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L&E Opinion: Basketball, unity and budget cuts

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Above: Starring Chris Evans (Fantastic Four) and Dakota Fanning (Coraline), “Push� is an action thriller about super-humans on the run from the agency that is trying to kill them.

‘Push’ is painful to watch

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he painfully inscrutable paranormal thriller “Push� introduces a host of characters with various gifts. Some can see the future, some can heal, some can plant ideas in other’s minds and some can make change for a dollar. By the time the credits roll, your most fervent wish is to run into a “wiper� (one who can erase memories). In an opening credits prologue, we learn that the U.S. government is continuing to perform psychic experiments started by the Nazis in order to create some kind of super-freakypowerful army. Like a lot of things in David Bourla’s script, the rules of engagement after the philanthropicminded telepaths begin to battle the evil mind-benders out for world domination are unclear. What we do know is that Nick Gant (Chris Evans) is a “mover,� a second-generation telekinetic who went into hiding after the Division killed his father more than a decade earlier. He lives a life of anonymity in Hong Kong, a densely populated place where fugitive psychics like him are safe, as long as they can keep their unique gift a secret. Into Nick’s

life there suddenly comes a 13-yearold “watcherâ€? Cassie Holmes (Dakota Fanning), a clairvoyant who needs his help in tracking down an escaped “pusherâ€? Kira, who may hold the key to bringing down the Division once and for all. A “pusherâ€? is the most powerful kind of psychic due to his RUKHUDELOLW\WRLQĂ XHQFHWKHDFWLRQV of others by planting thoughts in their minds. Now, as Nick emerges from hiding LQRUGHUWRKHOS&DVVLHĂ€QG.LUDWKH Division’s human bloodhounds are hot on their trail. In order to elude the authorities, they’ll need to disappear into the seedy underbelly of the city while relying on a team of rogue psychics to help cover their tracks. But Division Agent Henry Carver (Djimon Hounsou) is a powerful pusher who has made it his mission to stop them at all costs, regardless of the collateral damages that may occur in the process. Though this is a new kind of style for director Paul McGuigan, the average rating for “Pushâ€? is 4.5 stars out of 5.

t BYU-Hawaii the theme “unityâ€? has long been emphasized by student leadership, school administration and church leaders. The theme becomes increasingly important in a school where a student body of less than 3,000 represents 70 countries. There are truly few places in the world where unity should be a more important theme. Unity at BYU-Hawaii conjures up a variety of thoughts for me, including Foodfest, Songfest, BYUH Idol, Devotional, and our talented employees at the PCC. Recently I added another most impressive event to that important list. On the evening RI )HE  , ZLWQHVVHG D VLJQLĂ€FDQW number of the student body pack the CAC for the men’s basketball game. It was an important and intense game. 7KH6HDVLGHUVZHUHĂ€JKWLQJIRUKRPH court advantage in the play-offs and claimed it in a narrow victory. In the diverse crowd I yelled with students

–AUSTIN COOK

from Hong Kong, Brazil, Taiwan, the Philippines, the United States, Sweden, the islands of Polynesia and more. What made it all so inspiring to me was the fact that the students were there not to indulge in the sharing of culture the way they can at FoodFest or Culture Night, but to truly be a part of a common goal. I made new friends from Hong Kong who sat in the row in front of me. They asked to take pictures with me and my friends because we all started cheering together. Would it be sacrilegious to say I have never felt like I was more a part of Zion than at a basketball game? Maybe, but I discovered for myself the importance of celebrating something that makes us the same, just as much as celebrating the things that make us different. So as the season winds down, I want to congratulate our basketball teams for wonderful seasons. I wish to recognize the men’s Seasider PacWest champions. But most of all, now that our university faces important decisions regarding budget cuts (as outlined by Staff Writer Nicole Hamilton in the Feb. 19 issue of Ke Alaka’i) the future of athletics at BYUH is in question. If the nature of athletics has to change, it has to change. We go to school largely by the means of tithe-payer’s money, so it is a point we would be obligated to concede. But it is in that vein that I thank the basketball teams for what they have taught us and implore to the administration of this university that in the spirit of true unity, our legacy of winning athletics be continued at BYU-Hawaii.

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Projects of Peace Students join soul, heart and hands to make a difference

– JAROM REID

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photo courtesy of MOVIES.YAHOO.COM AND KE ALAKA’I FILE PHOTO

ONE Week

Be the change, see the peace

NCAA II Champs Seasiders to host sub-regional tourney

Knighthood

CIE hosts conference of champs


sports March 12, 2009 :SPYQIˆ-WWYI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ryan Anderson ART DIRECTOR Erynn Vierra WEB MASTER Jenna Chidester AD MANAGER Melody Chiang

MARKETING Terrence Kau COPY EDITORS Sam Akinaka April Courtright Amanda Hansen Karen Hemenway ADVISOR LeeAnn Lambert

STAFF WRITERS Rachel Adams Ben Buttars Lucy Cammock Brett Evans Nicole Hamilton Mary Jantalert Trijsten Leach Marni Vail Karly Zobrist Jordan Flake Austin Cook

ART Rachel Au Ieong Kent Carollo Courtney Banks Charlotte Aldridge Leona Tsang PHOTOGS Chris Gardener Nate Williams Meghan Seely Aaron Knudsen INTERNS Shem Greenwood Kathleen Majdali

PODCASTERS Lauren Woodbury Brian Poppleton Anna Daines

PUBLISHER

BYU-Hawaii KE ALAKA’I is printed weekly by: BYU-HAWAII PRINT SERVICES

kealakai.byuh.edu E-mail: kealakai@byuh.edu Phone: (808) 675-3694 Fax: (808) 675-3695 3J½GI&=9,E[EMM Aloha Center, Room 134 CAMPUS NEWS CENTER Campus Box 1920, BYU-Hawaii, Laie, HI 96762 U.S.A RSS FEED SUBSCRIBE ON-LINE: KEALAKAI.BYUH.EDU SEE BACK ISSUES ON-LINE: KEALAKAI.BYUH.EDU

ON THE COVER: Alice Yui and friends at the close of “@RTIMOS: Soul, heart and hands.� This was the third concert hosted by the @RTIMOS gang, with more performers than the previous, and the inclusion of an international live broadcast as well.

Editorial, & Photo Submissions, Advertising & Distribution inquiries: kealakai@byuh.edu

7KUHH/DG\ Seasiders ELGIDUHZHOO ABOVE: The Men’s team celebrate a 107 to 70 victory over HPU on March 8.

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â&#x20AC;&#x201C;SCOTT LOWE AND SAM AKINAKA

BRACKET FOR CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES AT BYU-HAWAII

Š Entire Contents Copyright 2009, Ke Alaka`i

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in this issue

NAtion

March 12, 2009

2&11.indd 1

6-7

8-9

11

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New Leadership - BYUHSA Elections: vying for your vote. Student wins $15k - Heli Huli North Shore Moped Rentals wins CIE Conference of Champions.

Be the change - ONE Week at BYUH promotes peace. Soul, heart and hands - 3rd installment of @RTIMOS is a hit.

Motherhood - Laie woman named Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Mother of the Year. Ewa tragedy - Stabbing increases community concern. Shop â&#x20AC;&#x2122;til you drop - Hawaii welcomes two new Target stores.

Basketball - BYUH to host NCAA II SubRegional Championship. 7IRMSVWLSRSVIHEX½REP home games - Three men ERHXLVII[SQIR½RMWLMRK up their BYUH careers.

Sports brings people together - Opinion: Basketball, unity and budget cuts. Movie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;wipeoutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; - â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is painful to watch.

Campus

Secrets have no friends - Obama airs Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dirty laundry. Latest government bailout - D.C. spends $30 billion more on AIG.

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4-5 & 10

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

genuine gold

Community

sports

Life & entertainment

Cover Photo by LEILANI MILLER

ABOVE: Lady Seasider Mahina Gago, junior guard, shoots during a game against HPU.

photos by AARON KNUDSEN

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

March 12, 2009

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3/11/09 1:31 PM


campus

Heli Huli North Shore Moped Rentals wins CIE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Conference of Championsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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March 12, 2009

10&3.indd 1

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

Obama airs Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dirty laundry

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he Willes Center for International Entrepreneurship hosted a business conference and business plan competition from Wednesday, March 4 to Friday, March, 6. A number of sessions were offered throughout the days, and highlighted here are some of the conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general sessions. Thursday Breakfast Professionally dressed and sleepy-eyed students gathered to attend the opening session and breakfast for the Center for International Entrepreneurship (CIE) sponsored event titled â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Conference of Champions.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The meeting commenced Thursday, March 5, at 8 a.m. in the ballroom. Students were provided with RDWPHDOIUXLWPXIĂ&#x20AC;QVDQGRUDQJHMXLFHEHIRUHKHDUing from guest speaker Dan McCormick. McCormick talked of ways that students can have success in the business world despite challenges with a failing economy: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The economy can be your friend. Ideas can be life changing and you only need one.â&#x20AC;? He encouraged students to think of businesses that will be successful with the current problems. He continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is an entrepreneur? It is someone that takes risks.â&#x20AC;? Dan Jones, sophomore in accounting from Ogden, 8WDKVDLG´7KHPDLQWZRWKLQJVWKDW,JRWRXWRIWKLV areâ&#x20AC;Śyou donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to [take risks] alone [and] to learn fromâ&#x20AC;Śpeopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past experiences.â&#x20AC;? McCormick said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone should always have two books with them - one to read and one to write in.â&#x20AC;? McCormick focused on the point that one has to always continue learning. Thursday Luncheon ,QKLV7KXUVGD\OXQFKHRQDGGUHVV%<8+DZDLL President Steven C. Wheelwright discussed the inauguration charge President Henry B. Eyring gave him almost two years ago. In his inaugural charge, President Eyring said success would be â&#x20AC;&#x153;realized as young people gain greater power to make the world better for others. Success wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in accolades to the president or the teachers; it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in recognition for the university. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in new or better buildings and equipment. ,WZRQ¡WEHLQPRUHHIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQF\6XFFHVVZLOOEHLQ the increase in the power of the students to improve families, communities, and the world.â&#x20AC;? The keynote address featured Carlos Martins, a ´SRRUÂľ%<83URYRJUDGXDWHRULJLQDOO\IURP%UD]LO who now owns the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest private system of language schools that includes 1,200 locations in seven countries, 15,000 employees and 500,000 students. He told the amazing story of how he followed his own rule â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;goal setting is essential for successâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at the start of 2008 to hand out 365 Church â&#x20AC;&#x153;passalongâ&#x20AC;? cards, at the rate of one a day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After 30 days I had passed out 100 cards; I thought maybe my goal was too little,â&#x20AC;? Martins said. Pondering what the real goal should be, Martins

