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wo American journalists will soon be standing trial in North Korea for committing “hostile acts� and entering the country illegally. If found guilty, the two women could be put in a prison labor camp for up to 10 years. On Friday, March 13, Laura Ling and Euna Lee left Seoul, Korea, for the Chinese border town of Yanji. Both women work for the San Francisco online news outlet Current TV, and the purpose of the trip was to interview the refugee children living in China and women who had been forced into human trafficking. Before arriving the journalists contacted Rev. Chun Ki-won of the Durihana Mission in Seoul, a group that works helping defectors. “I told them to consult with me first if they

head toward the border,� Chun said, adding that the border region can be “dangerous and difficult for foreigners.� His last contact with the journalists was March 17, when they were near the Tumen River, which divides China and North Korea. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton “is engaged on this matter right now,� spokesman Robert A. Wood told reporters Friday. “There is a lot of diplomacy going on. There have been a number of contacts made.� Battogtokh Baatar, senior in international cultural studies from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, said, “I think that their purpose was right to investigate North Korea. As independent journalists they should have had a solid plan, instead of undercover journalism. They could have informed the authorities about what they were doing; that could have prevented them from getting arrested.�

Although the United States is doing what they can to get the journalists back, it is difficult because there is no American presence in North Korea. Communication is currently being done through the Swedish Embassy, who confirmed they have been in contact with Ling and Lee although no other information has been provided. Roxanne Miller, senior in biology from Ridgecrest, Calif., said, “The journalists should have known that the North Korean government is pretty radical, but if they knew the consequences that could follow, then I think that it’s good that they tried to do some investigating. I think it’s a noble thing that they were trying to do. It’s a shame that they got arrested, but they should have been sneakier.� The details surrounding the arrest and imprisonment of the journalists are unclear. Bob Dietz, from the Committee to Protect Journalists said, “We call on the North Korean government to explain the circumstances of the detention of these two journalists.� Their cameraman Mitch Koss was held by the Chinese border guards but was not arrested and has not been available for comment. David Jensen, junior in biology from Cleveland, Ohio, said, “If you want to be out of trouble, stay out of trouble.� !" #$%&" %'(()%*" '+," -./" '00)%1'-/," 23/00

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Islands of Tonga rocked by underwater eruption

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tudents on campus said they were concerned about family and friends living in the South Pacific when they heard a powerful 7.9-magnitude earthquake struck, shaking an erupting underwater volcano off Tongaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main island on Wednesday, March 18. A cloud of smoke and steam was seen off the coast of Tonga, rising as high as 13 miles in the sky. The eruption took place about 6 miles from the southwest coast of Tongatapu island and about 130 miles south-southeast of the capital, Nukuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alofa. There were no immediate reports of injury or damage from the quake, which was felt more than 1,875 miles (3,000 kilometers) away in New Zealand. A tsunami warning for islands within 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) of the epicenter was canceled two hours later.

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Sisi Satini, sophomore from Nukuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alofa, Tonga, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I worried because my brother called me early in the morning and said he heard it was the biggest earthquake to ever occur in Tonga. So I missed class and rushed to get a phone card to call home. It ended up not being that bad.â&#x20AC;? Adrianna Ika, senior in social work from Bountiful, Utah, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I heard that the tremors were felt in Tonga but there were no serious injuries. The worst was case was broken glass.â&#x20AC;? The agency recorded a 5.3-magnitude aftershock in the same region two hours after the initial quake. Resident of Tonga Dana Stephenson said the quake started with â&#x20AC;&#x153;deep rumblings ... then side-to-side movement which seemed to go on forever but I guess was about 40 seconds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is long enough.â&#x20AC;? Of f icia ls in the Tonga n capita l,

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Unique and chic on a dime Helpful tips for tying the knot

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Nukuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;A lofa, were relieved that the 170-island archipelago appeared to have suffered no injuries or damage. National police commander, Chris

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photos by Associated Press

Green Thumb White Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new garden

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Superferry closes, hundreds lose jobs

Dance, dance Grooving at Winter Ball

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ince September 2007, the United States has increased its national debt on an average of $3.85 billion a day, according to the U.S. National Debt Clock website. As such, Federal Reserve officials have decided on a plan to try and reduce the United States’ debt. The Reserve plans to lower rates and pump $1.25 trillion into the financial system by purchasing treasury bonds and mortgage securities. They hope that lowering rates will lead to lower mortgage rates that will in turn spur more home buying. In addition, homeowners who refinance at lower rates could reduce their monthly payments, which could create greater profits. Having already lowered the main interest rate it controls nearly to zero, the central bank has increasingly turned to alternatives like buying securities as a way as a way of getting more dollars into the economy, a tactic that amounts to creating vast new sums of money out of thin air. Many questions arose about this trillion dollar plan but the question that stuck out the most was “Where does the Fed get all the money and are taxpayers on the hook?” The answer the Fed’s presented was that taxpayers are not on the hook, but other economists disagree. Simultaneously, American Insurance Group’s Stephen L. Blake faced Connecticut lawmakers on March 25 to defend the millions of taxpayer dollars used to-

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ward bonuses. Since receiving $150 billion in bailout funds, AIG has dolled out $165 million in bonuses. “The program did what it was supposed to do, and that was to retain employees,” Blake told members of the General Assembly’s Banks Committee. “As hard as people are working today, they know at the end of the day this business is going to be gone.” None of “the architects” of the problems that helped sink AIG as a whole last year have received the retention payments, Blake said. Blake acknowledged at the March 26 hearing

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front cover photo courtesy of MARK LEE

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photos by the ASSOCIATED PRESS

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that he couldn’t provide the state lawmakers with any information beyond what AIG’s CEO, Edward M. Liddy, recently told Congress about the bonuses. AIG offered up Blake’s testimony as a compromise to the committee leaders, who last week issued subpoenas to more than a dozen AIG executives, demanding that they appear at the state Capitol to answer questions about the bonuses. AIG executives were reluctant to appear because many have received death threats since news of the bonuses broke. Despite Blake’s appearance, the subpoenas remain in force. Rep. Ryan Barry, D-Manchester, the committee co-chairman, said Blake’s testimony was the “first stage” of compliance with the legislative subpoenas. Friday, March 27, another meeting was held at the White House between President Obama and chief executives from the 15 largest banks in the United States to discuss the economy. This administration proposed tighter regulation of the financial system, which included giving the government power to take over major financial institutions that are not banks, AIG. White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said, “It’s fair to say that they agreed on the need to update the framework of regulation.” Obama last week assailed AIG for “recklessness and greed” in its business practices, but he has since toned down his rhetoric. The administration needs industry cooperation for its economic plans to work. Richard Davis, of U.S. Bancorp, said Obama raised issues that have fueled the public’s outrage. “He’s not surprised by it. We reported back to him that we’re not surprised either,” said Davis.

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wenty-six elementary schoolchildren wielded shovels, rakes, pitchforks and wheelbarrows to help first lady Michelle Obama break ground on the first day of spring for an organic produce and herb garden on the White House grounds. Crops to be planted in the coming weeks on the 1,100-square-foot, L-shaped patch near the fountain on the South Lawn include spinach, broccoli, various lettuces, kale and collard greens, assorted herbs and blueberries, blackberries and raspberries. “We’re going to try to make our own honey here as well,” Mrs. Obama told the kids from Bancroft Elementary School in Washington before they got to work on Friday. The school has its own community garden. The students will be brought back to the White House next month to help with the planting, and after that to help harvest and cook some of the produce in the mansion’s kitchen. The first harvest is expected by late April. After she spoke, the students were paired off and handed a gardening tool. The first lady joined — first with a shovel, then a rake — and together they began pulling up the grass, dumping it into wheelbarrows and depositing the contents in a central location. “Are we done yet?” Mrs. Obama jokingly said at one point. “I want to plant. Let’s harvest something.” Some of the produce from the garden will be served in the White House, including to the First Family and at official functions. Some crops also will be donated to Miriam’s Kitchen,

a soup kitchen near the White House where Mrs. Obama recently helped serve lunch. Assistant chef Sam Kass gave no estimate on how much produce the garden would yield. Mrs. Obama, who has spoken about healthy eating, said the garden’s purpose is to make sure her family, White House staff and guests can eat fresh fruits and vegetables. BYU-Hawaii students mostly agree with the First Lady. “I think organic food is overrated,” said Natahli Mills, junior in mathematics from Hau’ula, “but that’s just me.” She went on to say that her family has a garden, which produces enough “to make a nice salad every night to feed 9.” Aissa Mitton, senior in international cultural studies from New Zealand, said, “I think that is a great idea. The land is there, you might as well use it!” The garden takes up a small fraction of the land space on the White House property. Mitton continued, “It’s good that it helps out other people as well, and it builds character in the kids.” Kit Ming Lau, junior in music education from Hong Kong, echoed these statements. “It’s always good that they have the White House open for elementary school students,” she said, adding, “I think if they do it for the long run, then it’s a good idea.” The garden, if successf ul, will continue as long as Mrs. Obama is living in the White House.

