability that he loves to share and enjoys using.” When King Kili, the crown prince of the Marshall Islands came to see the SWATT projects on Friday, March 16, Kuwahara said the prince loved the project and said this would save them money by not having to buy propane gas. Kuwahara said, “When I went to Kiribati last summer, I found out people are buying gas or fire wood that were expensive. “They also have sanitation problems. Human waste can create methane gas, so I decided to build a prototype. In that way, I can help people in the world who are suffering with sanitation problems.”

T

According to Kuwahara, he has been working on other projects, like small engines running on pressurized air instead of gasoline besides Daisi, prior to coming to BYUH. He also fixes cars and started a YouTube channel with how to fix car tutorials. “Skills are [shared] to help and support someone, but in order to do it, you have to sustain yourself by using the skills too, “ said Kuwahara. “A talent can help you but also help others at the same time. That’s what I love.” Harper said, “[Kuwahara] finds these beat up rusted motorbikes and he’ll resurrect them so they’ll work. In the process of fixing he would look at them and say, ‘You know, it would be really cool if they could run off of something other than gasoline’ … He’s developing an air engine so we can pump the air and compress it using solar wind power. “His idea is brilliant. Little engines like the weed whackers and lawn mowers are enormously polluting because the engine is so small. The gas doesn’t burn properly and the exhaust is very toxic,” added Harper. According to Harper, Kuwahara is going to make the world a better place. He continued, “He has the brain, the spirit, and the ambition behind him that it’s going to happen. All I want to do is be able to say that at some time in my life, I knew that guy,” he laughed, looked up and said, “I opened a few doors for him.” Kelsy Simmons, a senior studying interdisciplinary studies from Utah, shared something she enjoys about Kuwahara. “Every idea he has is to make life better around him.” Simmons said the first time she talked with him was when they passed some of his friends who came back from a potluck with a bag of hotdog buns. “They gave him a bag of hotdog buns and he said, ‘Oh great I haven’t had dinner yet.’ And he looked at me and said, ‘Hey do you want some hotdog buns?’” She leaned forward laughing and said, “It was just so fantastic … because he hadn’t had dinner yet and he just had a couple hotdog buns leftover from a potluck. … He’d only been on the island for not very long so it’s not like he was all integrated into the island spirit of sharing or anything. It was just the way he is and it’s pretty great.” Currently, Daisi is still under repair, but once it’s fixed, Kuwahara said he was thinking about putting a toilet on it so he can use it for human waste.•

MAY 2018

41


F EAT URE

Stephanie Robertson English instructor shares her experience of being a mother while having a career and expanding her education B Y AN E L CAN TO

42

KE ALAK A ‘I


According to Stephanie Robertson, she always puts her family first in every situation. Photo by Alvin Dy

ccording to Stephanie Robertson, a special instructor of English, reaching balance between home and work has not always been easy. Robertson shared how her priorities have led her to achieve her goals and ambitions. Shortly after earning her degree in English from BYU-Hawaii, Robertson became pregnant with her first baby, a decision that she had “always looked forward to with a lot of excitement.” In the middle of her pregnancy, Robertson worked on the North Shore with a mental health program for children. Robertson said, “I did not expect to have that kind of job, but it worked out really well. It was not easy to juggle pregnancy and new motherhood in a busy work environment, so I scaled back my hours and responsibilities to focus on family for a few years.” For Robertson, working is more than a source of income and personal fulfillment. She said, “I always put my children first no matter what, but it is good for my mental health to also work part time. I do my best to schedule work in ways that are conducive to our family schedule. I am very picky about who watches

A

our children if my husband cannot be around to watch them.” After her first child’s birth, Robertson received a job offer as a special instructor at BYUH, a job that Robertson referred to as her “absolute dream job.” Even after having her dream job, a loving husband and a baby; Robertson said she felt like she could expand her education. She said, “I wanted to pursue my master’s degree at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, so I could be an asset to the department and my students, but I was still in the thick of it as a young mother. The years passed and two more children came before I felt ready to close the chapter on having children and start to look more seriously at continuing my education.” While raising children and waiting for applying to graduate school, Robertson acquired seven years of work experience as special instructor in BYUH. A couple years ago Robertson finally enrolled to graduate school at the University of Hawaii. Robertson “felt prompted that it was time to finally apply,” and she is positive that this job experience was “a big factor in getting accepted to the program.”