ABOVE: 2008 Center for International Entrepreneurship Competition winner Brett Lee (Center) with (L to R) CIE Entrepreneurs-inResidence Todd Sibley and Leonard Black, BYUH President Steven Wheelwright and CIE Director James Ritchie. Lee won $15,000 to go towards his moped rental business which will be located at Turtle Bay Resort.

realized his company Web site receives 200,000 hits a month: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t I include an icon on our web site offering a prize of a book for the family, a Book of Mormon,â&#x20AC;? he continued. In addition, Martins also decided to insert a pass-along card into each of the 500,000 books his students get each year. 0DUWLQVQRWHG´7KHĂ&#x20AC;QDOUHVXOWLVWKDWRQDUHJXlar monthly basis, the Church receives approximately SKRQHFDOOVMXVWIURPWKLVLQLWLDWLYHÂľ ´,I\RXZDQWWRDFKLHYHVXFFHVVLQOLIHĂ&#x20AC;UVW believe in God, believe in yourself, believe in your dream and your divine potential and your personal ability to overcome and achieve,â&#x20AC;? said Martins. Friday Awards The Business Plan Competition ended with the DZDUGVFHUHPRQ\%<8+VHQLRU%UHWW/HH¡VSODQIRU Hele Huli North Shore Moped Rental, a moped rental business at Turtle Bay Resort in Kahuku, earned him the $15,000 top prize. Lee, a senior in hospitality and tourism management from Lancaster, California, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always liked mopeds and I work at Turtle Bay. I saw the opportunity, and noticed they could use the extra amenity. With the prize money, I hope to start up with a minimum of 10 mopeds, but probably 15 or 20.â&#x20AC;? Lee has already contracted for space in the park Each of four other teams won runner-up prizes of IRUWKHLUSURSRVHGSODQVDOORIWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOLVWV DOVRUHFHLYHGDQGHDFKRIWKHRWKHU%<8+ students who submitted a plan received a monetary award. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had more entrants this year than we ever had before,â&#x20AC;? said CIE Director James Ritchie, noting %<8+VWXGHQWVVXEPLWWHGEXVLQHVVSODQV2IWKDW QXPEHUMXGJHVVHOHFWHGIRUIXUWKHUHYDOXDWLRQ from which the top 15 â&#x20AC;&#x153;came prepared to present. 7KH\GLGQ¡WNQRZZKRWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOLVWVZHUHXQWLOZHDQâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK AND nounced their names,â&#x20AC;? he added.

resident Barrack Obama continued a house cleaning of previous administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies by releasing undisclosed information from George W. Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presidency. On Monday, Mar. 2, 2009, it was revealed that antiterror memos had claimed exceptional search-and-seizure powers and that the Central Intelligence Agency had destroyed nearly 100 videotapes of treatment and interrogations of terror suspects. The disclosures also revealed information about actions taken after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The Justice Department shared nine legal opinions that showed that the Bush administration had determined that some constitutional rights would not apply in the coming war. Only two weeks later there were lawyers trying to Ă&#x20AC;QGZD\VWRZLUHWDS86FRQYHUsations without warrants.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too often over the past deFDGH WKH Ă&#x20AC;JKW DJDLQVW WHUURULVP has been viewed as a zero-sum battle with our civil libertiesâ&#x20AC;Ś Not only is that school of thought misguided, I fear that in actuality it does more harm than good,â&#x20AC;? said Attorney General Eric Holder in a speech a few hours before the documents were released. There is still some investigation that has to be made on the matter of these secrets being kept. Of the destroyed videos there were those that showed the actions taken with hostages, but others held recordings that werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear. With these secrets released, C.I.A. spokesman George Little said the agency â&#x20AC;&#x153;has certainly cooperated with the Department of Justice investigation. If anyone thinks its agency policy to impede the enforcement of American law, they simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the facts.â&#x20AC;?

D.C. spends $30 billion more on AIG ABOVE: Dan McCormick, author and Nu Skin representative speaks about life-changing ideas and the result they can have, even in a downed economy. He spoke during the breakfst session of the conference on Thursday morning. BELOW: Ryan Ockey, Canadan real estate developer and father of a BYUH student, after speaking at the Friday morning KIRIVEPWIWWMSR3GOI]WTSOIEFSYXXLIFPIWWMRKWSJFIMRKEJ½PMated with the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leadership Council and PCC.

-MIKE FOLEY AND TRIJSTEN LEACH

photos by MONIQUE SAENZ

nation

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he American International Group, Inc., a previous recipient of government bailout funds, has encountered bad tidings yet again as the worldwide economic recession continues. The company, best known for its investment services, posted a loss in the fourth quarter of 2008 of RYHUELOOLRQWKHZRUVWTXDUWHUO\ORVVLQ86FRUporate history. As such, the bailout plans have been restructured, with the government extending an additional $30 billion to the struggling insurer. In the last quarter of 2008, AIG stock share prices fell $22.95 per share, causing a corporate loss of $61.7 billion and resulting in a company revenue of QHJDWLYH  ELOOLRQ :LWK WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW EDLORXW SODQ AIG estimated a substantial slowdown in negative SURĂ&#x20AC;WEXWUHVXOWVIHOOVKRUWRIH[SHFWDWLRQV(DUO\LQ 2008, economic analysts estimated a loss in value of around 25 cents per share, clearly far less than the actual loss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billions upon billions of dollars have been loaned to these companies and things are still not looking up,â&#x20AC;? said Alyssa Herzinger, sophomore in international cultural studies from Sandpoint, Idaho. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the money was pumped into the economy by

photos by the ASSOCIATED PRESS

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABOVE: President Barack Obama delivers remarks to members of the Business Council, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, in the East Room of the White House, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, in Washington.

way of the people who are spending it, I think things would level themselves out.â&#x20AC;? Her sentiments are echoed by Dustin Geddes, seQLRULQDFFRXQWLQJIURP&HGDU+LOOV8WDK+HVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIG got what it deserved. The way banks were giving out mortgages to pretty much anyone without proving salaries or assets or anything was ridiculous.â&#x20AC;? AIG, which has been selling its interests in other businesses to cut costs, originally bought some of the less-reliable mortgage interests that may have originally caused the economic fallout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And when people started defaulting [on their mortgages], kablammo,â&#x20AC;? Geddes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The spending in this nation is ridiculous,â&#x20AC;? said 6KDQQRQ0DMGDOLDUHVLGHQWRI/DLH´,W¡VPLQGERJgling because the government is so stingy in other FDVHV WKDW FDQ UHDOO\ EHQHĂ&#x20AC;W SHRSOH ZKR QHHG WKH money,â&#x20AC;? she continued. AIG income fell almost 90% in 2008, to $11 billion, down from $110 billion in 2007. Total losses for the year added up to nearly $90 million, compared WR D  SURĂ&#x20AC;W RI  ELOOLRQ 7RWDO EDLORXW PRQH\ issued to the troubled corporation now amounts to over $180 billion. In addition to mortgage and investing, AIG also has interests in insurance and is currently one of the largest automobile insurers in Hawaii. Policyholders are encouraged to ensure their insurance hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK AND -BRETT EVANS AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABOVE: 7TIGMEPMWX&VEHPI]/IWWPIV[SVOWSRXLIžSSV of the New York Stock Exchange, Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2009. The major stock indexes fell more than 5 percent Tuesday, including the Dow Jones industrial average, which tumbled 382 points.

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BYUHSA Election: Vying for your votes

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Because We Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Reid & Ng

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YUHSA presidential candidate Jarom Reid is a junior in ICS-Communications from Denver, Colo. He gained experience in government and leadership when he worked as an intern for a member of the Colorado Senate and through his position as a tour guide at the PCC. He currently serves as the student coordinator of Performance Series in the Student Leadership and Honor Department here at BYU-Hawaii. His running mate, Shel-

ley Ng, is a junior majoring in hotel and tourism management from San Diego, Calif. Ng has work experience from the BYU Provo International OfĂ&#x20AC;FHDQGDVDKLJKVFKRRO/LQN&UHZ/HDGHUZKHUH she experienced the â&#x20AC;&#x153;true meaning of leadership,â&#x20AC;? leading and motivating incoming freshmen. Reid and Ng believe that BYU-Hawaii students are good enough, smart enough, responsible enough, and diligent enough to take more of a lead at their school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because We Canâ&#x20AC;? is their motto.

O

ABOVE: Jarom Reid and Shelley Ng

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Walk the Talkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brown & Tongi

R ABOVE: Roger Brown and Jennifer Tongi

oger Brown grew up in multiple states, and even lived in Laie for a while before serving a mission in Argentina. Brown is majoring in international business with a minor in instructional design and development. His diverse background gives him a broad understanding of the world and different cultures. His VP candidate is Jennifer Tongi from Australia,

whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studying social work with a minor in hospitality and tourism management. Tongi is half Maori and Tongan, a background that helps her appreciate culture and tradition, incorporating and exploring innovation. Tongi and Brown expect to adequately represent their fellow students, so they will know that their voices matter and will be heard. Their motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Walk the Talk.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Power of Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tuala & Bay

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aika Tuala was raised in Independence, Mo., and served a mission in the Guatemala Quetzaltenango Mission. Tuala is majoring in biology and feels he understands what it takes to utilize diversity to build and create a stronger community. He wants to run for president because he wants to be able to make a difference. Mike Bay, running for VP of BYUHSA, from

Brigham City, Utah, served his mission in the Hawaii Honolulu Mission, and is a junior in the social work program. He has had a lot of experience serving in leadership positions throughout his life and is running with Tuala because he believes we can all help BYU-Hawaii rise to a higher level of unity. Tuala and Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Power of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? is intended to empower the student to become more a part of their school.