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April 2, 2009

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community

Superferry closes, leaves 236 without jobs

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he Superferry’s short run in Hawaii has finished. March 19, 2009 at 2:45 p.m. the ship sailed back into Honolulu Harbor from Kahului Harbor, in Maui, carrying about 400 people including 100 employees who wanted to be on the last trip. “I’m glad that the superferry is leaving because I think it is bad for the environment. They should have waited to finish the environmental study,” said Christy Wong, freshman in accounting from Kailua. The State of Hawaii gave the Superferry clearance to sail before an environmental study was finished. The Supreme Court disagreed with the decision. While the Superferry could sue the state, executives say that it’s not their focus at this time. “I’m not here to point fingers or fix blame at all,” said Fargo. “I don’t think it should be around because it had gotten the OK from the state before the environmental study was finished. If the Superferry had gotten the OK after the environmental study then I think it would be fine,”

said Marco Hardjorno, undeclared freshman from Honolulu. Plans have already begun to take place for the ship to leave Hawaii. Sources within the company said that the Superferry will be going back to A labama, where it was built, to be retrofitted with a new ramp. Executives of the Superferry will need to find more work for their ship as well. The company has already invested millions of dollars and does not want the ship to go unemployed. As of now, the closing of the Superferry left 236 workers without jobs. “Ultimately we’re going to have to find employment for Alakai and that means we’re going to have to move the ship,” said Tom Fargo, Superferry President & CEO. Options for the company to make more money are leasing to charter companies or to the military; something Fargo, who is a retired admiral, says was never part of the plan. “We always get the questions about if it was designed as a military operation and that is absolutely not true,” said Fargo. ! "#$%&'( )**+

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he parking lot at Laie Shopping Center is a little more crowded these days as one construction crew fills eight stalls with an expanded food court seating platform and another adds a new facade to the roof-line of the building. “We are giving up eight parking stalls, but the former service station is going to be demolished, so there will be additional parking on that side,” said Jeffrey Tyau, director of Engineering & Utilities for Hawaii Reserves, Inc. (HRI), which operates the shopping center. He said work on the project began recently and includes other improvements and repainting. “For example, in the Foodland area we’re demolishing the little cover by the ATM and rebuilding that. We’ll put a new sidewalk cover over it and building a new, more aesthetic entry at Foodland.” Tyau added the project is tentatively scheduled to be completed “in about three or four months.” He also said HRI’s Laie Water Company will be installing a new water main line on

Anemoku Street, on the cliff-side leading to Laie Point. “We haven’t got a firm date on that yet, but we’ll probably start on that within the next one-totwo months.” Ohana Auto Care (formerly Mickey’s Motors) closed at the end of August and relocated to the corner of Puuluana St. and Kamehameha Hwy. across from Kahuku High. That space “will ultimately be leveled, but in the interim we’ll more than likely use it as a base yard or storage area for the contractor who will be renovating the shopping center,” said Richard Vierra, HRI director of Property Management, last fall in an interview about plans for the shopping center. “Meanwhile, Laie Shopping Center is still going strong. For example, food is always popular here. Foodland is going gang-busters and is way ahead of schedule.” “We’ve been real fortunate because of our location and the community support,” he said.

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Dance Hysteria

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BYUH students get their grove on at the Winter Ball 

or girls, it was a night to get dressed up, an excuse to spend extra time on hair and makeup, and an opportunity to dance the night away. For guys, it was a night they had to wear a tie, an excuse to ask a girl on a date and an opportunity for a good meal. It was the night of Winter Ball, held on Friday, March 27, at the Polynesian Cultural Center. “I have never worked at the PCC so to me it’s really nice. I really enjoyed the atmosphere,” said Mark Bacera a junior in accounting from Yigo, Guam. The PCC was transformed from the usual Hale Aloha into a decorated venue. There were balloon arches leading into

Graduating prepared: Your C.A.P. and gown

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reparing for success in college is one thing. Preparing for life after college is quite another. In order to help students be as prepared as possible for a smooth transition into their chosen career, a new program at BYU-Hawaii, called the Career Development Program, focuses on preparing students for their careers and futures. The major focus of this new program is called the Career Advancement Program (CAP), which charts a course through the college path according to credits earned. For example, a student who reaches 30 credits must take two personality assessments. Then again at 60 credits, students need to complete a career plan. At 90 credits, they prepare for applying and interviewing for jobs so hopefully by graduation, at 120 credits, they will be prepared to enter the workforce or further education. Jodi Chowen, the CDP manager and advisor to all undeclared majors, said although some students may find the requirements bothersome, they could help all students, from freshman to transfer, in succeeding after college. There are three basic phases that accompany the CAP: Self-Assessment; Exploration & Planning; and Matching & Developing Professional Skills. The Self-Assessment part of this new program, for instance, explained Chowen, includes two personal-

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the dance with lights leading up to the dining and dancing area. There were also lanterns hanging from the ceiling of the room. “I thought the decorations were tasteful and interesting,” said Patrick Christensen, undeclared freshman from Midland, Mich. “I liked that the location was outdoor yet covered so that there was an airf low through out the night” said Rebecca Dickson, a freshman in international cultural studies from Gilroy, Calif. At the ball, there was a variety of activities available to students. Dinner was served at 9 p.m. in the Hale Aloha. There was a variety of meats along with side dishes such as potatoes, steamed vegetables, rolls, and noodles.

ity assessments, one called the MeyrsBriggs Type Indicator, and the other called the Strong Interest Inventory. Both of these tests can help students identify their personality types and the best career options for those types of personalities. “The university has made a commitment to assisting our students to be better prepared for their futures both in staffing and resources,” added Chowen. “The university pays for each MBTI and Strong Interest Inventory. My hope and goal is for students to embrace these opportunities as resources to make the most of their educational experience here.” Chowen also explained how the new program actually precedes what the LDS Church wants to see for its students. The university’s administration came up with the idea for a program similar to the CAP in 2006, Chowen said, but “In recent years, the church has had a focus on better preparing students for their careers and futures.” Students can find articles to this affect in the April 2009 Ensign and New Era. When asked about the CAP, Lauren Hally, sophomore in biology from Salt Lake City, Utah, said she was unfamiliar with the program, but thought it was a good idea. “I think a program that prepares students for the future is really helpful because I have seen a

After dinner, there was a table set up with snacks and extra food left over from dinner. The dance f loor was set up in the middle of the middle of the dining area with a deejay bumping the tunes, students dancing, and a disco ball reflecting onto the dance f loor. For a change of scene, The Imax Theater was also an option for the night. At the Imax the movies “Fire Proof My Marriage” and “Bedtime Stories” were shown. “The movie was great,” said Jinhee Bae a junior in biology from Daegu, South Korea, “It was nice because you could relax and not just dance the whole night.” ! "#$%&'( )*+#&,%"

lot of students finish college and then they are stuck,” she said. “If you can educate those students along the way, they should be prepared for whatever comes after college life.” While Hally is not alone in her lack of knowledge about the CAP, all students are required to participate in the program, said Chowen. To encourage students to learn more about the CAP and begin completing the requirements, the Career and Alumni Services Department will begin sending out e-mail reminders. But if students fail to fulfill them, Chowen said starting sometime in Spring Term, restrictions may be placed on student accounts. This gives students plenty of time to accomplish their tasks, she said. She also said everyone in the CDP wants BYUH students to succeed and they are willing to work with students who feel they have already met the requirements. “If a student feels strongly about having equivalent experience elsewhere – perhaps they have already taken the MBTI, or they have a professional resume – then they can simply come talk to me and I will make the appropriate notations on their account.” Students who have questions about the CAP or its requirements are encouraged to contact Jodi Chowen or any of the other Career Development Team members. The Career Services Office, located next to the Cafeteria, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday and on Fridays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. They can also be reached by phone at (808) 675-3533 or via e-mail at careerservices@ byuh.edu. ! /1*"( *"2'/0%"

photos by AARON KNUDSEN and courtesy CAREER SERVICES

oth the men’s and women’s BYU-Hawaii tennis teams destroyed their competition in twin doubleheaders on March 24. The teams played Tuskegee University in the morning, then moved on to Stillman College in the afternoon in Laie. The Seasider men’s team blasted through both matches, not losing a set in singles and taking all wins in doubles to improve to 15-4 for the season. Rong Ma, sophomore from Guangzhou, China, and Agnel Peter, sophomore from Vashi, India, took an 8-1 win against Tuskegee and an 8-0 win against Stillman in doubles. Doubles partners Manu Bajpai, sophomore from Bangalore, India, and Romeo Juhasz, freshman from Budapest, Hungary; and Carlton Taylor, sophomore from Pleasant Grove, Utah, and Joseph Beck, junior from Saginaw, Texas all defeated both teams with 8-0 scores. Ma continued on in singles to score 6-0 and 6-1 against his opponents. Peter’s Tuskegee opponent quit while Peter was ahead 6-1, and he continued to get back-to-back 6-1 scores against Stillman. Juhasz held a 6-3, 6-1 win versus Tuskegee and twin 6-0 scores at Stillman. Taylor scored 6-1, 6-0 wins against both