According to Coordinator of Composition Dr. Anna Marie Christiansen, Robertson is an exceptional teacher. Christiansen commented about Robertson’s approach of teaching mindfulness to help students in their writing, “Students like her class a lot. She is doing something really innovative in the classroom, and as a composition coordinator it is very exciting to see she’s testing out some theories in class to see how to work with students.” Makenna Dowell, a freshman from Utah majoring in biology, said, “The most valuable thing I learned with Sister Robertson was mindfulness; because it reminds you that you need to prioritize in order to get things done.” Dowell said, “She is very nice and understanding of student’s time and needs, but also firm and has rules that allow us to become more responsible. She understands that you have other things to do besides school, that you have a life.” Robertson said, “I am about half way through the program now and although it is hard to balance family, work and school, I am having the time of my life. I do not regret putting off educational goals for one minute Continued on Page 44 MAY 2018

43


F EAT URE

Continued from Page 43

because my three sons and little daughter are our greatest blessings. They are our greatest achievements. “My main motivation for pursuing my career is to never stop learning and progressing. Learning keeps you young and alive. Learning keeps life exciting. I also want to set an example for my children. I want them to see their mother setting goals and working hard to achieve them even when things get hard – especially when things get hard actually.” Robertson added, “The best part of my job is when I get to see a student succeed at writing. Students frequently arrive on the first day of the semester dreading the assignments to come with fear in their eyes. I love working with these writers by showing them tips and tricks they can use for the rest of their academic career and beyond. Once students can see what’s in it for them, they are a lot more willing to put in the work to claim their education.” Robertson sees her husband as a valuable companion in her life adventure, and outlined how he has helped her strike a

44

KE ALAK A ‘I

Robertson says her children are her greatest blessing. Photos by Alvin Dy

work-life balance. “I married my best friend. We are a partnership through and through. He cheers me on when I am tired from hours of grading or grad school homework, and I support him in his tireless work to support our family in addition to his other interests and responsibilities. “We both care for our children and do housework and cook for the family. We both contribute to the household. Our contributions in family work and work outside the home are done out of great love and respect for each other and our children. “If my students ever ask me marriage advice, I always respond: ‘Marry someone who is on your team. Marry someone who encourages you to be your very best self. Marry someone who shows you the utmost respect in every situation. And finally, marry someone who will laugh with you at 2 a.m. as you change, feed, and burp an infant for the seemingly hundredth time that night.’ I can only speak from my own imperfect experience. My husband is the co-captain of Team Robertson, and I am grateful for his collaborative spirit.” •


lifestyle

in this section Returned missionaries share things they wish they knew before leaving on a mission

46

BYUH couples describe their experiences of finding their eternal companions

52

Students describe their ideal movie date environments

48

Students say ending relationships is hard but better in the long run for them

54

Single students say single life is full of opportunity and happiness

50

BYUH surfers describe the feelings they get from being out in the waves

56

Students share how friendships last or break apart with time

59

MAY 2018

45


L IF ESTY LE

Pre-mission tips

Prepare to be a missionary by acquiring mission habits, say returned missionaries B Y D E N AL I LO F L I N

46

KE ALAK A ‘I


UTILIZE THE TEMPLE

I

T

STUDY BOOK OF MORMON + PREACH MY GOSPEL

he best way to prepare for a mission is regular scripture study, attending a mission preparation class, and recognizing your potentials and weaknesses, according to returned missionaries at BYU-Hawaii. Jarom Skarda, a sophomore from Minnesota studying biochemistry, said, “Go to the temple a lot. It’s like a school to prepare you. It’s really great when you go and perform an ordinance. But going and receiving the gift of your endowments will help you learn and be able to receive even more.” Autumn Wahl, a freshman from Utah studying hospitality and tourism management, explained the importance of learning how to deal with stress in a way missionaries are able to within their mission rules. She said, “A lot of times, people nap or watch a video or listen to music, but you can’t do that on your mission. Find ways that help you distress because missions can be stressful. Find your own motivation. “Something people can start reading is ‘Adjusting to Missionary Life’ found in the Gospel Library. It can also help with studies, homesickness, managing stress, and even being patient. Take it one day at a time.” Preach My Gospel is a very helpful tool even before your mission, Skarda stated. “Focus on chapters 6, 8, and 10. … You will learn so much from reading those.” The chapters cover Christlike attributes, using time wisely and teaching skills. He added, “The best way to prepare is to go through the readings, highlight important details, and take notes.” In addition to Preach My Gospel, sophomore Thomas Johnson, a biochemistry major from Laie, suggested religion classes such as foundations of the restoration to help get started on mission prep. Johnson served in the Tacoma Washington Mission. He