ABOVE: Maika Tuala and Mike Bay

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One Heart and One Mindâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Limary & Avalos

L ABOVE: Lillie Avalos and Leialoha Limary

PRIMARY ELECTION IS THURSDAY, MARCH 12 Q&A - AT 11AM

GENERAL ELECTION IS THURSDAY, MARCH 19 Q&A - AT 11AM

Vote in the Aloha Center

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eialoha Limary is a native of Sacrament, Calif., and returned missionary from the Utah Salt Lake City South Mission. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RQHRIĂ&#x20AC;YHPHPEHUVRIKHUIDPLO\ZKRDWtended BYUH and is majoring in ICS-Communications and plans on becoming a Foreign Service RIĂ&#x20AC;FHURUZRUNLQJIRUWKH)RUHLJQ$IIDLUV'HSDUWment. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running for president to learn about leadership skills on a larger scale and to help her accomplish future goals. VP candidate Lillie Avalos,

Hawaii welcomes Community two new Target stores ne, two, three, shop! A soft opening for Target turned into a big hit as more than 1,800 people streamed through the doors of the just opened .DSROHLVWRUHZLWKLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWPLQXWHV On Wednesday, March 4, Target held soft RSHQLQJVDWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWWZR7DUJHWVWRUHVWRFRPH to Hawaii, which are located in Kapolei and Salt Lake. This soft opening wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t highly pubOLFL]HG DV WR DOORZ HPSOR\HHV WLPH WR Ă&#x20AC;[ WKH tweaks before the grand opening held Sunday, March 8. Little did Target organizers know that over 450 people would be waiting outside of the Salt Lake store for the doors to open at 8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have run a lot of Targets (on the mainland), but I have never seen this level of energy,â&#x20AC;? Kapolei store manager Jon Radtke told The Honolulu Advertiser. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was supposed to be a soft opening but it was more like a grand opening.â&#x20AC;? Radtke noted to The Honolulu Advertiser that he anticipated huge crowds for the grand opening, but given the state of the economy, did not expect actual sales to follow suit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to have some pretty exciting reports to headquarters, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very pleased with our results,â&#x20AC;? said Radtke The excitement of a Target store opening has streamed from the Target store associates to BYU-Hawaii campus as well. Krystalee Hazard, sophomore in physical education from Weldon, Calif., said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love Target! They have the cutest clothes and jewelry at a good price.â&#x20AC;? She said she feels Target has a little higher quality goods than Wal-Mart, too. Elizabeth Walker, junior in hotel and tourism management from Niles, Mich., and friends headed to Target on Friday to preview the new

A

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of BYUHSA is Emily Judson, senior in TESOL Education with a Spanish minor from Lindon, Utah. She recently returned from a semester at BYU Provo, an experience she enjoyed, but she discovered that her heart belongs at BYU-Hawaii. Fonua and Judson believe that each student at BYU-Hawaii has a unique role in obtaining international peace and their motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peace by Piece.â&#x20AC;?

ABOVE: Emily Judson and Alma Fonua

photos courtesy of the candidates

-NICOLE HAMILTON

Above: Hawaii is now home to two new Target stores with locations in Salt Lake and Kapolei. The Minnesota-based chain will compete with Wal-Mart as a one-stop-shop for consumers, offering a large variety of products for relatively inexpensive prices.

Laie woman named Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mother of the Year

IURP 5HGODQGV &DOLI LV WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW LQ KHU IDPLO\ WR attend a Brigham Young University and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s majoring in mathematics. She plans to use her background in mathematics as a researcher/analyst in WKH PHGLFDO Ă&#x20AC;HOG  6KH¡V UXQQLQJ IRU 93 WR DSSO\ her leadership skills and gain a better knowledge of how to listen and attend the needs of her fellow classmates. Limary and Avalos want to encourage their fellow students to be of â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Heart and One Mind,â&#x20AC;? which is their campaign motto.

H

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peace by Pieceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fonua & Judson lma Fonua was raised in Magna, Utah, and served a mission in the Kingdom of Tonga and Niue Island, which gave him â&#x20AC;&#x153;a stronger love and appreciation for [his] ancestors and their journey in the gospel.â&#x20AC;? Fonua is now a senior studying IBM and said coming to Hawaii is one of the best choices heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have ever made. Running with him for VP

store. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming from the mainland, we have Target everywhere and what was nice was this Target was just like every other one in the mainland. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to target to tourists or locals like Wal-Mart tends to do. Also I liked how big the store was and that there was accessible parking.â&#x20AC;? Both Target stores will now be open Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sundays.

ABOVE: Laie resident Joselyn Akana has been named the Young Mother of the Year for the State of Hawaii. She and her husband, Brandyn, a basketball coach and an EXS faculty member at BYUH, have three children.

awaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Mother of the Year for 2009 is none other than Laie resident and Hawaii native Joselyn Akana. Akana is the wife of Seasider Basketball Assistant Coach Brandyn Akana, who is also the bishop of the BYU-Hawaii 17th Ward. They have been married for 10 years and have two daughters and one son, all under the age of 8. Akana said that the most rewarding thing about being a mother is how unconditionally forgiving and loving her children are. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a bad day,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;they still tell me that they love me.â&#x20AC;? Akanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience with being nominated for Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2009 Young Mother of the Year was very unique. She was selected by a local committee of American Mothers, Inc. (AMI) in Laie comprised of Donette Tew, Lisa Wagner, and May Shumway. These three sisters have each been Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Mother

photos by the ASSOCIATED PRESS and JENNA CHIDESTER

of the Year themselves - Wagner in 1999, Tew in 2004 and Shumway in 2005. The committee had been seeking inspiration for a few weeks to help them decide which Young Mother of the Year candidate was the right choice. The day before their nomination was due to the AMI, they felt that Joselyn Akana should be the nominee for 2009. Akana had not been on the list of nominees they were praying about in the previous weeks, however all three women had been inspired and agreed that she was the right woman for the title. To Akana, the nomination was humbling and an answer to her prayers. She explained that at the beginning of 2009, she had made two New Yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ResoluWLRQV7KHĂ&#x20AC;UVWZDVWRVWRSFRPSODLQLQJDQGWKHVHFond was to become a better mom by learning to work with her children to emphasize their strengths instead of focusing on their weaknesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized that Heavenly Father was giving me an opportunity here,â&#x20AC;? said Akana. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My New Yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; resolutions and prayers were answeredâ&#x20AC;Ś I saw this as a great learning opportunity.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;RACHEL ADAMS

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community

ABOVE: Flowers cover the bench in an Ewa shopping center where Asa Yamashita, a high school teacher, was stabbed and died on Feb. 27, 2009.

Stabbing increases community concern

T

he head of Waianae High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s English Department, Asa Yamashita, was stabbed and died in an Ewa shopping center on Feb. 27. Tittleman Fauatea, 25, has been charged with murder in the second degree with bail posted at $500,000. The murder has raised some serious questions about the manner in which the State of Hawaii deals with those whose mental health problems could endanger others. Fauatea was released from psychiatric care just three months ago, after serv-

ing a short six-day sentence for harassment. Although his psychiatric assessment advised no less than 60 additional days in a hospital, he was released due to a lack of paperwork. Although this kind of incident is uncommon in Oahu, it raises the questions about what can be done to protect the Laie community. Helaman M. .D¡RQRQLDVVLVWDQWGLUHFWRURI6HFXULW\UHDIĂ&#x20AC;UPV that while Laie is generally a safe community, students can never be too careful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laie is quite safe compared to other communities. We just need to think things through. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in Hawaii; a lot of

students are here to have a good time but we also need to take precautions. Always stay in lighted areas and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go walking alone, especially to the beach parks.â&#x20AC;? In relation to the stabbing, Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ononi VDLG´,W¡VGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRVD\ZKDW\RXVKRXOGGR:H normally say donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be alone. But she (Yamashita) was in a public area. The attacker was just unbalanced. In that situation thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really not a lot that can be done.â&#x20AC;? Students have mixed feelings about their safety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel safe on campus. I think our security GRHV D JRRG MRE , IHHO Ă&#x20AC;QH DURXQG /DLH , WKLQN our community is safe,â&#x20AC;? said Ivy Sessions, junior in two-dimensional art from Huntington Beach, Calif. Freshman in music, Travis Kneisly from South Carolina agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On campus I guess I feel pretty safe. Physically I always feel safe, but the safety of my property always concerns me.â&#x20AC;? In spite of feeling safe on campus and in Laie, Security recommends that students never get too comfortable, and that it is important to always be aware of surroundings. Some students have had different experiences. Grace Qwok, sophomore in international cultural studies from Hong Kong, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I work at the Aloha Center and my boss has access to a lot of cameras. I have seen a lot things, especially vandalism of school property. Because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an open area you never know if people are students or not. Sometimes people think that because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a church community they are safe, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not always true. I think students should pay more attention to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s around. Even in the dorms people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize how dangerous it can be.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LUCY C AMMOCK AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE! Kamehameha Schools is pleased to offer scholarships for the 2009-2010 academic year.