Wily and Alves gain more honors for outstanding play this season

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atoya Wily, senior forward from Laie, has been named PacWest Player of the Year, and was rostered on the Daktronics NCAA II All-American First Team. This is Wily’s second time holding the honor. Lucas Alves, junior forward from Casa Branca, Brazil, has been named to the National Association of Basketball Coaches AllAmerican First team, as well as Daktronics NCAA H)#/6)!1,46! %$+,'-! .&+! II Player of the Year and !"#$%&) (&',/+!6&)+!:/'#,'$&(!#/!-),'!)::/8 All-American first team. 4)%&(!*/+!.&+!&**/+#(!#.,(!6&)+= Each player brought a priceless addition to the team. Wily was named PacWest Player of the Week an astounding six times for her senior season. She held national rankings for rebounds at 13.9 per game, scoring at 25.6 points per game, and field goal percentage at 59.5 percent. She also average 6.3 offensive rebounds per game. Alves led the PacWest Conference by averaging 19.8 points per game, 7.5 rebounds per game, and a 52.7 percent shot from the field, all while averaging 27 minutes per game. Alves was named PacWest Player of the Week three times during the season. Alves has been honored as PacWest Player of the Year for each of his last two seasons of play. The first men’s basketball player from BYU-Hawaii to be named National Player of the Year, Alves has pulled down over 600 rebounds and scored over 1,500 points as a Seasider. The two titans known for their power to the team end this season with multiple honors as the Lady Seasiders placed third in the PacWest and the Seasider men finished as PacWest champions with a school-record 27-2 season. ! -'"( -., ,*/0

photos by KE ALAKAI ARCHIVES

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schools. Bajpai won 6-1, 6-2 against Tuskegee and 6-1 scores against Stillman. Beck scored two 6-0s against Tuskegee and two 6-1s against Stillman. The Lady Seasiders improved their record 20-0 for the season by beating both teams 9-0. Doubles partners, Elwen Li and Yuan Jia won 8-0 against Tuskegee and then by default against Stillman. Jenny Chin and Wen-Lin took 8-0 wins against both competitors. Shawni Proter and Ayako Ikeda had 8-1 scores in both their matches. Jia won both her matches in singles play 6-1, 6-0 against Tuskegee and 6-0, 6-1 against Stillman. Wang took 6-0, 6-0 wins in both matches. Chin took 6-0, 6-0 against Tuskegee and 6-1, 6-0 against Stillman. Porter brought on 6-0, 6-0 win against Tuskegee and a two 6-1 victory against Stillman. Ikeda took a 6-2, 6-0 win in the morning and a 6-1, 6-1 win in the afternoon. The Lady Seasiders will play Notre Dame de Namur on April 7 in Kailua-Kona on the Big Island. However, the men’s team does not have another match scheduled until the NCAA West Regional Tournament beginning May 7. ! -'"( -., ,*/0

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In Phoenix, the Lady Seasiders seemed unable to shake off the previous loss as they faced the powerful Grand Canyon University team. The Antelopes took control of the games ending with a 9-2 score in the first game and a 17-7 score the second. The Antelopes scored four runs in the third and five in the fourth to run ahead by nine. In response Lauren Fielding, freshman outfield from Mesa, Ariz., hit her first home run of the season to bring Lehano in during the top of the fifth. The second game brought a rally from the Lady Seasiders to get ahead 5-4. Grand Canyon fought back with their a run to tie the game in the fourth inning, but Ivy Sessions, senior third base from Huntington Beach, Calif., hit a double in the fifth inning and scored later off on RBI single by Kim Artiaga, senior shortstop from Avery, Calif. Necaise then sent Artiaga home on a single. The Seasiders led 7-5 until the Antelopes tied it in the bottom of the fifth, and then executed 10 more runs in the sixth inning to seal the deal. The Seasiders will go on to play Notre Dame de Namur on Wednesday, April 1 in Belmont, Calif. It will be their last mainland game.

he Lady Seasiders split games against Dixie State in a PacWest double-header on May 28. Then two days later, the Seasiders fell twice to Grand Canyon University. BYU-Hawaii now holds a 12-24 overall season record as well as a 5-13 PacWest conference record. The first game against Dixie brought high spirits to the Lady Seasiders as Katresha Veazie, senior pitcher from Erda, Utah, pitched a one-hitter in the 3-1 victory. Veazie struck out five and walked four against the Red Storm and only allowed a single home run in the fourth inning. Morgan Necaise, junior first base from Bay St Louis, Miss., scored after Brooke Perrington, sophomore outfielder from Kaneohe, Hawaii, hit a sacrifice f ly during the top of the second. Melissa Lehano, senior third base from Mililani, Hawaii scored, off of an RBI single during the top of the third by Kahealani Alohikea-Betham, sophomore catcher from Ewa Beach, Hawaii. The last score was brought on by an RBI ground out by Ashley Parry, freshman outfield from Santa Clara, Utah, which brought Danielle Bahr, freshman outfield from Hubbard, Ore., home, pinch-running for Veazie. Lauren Folta, Red Storm pitcher, stif led the Lady Seasiders in the second game loss 6-0 by striking out nine, walking only two, and allowing only one hit. Not one of the Seasiders got past first base during the entire game. The Red Storm hit with a fury with nine hits and scored twice in the first !"#$%&) H)%6! "&)(,%&+! U),4)!K'%&+(/'! ,(! )#! E)#! %$+,'-! )! -)2&! &)+4,&+! and third and once in the #.,(!(&2&(#&+=!!>.&!"&)(,%&+(!+&#$+'!./2&!*+/2!)!2),'4)'%!#+,0!#.,(!D&&F= second and sixth innings.

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Understanding your God

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s the guest Joseph Smith Lecturer, S. Michael Wilcox opened his three lecture series by speaking at the devotional on March 31. His talk was a down to earth approach to “understanding the God we pray to.” Wilcox began his talk by comparing the scriptures to letters from our Heavenly Father. “There are times in our lives when we need to open the letter and communicate with our father in heaven and understand something about what He is like.” Over the course of his address Wilcox outlined some of the most important letters that can be found in the scriptures. The first was that we worship what he called a “fourth watch God.” He said sometimes it can feel as though we “toil against the wind, there may be some trial we want to be over and we wonder if Heavenly Father is listening.” Wilcox explained that it is dangerous to start making assumptions about why the Lord does not seem to be there. Just assume, he said, that “If the Lord is not there, it’s not the fourth watch.” Michael Weber, physics professor said, “I really like what he said about the Lord being a fourth watch God. He explained things in a way that was not intellectual, anyone could understand. He was talking about things that everyone wants to know, like how to get answers to your prayers. The devotional was amazing!” The second “letter” Wilcox talked about was the story of the Jaredites and the way the Lord asked them to make ships that were “tight like unto a

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ithin the month of March, Apple announced two new generations of products: the iPod Shuff le and the iPhone. The third generation iPod Shuff le starts at $79.00 and is available at Apple stores, online, or even at the BYU-Hawaii bookstore. The iPhone OS 3.0 will be a free upgrade to all current iPhone users. The now available third generation iPod shuff le is being advertised as “the world’s first music player that talks to you”. Thanks to new “Voiceover” technology, the Shuff le has the ability to recognize a song that is playing and announce the song title and artist while listening. It can also recognize the spoken names of playlists in the iTunes library so that one may be selected. “Voiceover” is capable of doing this in 14 different languages, including English, Spanish, Japanese and Mandarin. Another update to the iPod Shuff le is that it now comes with a 4GB capacity, so it can hold up to 1,000 songs. It has also been redesigned as a small clip-on device that is no larger than a common house key, and the controls have been moved onto the ear bud cord so they are easier to reach. iPhone OS 3.0 won’t be available until Summer 2009, but it also has many updated features. The new software will provide the ability to: search the iPhone, cut, copy and paste, and then read and compose text messages and e-mail while the iPhone is in the landscape position. There are also many improvements being made to applications for the iPhone, such as in-application purchases like buying subscriptions in an application or paying for a new level in a game.