SET A SCHEDULE FOR STUDY

ATTEND MISSION PREP CLASS

said, “Getting in a regular habit of scripture study, and realizing that you won’t ever fully be prepared, is important. Nobody is ever completely ready, and everyone has different weaknesses.” Johnson emphasized the temple as one of the best sources to utilize. He said, “Work in the temple as much as you can and receive your endowments whenever you feel like you should - with counsel from the Lord.” Before his mission, Johnson said he was curious about what promptings from the Spirit really felt like. “You always hear stories about the different ways everyone recognizes the Spirit, and I was worried that I didn’t know what it felt like. I wanted to make sure I could do what the Lord needed me to.” Wahl shared her biggest concern was learning the language and figuring out how to use it in the mission. She was born in Germany, grew up in Utah, and went back to serve in the Berlin Germany Mission. She said, “I wish I would’ve known that missionaries aren’t perfect. I spent time with missionaries when I lived in New Zealand, and I knew they weren’t perfect. When you learn that you aren’t expected to be a perfect missionary, it’s a relief. “Don’t set your expectations too high for yourself. Focus on your growth. Leave room for yourself to improve. Otherwise, you will only feel like you’re letting yourself and the Lord down, when you really don’t,” Wahl added. Skarda served his mission in Baltimore, Maryland. He said he wished he knew the importance of understanding who you are. He stated, “In your mission, you are identified as a missionary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.You know who you are – you’re a son or daughter of God.”

FOCUS ON PROGRESS

Wahl said, “I really enjoyed mission preparation [class] every Sunday. Even though it was an hour and a half drive, it was fun to go and learn from people who recently finished their mission. I also found it helpful to talk to my grandparents and family members who served.” A set schedule is a big part of being a missionary, said Johnson. He relayed, “I wish I would’ve known better how to get on a regular study schedule. I would’ve liked to know how to manage my time and better understand the scriptures of course.” Wahl’s advice to those who are thinking about serving is to always pray about your mission decision. She stated, “If it’s a good thing and you feel good about it, then do it.” When deciding whether or not to serve, Skarda’s advice is: “For men, they should go 100 percent.You will learn so much about how to be able to provide and things you couldn’t learn otherwise. For sisters, the Lord has a plan and He knows who needs to serve. He will let you know.” Skarda stated, “It’s really about the small things, even praying before meals can take you so far. God doesn’t expect perfection. He expects you to do what you can to be ready to go on time. It shows that you want to be obedient to what the Lord asks.You want to align your will with God’s, and you have to master the small things to be able to start the big things.” •

TO LEARN

MORE

Read this article about an address by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland given to missionaries at the MTC on Jan. 24, 2013 Go to LDS.org and type in Elder Holland Tells Missionaries to “Invest” in the Work MAY 2018

47


L IF ESTY LE

Mormons &

movies

Students say successful dates are planned by gauging one another’s movie interests and food choices B Y DAN I CASTRO

rom best and worst movie genres on a date, as well as never fail picks, good movie snacks, and why movie dates are not the best date idea, single BYUHawaii students shared their opinions on what makes a possibly good movie date. “My go-to movies are action movies because they have a lot that factors in them,” said Keanu Dellona, a freshman from California, currently undecided with his major. “Action movies have a little bit of comedy, a little bit of action, and romance. They also have all the fighting and it’s awesome. “I mainly think of the Marvel movies. Captain America, I think would be a good movie for a date. I would go with the first one. It has a little bit of everything. It addresses things of the past, as well as having romance, some humor, and plenty of action,” Dellona added. Joshua Hansen, a freshman from Utah studying computer science, shared why comedy movies would be a better bridge builder and allow him and his date to find common interests. Hansen said, “The person you’re into has to have a good sense of humor. If you can find something funny that they find funny themselves, that’s a good sign. I think laughter is going to help people connect better. “Hot Rod is the No. 1 [movie]. A few more good ones would be ‘Nacho Libre,’