Counseling Center works with local agencies to combat domestic violence

L

eilani Auna, from BYU-Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Development Center, gave some additional information this week on what can be done to help facilitate change for those in abusive relationships. Â&#x2021;,ILWLVQRWVDIHIRUDZRPDQLQKHUKRPH she can contact a shelter. Some telephone numbers to call are: Windward Emergency Shelter: 528-0606 Domestic Violence Crisis Hotline: 841-0822 BYUH Housing: 675-3534

BYUH Security: 675-3503 or 293-3911. Â&#x2021; ,I \RX VXVSHFW WKDW \RXU QHLJKERUV RU friends are in an abusive relationship and you live in TVA, you can report it to the BYU+DZDLL+RXVLQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FH79$WHQDQWVUHFHLYHD letter from the Temple View Apartment Council for disrupting the peace and are asked to come into the Counseling Center. Â&#x2021;,I\RXVXVSHFWWKDWDVLWXDWLRQKDVEHFRPH violent, the police or security should be called. Â&#x2021;7KHUHLVDQRQFDOOFULVLVFRXQVHORUZKRFDQ

BYUH alum Schumacher gives recital

Schumacher visited the BYUH campus all last week, March 1-7. While he was here, he performed the musical number at devotional, practiced for his recital at the end of the week and visited various music classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;BYU-HaZDLLLVGHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\DGLIIHUHQWSODFHQRZÂľKHVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;but it still feels like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m returning home.â&#x20AC;? His week long visit concluded with a solo piano recital. Schumacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance included a wide variety of pieces from composers Bach, Beethoven, Muczynski, Liszt and Scriabin. Other BYUH alumni who went to school with Schumacher also attended the performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I graduated with Chad and I was also a piano major. Chad and I were in a master class together,â&#x20AC;? said Jennifer Kim, who graduated from BYUH with Shumacher in 2004. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blowing some of [these pieces] out of the water!â&#x20AC;?

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any audience members expressed amazement at the talents of BYUHawaii alumnus Chad Schumacher as he performed a recital in the McKay Auditorium on Saturday, March 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so good, I loved watching his facial expressions as he played,â&#x20AC;? said Tessa Brady, freshman in music composition from Portland, Oregon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fascinating to me.â&#x20AC;?

be contacted through BYUH Security 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Â&#x2021;$ELVKRSFDQEHFRQWDFWHG Â&#x2021;&RXSOHVDQGVWXGHQWVFDQFRPHDQ\WLPHWR the Counseling Center for help and be referred to local agencies for additional assistance. Auna also said the Counseling Center has several programs run in conjunction with community organizations to help support families in Laie, including several womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group, a parent and child interaction group, a pregnant motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group. The center also holds an annual TVA Family Day where local agencies come to campus to offer students and families further information. Students should know that the Counseling Center insures privacy for all its clients. Information shared with a counselor, Auna said, will not be given to other departments in the school. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;LUCY C AMMOCK

7KHĂ&#x20AC;QDOSLHFHWKDW6FKXPDFKHUSHUIRUPHG was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apres une lecture de Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonataâ&#x20AC;? by Franz Liszt. Schumacher introduced this piece to the audience by telling the story behind the piece and saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I consider this sonata to be one of the greatest masterpieces of all time.â&#x20AC;? In order to portray the story behind the piece, which is based on Danteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s literary masterpiece, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Divine Comedy,â&#x20AC;? he also had a slideshow playing with works from the artist Gustav Dore. The audience enjoyed this multimedia presentation, applauding so much that Schumacher returned to play an encore piece after he left the stage. Schumacher recently started his own music production company and is also working on a solo album. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;RACHEL ADAMS

                                               

NOW HIRING:

Nä Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;okama a Pauahi

Classy Alaskan Lodge has opening for high  energy Kitchen Assistant/ Chambermaid for Spring/Summer season.

A need-based scholarship available to students enrolled in associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or doctoral degree programs. Eligibility requirements:  Be a Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i resident  Be a full-time, classified student at an accredited U.S. educational institution  Have financial need

Application deadline: APRIL 20, 2009 All applicants must complete a College Scholarship Services PROFILE at www.collegeboard.com/profile.

Need kĂśkua? Download a scholarship application guidebook at the Kamehameha Schools Financial Aid and Scholarship Services website at www.ksbe.edu/finaid.

CONTACT:

For additional help, call 534-8080.

shanran@starband. net

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS Kamehameha Schools' policy is to give preference to applicants of Hawaiian ancestry to the extent permitted by law. Applicants who wish to be considered under this policy must have their Hawaiian ancestry verified by KS' Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;oulu Hawaiian Data Center. For information, call toll-free at 1-800-842-4682, press 9 and ext. 36228, or visit www.ksbe.edu/datacenter.

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Nä Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;okama a Pauahi scholarship recipient Louie Agrabante of Waiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;anae is currently pursuing his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree at Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Pacific University. photo by the HONOLULU ADVERTISER

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ONE Not  the  loneliest  number. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  must  be  the  change  we   want  to  see  in  the  world.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Mahatma Gandhi

m

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MARNI VAIL

ABOVE: Miles Smith holds a serving of rice at the hunger banquet representing the amount an average person would receive for an entire meal in a third-world country.

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LEFT: Keith Marcelino serenades the crowd at one weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic night.

ABOVE: (L to R) Laura Beynon, Spencer Clegg, and Leah Hinckley perform with an ensemble at @RTIMOS.

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yes were glued to the stage as the third production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;@RTIMOS: Soul, Heart and Hands,â&#x20AC;? took the audience on an adventure through various types of musical performances to promote peace, unity, and love internationally. On Wednesday March 4, students, faculty and community members eagerly waited in the theater for the show to begin. )RXQGHU$UW6DRZLFKLWVDLG´#57,0266RXO+HDUWDQG+DQGVWRRN about three months to produce. We had auditions, weekly meetings, and special meetings with different departments and organizations in the school as well.â&#x20AC;? Saowichit is an interdisciplinary studies major from Thailand. During this performance, a variety of talented students from BYU-Hawaii volunteered their time and skills to help Saowichit promote this cause and provide the entertainment for the evening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like performing and I loved the fact that the auditorium was packed since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so hard sometimes to get full participation from students in concerts,â&#x20AC;? noted performer Leah Hinckley, sophomore in international business management from Evanston, Wyo. Many of the acts expressed different cultures. The Phung family demRQVWUDWHGDWUDGLWLRQDO&KLQHVHOLRQGDQFH*DEULHO)LJXHLURDQGIULHQGVSHUformed Capoiera, which used to be a Brazilian cultural activity but is now considered a sport. The Hawaiian culture was shown by a group of girls who danced a hula to the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lei Haliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;a.â&#x20AC;? The Korean Club performed a traditional Korean drumming act. Also, the Maori culture was expressed as the Rongomau, representing the Aotearoa Village of the PCC, presented a â&#x20AC;&#x153;haka of peace.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really liked the Maori performance because I get so pumped up from the culture,â&#x20AC;? expressed Melanie Roy, junior in biology from San Diego, Calif. Many other performances were presented such as videos, slide shows , a blindfolded pianist playing, an overture to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Barber of Seville,â&#x20AC;? a SpanLVKĂ DPHQFRKLSKRSDQGEDOOHWGDQFLQJDQGPRUHVLQJLQJDQGSOD\LQJRI instruments. 7KHĂ&#x20AC;QDOHRI#57,026WLHGWKHZKROHQLJKWWRJHWKHUDOORIWKHSHUformers sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;With My Own Two Handsâ&#x20AC;? and involved the crowd by giving out lyrics. They also threw out blown up balls, representing earth, into the audience that were bounced around throughout the song.

@ ARTIMOS

ahatma Gandhi believed that â&#x20AC;&#x153;we must be the change we want to see in the world.â&#x20AC;? Events of BYUHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ONE week, held March 3 to 6, offered students the opportunity to demonstrate how they can be the change. Tuesday night in the McKay Auditorium, there was a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;in Habibtiâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;in, My Loveâ&#x20AC;?), a documentary about nonviolent resistance in a West Bank village. The documentary presented Palestinian objectors in Bilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;in against the illegal construction of an Israeli separation wall. Meagan Walser, senior in International Cultural Studies from Warwick, R.I. said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was sad, but you have to have hope that enough someones will hear them and say no.â&#x20AC;? Wednesday night, also in the McKay auditorium, students danced, raised their voices in song, and spoke hopeful words about peace in the world. Each act seemed to be more diverse than the one before it. A hip hop and ballet compilation showed how one song can be danced to in a number of fashions. Uncle Benny, who hosted during @RTIMOS, sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;What a Wonderful World.â&#x20AC;? Thursday night, students participated in the Hunger Banquet. Some students, given â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONEâ&#x20AC;? cards, were supposed to represent ´Ă&#x20AC;UVWZRUOGÂľFRXQWULHVDQGZHUHVHDWHGDWDWDEOHZLWKVLOYHUZDUH and were served a four course meal with chicken, salad, cake and lemonade. However, the greater the number a student received, the less special treatment was provided. Being from second world country, less food was served. Those from third world countries were given only one scoop of rice in their hand and had to sit on the Ă RRU(PLO\<RUNMXQLRULQ,&6IURP*UDQG5DSLGV0LFKLJDQVDLG she felt indignant when she was designated to be in a third world UDWKHUWKDQEHLQJIURPDĂ&#x20AC;UVWZRUOGFRXQWU\)ROORZLQJWKH+XQJHU Banquet, there was an Open Mic Night held in the Seasider, where many students shared both their talents and thoughts through song and poetry. )ULGD\DGDQFHZUDSSHGXSWKHZHHN¡VSHDFHHYHQWV$VHUYLFH project was held on Saturday as students attempted to reach out to the community by extending forth their hands to help members of the community with odd jobs and yard work, as well as at the PCC and temple.

photos by Chris Gardner

photos by AARON KNUDSEN

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;NICOLE HAMILTON

ABOVE: Members of the Korean club perform at @RTIMOS.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  that   performing  arts   have  this  great   power  of  unify-­ ing  people.  From   the  moment  you   enter  the  the-­ atre  everyone  is   equal.  You  can   just  enjoy  being   in  the  moment.â&#x20AC;?   -Carissa Lang

celebrating  peace  and   unity  for  one  whole

WEEK http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

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ONE Not  the  loneliest  number. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  must  be  the  change  we   want  to  see  in  the  world.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Mahatma Gandhi

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â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MARNI VAIL

ABOVE: Miles Smith holds a serving of rice at the hunger banquet representing the amount an average person would receive for an entire meal in a third-world country.