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YU-Hawaii students taking HTM 255-Properties Management will soon be presenting BYUH’s Physical Plant employees with their plans to reduce school energy consumption. As a class project, the group was tasked with the job of finding ways to lower the cost of utilities. Chas Shirley, junior in hospitality and tourism management from Utah, is a member of the group, which also includes Alan Kemsley, Lloyd Pekitpekit, Sheng Ai Yang, and Cindy Wong. Shirley said, “We want people to do more to lower the energy costs on campus.” He outlined many of the group’s focus points and initiatives to remind others to conserve energy. “We placed stickers in the hales and in some of the classrooms to remind people

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dish.” Wilcox pointed out that the reason why the ships had to be tight like unto a dish is because of the strong winds that the Lord would send. He said that the Lord doesn’t want to take away the trials, he wants to teach us how to prepare for them, and though sometimes we might ask the Lord to “blow softly, breeze us to the promised land,” instead he “prefers to prepare us to face the storms of life, rather than distill them.” Jared Fotu, sophomore in math from Laie, Hawaii, said, “Just be patient even though there are hard times. He was a great speaker.” “If you are past your fourth watch and he doesn’t come, don’t assume that he’s not there, assume that you are tight like unto a dish,” Wilcox said. “And, if you are not tight like unto a dish when the fourth watch comes, he will be there.” Wilcox went on to explain, “The Lord only gives bread, He never gives stones.” He said sometimes we turn the bread into a stone because it’s not what we wanted or anticipated, but all the gifts that come from God are good. Wilcox finished by reminding us of where we are, on the “Islands of the sea” and the importance of our location. He said, “You are on God’s chosen symbol that he remembers his people, you will be Gods message as you go back to those places.” Kyle Rowley, junior in international business management from Great Falls, Montana, said, “I thought the devotional was awesome. The Spirit was really strong. I was in the choir and at the end as we were singing the last verse of ‘Come we that love The Lord,’ the Spirit was so strong! The speaker was

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Sanchez with BYUH Salsa

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tudents were invited to dance on stage to the swinging sounds produced at the BYU-Hawaii Salsa Orchestra concert, March 25, in the McKay Auditorium. The 12 instrumentalists and four vocaliststurned-backup dancers performed under the direction of music faculty member Darren Duerden. “It was very well put together. Professor Duerden always does a good job of utilizing student talent to put on an entertaining show,” said Erika Marler, senior in interdisciplinary studies from New Zealand. The performance consisted of an enthusiastic mix of mambo, merengue, and cha-cha rhythms as well as one bossa nova and one boogaloo piece for added crowd-pleasing participation. A total of 12 musical numbers were performed over the course of the concert. This semester, Salsa Orchestra was honored to feature special guest Rolando Sanchez. Bandleader of Hawaii’s premiere Latin ensemble, Salsa Hawaii.

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to turn off the lights and water when they leave their rooms or bathrooms,” he said. The placards have tips and ideas to lower energy use, as given by the Hawaiian Electric Company. Money-saving ideas can also be found online at www.heco.com. The group also sponsored Earth Hour, a nonprofit initiative to lower energy and reduce the effects of global warming. Said Shirley, “We ended up working with SIFE [on the project] and they were the ones who had the idea to work on Earth Hour. We set up a Facebook group, had a booth in the Aloha Center, and played a video that was shown at Culture Night.” “Saving energy benefits everyone,” said Dustin Geddes, senior in accounting from Cedar Hills, Utah. “If the school saves money, costs for students go down,” echoed Shirley. The group will present the results of their efforts to Physical Plant employees on Wednesday, April 8. When asked if there was anything students could do to help, Shirley said, “Just be more aware of saving energy.”

Sanchez and Salsa Hawaii have received various awards including Hawaiian Music Awards for their album, Rhythm of the Islands, including Best Latin Recording and Best Latin Vocalist. Yesenia Arevalo, junior in political science from Sacramento, Calif., said, “Being Latin myself, I really appreciate the energy that someone like Rolando brings. He was a lot of fun and really made me want to shake my hips.” Arevalo also noted that she was impressed to see Sanchez had lived in Hawaii for so long and still held tightly to his cultural roots. A lively Latin dance was performed when vocalist, Michaela Dunlap, and dance partner, Oscar Noguera, entered center stage to “take a turn” about halfway through the concert. This act added visual entertainment and got the crowd roused and ready to join in. The crowd really gave back when the final song, “Bang Bang,” allowed them to raise their voices and chant along, “Beep beep! Ahhh, beep beep! Ahhh, BANG! BANG!” Devin Eror, sophomore in international business management from Kailua, commented, “There’s nothing like a show that goes out with a bang.”

photos by MONIQUE SAENZ and AARON KNUDSEN graphic courtesy of CHAS SHIRLEY

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Q: Tell us about yourself, Natalie? A: I am a wife, mom and photographer, and my roles are played out in that order. I’ve found that when my husband and kids are paramount, everything else falls into place. Q: When did you become interested in photography? A: I got my start in photography when I was 12 or 13. We went on a church history trip across the country and I got to be the family photographer. I remember getting the pictures back and thinking, “Well, there you have it. I’ll never be a photographer!” They were terrible! I’ve always had an interest, though, in preserving important memories, so I kept taking pictures throughout middle school and high school. When I got married, my dad gave me a really great camera, and that rekindled my love for photography. Once I had my first son, it was over. I was taking pictures like crazy all the time. One thing led to another and suddenly I was getting paid for it. Because I didn’t have a formal education in photography, I spent a lot of time studying books and online. In the last couple of years, I have attended countless photography workshops all over the country and have literally learned from the very best in the industry and immersed myself in the art and science of photography. Q: Who has influenced your photography the most? A: Jonathan Canlas. He’s one of the most talented and down to earth photographers I know. I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am now if he hadn’t taken me under his wing. Also Mike Colón has been really wonderful to me. He and his wife have become dear friends and his open-book policy has certainly blessed my business and my life. Q: What do you need from couples to have a successful shoot? A: If a couple is relaxed and trusts me, we’re going to do just fine. No one understands better than I do how terrible it is to be in front of the camera. I am the least photogenic person of all time, so trust me, I get it. If clients can just relax, follow my direction, and trust that I’m going to make them look great, everything will run more smoothly, and at the end of the day, we’ll end up with shots that shine. Q: For those that don’t have a lot of money to spend on a photographer what can they do to make their photos unique? A: That’s a good question and a difficult one to answer. It’s important to remember that the photography budget is generally one of the largest portions of the wedding budget as a whole and for good reason. Your photography is the only tangible evidence you walk away with at the end of the day. It’s your family heirloom. Don’t scrimp in that arena if you can help it. If you are on a tight budget though, one of the most important things you can do is to do your research. Try to find a photographer who’s work you admire and who is also within your price range. If you’re able to find one but you’re not totally excited about their work, get together a really detailed shoot list. Browse images you like online and send them to the photographer. Be specific, be flexible and allow the photographer to have artistic license, but still be specific. Final Comments: The most important thing a couple can remember when planning their wedding is that none of it’s really about a wedding at all. At the end of the day, when the cake is eaten, the flowers are brown, your feet are swollen and that beautiful white dress is all stained at the hem from too much dancing, you walk away with a marriage. All of this is about a marriage: nothing more and nothing less. Ultimately none of it matters, not even the photography . . . though it does pain me to say that. But in all honesty, in the end the marriage is forever. It’s what all the celebrating is about anyway. As long as you’re getting married in the right place at the right time to the right person, you’ve got it made. Everything else is icing on the cake, no pun intended.

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Local photographer Natalie Norton takes time out of her day to talk Wedding Photography with the Ke Alaka’i.

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ust because it’s “modest” doesn’t  mean it’s pretty. A lot of LDS  women choose their dresses  according to what is considered  modest. But that doesn’t mean you  should ignore style. You can wear  something that is more than modest;  it can be stylish, too. Try thinking  outside the box when choosing your  wedding dress. Check with the temple  matron if you have questions about  appropriate styles for temple wed­ dings. Here are some ideas: !"#$%&'()*"+"(',,)*)%-"&.))/)".)%0-1"$*" neckline. Sleeves can be a little lon­ ger; they don’t have to be capped. Try  a boat neck, or a sweetheart neck. !"2$%3-"45&-".$$6"+-"-1)"7$()&-"(*)&&" websites. Try all of them. Remember,  -1'%0&"8+%"9)")+&'.:"+(45&-)("+%(" sometimes it’s cheaper to have the  dress made. As members of the LDS  Church, we do have access to thou­ sands of industrious women who have  been sewing for years. !";1'&":)+*<"9*'(+.",+&1'$%"'&"+.."+9$5-" a pretty, vintage look. Don’t forget to  check out the second­hand stores for  vintage dresses. They are normally  already modest and often, with a good  dry cleaning, turn out beautifully. !"=,":$5"+.*)+(:"1+/)"+"(*)&&<"-*:"+((­ '%0"+%"+>>.'?5@"A$B)*"$*"*'99$%C"D$5" can pick any of these things up for  45&-"+",)B"($..+*&C"E(("&$7)"&>$%-+­ neity with brightly colored shoes or a  headband. !"F$*"-1$&)"&-'..".$$6'%0",$*"+"(*)&&<" .$$6",$*".+8)<"9$B&<"A$B)*&<"*5,A)&<" pleats, or even try a shorter, mid­calf  length skirt. !"E9$/)"+..").&)<"*)7)79)*<"-1)*)"'&"+" time and a place for plain and simple,  and your wedding is not it.

next morning with all your closest friends !/0',*90: - With cotton candy and a trampoline Outdoor dance party - program your I-Pod to your favorite songs, set up some lights and dance the night away. !"#$%&'()$'*+$,"-.#$/"0.0$.0$."#$1-2".$,'3$.')#*$%4$ 5'.'&-#$501.0*6$$70*.'(.$5'.'&-#$'.$,,,6*'.'&-#*018 .0*/"0.06(09$01$:;:$<=>8<=?@6 !"#$/"0.0$'%0A#$,'3$.')#*$%4$B'1)$C##6$$70*.'(.$ B'1)$'.$9'1)D"0&&'+'4/"0.06(09$01$:;:$>@;8<?EF6 http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