F

48

KE ALAK A ‘I

‘Napoleon Dynamite,’ or ‘Anchorman.’ If she can watch ‘Hot Rod’ and laugh at it’s stupid humor and everything, then she’s a keeper. Whatever [movies] they are into is a good thing, especially if you’re into it too,” Hansen continued. Hailey Kenyon, a freshman from Oregon majoring in Hawaiian studies, explained why choosing the best movie genre “was such a hard question. I went with comedy only because when I got down to it, the best movies for a date, with no fails, are comedy, action, and sci-fi. The problem is, not everyone is into sci-fi. Not everyone is into action, and granted, not everyone is into every type of comedy, but everyone likes to laugh. So, you can never fail with a comedy. Laughing is great,” added Kenyon. Transitioning from the best movie genre, Dellona, Hansen, and Kenyon also shared which movie genres resulted in a less positive experience. Dellona said he doesn’t do drama movies. He shared dramas are a major “put off. I don’t mainly look for it in the first place.Yes, there is drama in everything, but if there is drama in everything, I’m put off by that. I don’t want two hours of simple drama. We have enough of that in real life.” Kenyon shared, “Romance is the worst. Not everyone is into romance. Me, specifically,

I am not a huge fan of the romance category. If I’m going to watch a romance, I’m pretty picky. It’s a little bit forward. It works if you’ve been together for a really long time, and you’re serious about each other. It kind of sets off the vibe and puts it out there that you’re looking for that kind of romance. “That can be kind of awkward because you can easily end up in a situation where one of you might be really invested in the other one, and the other is wondering, ‘What the heck is going on with this person?’” Hansen shared the same thought process as Kenyon, saying horror movies can lead to uncomfortable feelings on a date. Hansen said, “I think horror [movies] at the end of the day, induces you to cuddle. But if that person feels awkward about that or doesn’t want to do that kind of thing, then it ends up being more awkward because you’re by yourself and scared at the same time.You can’t hold on to the person next to you.” Kenyon and Dellona shared their picks for the greatest-of-all-time, movies or GOAT movies. Kenyon said these specific movie decisions have never failed her. Kenyon said, “For GOAT [movies] I would say ‘Jumanji,’ or ‘Pirates of the Caribbean,’ if I’m in the mood for adventure or action. However, if I’m in the [rare] mood to watch a romantic movie, ‘Stardust’ or ‘Princess Bride’ are great.”


Dellona agreed and stated how “‘Princess Bride’ has everything. A lot of action, humor, chivalry, and romance. It shows appreciation for classic movies. This is a classic movie everyone loves, and you can never go wrong with popcorn and butter. But I like to add a little bit of cheddar, too.” A common theme among students who were interviewed about movie date nights were a great snack makes a movie even better. Kenyon and Hansen went into more descriptive details. Kenyon said, “If it’s going to be a chocolate, then the miniature Charleston Chews. I like the vanilla and the texture. If not chocolate, Sour Patch Kids for the win, 100 percent. It’s sour and I love sour, plus it’s easy to share, but be cautioned, I won’t share too much.” Hansen said he hopes to just leave a good impression and make sure his date is having a good time. Hansen said, “Probably a chocolate mint or something like that because it is the least messy. It’s going to be a lot less messy than popcorn or nachos. It also depends on what she wants. I’m happy with that.” According to Kenyon, movie dates are not always the best option if you want to get to know someone. “The first date is usually meant to get to know each other.You can’t get to know someone while watching a movie.You can get to know a part of their personality, but you’re not getting who they are because you’re not actually talking to them. A good first date is doing something you both enjoy that allows you both to talk, communicate, and get to know each other.” Dellona said that timing is everything. He shared, “I think movie dates, at its earliest, should be on the third date. Dates are a way for us to get to know someone. They give us the chance to get close to someone. For the majority of a movie date, you guys are watching not talking. “Learn their interests, learn who they are. Enjoy each other’s presence,” Dellona added. Kenyon ended with encouraging advice, “Get out and ask people. I feel like a lot of people are timid... We don’t need to know if we like you beforehand. Most [girls] just want to get asked. We will say yes, and we will

decide on that first date if we want a second date or more. Most of the time, we don’t really know we like you until you’ve asked us on a date, and we’ve gone on that date. “As for girls, don’t be afraid to ask guys. Some of them are really shy, and that’s okay. Don’t be afraid to ask. It’s not something you can’t do. Just ask.” •

Preferred Date-Movie Genre

**The results were taken from a written survey done in the BYUH Cafeteria and was composed by 100 students.

Illustration by Lorin Vilayvong

MAY 2018

49


LRIFeli ESTY LE g i on

APPRECIATE BEING

SINGLE Relationship status should not define self-worth, says single BYU-Hawaii students B Y H E L AM L AU