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LEFT: Keith Marcelino serenades the crowd at one weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic night.

ABOVE: (L to R) Laura Beynon, Spencer Clegg, and Leah Hinckley perform with an ensemble at @RTIMOS.

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yes were glued to the stage as the third production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;@RTIMOS: Soul, Heart and Hands,â&#x20AC;? took the audience on an adventure through various types of musical performances to promote peace, unity, and love internationally. On Wednesday March 4, students, faculty and community members eagerly waited in the theater for the show to begin. )RXQGHU$UW6DRZLFKLWVDLG´#57,0266RXO+HDUWDQG+DQGVWRRN about three months to produce. We had auditions, weekly meetings, and special meetings with different departments and organizations in the school as well.â&#x20AC;? Saowichit is an interdisciplinary studies major from Thailand. During this performance, a variety of talented students from BYU-Hawaii volunteered their time and skills to help Saowichit promote this cause and provide the entertainment for the evening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like performing and I loved the fact that the auditorium was packed since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so hard sometimes to get full participation from students in concerts,â&#x20AC;? noted performer Leah Hinckley, sophomore in international business management from Evanston, Wyo. Many of the acts expressed different cultures. The Phung family demRQVWUDWHGDWUDGLWLRQDO&KLQHVHOLRQGDQFH*DEULHO)LJXHLURDQGIULHQGVSHUformed Capoiera, which used to be a Brazilian cultural activity but is now considered a sport. The Hawaiian culture was shown by a group of girls who danced a hula to the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lei Haliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;a.â&#x20AC;? The Korean Club performed a traditional Korean drumming act. Also, the Maori culture was expressed as the Rongomau, representing the Aotearoa Village of the PCC, presented a â&#x20AC;&#x153;haka of peace.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really liked the Maori performance because I get so pumped up from the culture,â&#x20AC;? expressed Melanie Roy, junior in biology from San Diego, Calif. Many other performances were presented such as videos, slide shows , a blindfolded pianist playing, an overture to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Barber of Seville,â&#x20AC;? a SpanLVKĂ DPHQFRKLSKRSDQGEDOOHWGDQFLQJDQGPRUHVLQJLQJDQGSOD\LQJRI instruments. 7KHĂ&#x20AC;QDOHRI#57,026WLHGWKHZKROHQLJKWWRJHWKHUDOORIWKHSHUformers sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;With My Own Two Handsâ&#x20AC;? and involved the crowd by giving out lyrics. They also threw out blown up balls, representing earth, into the audience that were bounced around throughout the song.

@ ARTIMOS

ahatma Gandhi believed that â&#x20AC;&#x153;we must be the change we want to see in the world.â&#x20AC;? Events of BYUHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ONE week, held March 3 to 6, offered students the opportunity to demonstrate how they can be the change. Tuesday night in the McKay Auditorium, there was a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;in Habibtiâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;in, My Loveâ&#x20AC;?), a documentary about nonviolent resistance in a West Bank village. The documentary presented Palestinian objectors in Bilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;in against the illegal construction of an Israeli separation wall. Meagan Walser, senior in International Cultural Studies from Warwick, R.I. said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was sad, but you have to have hope that enough someones will hear them and say no.â&#x20AC;? Wednesday night, also in the McKay auditorium, students danced, raised their voices in song, and spoke hopeful words about peace in the world. Each act seemed to be more diverse than the one before it. A hip hop and ballet compilation showed how one song can be danced to in a number of fashions. Uncle Benny, who hosted during @RTIMOS, sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;What a Wonderful World.â&#x20AC;? Thursday night, students participated in the Hunger Banquet. Some students, given â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONEâ&#x20AC;? cards, were supposed to represent ´Ă&#x20AC;UVWZRUOGÂľFRXQWULHVDQGZHUHVHDWHGDWDWDEOHZLWKVLOYHUZDUH and were served a four course meal with chicken, salad, cake and lemonade. However, the greater the number a student received, the less special treatment was provided. Being from second world country, less food was served. Those from third world countries were given only one scoop of rice in their hand and had to sit on the Ă RRU(PLO\<RUNMXQLRULQ,&6IURP*UDQG5DSLGV0LFKLJDQVDLG she felt indignant when she was designated to be in a third world UDWKHUWKDQEHLQJIURPDĂ&#x20AC;UVWZRUOGFRXQWU\)ROORZLQJWKH+XQJHU Banquet, there was an Open Mic Night held in the Seasider, where many students shared both their talents and thoughts through song and poetry. )ULGD\DGDQFHZUDSSHGXSWKHZHHN¡VSHDFHHYHQWV$VHUYLFH project was held on Saturday as students attempted to reach out to the community by extending forth their hands to help members of the community with odd jobs and yard work, as well as at the PCC and temple.

photos by Chris Gardner

photos by AARON KNUDSEN

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;NICOLE HAMILTON

ABOVE: Members of the Korean club perform at @RTIMOS.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  that   performing  arts   have  this  great   power  of  unify-­ ing  people.  From   the  moment  you   enter  the  the-­ atre  everyone  is   equal.  You  can   just  enjoy  being   in  the  moment.â&#x20AC;?   -Carissa Lang

celebrating  peace  and   unity  for  one  whole

WEEK http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

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ABOVE: Flowers cover the bench in an Ewa shopping center where Asa Yamashita, a high school teacher, was stabbed and died on Feb. 27, 2009.

Stabbing increases community concern

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he head of Waianae High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s English Department, Asa Yamashita, was stabbed and died in an Ewa shopping center on Feb. 27. Tittleman Fauatea, 25, has been charged with murder in the second degree with bail posted at $500,000. The murder has raised some serious questions about the manner in which the State of Hawaii deals with those whose mental health problems could endanger others. Fauatea was released from psychiatric care just three months ago, after serv-

ing a short six-day sentence for harassment. Although his psychiatric assessment advised no less than 60 additional days in a hospital, he was released due to a lack of paperwork. Although this kind of incident is uncommon in Oahu, it raises the questions about what can be done to protect the Laie community. Helaman M. .D¡RQRQLDVVLVWDQWGLUHFWRURI6HFXULW\UHDIĂ&#x20AC;UPV that while Laie is generally a safe community, students can never be too careful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laie is quite safe compared to other communities. We just need to think things through. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in Hawaii; a lot of

students are here to have a good time but we also need to take precautions. Always stay in lighted areas and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go walking alone, especially to the beach parks.â&#x20AC;? In relation to the stabbing, Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ononi VDLG´,W¡VGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRVD\ZKDW\RXVKRXOGGR:H normally say donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be alone. But she (Yamashita) was in a public area. The attacker was just unbalanced. In that situation thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really not a lot that can be done.â&#x20AC;? Students have mixed feelings about their safety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel safe on campus. I think our security GRHV D JRRG MRE , IHHO Ă&#x20AC;QH DURXQG /DLH , WKLQN our community is safe,â&#x20AC;? said Ivy Sessions, junior in two-dimensional art from Huntington Beach, Calif. Freshman in music, Travis Kneisly from South Carolina agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On campus I guess I feel pretty safe. Physically I always feel safe, but the safety of my property always concerns me.â&#x20AC;? In spite of feeling safe on campus and in Laie, Security recommends that students never get too comfortable, and that it is important to always be aware of surroundings. Some students have had different experiences. Grace Qwok, sophomore in international cultural studies from Hong Kong, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I work at the Aloha Center and my boss has access to a lot of cameras. I have seen a lot things, especially vandalism of school property. Because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an open area you never know if people are students or not. Sometimes people think that because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a church community they are safe, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not always true. I think students should pay more attention to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s around. Even in the dorms people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize how dangerous it can be.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LUCY C AMMOCK AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE! Kamehameha Schools is pleased to offer scholarships for the 2009-2010 academic year.

Counseling Center works with local agencies to combat domestic violence

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eilani Auna, from BYU-Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Development Center, gave some additional information this week on what can be done to help facilitate change for those in abusive relationships. Â&#x2021;,ILWLVQRWVDIHIRUDZRPDQLQKHUKRPH she can contact a shelter. Some telephone numbers to call are: Windward Emergency Shelter: 528-0606 Domestic Violence Crisis Hotline: 841-0822 BYUH Housing: 675-3534

BYUH Security: 675-3503 or 293-3911. Â&#x2021; ,I \RX VXVSHFW WKDW \RXU QHLJKERUV RU friends are in an abusive relationship and you live in TVA, you can report it to the BYU+DZDLL+RXVLQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FH79$WHQDQWVUHFHLYHD letter from the Temple View Apartment Council for disrupting the peace and are asked to come into the Counseling Center. Â&#x2021;,I\RXVXVSHFWWKDWDVLWXDWLRQKDVEHFRPH violent, the police or security should be called. Â&#x2021;7KHUHLVDQRQFDOOFULVLVFRXQVHORUZKRFDQ

BYUH alum Schumacher gives recital

Schumacher visited the BYUH campus all last week, March 1-7. While he was here, he performed the musical number at devotional, practiced for his recital at the end of the week and visited various music classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;BYU-HaZDLLLVGHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\DGLIIHUHQWSODFHQRZÂľKHVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;but it still feels like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m returning home.â&#x20AC;? His week long visit concluded with a solo piano recital. Schumacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance included a wide variety of pieces from composers Bach, Beethoven, Muczynski, Liszt and Scriabin. Other BYUH alumni who went to school with Schumacher also attended the performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I graduated with Chad and I was also a piano major. Chad and I were in a master class together,â&#x20AC;? said Jennifer Kim, who graduated from BYUH with Shumacher in 2004. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blowing some of [these pieces] out of the water!â&#x20AC;?