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Q: Tell us about yourself, Natalie? A: I am a wife, mom and photographer, and my roles are played out in that order. I’ve found that when my husband and kids are paramount, everything else falls into place. Q: When did you become interested in photography? A: I got my start in photography when I was 12 or 13. We went on a church history trip across the country and I got to be the family photographer. I remember getting the pictures back and thinking, “Well, there you have it. I’ll never be a photographer!” They were terrible! I’ve always had an interest, though, in preserving important memories, so I kept taking pictures throughout middle school and high school. When I got married, my dad gave me a really great camera, and that rekindled my love for photography. Once I had my first son, it was over. I was taking pictures like crazy all the time. One thing led to another and suddenly I was getting paid for it. Because I didn’t have a formal education in photography, I spent a lot of time studying books and online. In the last couple of years, I have attended countless photography workshops all over the country and have literally learned from the very best in the industry and immersed myself in the art and science of photography. Q: Who has influenced your photography the most? A: Jonathan Canlas. He’s one of the most talented and down to earth photographers I know. I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am now if he hadn’t taken me under his wing. Also Mike Colón has been really wonderful to me. He and his wife have become dear friends and his open-book policy has certainly blessed my business and my life. Q: What do you need from couples to have a successful shoot? A: If a couple is relaxed and trusts me, we’re going to do just fine. No one understands better than I do how terrible it is to be in front of the camera. I am the least photogenic person of all time, so trust me, I get it. If clients can just relax, follow my direction, and trust that I’m going to make them look great, everything will run more smoothly, and at the end of the day, we’ll end up with shots that shine. Q: For those that don’t have a lot of money to spend on a photographer what can they do to make their photos unique? A: That’s a good question and a difficult one to answer. It’s important to remember that the photography budget is generally one of the largest portions of the wedding budget as a whole and for good reason. Your photography is the only tangible evidence you walk away with at the end of the day. It’s your family heirloom. Don’t scrimp in that arena if you can help it. If you are on a tight budget though, one of the most important things you can do is to do your research. Try to find a photographer who’s work you admire and who is also within your price range. If you’re able to find one but you’re not totally excited about their work, get together a really detailed shoot list. Browse images you like online and send them to the photographer. Be specific, be flexible and allow the photographer to have artistic license, but still be specific. Final Comments: The most important thing a couple can remember when planning their wedding is that none of it’s really about a wedding at all. At the end of the day, when the cake is eaten, the flowers are brown, your feet are swollen and that beautiful white dress is all stained at the hem from too much dancing, you walk away with a marriage. All of this is about a marriage: nothing more and nothing less. Ultimately none of it matters, not even the photography . . . though it does pain me to say that. But in all honesty, in the end the marriage is forever. It’s what all the celebrating is about anyway. As long as you’re getting married in the right place at the right time to the right person, you’ve got it made. Everything else is icing on the cake, no pun intended.

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Local photographer Natalie Norton takes time out of her day to talk Wedding Photography with the Ke Alaka’i.

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ust because it’s “modest” doesn’t  mean it’s pretty. A lot of LDS  women choose their dresses  according to what is considered  modest. But that doesn’t mean you  should ignore style. You can wear  something that is more than modest;  it can be stylish, too. Try thinking  outside the box when choosing your  wedding dress. Check with the temple  matron if you have questions about  appropriate styles for temple wed­ dings. Here are some ideas: !"#$%&'()*"+"(',,)*)%-"&.))/)".)%0-1"$*" neckline. Sleeves can be a little lon­ ger; they don’t have to be capped. Try  a boat neck, or a sweetheart neck. !"2$%3-"45&-".$$6"+-"-1)"7$()&-"(*)&&" websites. Try all of them. Remember,  -1'%0&"8+%"9)")+&'.:"+(45&-)("+%(" sometimes it’s cheaper to have the  dress made. As members of the LDS  Church, we do have access to thou­ sands of industrious women who have  been sewing for years. !";1'&":)+*<"9*'(+.",+&1'$%"'&"+.."+9$5-" a pretty, vintage look. Don’t forget to  check out the second­hand stores for  vintage dresses. They are normally  already modest and often, with a good  dry cleaning, turn out beautifully. !"=,":$5"+.*)+(:"1+/)"+"(*)&&<"-*:"+((­ '%0"+%"+>>.'?5@"A$B)*"$*"*'99$%C"D$5" can pick any of these things up for  45&-"+",)B"($..+*&C"E(("&$7)"&>$%-+­ neity with brightly colored shoes or a  headband. !"F$*"-1$&)"&-'..".$$6'%0",$*"+"(*)&&<" .$$6",$*".+8)<"9$B&<"A$B)*&<"*5,A)&<" pleats, or even try a shorter, mid­calf  length skirt. !"E9$/)"+..").&)<"*)7)79)*<"-1)*)"'&"+" time and a place for plain and simple,  and your wedding is not it.

next morning with all your closest friends !/0',*90: - With cotton candy and a trampoline Outdoor dance party - program your I-Pod to your favorite songs, set up some lights and dance the night away. !"#$%&'()$'*+$,"-.#$/"0.0$.0$."#$1-2".$,'3$.')#*$%4$ 5'.'&-#$501.0*6$$70*.'(.$5'.'&-#$'.$,,,6*'.'&-#*018 .0*/"0.06(09$01$:;:$<=>8<=?@6 !"#$/"0.0$'%0A#$,'3$.')#*$%4$B'1)$C##6$$70*.'(.$ B'1)$'.$9'1)D"0&&'+'4/"0.06(09$01$:;:$>@;8<?EF6 http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

April 2, 2009

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Understanding your God

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s the guest Joseph Smith Lecturer, S. Michael Wilcox opened his three lecture series by speaking at the devotional on March 31. His talk was a down to earth approach to “understanding the God we pray to.” Wilcox began his talk by comparing the scriptures to letters from our Heavenly Father. “There are times in our lives when we need to open the letter and communicate with our father in heaven and understand something about what He is like.” Over the course of his address Wilcox outlined some of the most important letters that can be found in the scriptures. The first was that we worship what he called a “fourth watch God.” He said sometimes it can feel as though we “toil against the wind, there may be some trial we want to be over and we wonder if Heavenly Father is listening.” Wilcox explained that it is dangerous to start making assumptions about why the Lord does not seem to be there. Just assume, he said, that “If the Lord is not there, it’s not the fourth watch.” Michael Weber, physics professor said, “I really like what he said about the Lord being a fourth watch God. He explained things in a way that was not intellectual, anyone could understand. He was talking about things that everyone wants to know, like how to get answers to your prayers. The devotional was amazing!” The second “letter” Wilcox talked about was the story of the Jaredites and the way the Lord asked them to make ships that were “tight like unto a

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ithin the month of March, Apple announced two new generations of products: the iPod Shuff le and the iPhone. The third generation iPod Shuff le starts at $79.00 and is available at Apple stores, online, or even at the BYU-Hawaii bookstore. The iPhone OS 3.0 will be a free upgrade to all current iPhone users. The now available third generation iPod shuff le is being advertised as “the world’s first music player that talks to you”. Thanks to new “Voiceover” technology, the Shuff le has the ability to recognize a song that is playing and announce the song title and artist while listening. It can also recognize the spoken names of playlists in the iTunes library so that one may be selected. “Voiceover” is capable of doing this in 14 different languages, including English, Spanish, Japanese and Mandarin. Another update to the iPod Shuff le is that it now comes with a 4GB capacity, so it can hold up to 1,000 songs. It has also been redesigned as a small clip-on device that is no larger than a common house key, and the controls have been moved onto the ear bud cord so they are easier to reach. iPhone OS 3.0 won’t be available until Summer 2009, but it also has many updated features. The new software will provide the ability to: search the iPhone, cut, copy and paste, and then read and compose text messages and e-mail while the iPhone is in the landscape position. There are also many improvements being made to applications for the iPhone, such as in-application purchases like buying subscriptions in an application or paying for a new level in a game.