Students Hailey Kenyon and Timotius Mocodompis chat in the Aloha Center. Single students say it can be hard to be single on campus, but how people feel about themselves should not be based on being in a relationship. Single students say they can grow and progress and be happy. Photo by Wesley Ng

50

KE ALAK A ‘I


B

eing single can sometimes be frustrating, according to BYUHawaii students, especially being part of a Mormon culture that says marriage is an important priority. Single students said they had to learn to love and accept themselves, work on building friendships, serve others, and not rush into relationships or drop their standards. One female student expressed, “It wasn’t long ago I hated being single. Every reminder was painful and when someone said something like, ‘Believe me, it’s not what it’s cracked up to be.’ I would get upset and would think to myself, ‘Yeah, says the person in the happy relationship. What would you know about any of this?’ “It was a couple of months later I realized if I wanted to date, then I should do more about it. I got out of my comfort zone and started making friends with more guys and even asked a few of them out on dates. It helped me gain more experience and made me realize a lot about myself.” She shared three things she personally learned on why being single is okay. “First, yes, I love companionship, and the girl inside of me would love a relationship, but I can be just as happy even when I’m single. In fact, I feel happier now than I have in a long time. “Second, a relationship is a beautiful thing and shouldn’t be rushed or forced.You shouldn’t be in a relationship just to say you’re in one. I would rather be alone than ending up with someone I’m really not into. Third, don’t lower your standards and don’t be someone you aren’t just to be with someone.” She explained how sometimes it can be hard to stay positive when other people are always getting into relationships, “but there’s no point wasting your time thinking about it. I think what has made me be the happiest is building myself into the person I want to be and focusing on being a friend to others and just serving. “It’s taken me a while to learn this but since I have, I have been so much happier and no longer feel the frustration I once felt. I no longer focus on my lack of relationship or trying to get into one, and boy is it great.” Moanalui David Kadarnya from New Zealand majoring in biology, gave advice to those who feel they need to rush into a relationship. “I do want a girlfriend, but I don’t let that diminish my self-worth.

“It is good to go on dates.You can get to know what you want. Even if you cannot get dates, stick to the gospel.” He shared his testimony of how Heavenly Father loves everyone, regardless of one’s relationship status. He described it as “an unconditional love.” He quoted 2 Nephi 2:27. “Men are free according to the flesh and all things are given them which are expedient unto man…” He continued, “ Your happiness depends on yourself but not your relationship status. People who are in relationships or married does not necessarily mean they are happy. “[We should] be our own source of happiness, but not only to be happy because of someone else. Learn to be happy on our own, and then share the happiness to the one when he or she comes into our life. “You have to think about why you want to get into the relationship. Remember who you are.You don’t have to build your life around the person you marry.You also need to be yourself. It is something that will happen and I have faith it will happen according to the Lord’s time.” Emily Holt, a senior from Utah majoring in hotel management declared her relationship status as single and ready to mingle. She said, “I am open to a relationship but I am not hungry for that.” She said her confidence and positivity is from the assurance from God that one day she will be getting married. She laughed, “I will get it one day and don’t know why I [should] freak out right now. “When you think of yourself in 10 years, you picture yourself with your kids and obviously with your husband,” she said with a laugh. “One day I will meet him.” She thinks according to the BYUH cultures, being single somehow is a negative thing. Holt agreed finding your other half is a great and a righteous desire but not the pure reason of our existence. “There is much more in our life than just finding somebody.” Taking what she learned from her eternal marriage class, she said, “Use time wisely while you are single.You can get a lot of skills like technical skills, communication skills, relationship skills rather than thinking of it as a time that you are waiting. This is your life, and you want the best of it.” •

MAY 2018

51


L IF ESTY LE

An unexpected proposal Through distance and opposition, love conquered all, says two BYU-Hawaii couples B Y ZE E K CH E N G