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any audience members expressed amazement at the talents of BYUHawaii alumnus Chad Schumacher as he performed a recital in the McKay Auditorium on Saturday, March 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so good, I loved watching his facial expressions as he played,â&#x20AC;? said Tessa Brady, freshman in music composition from Portland, Oregon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fascinating to me.â&#x20AC;?

be contacted through BYUH Security 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Â&#x2021;$ELVKRSFDQEHFRQWDFWHG Â&#x2021;&RXSOHVDQGVWXGHQWVFDQFRPHDQ\WLPHWR the Counseling Center for help and be referred to local agencies for additional assistance. Auna also said the Counseling Center has several programs run in conjunction with community organizations to help support families in Laie, including several womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group, a parent and child interaction group, a pregnant motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group. The center also holds an annual TVA Family Day where local agencies come to campus to offer students and families further information. Students should know that the Counseling Center insures privacy for all its clients. Information shared with a counselor, Auna said, will not be given to other departments in the school. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;LUCY C AMMOCK

7KHĂ&#x20AC;QDOSLHFHWKDW6FKXPDFKHUSHUIRUPHG was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apres une lecture de Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonataâ&#x20AC;? by Franz Liszt. Schumacher introduced this piece to the audience by telling the story behind the piece and saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I consider this sonata to be one of the greatest masterpieces of all time.â&#x20AC;? In order to portray the story behind the piece, which is based on Danteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s literary masterpiece, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Divine Comedy,â&#x20AC;? he also had a slideshow playing with works from the artist Gustav Dore. The audience enjoyed this multimedia presentation, applauding so much that Schumacher returned to play an encore piece after he left the stage. Schumacher recently started his own music production company and is also working on a solo album. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;RACHEL ADAMS

                                               

NOW HIRING:

Nä Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;okama a Pauahi

Classy Alaskan Lodge has opening for high  energy Kitchen Assistant/ Chambermaid for Spring/Summer season.

A need-based scholarship available to students enrolled in associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or doctoral degree programs. Eligibility requirements:  Be a Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i resident  Be a full-time, classified student at an accredited U.S. educational institution  Have financial need

Application deadline: APRIL 20, 2009 All applicants must complete a College Scholarship Services PROFILE at www.collegeboard.com/profile.

Need kĂśkua? Download a scholarship application guidebook at the Kamehameha Schools Financial Aid and Scholarship Services website at www.ksbe.edu/finaid.

CONTACT:

For additional help, call 534-8080.

shanran@starband. net

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS Kamehameha Schools' policy is to give preference to applicants of Hawaiian ancestry to the extent permitted by law. Applicants who wish to be considered under this policy must have their Hawaiian ancestry verified by KS' Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;oulu Hawaiian Data Center. For information, call toll-free at 1-800-842-4682, press 9 and ext. 36228, or visit www.ksbe.edu/datacenter.

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Nä Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;okama a Pauahi scholarship recipient Louie Agrabante of Waiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;anae is currently pursuing his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree at Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Pacific University. photo by the HONOLULU ADVERTISER

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BYUHSA Election: Vying for your votes

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Because We Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Reid & Ng

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YUHSA presidential candidate Jarom Reid is a junior in ICS-Communications from Denver, Colo. He gained experience in government and leadership when he worked as an intern for a member of the Colorado Senate and through his position as a tour guide at the PCC. He currently serves as the student coordinator of Performance Series in the Student Leadership and Honor Department here at BYU-Hawaii. His running mate, Shel-

ley Ng, is a junior majoring in hotel and tourism management from San Diego, Calif. Ng has work experience from the BYU Provo International OfĂ&#x20AC;FHDQGDVDKLJKVFKRRO/LQN&UHZ/HDGHUZKHUH she experienced the â&#x20AC;&#x153;true meaning of leadership,â&#x20AC;? leading and motivating incoming freshmen. Reid and Ng believe that BYU-Hawaii students are good enough, smart enough, responsible enough, and diligent enough to take more of a lead at their school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because We Canâ&#x20AC;? is their motto.

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ABOVE: Jarom Reid and Shelley Ng

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Walk the Talkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brown & Tongi

R ABOVE: Roger Brown and Jennifer Tongi

oger Brown grew up in multiple states, and even lived in Laie for a while before serving a mission in Argentina. Brown is majoring in international business with a minor in instructional design and development. His diverse background gives him a broad understanding of the world and different cultures. His VP candidate is Jennifer Tongi from Australia,

whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studying social work with a minor in hospitality and tourism management. Tongi is half Maori and Tongan, a background that helps her appreciate culture and tradition, incorporating and exploring innovation. Tongi and Brown expect to adequately represent their fellow students, so they will know that their voices matter and will be heard. Their motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Walk the Talk.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Power of Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tuala & Bay

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aika Tuala was raised in Independence, Mo., and served a mission in the Guatemala Quetzaltenango Mission. Tuala is majoring in biology and feels he understands what it takes to utilize diversity to build and create a stronger community. He wants to run for president because he wants to be able to make a difference. Mike Bay, running for VP of BYUHSA, from

Brigham City, Utah, served his mission in the Hawaii Honolulu Mission, and is a junior in the social work program. He has had a lot of experience serving in leadership positions throughout his life and is running with Tuala because he believes we can all help BYU-Hawaii rise to a higher level of unity. Tuala and Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Power of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? is intended to empower the student to become more a part of their school.

ABOVE: Maika Tuala and Mike Bay

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One Heart and One Mindâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Limary & Avalos

L ABOVE: Lillie Avalos and Leialoha Limary

PRIMARY ELECTION IS THURSDAY, MARCH 12 Q&A - AT 11AM

GENERAL ELECTION IS THURSDAY, MARCH 19 Q&A - AT 11AM

Vote in the Aloha Center

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eialoha Limary is a native of Sacrament, Calif., and returned missionary from the Utah Salt Lake City South Mission. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RQHRIĂ&#x20AC;YHPHPEHUVRIKHUIDPLO\ZKRDWtended BYUH and is majoring in ICS-Communications and plans on becoming a Foreign Service RIĂ&#x20AC;FHURUZRUNLQJIRUWKH)RUHLJQ$IIDLUV'HSDUWment. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running for president to learn about leadership skills on a larger scale and to help her accomplish future goals. VP candidate Lillie Avalos,

Hawaii welcomes Community two new Target stores ne, two, three, shop! A soft opening for Target turned into a big hit as more than 1,800 people streamed through the doors of the just opened .DSROHLVWRUHZLWKLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWPLQXWHV On Wednesday, March 4, Target held soft RSHQLQJVDWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWWZR7DUJHWVWRUHVWRFRPH to Hawaii, which are located in Kapolei and Salt Lake. This soft opening wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t highly pubOLFL]HG DV WR DOORZ HPSOR\HHV WLPH WR Ă&#x20AC;[ WKH tweaks before the grand opening held Sunday, March 8. Little did Target organizers know that over 450 people would be waiting outside of the Salt Lake store for the doors to open at 8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have run a lot of Targets (on the mainland), but I have never seen this level of energy,â&#x20AC;? Kapolei store manager Jon Radtke told The Honolulu Advertiser. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was supposed to be a soft opening but it was more like a grand opening.â&#x20AC;? Radtke noted to The Honolulu Advertiser that he anticipated huge crowds for the grand opening, but given the state of the economy, did not expect actual sales to follow suit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to have some pretty exciting reports to headquarters, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very pleased with our results,â&#x20AC;? said Radtke The excitement of a Target store opening has streamed from the Target store associates to BYU-Hawaii campus as well. Krystalee Hazard, sophomore in physical education from Weldon, Calif., said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love Target! They have the cutest clothes and jewelry at a good price.â&#x20AC;? She said she feels Target has a little higher quality goods than Wal-Mart, too. Elizabeth Walker, junior in hotel and tourism management from Niles, Mich., and friends headed to Target on Friday to preview the new

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of BYUHSA is Emily Judson, senior in TESOL Education with a Spanish minor from Lindon, Utah. She recently returned from a semester at BYU Provo, an experience she enjoyed, but she discovered that her heart belongs at BYU-Hawaii. Fonua and Judson believe that each student at BYU-Hawaii has a unique role in obtaining international peace and their motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peace by Piece.â&#x20AC;?

ABOVE: Emily Judson and Alma Fonua

photos courtesy of the candidates

-NICOLE HAMILTON

Above: Hawaii is now home to two new Target stores with locations in Salt Lake and Kapolei. The Minnesota-based chain will compete with Wal-Mart as a one-stop-shop for consumers, offering a large variety of products for relatively inexpensive prices.

Laie woman named Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mother of the Year

IURP 5HGODQGV &DOLI LV WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW LQ KHU IDPLO\ WR attend a Brigham Young University and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s majoring in mathematics. She plans to use her background in mathematics as a researcher/analyst in WKH PHGLFDO Ă&#x20AC;HOG  6KH¡V UXQQLQJ IRU 93 WR DSSO\ her leadership skills and gain a better knowledge of how to listen and attend the needs of her fellow classmates. Limary and Avalos want to encourage their fellow students to be of â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Heart and One Mind,â&#x20AC;? which is their campaign motto.

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peace by Pieceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fonua & Judson lma Fonua was raised in Magna, Utah, and served a mission in the Kingdom of Tonga and Niue Island, which gave him â&#x20AC;&#x153;a stronger love and appreciation for [his] ancestors and their journey in the gospel.â&#x20AC;? Fonua is now a senior studying IBM and said coming to Hawaii is one of the best choices heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have ever made. Running with him for VP

store. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming from the mainland, we have Target everywhere and what was nice was this Target was just like every other one in the mainland. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to target to tourists or locals like Wal-Mart tends to do. Also I liked how big the store was and that there was accessible parking.â&#x20AC;? Both Target stores will now be open Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sundays.