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YU-Hawaii students taking HTM 255-Properties Management will soon be presenting BYUH’s Physical Plant employees with their plans to reduce school energy consumption. As a class project, the group was tasked with the job of finding ways to lower the cost of utilities. Chas Shirley, junior in hospitality and tourism management from Utah, is a member of the group, which also includes Alan Kemsley, Lloyd Pekitpekit, Sheng Ai Yang, and Cindy Wong. Shirley said, “We want people to do more to lower the energy costs on campus.” He outlined many of the group’s focus points and initiatives to remind others to conserve energy. “We placed stickers in the hales and in some of the classrooms to remind people

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dish.” Wilcox pointed out that the reason why the ships had to be tight like unto a dish is because of the strong winds that the Lord would send. He said that the Lord doesn’t want to take away the trials, he wants to teach us how to prepare for them, and though sometimes we might ask the Lord to “blow softly, breeze us to the promised land,” instead he “prefers to prepare us to face the storms of life, rather than distill them.” Jared Fotu, sophomore in math from Laie, Hawaii, said, “Just be patient even though there are hard times. He was a great speaker.” “If you are past your fourth watch and he doesn’t come, don’t assume that he’s not there, assume that you are tight like unto a dish,” Wilcox said. “And, if you are not tight like unto a dish when the fourth watch comes, he will be there.” Wilcox went on to explain, “The Lord only gives bread, He never gives stones.” He said sometimes we turn the bread into a stone because it’s not what we wanted or anticipated, but all the gifts that come from God are good. Wilcox finished by reminding us of where we are, on the “Islands of the sea” and the importance of our location. He said, “You are on God’s chosen symbol that he remembers his people, you will be Gods message as you go back to those places.” Kyle Rowley, junior in international business management from Great Falls, Montana, said, “I thought the devotional was awesome. The Spirit was really strong. I was in the choir and at the end as we were singing the last verse of ‘Come we that love The Lord,’ the Spirit was so strong! The speaker was

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Sanchez with BYUH Salsa

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tudents were invited to dance on stage to the swinging sounds produced at the BYU-Hawaii Salsa Orchestra concert, March 25, in the McKay Auditorium. The 12 instrumentalists and four vocaliststurned-backup dancers performed under the direction of music faculty member Darren Duerden. “It was very well put together. Professor Duerden always does a good job of utilizing student talent to put on an entertaining show,” said Erika Marler, senior in interdisciplinary studies from New Zealand. The performance consisted of an enthusiastic mix of mambo, merengue, and cha-cha rhythms as well as one bossa nova and one boogaloo piece for added crowd-pleasing participation. A total of 12 musical numbers were performed over the course of the concert. This semester, Salsa Orchestra was honored to feature special guest Rolando Sanchez. Bandleader of Hawaii’s premiere Latin ensemble, Salsa Hawaii.

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to turn off the lights and water when they leave their rooms or bathrooms,” he said. The placards have tips and ideas to lower energy use, as given by the Hawaiian Electric Company. Money-saving ideas can also be found online at www.heco.com. The group also sponsored Earth Hour, a nonprofit initiative to lower energy and reduce the effects of global warming. Said Shirley, “We ended up working with SIFE [on the project] and they were the ones who had the idea to work on Earth Hour. We set up a Facebook group, had a booth in the Aloha Center, and played a video that was shown at Culture Night.” “Saving energy benefits everyone,” said Dustin Geddes, senior in accounting from Cedar Hills, Utah. “If the school saves money, costs for students go down,” echoed Shirley. The group will present the results of their efforts to Physical Plant employees on Wednesday, April 8. When asked if there was anything students could do to help, Shirley said, “Just be more aware of saving energy.”

Sanchez and Salsa Hawaii have received various awards including Hawaiian Music Awards for their album, Rhythm of the Islands, including Best Latin Recording and Best Latin Vocalist. Yesenia Arevalo, junior in political science from Sacramento, Calif., said, “Being Latin myself, I really appreciate the energy that someone like Rolando brings. He was a lot of fun and really made me want to shake my hips.” Arevalo also noted that she was impressed to see Sanchez had lived in Hawaii for so long and still held tightly to his cultural roots. A lively Latin dance was performed when vocalist, Michaela Dunlap, and dance partner, Oscar Noguera, entered center stage to “take a turn” about halfway through the concert. This act added visual entertainment and got the crowd roused and ready to join in. The crowd really gave back when the final song, “Bang Bang,” allowed them to raise their voices and chant along, “Beep beep! Ahhh, beep beep! Ahhh, BANG! BANG!” Devin Eror, sophomore in international business management from Kailua, commented, “There’s nothing like a show that goes out with a bang.”

photos by MONIQUE SAENZ and AARON KNUDSEN graphic courtesy of CHAS SHIRLEY

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Dance Hysteria

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BYUH students get their grove on at the Winter Ball 

or girls, it was a night to get dressed up, an excuse to spend extra time on hair and makeup, and an opportunity to dance the night away. For guys, it was a night they had to wear a tie, an excuse to ask a girl on a date and an opportunity for a good meal. It was the night of Winter Ball, held on Friday, March 27, at the Polynesian Cultural Center. “I have never worked at the PCC so to me it’s really nice. I really enjoyed the atmosphere,” said Mark Bacera a junior in accounting from Yigo, Guam. The PCC was transformed from the usual Hale Aloha into a decorated venue. There were balloon arches leading into

Graduating prepared: Your C.A.P. and gown

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reparing for success in college is one thing. Preparing for life after college is quite another. In order to help students be as prepared as possible for a smooth transition into their chosen career, a new program at BYU-Hawaii, called the Career Development Program, focuses on preparing students for their careers and futures. The major focus of this new program is called the Career Advancement Program (CAP), which charts a course through the college path according to credits earned. For example, a student who reaches 30 credits must take two personality assessments. Then again at 60 credits, students need to complete a career plan. At 90 credits, they prepare for applying and interviewing for jobs so hopefully by graduation, at 120 credits, they will be prepared to enter the workforce or further education. Jodi Chowen, the CDP manager and advisor to all undeclared majors, said although some students may find the requirements bothersome, they could help all students, from freshman to transfer, in succeeding after college. There are three basic phases that accompany the CAP: Self-Assessment; Exploration & Planning; and Matching & Developing Professional Skills. The Self-Assessment part of this new program, for instance, explained Chowen, includes two personal-

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the dance with lights leading up to the dining and dancing area. There were also lanterns hanging from the ceiling of the room. “I thought the decorations were tasteful and interesting,” said Patrick Christensen, undeclared freshman from Midland, Mich. “I liked that the location was outdoor yet covered so that there was an airf low through out the night” said Rebecca Dickson, a freshman in international cultural studies from Gilroy, Calif. At the ball, there was a variety of activities available to students. Dinner was served at 9 p.m. in the Hale Aloha. There was a variety of meats along with side dishes such as potatoes, steamed vegetables, rolls, and noodles.

ity assessments, one called the MeyrsBriggs Type Indicator, and the other called the Strong Interest Inventory. Both of these tests can help students identify their personality types and the best career options for those types of personalities. “The university has made a commitment to assisting our students to be better prepared for their futures both in staffing and resources,” added Chowen. “The university pays for each MBTI and Strong Interest Inventory. My hope and goal is for students to embrace these opportunities as resources to make the most of their educational experience here.” Chowen also explained how the new program actually precedes what the LDS Church wants to see for its students. The university’s administration came up with the idea for a program similar to the CAP in 2006, Chowen said, but “In recent years, the church has had a focus on better preparing students for their careers and futures.” Students can find articles to this affect in the April 2009 Ensign and New Era. When asked about the CAP, Lauren Hally, sophomore in biology from Salt Lake City, Utah, said she was unfamiliar with the program, but thought it was a good idea. “I think a program that prepares students for the future is really helpful because I have seen a

After dinner, there was a table set up with snacks and extra food left over from dinner. The dance f loor was set up in the middle of the middle of the dining area with a deejay bumping the tunes, students dancing, and a disco ball reflecting onto the dance f loor. For a change of scene, The Imax Theater was also an option for the night. At the Imax the movies “Fire Proof My Marriage” and “Bedtime Stories” were shown. “The movie was great,” said Jinhee Bae a junior in biology from Daegu, South Korea, “It was nice because you could relax and not just dance the whole night.” ! "#$%&'( )*+#&,%"

lot of students finish college and then they are stuck,” she said. “If you can educate those students along the way, they should be prepared for whatever comes after college life.” While Hally is not alone in her lack of knowledge about the CAP, all students are required to participate in the program, said Chowen. To encourage students to learn more about the CAP and begin completing the requirements, the Career and Alumni Services Department will begin sending out e-mail reminders. But if students fail to fulfill them, Chowen said starting sometime in Spring Term, restrictions may be placed on student accounts. This gives students plenty of time to accomplish their tasks, she said. She also said everyone in the CDP wants BYUH students to succeed and they are willing to work with students who feel they have already met the requirements. “If a student feels strongly about having equivalent experience elsewhere – perhaps they have already taken the MBTI, or they have a professional resume – then they can simply come talk to me and I will make the appropriate notations on their account.” Students who have questions about the CAP or its requirements are encouraged to contact Jodi Chowen or any of the other Career Development Team members. The Career Services Office, located next to the Cafeteria, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday and on Fridays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. They can also be reached by phone at (808) 675-3533 or via e-mail at careerservices@ byuh.edu. ! /1*"( *"2'/0%"

photos by AARON KNUDSEN and courtesy CAREER SERVICES

oth the men’s and women’s BYU-Hawaii tennis teams destroyed their competition in twin doubleheaders on March 24. The teams played Tuskegee University in the morning, then moved on to Stillman College in the afternoon in Laie. The Seasider men’s team blasted through both matches, not losing a set in singles and taking all wins in doubles to improve to 15-4 for the season. Rong Ma, sophomore from Guangzhou, China, and Agnel Peter, sophomore from Vashi, India, took an 8-1 win against Tuskegee and an 8-0 win against Stillman in doubles. Doubles partners Manu Bajpai, sophomore from Bangalore, India, and Romeo Juhasz, freshman from Budapest, Hungary; and Carlton Taylor, sophomore from Pleasant Grove, Utah, and Joseph Beck, junior from Saginaw, Texas all defeated both teams with 8-0 scores. Ma continued on in singles to score 6-0 and 6-1 against his opponents. Peter’s Tuskegee opponent quit while Peter was ahead 6-1, and he continued to get back-to-back 6-1 scores against Stillman. Juhasz held a 6-3, 6-1 win versus Tuskegee and twin 6-0 scores at Stillman. Taylor scored 6-1, 6-0 wins against both