Illustration by Zeek Cheng

52

KE ALAK A ‘I


ohn Diaz, a graphic design alumnus from the Philippines was turned down twice when proposing to his wife, Malia Diaz, a senior from Idaho studying peace building. John proposed to Malia the first time when they had been dating for three months. John said, “We went on a road trip for a friend’s wedding in Idaho. I proposed to her at BYUIdaho, but she said no. Despite her answer, we were still in love.” After the first attempt, John went back to Hawaii and Malia stayed in Idaho. Nevertheless, John didn’t give up and went back to Idaho four months later and proposed again. Malia turned down John for the second time. John was so down, and he said they broke up afterward. Nonetheless, after their break up, Malia couldn’t stop thinking about the relationship. Malia said, “After I rejected him the second time, I went to Nepal. “I couldn’t stop thinking about the mistake I made. So I decided to pull off a proposal for John with my friends,” Malia continued. Malia ended up proposing to John, and she said she stayed up all night with her roommate to plan the proposal. “I was really nervous and sweating the whole time. I didn’t know if he was going to say yes because he was pretty mad at me for saying no twice.” Malia tricked John and had him play a song for one of her friend’s proposal during an open mic night on campus. Malia said, “I asked a friend to ask John to play a song for her proposal, but John didn’t know it’s for his own proposal. We turned off the mic toward the end of the song, then I showed up to finish it.. I proposed to him in front of everyone at his open mic.” Malia shared how grateful she is for their relationship. “This relationship is like a roller coaster, but I’m grateful for John’s persistence. Otherwise, we wouldn’t be together today. We help each other grow more each day.” Chung Hang Chan, a sophomore from Hong Kong studying biology, started a long distance relationship online with his wife from Texas whom he met on his mission.

J

Even though they lived in different places and were going on different paths, they followed the prompting of the spirit and chased their dream to be with the love of their lives. After their mission, they added each other on Facebook and started messaging. Chan said, “I started to make small talk with her on Facebook. I found out she’s attracted to Asian guys. Meanwhile, I’m attracted to Latinas. I told her I really liked her and I wanted to date her. So, we started dating online.” The long-distance relationship was a challenge because they were going on different paths. They broke up the first week Chan came to BYU-Hawaii. However, his wife told him that she would wait for him. Chan said, “I really felt loved by her. There are many great girls out there, but I feel they are not as spiritually prepared and loving as my wife.” Chan felt that the spirit has been guiding him throughout his decision to propose. After dating online for half a year, Chan decided to visit her in Texas during Christmas break. “I bought her a pearl necklace as a Christmas present, and I won a pearl ring as a prize. I was just thinking, ‘That’s great, I can give her another gift.’ But I received a prompting that I should propose to her.” Chan said, “During the visit, I asked permission from her parents to marry their daughter. Her dad told me that his daughter was so lost when she first got home from her mission. But when I came into her life, she found her purpose and joy again. At that time, I realized I played a very important role in her life.” According to Chan, there were also other challenges his wife encountered. “Coming to Hawaii was never a part of her plan, and her brother didn’t support the idea of marriage. He told her she should chase her dream instead of going to Hawaii, but she followed the prompting of the spirit and decided to come anyway.” Chan said their marriage has brought him a lot of joy. “My wife makes me feel safe and loved. Being a student is stressful. But with her support, challenges become easier. She helps me reach my potential to become a better man.”•

MAY 2018

53


L IF ESTY LE

Overcoming heartbreak Going through a breakup and moving on is hard, but it is possible and you can learn from it, according to students B Y AN E L CAN TO

54

KE ALAK A ‘I


Students portray breaking up. Sometimes staying friends can be too difficult and you have to cut them out completely, said student Leilanie Coker. Photos by Gab Batac

haring their personal stories of their most difficult breakups, three students gave advice on how they personally worked through heartbreak, and moved on.

s

TH E B R E A K U P

Karina Loeza, a junior from California studying social work, said after dating a boy for a couple weeks, they became boyfriend and girlfriend, but she didn’t feel comfortable with their relationship. “I just had this feeling I couldn’t fully trust this person,” said Loeza. According to Loeza, she was with her boyfriend in her home the day they broke up. She recalled how he broke a glass on the floor after she mentioned to him she was part of a study group with other boys. She said she felt prompted to tell him she had to leave for her class earlier than she thought. Then 20 minutes later after getting to school, she broke up with him through a phone call. She said even though she wanted to break up with the boy, after breaking up with the guy, she felt a “little bit empty.” Kristi Nelson, an undecided freshman from Arizona, shared how she started dating a friend who wasn’t a member. She said she gave him a copy of the Book of Mormon. “He read it, he loved it, and he wanted to get baptized, but then his parents totally rejected the idea.” Nelson added, “The day he told me he wanted to get baptized was the

happiest [moment], but as it was causing a lot of contention within their family, we ended up breaking up.” Leilanie Coker, majoring in business marketing, said she broke up with her boyfriend because they moved to different colleges. “It didn’t end up working,” she said, “so I had to do the better thing by breaking up with him instead of dragging it on for no reason.” OV E RCO MING T H E H EA RT BR EA K