ABOVE: Laie resident Joselyn Akana has been named the Young Mother of the Year for the State of Hawaii. She and her husband, Brandyn, a basketball coach and an EXS faculty member at BYUH, have three children.

awaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Mother of the Year for 2009 is none other than Laie resident and Hawaii native Joselyn Akana. Akana is the wife of Seasider Basketball Assistant Coach Brandyn Akana, who is also the bishop of the BYU-Hawaii 17th Ward. They have been married for 10 years and have two daughters and one son, all under the age of 8. Akana said that the most rewarding thing about being a mother is how unconditionally forgiving and loving her children are. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a bad day,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;they still tell me that they love me.â&#x20AC;? Akanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience with being nominated for Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2009 Young Mother of the Year was very unique. She was selected by a local committee of American Mothers, Inc. (AMI) in Laie comprised of Donette Tew, Lisa Wagner, and May Shumway. These three sisters have each been Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Mother

photos by the ASSOCIATED PRESS and JENNA CHIDESTER

of the Year themselves - Wagner in 1999, Tew in 2004 and Shumway in 2005. The committee had been seeking inspiration for a few weeks to help them decide which Young Mother of the Year candidate was the right choice. The day before their nomination was due to the AMI, they felt that Joselyn Akana should be the nominee for 2009. Akana had not been on the list of nominees they were praying about in the previous weeks, however all three women had been inspired and agreed that she was the right woman for the title. To Akana, the nomination was humbling and an answer to her prayers. She explained that at the beginning of 2009, she had made two New Yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ResoluWLRQV7KHĂ&#x20AC;UVWZDVWRVWRSFRPSODLQLQJDQGWKHVHFond was to become a better mom by learning to work with her children to emphasize their strengths instead of focusing on their weaknesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized that Heavenly Father was giving me an opportunity here,â&#x20AC;? said Akana. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My New Yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; resolutions and prayers were answeredâ&#x20AC;Ś I saw this as a great learning opportunity.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;RACHEL ADAMS

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Heli Huli North Shore Moped Rentals wins CIE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Conference of Championsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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Obama airs Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dirty laundry

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he Willes Center for International Entrepreneurship hosted a business conference and business plan competition from Wednesday, March 4 to Friday, March, 6. A number of sessions were offered throughout the days, and highlighted here are some of the conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general sessions. Thursday Breakfast Professionally dressed and sleepy-eyed students gathered to attend the opening session and breakfast for the Center for International Entrepreneurship (CIE) sponsored event titled â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Conference of Champions.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The meeting commenced Thursday, March 5, at 8 a.m. in the ballroom. Students were provided with RDWPHDOIUXLWPXIĂ&#x20AC;QVDQGRUDQJHMXLFHEHIRUHKHDUing from guest speaker Dan McCormick. McCormick talked of ways that students can have success in the business world despite challenges with a failing economy: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The economy can be your friend. Ideas can be life changing and you only need one.â&#x20AC;? He encouraged students to think of businesses that will be successful with the current problems. He continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is an entrepreneur? It is someone that takes risks.â&#x20AC;? Dan Jones, sophomore in accounting from Ogden, 8WDKVDLG´7KHPDLQWZRWKLQJVWKDW,JRWRXWRIWKLV areâ&#x20AC;Śyou donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to [take risks] alone [and] to learn fromâ&#x20AC;Śpeopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past experiences.â&#x20AC;? McCormick said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone should always have two books with them - one to read and one to write in.â&#x20AC;? McCormick focused on the point that one has to always continue learning. Thursday Luncheon ,QKLV7KXUVGD\OXQFKHRQDGGUHVV%<8+DZDLL President Steven C. Wheelwright discussed the inauguration charge President Henry B. Eyring gave him almost two years ago. In his inaugural charge, President Eyring said success would be â&#x20AC;&#x153;realized as young people gain greater power to make the world better for others. Success wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in accolades to the president or the teachers; it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in recognition for the university. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in new or better buildings and equipment. ,WZRQ¡WEHLQPRUHHIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQF\6XFFHVVZLOOEHLQ the increase in the power of the students to improve families, communities, and the world.â&#x20AC;? The keynote address featured Carlos Martins, a ´SRRUÂľ%<83URYRJUDGXDWHRULJLQDOO\IURP%UD]LO who now owns the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest private system of language schools that includes 1,200 locations in seven countries, 15,000 employees and 500,000 students. He told the amazing story of how he followed his own rule â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;goal setting is essential for successâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at the start of 2008 to hand out 365 Church â&#x20AC;&#x153;passalongâ&#x20AC;? cards, at the rate of one a day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After 30 days I had passed out 100 cards; I thought maybe my goal was too little,â&#x20AC;? Martins said. Pondering what the real goal should be, Martins

ABOVE: 2008 Center for International Entrepreneurship Competition winner Brett Lee (Center) with (L to R) CIE Entrepreneurs-inResidence Todd Sibley and Leonard Black, BYUH President Steven Wheelwright and CIE Director James Ritchie. Lee won $15,000 to go towards his moped rental business which will be located at Turtle Bay Resort.

realized his company Web site receives 200,000 hits a month: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t I include an icon on our web site offering a prize of a book for the family, a Book of Mormon,â&#x20AC;? he continued. In addition, Martins also decided to insert a pass-along card into each of the 500,000 books his students get each year. 0DUWLQVQRWHG´7KHĂ&#x20AC;QDOUHVXOWLVWKDWRQDUHJXlar monthly basis, the Church receives approximately SKRQHFDOOVMXVWIURPWKLVLQLWLDWLYHÂľ ´,I\RXZDQWWRDFKLHYHVXFFHVVLQOLIHĂ&#x20AC;UVW believe in God, believe in yourself, believe in your dream and your divine potential and your personal ability to overcome and achieve,â&#x20AC;? said Martins. Friday Awards The Business Plan Competition ended with the DZDUGVFHUHPRQ\%<8+VHQLRU%UHWW/HH¡VSODQIRU Hele Huli North Shore Moped Rental, a moped rental business at Turtle Bay Resort in Kahuku, earned him the $15,000 top prize. Lee, a senior in hospitality and tourism management from Lancaster, California, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always liked mopeds and I work at Turtle Bay. I saw the opportunity, and noticed they could use the extra amenity. With the prize money, I hope to start up with a minimum of 10 mopeds, but probably 15 or 20.â&#x20AC;? Lee has already contracted for space in the park Each of four other teams won runner-up prizes of IRUWKHLUSURSRVHGSODQVDOORIWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOLVWV DOVRUHFHLYHGDQGHDFKRIWKHRWKHU%<8+ students who submitted a plan received a monetary award. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had more entrants this year than we ever had before,â&#x20AC;? said CIE Director James Ritchie, noting %<8+VWXGHQWVVXEPLWWHGEXVLQHVVSODQV2IWKDW QXPEHUMXGJHVVHOHFWHGIRUIXUWKHUHYDOXDWLRQ from which the top 15 â&#x20AC;&#x153;came prepared to present. 7KH\GLGQ¡WNQRZZKRWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOLVWVZHUHXQWLOZHDQâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK AND nounced their names,â&#x20AC;? he added.

resident Barrack Obama continued a house cleaning of previous administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies by releasing undisclosed information from George W. Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presidency. On Monday, Mar. 2, 2009, it was revealed that antiterror memos had claimed exceptional search-and-seizure powers and that the Central Intelligence Agency had destroyed nearly 100 videotapes of treatment and interrogations of terror suspects. The disclosures also revealed information about actions taken after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The Justice Department shared nine legal opinions that showed that the Bush administration had determined that some constitutional rights would not apply in the coming war. Only two weeks later there were lawyers trying to Ă&#x20AC;QGZD\VWRZLUHWDS86FRQYHUsations without warrants.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too often over the past deFDGH WKH Ă&#x20AC;JKW DJDLQVW WHUURULVP has been viewed as a zero-sum battle with our civil libertiesâ&#x20AC;Ś Not only is that school of thought misguided, I fear that in actuality it does more harm than good,â&#x20AC;? said Attorney General Eric Holder in a speech a few hours before the documents were released. There is still some investigation that has to be made on the matter of these secrets being kept. Of the destroyed videos there were those that showed the actions taken with hostages, but others held recordings that werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear. With these secrets released, C.I.A. spokesman George Little said the agency â&#x20AC;&#x153;has certainly cooperated with the Department of Justice investigation. If anyone thinks its agency policy to impede the enforcement of American law, they simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the facts.â&#x20AC;?

D.C. spends $30 billion more on AIG ABOVE: Dan McCormick, author and Nu Skin representative speaks about life-changing ideas and the result they can have, even in a downed economy. He spoke during the breakfst session of the conference on Thursday morning. BELOW: Ryan Ockey, Canadan real estate developer and father of a BYUH student, after speaking at the Friday morning KIRIVEPWIWWMSR3GOI]WTSOIEFSYXXLIFPIWWMRKWSJFIMRKEJ½PMated with the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leadership Council and PCC.