Wily and Alves gain more honors for outstanding play this season

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atoya Wily, senior forward from Laie, has been named PacWest Player of the Year, and was rostered on the Daktronics NCAA II All-American First Team. This is Wily’s second time holding the honor. Lucas Alves, junior forward from Casa Branca, Brazil, has been named to the National Association of Basketball Coaches AllAmerican First team, as well as Daktronics NCAA H)#/6)!1,46! %$+,'-! .&+! II Player of the Year and !"#$%&) (&',/+!6&)+!:/'#,'$&(!#/!-),'!)::/8 All-American first team. 4)%&(!*/+!.&+!&**/+#(!#.,(!6&)+= Each player brought a priceless addition to the team. Wily was named PacWest Player of the Week an astounding six times for her senior season. She held national rankings for rebounds at 13.9 per game, scoring at 25.6 points per game, and field goal percentage at 59.5 percent. She also average 6.3 offensive rebounds per game. Alves led the PacWest Conference by averaging 19.8 points per game, 7.5 rebounds per game, and a 52.7 percent shot from the field, all while averaging 27 minutes per game. Alves was named PacWest Player of the Week three times during the season. Alves has been honored as PacWest Player of the Year for each of his last two seasons of play. The first men’s basketball player from BYU-Hawaii to be named National Player of the Year, Alves has pulled down over 600 rebounds and scored over 1,500 points as a Seasider. The two titans known for their power to the team end this season with multiple honors as the Lady Seasiders placed third in the PacWest and the Seasider men finished as PacWest champions with a school-record 27-2 season. ! -'"( -., ,*/0

photos by KE ALAKAI ARCHIVES

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schools. Bajpai won 6-1, 6-2 against Tuskegee and 6-1 scores against Stillman. Beck scored two 6-0s against Tuskegee and two 6-1s against Stillman. The Lady Seasiders improved their record 20-0 for the season by beating both teams 9-0. Doubles partners, Elwen Li and Yuan Jia won 8-0 against Tuskegee and then by default against Stillman. Jenny Chin and Wen-Lin took 8-0 wins against both competitors. Shawni Proter and Ayako Ikeda had 8-1 scores in both their matches. Jia won both her matches in singles play 6-1, 6-0 against Tuskegee and 6-0, 6-1 against Stillman. Wang took 6-0, 6-0 wins in both matches. Chin took 6-0, 6-0 against Tuskegee and 6-1, 6-0 against Stillman. Porter brought on 6-0, 6-0 win against Tuskegee and a two 6-1 victory against Stillman. Ikeda took a 6-2, 6-0 win in the morning and a 6-1, 6-1 win in the afternoon. The Lady Seasiders will play Notre Dame de Namur on April 7 in Kailua-Kona on the Big Island. However, the men’s team does not have another match scheduled until the NCAA West Regional Tournament beginning May 7. ! -'"( -., ,*/0

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In Phoenix, the Lady Seasiders seemed unable to shake off the previous loss as they faced the powerful Grand Canyon University team. The Antelopes took control of the games ending with a 9-2 score in the first game and a 17-7 score the second. The Antelopes scored four runs in the third and five in the fourth to run ahead by nine. In response Lauren Fielding, freshman outfield from Mesa, Ariz., hit her first home run of the season to bring Lehano in during the top of the fifth. The second game brought a rally from the Lady Seasiders to get ahead 5-4. Grand Canyon fought back with their a run to tie the game in the fourth inning, but Ivy Sessions, senior third base from Huntington Beach, Calif., hit a double in the fifth inning and scored later off on RBI single by Kim Artiaga, senior shortstop from Avery, Calif. Necaise then sent Artiaga home on a single. The Seasiders led 7-5 until the Antelopes tied it in the bottom of the fifth, and then executed 10 more runs in the sixth inning to seal the deal. The Seasiders will go on to play Notre Dame de Namur on Wednesday, April 1 in Belmont, Calif. It will be their last mainland game.

he Lady Seasiders split games against Dixie State in a PacWest double-header on May 28. Then two days later, the Seasiders fell twice to Grand Canyon University. BYU-Hawaii now holds a 12-24 overall season record as well as a 5-13 PacWest conference record. The first game against Dixie brought high spirits to the Lady Seasiders as Katresha Veazie, senior pitcher from Erda, Utah, pitched a one-hitter in the 3-1 victory. Veazie struck out five and walked four against the Red Storm and only allowed a single home run in the fourth inning. Morgan Necaise, junior first base from Bay St Louis, Miss., scored after Brooke Perrington, sophomore outfielder from Kaneohe, Hawaii, hit a sacrifice f ly during the top of the second. Melissa Lehano, senior third base from Mililani, Hawaii scored, off of an RBI single during the top of the third by Kahealani Alohikea-Betham, sophomore catcher from Ewa Beach, Hawaii. The last score was brought on by an RBI ground out by Ashley Parry, freshman outfield from Santa Clara, Utah, which brought Danielle Bahr, freshman outfield from Hubbard, Ore., home, pinch-running for Veazie. Lauren Folta, Red Storm pitcher, stif led the Lady Seasiders in the second game loss 6-0 by striking out nine, walking only two, and allowing only one hit. Not one of the Seasiders got past first base during the entire game. The Red Storm hit with a fury with nine hits and scored twice in the first !"#$%&) H)%6! "&)(,%&+! U),4)!K'%&+(/'! ,(! )#! E)#! %$+,'-! )! -)2&! &)+4,&+! and third and once in the #.,(!(&2&(#&+=!!>.&!"&)(,%&+(!+&#$+'!./2&!*+/2!)!2),'4)'%!#+,0!#.,(!D&&F= second and sixth innings.

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he Superferry’s short run in Hawaii has finished. March 19, 2009 at 2:45 p.m. the ship sailed back into Honolulu Harbor from Kahului Harbor, in Maui, carrying about 400 people including 100 employees who wanted to be on the last trip. “I’m glad that the superferry is leaving because I think it is bad for the environment. They should have waited to finish the environmental study,” said Christy Wong, freshman in accounting from Kailua. The State of Hawaii gave the Superferry clearance to sail before an environmental study was finished. The Supreme Court disagreed with the decision. While the Superferry could sue the state, executives say that it’s not their focus at this time. “I’m not here to point fingers or fix blame at all,” said Fargo. “I don’t think it should be around because it had gotten the OK from the state before the environmental study was finished. If the Superferry had gotten the OK after the environmental study then I think it would be fine,”

said Marco Hardjorno, undeclared freshman from Honolulu. Plans have already begun to take place for the ship to leave Hawaii. Sources within the company said that the Superferry will be going back to A labama, where it was built, to be retrofitted with a new ramp. Executives of the Superferry will need to find more work for their ship as well. The company has already invested millions of dollars and does not want the ship to go unemployed. As of now, the closing of the Superferry left 236 workers without jobs. “Ultimately we’re going to have to find employment for Alakai and that means we’re going to have to move the ship,” said Tom Fargo, Superferry President & CEO. Options for the company to make more money are leasing to charter companies or to the military; something Fargo, who is a retired admiral, says was never part of the plan. “We always get the questions about if it was designed as a military operation and that is absolutely not true,” said Fargo. ! "#$%&'( )**+

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he parking lot at Laie Shopping Center is a little more crowded these days as one construction crew fills eight stalls with an expanded food court seating platform and another adds a new facade to the roof-line of the building. “We are giving up eight parking stalls, but the former service station is going to be demolished, so there will be additional parking on that side,” said Jeffrey Tyau, director of Engineering & Utilities for Hawaii Reserves, Inc. (HRI), which operates the shopping center. He said work on the project began recently and includes other improvements and repainting. “For example, in the Foodland area we’re demolishing the little cover by the ATM and rebuilding that. We’ll put a new sidewalk cover over it and building a new, more aesthetic entry at Foodland.” Tyau added the project is tentatively scheduled to be completed “in about three or four months.” He also said HRI’s Laie Water Company will be installing a new water main line on

Anemoku Street, on the cliff-side leading to Laie Point. “We haven’t got a firm date on that yet, but we’ll probably start on that within the next one-totwo months.” Ohana Auto Care (formerly Mickey’s Motors) closed at the end of August and relocated to the corner of Puuluana St. and Kamehameha Hwy. across from Kahuku High. That space “will ultimately be leveled, but in the interim we’ll more than likely use it as a base yard or storage area for the contractor who will be renovating the shopping center,” said Richard Vierra, HRI director of Property Management, last fall in an interview about plans for the shopping center. “Meanwhile, Laie Shopping Center is still going strong. For example, food is always popular here. Foodland is going gang-busters and is way ahead of schedule.” “We’ve been real fortunate because of our location and the community support,” he said.