According to Coker, her first semester in BYUH was really hard as she was “freshly heartbroken,” and no one asked her out on a date. Because of this, she said she felt there is not much of a dating culture at BYU-Hawaii. “There is no one you can really distract yourself with, so I just kinda just sat in my dorm sobbing.” According to Coker, attempting to keep the former boyfriend or girlfriend as a friend is what makes the breakup the hardest. She said, “If you do that, you will never be able to get over him.You just have to cut them out, even if you don’t want to.” Coker added, “For a long time I kept him on social media and talked to him once in a while, but as soon as I cut him out completely, I was able to get over him. Hopefully one day we can be friends again, but not for now.” Loeza said after a bad break up, she felt more “safe and loved” by talking with good old

friends of the opposite sex. She explained how it reassured her that men should never make her feel bad, and expressed how those friends showed concern for her and her feelings. Nelson shared how she felt a little bit sad the whole year after breaking up with her boyfriend. She desired to stay friends, but she reflected on the idea and decided it would not work. “It was hard for me watching someone I trusted turn into a total stranger who won’t even make eye contact with me or talk to me anymore,” said Nelson. MOV E O N A ND KEEP DATING

Loeza said after her breakup, she met amazing people by dating. She said, “I think really caring about the other one makes the difference.” Loeza added though dating can be difficult, she personally “grows so much and even meets amazing men. Everyday you go out it’s like a mini interview.You have to learn how to put into words where you come from, where you’re at, and where you’re going. You learn so much about yourself. Every change in your life will demand a new you.” Nelson added attending a different school helped her to move on and learn that breaking up was “not the end of the world,” but instead a “good learning experience.” •

MAY 2018

55


WALKING ON

L IF ESTY LE

The dangers of surfing do not outweigh the joy of being on the water, according to students who surf BY DAN I CAST R O

56

KE ALAK A ‘I


WATER

Nick Gruen said surfing helps him forget about his worries momentarily as he rides the waves. Photos by @mr_ gru

A

ccording to BYU-Hawaii surfers, their shared love for surfing brings them closer together. They shared how it strengthens their faith, builds friendships, and offers a thrill beyond compare despite the dangers that accompany the sport. “I used to surf all the time back home,” said Jashon Waters, a freshman from New Zealand studying psychology. “Here, it’s just a big playground, a lot of opportunity, and big waves. When I was in the MTC, I flirted with the idea that feeling the spirit is much like catching a wave. The feelings of joy and your heart.” Nick Gruen, a senior from California studying interdisciplinary studies, said, “I had the opportunity to be on the surf team in high school and take Surf [physical education] in the mornings. Imagine that? A class for school that required you to surf. It’s nice to get out there and feel completely removed from everything else going on. “I can just focus on what’s around me and have a good worry-free time. I think God’s talent with what he’s created for us really shows when I’m out there in the water. It’s such a beautiful place to be.” Paul Davis, a junior from California studying business management, expressed surfing has been a great activity to do with his friends and has increased his faith. Davis said, “I know God created these beaches with barrels and good waves in mind. If I were to relate it to the gospel, I would just say it’s a testament to the beautiful creation of the earth. Nothing could compare to riding a barrel and catching that vision. It’s a carefree environment where my friends and I can just have fun and be stoked for each other. It’s a non-competitive sport, so I just enjoy being out in the water.” Waters, despite being busy with other responsibilities, commented he tries to “go as much as [he] can. I don’t have a car here, so I can’t drive, but when I go, my friends go. Often times when friends enjoy surfing together, they enjoy each other’s company. It’s good to have something to bond with and connect over. Continues on Page 58