-MIKE FOLEY AND TRIJSTEN LEACH

photos by MONIQUE SAENZ

nation

T

he American International Group, Inc., a previous recipient of government bailout funds, has encountered bad tidings yet again as the worldwide economic recession continues. The company, best known for its investment services, posted a loss in the fourth quarter of 2008 of RYHUELOOLRQWKHZRUVWTXDUWHUO\ORVVLQ86FRUporate history. As such, the bailout plans have been restructured, with the government extending an additional $30 billion to the struggling insurer. In the last quarter of 2008, AIG stock share prices fell $22.95 per share, causing a corporate loss of $61.7 billion and resulting in a company revenue of QHJDWLYH  ELOOLRQ :LWK WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW EDLORXW SODQ AIG estimated a substantial slowdown in negative SURĂ&#x20AC;WEXWUHVXOWVIHOOVKRUWRIH[SHFWDWLRQV(DUO\LQ 2008, economic analysts estimated a loss in value of around 25 cents per share, clearly far less than the actual loss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billions upon billions of dollars have been loaned to these companies and things are still not looking up,â&#x20AC;? said Alyssa Herzinger, sophomore in international cultural studies from Sandpoint, Idaho. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the money was pumped into the economy by

photos by the ASSOCIATED PRESS

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABOVE: President Barack Obama delivers remarks to members of the Business Council, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, in the East Room of the White House, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, in Washington.

way of the people who are spending it, I think things would level themselves out.â&#x20AC;? Her sentiments are echoed by Dustin Geddes, seQLRULQDFFRXQWLQJIURP&HGDU+LOOV8WDK+HVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIG got what it deserved. The way banks were giving out mortgages to pretty much anyone without proving salaries or assets or anything was ridiculous.â&#x20AC;? AIG, which has been selling its interests in other businesses to cut costs, originally bought some of the less-reliable mortgage interests that may have originally caused the economic fallout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And when people started defaulting [on their mortgages], kablammo,â&#x20AC;? Geddes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The spending in this nation is ridiculous,â&#x20AC;? said 6KDQQRQ0DMGDOLDUHVLGHQWRI/DLH´,W¡VPLQGERJgling because the government is so stingy in other FDVHV WKDW FDQ UHDOO\ EHQHĂ&#x20AC;W SHRSOH ZKR QHHG WKH money,â&#x20AC;? she continued. AIG income fell almost 90% in 2008, to $11 billion, down from $110 billion in 2007. Total losses for the year added up to nearly $90 million, compared WR D  SURĂ&#x20AC;W RI  ELOOLRQ 7RWDO EDLORXW PRQH\ issued to the troubled corporation now amounts to over $180 billion. In addition to mortgage and investing, AIG also has interests in insurance and is currently one of the largest automobile insurers in Hawaii. Policyholders are encouraged to ensure their insurance hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK AND -BRETT EVANS AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABOVE: 7TIGMEPMWX&VEHPI]/IWWPIV[SVOWSRXLIžSSV of the New York Stock Exchange, Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2009. The major stock indexes fell more than 5 percent Tuesday, including the Dow Jones industrial average, which tumbled 382 points.

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March 12, 2009

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sports March 12, 2009 :SPYQIÂ&#x2C6;-WWYI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ryan Anderson ART DIRECTOR Erynn Vierra WEB MASTER Jenna Chidester AD MANAGER Melody Chiang

MARKETING Terrence Kau COPY EDITORS Sam Akinaka April Courtright Amanda Hansen Karen Hemenway ADVISOR LeeAnn Lambert

STAFF WRITERS Rachel Adams Ben Buttars Lucy Cammock Brett Evans Nicole Hamilton Mary Jantalert Trijsten Leach Marni Vail Karly Zobrist Jordan Flake Austin Cook

ART Rachel Au Ieong Kent Carollo Courtney Banks Charlotte Aldridge Leona Tsang PHOTOGS Chris Gardener Nate Williams Meghan Seely Aaron Knudsen INTERNS Shem Greenwood Kathleen Majdali

PODCASTERS Lauren Woodbury Brian Poppleton Anna Daines

PUBLISHER

BYU-Hawaii KE ALAKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;I is printed weekly by: BYU-HAWAII PRINT SERVICES

kealakai.byuh.edu E-mail: kealakai@byuh.edu Phone: (808) 675-3694 Fax: (808) 675-3695 3J½GI&=9,E[EMM Aloha Center, Room 134 CAMPUS NEWS CENTER Campus Box 1920, BYU-Hawaii, Laie, HI 96762 U.S.A RSS FEED SUBSCRIBE ON-LINE: KEALAKAI.BYUH.EDU SEE BACK ISSUES ON-LINE: KEALAKAI.BYUH.EDU

ON THE COVER: Alice Yui and friends at the close of â&#x20AC;&#x153;@RTIMOS: Soul, heart and hands.â&#x20AC;? This was the third concert hosted by the @RTIMOS gang, with more performers than the previous, and the inclusion of an international live broadcast as well.

Editorial, & Photo Submissions, Advertising & Distribution inquiries: kealakai@byuh.edu

7KUHH/DG\ Seasiders ELGIDUHZHOO ABOVE: The Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team celebrate a 107 to 70 victory over HPU on March 8.

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â&#x20AC;&#x201C;SCOTT LOWE AND SAM AKINAKA

BRACKET FOR CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES AT BYU-HAWAII

Š Entire Contents Copyright 2009, Ke Alaka`i

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in this issue

NAtion

March 12, 2009

2&11.indd 1

6-7

8-9

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New Leadership - BYUHSA Elections: vying for your vote. Student wins $15k - Heli Huli North Shore Moped Rentals wins CIE Conference of Champions.

Be the change - ONE Week at BYUH promotes peace. Soul, heart and hands - 3rd installment of @RTIMOS is a hit.

Motherhood - Laie woman named Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Mother of the Year. Ewa tragedy - Stabbing increases community concern. Shop â&#x20AC;&#x2122;til you drop - Hawaii welcomes two new Target stores.

Basketball - BYUH to host NCAA II SubRegional Championship. 7IRMSVWLSRSVIHEX½REP home games - Three men ERHXLVII[SQIR½RMWLMRK up their BYUH careers.

Sports brings people together - Opinion: Basketball, unity and budget cuts. Movie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;wipeoutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; - â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is painful to watch.

Campus

Secrets have no friends - Obama airs Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dirty laundry. Latest government bailout - D.C. spends $30 billion more on AIG.

0 2

4-5 & 10

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genuine gold

Community

sports

Life & entertainment

Cover Photo by LEILANI MILLER

ABOVE: Lady Seasider Mahina Gago, junior guard, shoots during a game against HPU.

photos by AARON KNUDSEN

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March 12, 2009

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3/11/09 1:31 PM


L&E Opinion: Basketball, unity and budget cuts

A

Above: Starring Chris Evans (Fantastic Four) and Dakota Fanning (Coraline), â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pushâ&#x20AC;? is an action thriller about super-humans on the run from the agency that is trying to kill them.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is painful to watch

T

he painfully inscrutable paranormal thriller â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pushâ&#x20AC;? introduces a host of characters with various gifts. Some can see the future, some can heal, some can plant ideas in otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minds and some can make change for a dollar. By the time the credits roll, your most fervent wish is to run into a â&#x20AC;&#x153;wiperâ&#x20AC;? (one who can erase memories). In an opening credits prologue, we learn that the U.S. government is continuing to perform psychic experiments started by the Nazis in order to create some kind of super-freakypowerful army. Like a lot of things in David Bourlaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s script, the rules of engagement after the philanthropicminded telepaths begin to battle the evil mind-benders out for world domination are unclear. What we do know is that Nick Gant (Chris Evans) is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;mover,â&#x20AC;? a second-generation telekinetic who went into hiding after the Division killed his father more than a decade earlier. He lives a life of anonymity in Hong Kong, a densely populated place where fugitive psychics like him are safe, as long as they can keep their unique gift a secret. Into Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

life there suddenly comes a 13-yearold â&#x20AC;&#x153;watcherâ&#x20AC;? Cassie Holmes (Dakota Fanning), a clairvoyant who needs his help in tracking down an escaped â&#x20AC;&#x153;pusherâ&#x20AC;? Kira, who may hold the key to bringing down the Division once and for all. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;pusherâ&#x20AC;? is the most powerful kind of psychic due to his RUKHUDELOLW\WRLQĂ XHQFHWKHDFWLRQV of others by planting thoughts in their minds. Now, as Nick emerges from hiding LQRUGHUWRKHOS&DVVLHĂ&#x20AC;QG.LUDWKH Divisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s human bloodhounds are hot on their trail. In order to elude the authorities, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to disappear into the seedy underbelly of the city while relying on a team of rogue psychics to help cover their tracks. But Division Agent Henry Carver (Djimon Hounsou) is a powerful pusher who has made it his mission to stop them at all costs, regardless of the collateral damages that may occur in the process. Though this is a new kind of style for director Paul McGuigan, the average rating for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pushâ&#x20AC;? is 4.5 stars out of 5.

t BYU-Hawaii the theme â&#x20AC;&#x153;unityâ&#x20AC;? has long been emphasized by student leadership, school administration and church leaders. The theme becomes increasingly important in a school where a student body of less than 3,000 represents 70 countries. There are truly few places in the world where unity should be a more important theme. Unity at BYU-Hawaii conjures up a variety of thoughts for me, including Foodfest, Songfest, BYUH Idol, Devotional, and our talented employees at the PCC. Recently I added another most impressive event to that important list. On the evening RI )HE  , ZLWQHVVHG D VLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQW number of the student body pack the CAC for the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball game. It was an important and intense game. 7KH6HDVLGHUVZHUHĂ&#x20AC;JKWLQJIRUKRPH court advantage in the play-offs and claimed it in a narrow victory. In the diverse crowd I yelled with students

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUSTIN COOK

from Hong Kong, Brazil, Taiwan, the Philippines, the United States, Sweden, the islands of Polynesia and more. What made it all so inspiring to me was the fact that the students were there not to indulge in the sharing of culture the way they can at FoodFest or Culture Night, but to truly be a part of a common goal. I made new friends from Hong Kong who sat in the row in front of me. They asked to take pictures with me and my friends because we all started cheering together. Would it be sacrilegious to say I have never felt like I was more a part of Zion than at a basketball game? Maybe, but I discovered for myself the importance of celebrating something that makes us the same, just as much as celebrating the things that make us different. So as the season winds down, I want to congratulate our basketball teams for wonderful seasons. I wish to recognize the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seasider PacWest champions. But most of all, now that our university faces important decisions regarding budget cuts (as outlined by Staff Writer Nicole Hamilton in the Feb. 19 issue of Ke Alakaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i) the future of athletics at BYUH is in question. If the nature of athletics has to change, it has to change. We go to school largely by the means of tithe-payerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s money, so it is a point we would be obligated to concede. But it is in that vein that I thank the basketball teams for what they have taught us and implore to the administration of this university that in the spirit of true unity, our legacy of winning athletics be continued at BYU-Hawaii.

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Projects of Peace Students join soul, heart and hands to make a difference

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JAROM REID

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photo courtesy of MOVIES.YAHOO.COM AND KE ALAKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;I FILE PHOTO

ONE Week

Be the change, see the peace

NCAA II Champs Seasiders to host sub-regional tourney

Knighthood

CIE hosts conference of champs


Mar 12, 2009