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ince September 2007, the United States has increased its national debt on an average of $3.85 billion a day, according to the U.S. National Debt Clock website. As such, Federal Reserve officials have decided on a plan to try and reduce the United States’ debt. The Reserve plans to lower rates and pump $1.25 trillion into the financial system by purchasing treasury bonds and mortgage securities. They hope that lowering rates will lead to lower mortgage rates that will in turn spur more home buying. In addition, homeowners who refinance at lower rates could reduce their monthly payments, which could create greater profits. Having already lowered the main interest rate it controls nearly to zero, the central bank has increasingly turned to alternatives like buying securities as a way as a way of getting more dollars into the economy, a tactic that amounts to creating vast new sums of money out of thin air. Many questions arose about this trillion dollar plan but the question that stuck out the most was “Where does the Fed get all the money and are taxpayers on the hook?” The answer the Fed’s presented was that taxpayers are not on the hook, but other economists disagree. Simultaneously, American Insurance Group’s Stephen L. Blake faced Connecticut lawmakers on March 25 to defend the millions of taxpayer dollars used to-

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ward bonuses. Since receiving $150 billion in bailout funds, AIG has dolled out $165 million in bonuses. “The program did what it was supposed to do, and that was to retain employees,” Blake told members of the General Assembly’s Banks Committee. “As hard as people are working today, they know at the end of the day this business is going to be gone.” None of “the architects” of the problems that helped sink AIG as a whole last year have received the retention payments, Blake said. Blake acknowledged at the March 26 hearing

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that he couldn’t provide the state lawmakers with any information beyond what AIG’s CEO, Edward M. Liddy, recently told Congress about the bonuses. AIG offered up Blake’s testimony as a compromise to the committee leaders, who last week issued subpoenas to more than a dozen AIG executives, demanding that they appear at the state Capitol to answer questions about the bonuses. AIG executives were reluctant to appear because many have received death threats since news of the bonuses broke. Despite Blake’s appearance, the subpoenas remain in force. Rep. Ryan Barry, D-Manchester, the committee co-chairman, said Blake’s testimony was the “first stage” of compliance with the legislative subpoenas. Friday, March 27, another meeting was held at the White House between President Obama and chief executives from the 15 largest banks in the United States to discuss the economy. This administration proposed tighter regulation of the financial system, which included giving the government power to take over major financial institutions that are not banks, AIG. White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said, “It’s fair to say that they agreed on the need to update the framework of regulation.” Obama last week assailed AIG for “recklessness and greed” in its business practices, but he has since toned down his rhetoric. The administration needs industry cooperation for its economic plans to work. Richard Davis, of U.S. Bancorp, said Obama raised issues that have fueled the public’s outrage. “He’s not surprised by it. We reported back to him that we’re not surprised either,” said Davis.

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wenty-six elementary schoolchildren wielded shovels, rakes, pitchforks and wheelbarrows to help first lady Michelle Obama break ground on the first day of spring for an organic produce and herb garden on the White House grounds. Crops to be planted in the coming weeks on the 1,100-square-foot, L-shaped patch near the fountain on the South Lawn include spinach, broccoli, various lettuces, kale and collard greens, assorted herbs and blueberries, blackberries and raspberries. “We’re going to try to make our own honey here as well,” Mrs. Obama told the kids from Bancroft Elementary School in Washington before they got to work on Friday. The school has its own community garden. The students will be brought back to the White House next month to help with the planting, and after that to help harvest and cook some of the produce in the mansion’s kitchen. The first harvest is expected by late April. After she spoke, the students were paired off and handed a gardening tool. The first lady joined — first with a shovel, then a rake — and together they began pulling up the grass, dumping it into wheelbarrows and depositing the contents in a central location. “Are we done yet?” Mrs. Obama jokingly said at one point. “I want to plant. Let’s harvest something.” Some of the produce from the garden will be served in the White House, including to the First Family and at official functions. Some crops also will be donated to Miriam’s Kitchen,

a soup kitchen near the White House where Mrs. Obama recently helped serve lunch. Assistant chef Sam Kass gave no estimate on how much produce the garden would yield. Mrs. Obama, who has spoken about healthy eating, said the garden’s purpose is to make sure her family, White House staff and guests can eat fresh fruits and vegetables. BYU-Hawaii students mostly agree with the First Lady. “I think organic food is overrated,” said Natahli Mills, junior in mathematics from Hau’ula, “but that’s just me.” She went on to say that her family has a garden, which produces enough “to make a nice salad every night to feed 9.” Aissa Mitton, senior in international cultural studies from New Zealand, said, “I think that is a great idea. The land is there, you might as well use it!” The garden takes up a small fraction of the land space on the White House property. Mitton continued, “It’s good that it helps out other people as well, and it builds character in the kids.” Kit Ming Lau, junior in music education from Hong Kong, echoed these statements. “It’s always good that they have the White House open for elementary school students,” she said, adding, “I think if they do it for the long run, then it’s a good idea.” The garden, if successf ul, will continue as long as Mrs. Obama is living in the White House.

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April 2, 2009

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wo American journalists will soon be standing trial in North Korea for committing â&#x20AC;&#x153;hostile actsâ&#x20AC;? and entering the country illegally. If found guilty, the two women could be put in a prison labor camp for up to 10 years. On Friday, March 13, Laura Ling and Euna Lee left Seoul, Korea, for the Chinese border town of Yanji. Both women work for the San Francisco online news outlet Current TV, and the purpose of the trip was to interview the refugee children living in China and women who had been forced into human trafficking. Before arriving the journalists contacted Rev. Chun Ki-won of the Durihana Mission in Seoul, a group that works helping defectors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told them to consult with me first if they

head toward the border,â&#x20AC;? Chun said, adding that the border region can be â&#x20AC;&#x153;dangerous and difficult for foreigners.â&#x20AC;? His last contact with the journalists was March 17, when they were near the Tumen River, which divides China and North Korea. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton â&#x20AC;&#x153;is engaged on this matter right now,â&#x20AC;? spokesman Robert A. Wood told reporters Friday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a lot of diplomacy going on. There have been a number of contacts made.â&#x20AC;? Battogtokh Baatar, senior in international cultural studies from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that their purpose was right to investigate North Korea. As independent journalists they should have had a solid plan, instead of undercover journalism. They could have informed the authorities about what they were doing; that could have prevented them from getting arrested.â&#x20AC;?

Although the United States is doing what they can to get the journalists back, it is difficult because there is no American presence in North Korea. Communication is currently being done through the Swedish Embassy, who confirmed they have been in contact with Ling and Lee although no other information has been provided. Roxanne Miller, senior in biology from Ridgecrest, Calif., said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The journalists should have known that the North Korean government is pretty radical, but if they knew the consequences that could follow, then I think that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good that they tried to do some investigating. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a noble thing that they were trying to do. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shame that they got arrested, but they should have been sneakier.â&#x20AC;? The details surrounding the arrest and imprisonment of the journalists are unclear. Bob Dietz, from the Committee to Protect Journalists said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We call on the North Korean government to explain the circumstances of the detention of these two journalists.â&#x20AC;? Their cameraman Mitch Koss was held by the Chinese border guards but was not arrested and has not been available for comment. David Jensen, junior in biology from Cleveland, Ohio, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want to be out of trouble, stay out of trouble.â&#x20AC;? !" #$%&" %'(()%*" '+," -./" '00)%1'-/," 23/00

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Islands of Tonga rocked by underwater eruption

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tudents on campus said they were concerned about family and friends living in the South Pacific when they heard a powerful 7.9-magnitude earthquake struck, shaking an erupting underwater volcano off Tongaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main island on Wednesday, March 18. A cloud of smoke and steam was seen off the coast of Tonga, rising as high as 13 miles in the sky. The eruption took place about 6 miles from the southwest coast of Tongatapu island and about 130 miles south-southeast of the capital, Nukuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alofa. There were no immediate reports of injury or damage from the quake, which was felt more than 1,875 miles (3,000 kilometers) away in New Zealand. A tsunami warning for islands within 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) of the epicenter was canceled two hours later.

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April 2, 2009

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Sisi Satini, sophomore from Nukuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alofa, Tonga, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I worried because my brother called me early in the morning and said he heard it was the biggest earthquake to ever occur in Tonga. So I missed class and rushed to get a phone card to call home. It ended up not being that bad.â&#x20AC;? Adrianna Ika, senior in social work from Bountiful, Utah, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I heard that the tremors were felt in Tonga but there were no serious injuries. The worst was case was broken glass.â&#x20AC;? The agency recorded a 5.3-magnitude aftershock in the same region two hours after the initial quake. Resident of Tonga Dana Stephenson said the quake started with â&#x20AC;&#x153;deep rumblings ... then side-to-side movement which seemed to go on forever but I guess was about 40 seconds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is long enough.â&#x20AC;? Of f icia ls in the Tonga n capita l,

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

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Unique and chic on a dime Helpful tips for tying the knot

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Nukuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;A lofa, were relieved that the 170-island archipelago appeared to have suffered no injuries or damage. National police commander, Chris

Kelly, said this was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quite remarkable, given the magnitude of it. We might !" -3140-/+" #/ '%." '+," -./" '00)%1'-/," 23/00

photos by Associated Press

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Apr 2, 2009