MAY 2018

57


L IF ESTY LE Continued from Page 57

“It’s exciting to catch a wave. It feels great. I’m confident that I’ll keep coming back to it for the rest of my life. I love the thrill of a challenge as well. There’s always something you can learn and improve on when you’re surfing. Every time you get in the water, most of the time you have something on your mind that you’re working on. Otherwise, you’re just out there having fun.” Gruen said if there is something you really enjoy, you make time for it. “I go at least four times a week. It always feels great to get in the ocean and get a little work out. I try to plan out my day and stick to the schedule I’ve made. Of course, there are days where I have too much going on and I need to decide to do the other work I have over surf. Luckily, the sun rises a lot earlier than any class or work I have, so I take that opportunity to go early. “When there’s waves and homework to be done, I find myself often choosing the waves,” said Waters. “It’s like curving on a longboard, but you’re on water. Surfing is unique in that way. It’s almost the closest thing to walking on water. It’s the sensation. It’s amazing.” According to Gruen, regardless of your perceived skill with the waves, “the ocean is no joke. It shouldn’t be taken lightly. I’ve been an ocean marine safety lifeguard for five years now, and I need to mention that people can and do get seriously hurt and killed. The ocean can be extremely violent, especially here in Hawaii. “So please, be safe and know and understand surf culture and your ability to surf before thinking of paddling out. Remember: If in doubt, don’t go out,” Gruen added. Waters said he has to worry about another danger, his epilepsy. Waters said, “There are different types of epilepsy. I have seizures that make me go unconscious. My muscles convulse, and I have no control over my body. When I become conscious again, I don’t remember anything. I’m fortunate that it is a minor case of epilepsy and that it’s relatively controllable through medication and proper sleep management. I generally don’t go out surfing if I had a rough night and not well rested.” Waters smiled and shared, “I just have to be extra careful. If I have a seizure in the water, the chances of me surviving are quite slim. Don’t give up on what you love. If it makes you happy, don’t give up on it.” • 58

KE ALAK A ‘I

BYUH surfers say surfing brings them closer together. Photos by @mr_ gru


Maintaining friendships takes effort Ending or building friendships from college is a choice, explained BYU-Hawaii students Illustration by McKenna Locken

B Y V IC Z HONG MO N G AN

C

ollege friends come and go, according to BYU-Hawaii students, but it is primarily up to the individual to continue to develop and allow their friendships to grow. Technology and social media make it easier to state connected, but students said people still have to choose to make the effort to maintain friendships. “Good friends, who later went their separate ways, were still in touch with me at the beginning, but gradually the contact died down,” shared Russell Runnels, a senior from Hawaii majoring in information technology. “I don’t see it as a ‘two-way street.’ If you want to contact them, you will contact them.” Natasya Haridas, a freshman from Malaysia majoring in hospitality and tourism management, said college friendships can last. “I think it’s especially difficult when you’re studying overseas. It is so much more difficult to meet up, and the distance is definitely a barrier. However, if two people want to keep the friendship, I guess it could work. Especially, with technology nowadays, it’s really easy to keep in touch. It just takes time and effort.” Runnels said with the help of technology, staying in contact is easier than staying out of contact. “Back in my time in high school there was no such thing as Facebook or social media. It’s either you write your friends letters or try to call them and pay the fees.” Nicole Kepo’o, a sophomore from Big Island majoring in English, said, “The first year here, my friends in school were my roommates. We were to … do everything together. Afterwards, I started thinking maybe I should make new friends, and the relationships were sort of fading away. Especially my first roommate, she went on her mission and our friendship ended or was changed to another level because she was not here. “You connect and you make friends because you were with each other 24/7, but it might end because they move away,” she said, or people feel they are seeing each other too much every day.

According to Runnels, since BYUH students are to go back to their own countries, they will have a hard time keeping in touch with each other often. “The group of my friends here on this campus are going to spread out all over the place. I have one going to the East Coast, one going to the Midwest, one going to Utah, and I am trying to stay here in Hawaii. We always say this is the most diverse university in the nation, but trying to keep in touch with the ones who are in different corners of the world is hard. When you leave college, you are in a different world.” Haridas said her ideal kind of friendship is a low-maintenance friendship. “A low-maintenance friendship means you don’t need to meet each other every day, nor do you need to keep texting each other.You know they care about you and they will always have your back when you need them. When you meet, you can just be yourself instead of having to pretend to be someone else.” Rosina Zheng, a senior from China majoring in elementary education, shared how being married should not affect friendships. “Some people think partnerships are more important than friendships, but I don’t think so. Though I am married, I can still invite friends over for dinner to keep up the friendships.” Haridas said she learned from her experience how communication is the key to sustaining friendships. She shared how one of her childhood friends stopped talking to her altogether and “until now I don’t know what exactly the cause of the end of our friendship was. I think I’ve asked her at least twice, but she only said that it’s because I’ve changed. It is very frustrating because I still value our friendship. I feel like the situation could have been solved if she told me what exactly was wrong. Instead, she kept it to herself.” •

MAY 2018

59


Graduate Richard Solomon Chadderton from New Zealand performs the hongi with Hirini Wikaira after the Winter 2018 Graduation on April 21 in the CAC. Photo by Adam Case

Ke Alaka'i- May 2018  
Ke Alaka'i- May 2018