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Books and bouncing as the semester begins

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he Opening Social is the Ă€UVW RSSRUWXQLW\ RI WKH semester to make new friends and dance the night away. It ransformed the Cannon Activities Center into a social event and Moroccan-looking bazaar. People were also sitting on the Ă RRU VXUURXQGHG E\ ERRNV MHZHOU\ clothing and other items for sale at the BYUHSA sponsored book sale. The bargain hunting was accompanied by blow-up jungle gyms on the other side of the room, and the night’s HYHQWV HQGHG ZLWK WKH Ă€UVW GDQFH RI the semester. Mixed emotions resulted from the Opening Social however, with complaints coming in about lighting, lack of space and a lack of food. However, Emily York, junior in International Cultural Studies from Michigan, said, “I was extremely pleased with everyone’s company. I really saw some dancers come out that night and I felt joyous vibes bouncing

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DURXQGWKHURRPÂľ Momomi Hannemann, senior in TESOL from Washington, left feeling a little ripped off after buying a $20 used 6th edition textbook. “I really needed the 8th addition, but this was DOO,FRXOGĂ€QG%XW,GLGQ¡WWKLQNWKH RQOLQHZDVZRUWKLWÂľ 7KRXJKQRWHYHU\RQHZDVVDWLVĂ€HG with their purchases, some were appeased by the dance. 2I WKH Ă€UVW GDQFH RI WKH VHPHVter, Theodore Davis, senior in Business from Utah said it was “the best one ever! It was fun and exciting and SUREDEO\WKHEHVWDWWHQGHGHYHUÂľ Pehrson Hawkley, senior in biochemistry from New Jersey, said, “The best part of the whole night‌ was the EDNHU\Âľ+DZNOH\ZDVUHIHUULQJWRWKH bake sale put on by a student in need fund raising for their tuition. –MARNI VAIL

Above: (L to R) Ryan Orm, Ronald Casaba and Jacob Auna bargain with fel-

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low students at the book sale during the &=9,7%3TIRMRK7SGMEP

BYU-Hawaii campus reaches 50-year mark

ec. 17, 2008, the Brigham Young University Hawaii campus — that is, the actual physical plant — marks 50 years to the day since President David O. McKay stood at the podium in the brand new auditorium, now named in his honor, and dedicated the core facilities of the Church College of Hawaii (renamed in 1974) that the labor missionaries had just completed. That morning, President McKay and Elder Mar-

,Q WKH DXGLWRULXP WKH DXGLHQFH Ă€OOHG HYHU\ seat, awaiting their arrival. Large louvers on the VLGHV ZKLFKKDYHORQJVLQFHEHHQĂ€OOHGLQ ZHUH opened so more people could watch, and loudspeakers were also set up for even more people in ion G. Romney of the Quorum of the Twelve, and the foyer and hallways. their wives, walked from Laie Elementary School Hawaii Governor William F. Quinn, Honolulu parting the long garlands of plumeria patterned Mayor Neal S. Blaisdell, Deputy Superintendent of after the greeting community residents gave King Territorial Schools Deal F. Crooker, and UniverKalakaua when he visited in 1874. They stopped for sity of Hawaii President Dr. Laurence Snyder were the unveiling of the mosaic mural above the foyer already on the stand. of the building now also named in his honor. The In his remarks, Gov. Quinn said, “We have no PXUDO KDG OLWHUDOO\ EHHQ Ă€QLVKHG MXVW D KDOIKRXU doubt that the Church College of Hawaii will serve before President WKH 3DFLĂ€F ZRUOG ZHOO Âł DV DQ HGXFDWLRQDO McKay’s arrival. center — just as heretofore Laie has been a Below: Fifty years ago, the Church College spiritual center; and that we, the Occidental SJ,E[EMM´W½VWXTL]WMGEPFYMPHMRK[EWHIHM- SHRSOH WKH 3RO\QHVLDQ SHRSOH RI WKH 3DFLĂ€F world will come and that the Church College cated by President David O. McKay. Today of Hawaii will make its contributions to the that same building bears his name. destiny of Hawaii which is so manifest in this 3DFLĂ€FZRUOGWREHLQWUXWKDOHDGHURIDOORI WKHSHRSOHVRIWKH3DFLĂ€FÂľ About two hours later, as President McKay began his remarks, he recalled that 38 years earlier ´ZH VWRRG DURXQG WKH Ă DJSROH DQG SOHGJHG DOOHJLDQFHWRWKHĂ DJVRGHDUWRDOORIXV¾³DVFHQH recreated in the mosaic mural. –MIKE FOLEY

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Who’s new on campus?

PHOTOS BY RYAN BAGLEY

January 15, 2009

Opening Social Book sale, dance ERHMRžEXEFPIW welcome students

Men’s basketball jumps up in ranks January 15, 2008

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS RIVERS PUZEY

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January 15, 2009

Volume 87 • Issue 1

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ryan Anderson ART DIRECTOR Erynn Vierra COPY EDITORS Amanda Hansen Karen Hemenway Sam Akinaka

WEB MASTER Jenna Chidester AD MANAGER Melody Chiang ADVISOR LeeAnn Lambert

STAFF WRITERS Ben Buttars April Courtright Brett Evans Mary Jantalert Trijsten Leach Marni Vail Karly Zobrist Jordan Flake PODCASTERS Lauren Woodbury

ART Rachel Au Ieong Terrence Kau Kent Carollo PHOTOGS Ryan Bagley INTERNS Shem Greenwood Kathleen Majdali

PUBLISHER Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

KE ALAKA’I is published weekly by: BYU-HAWAII PRINT SERVICES kealakai.byuh.edu

E-mail: kealakai@byuh.edu Phone: (808) 675-3694 Fax: (808) 675-3695 3J½GI&=9,E[EMM%PSLE'IRXIV Room 134 CAMPUS NEWS CENTER 'EQTYW&S\ &=9,E[EMM0EMI,- U.S.A RSS FEED SUBSCRIBE ON-LINE: KEALAKAI.BYUH.EDU SEE BACK ISSUES ON-LINE: KEALAKAI.BYUH.EDU

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Table of Contents

Editorial, & Photo Submissions, Advertising & Distribution inquiries: kealakai@byuh.edu Š Entire Contents Copyright 2008, Ke Alaka`i

3

4-5

6

8

7YV½RK-4MTIPMRI1EWXIVW7PEXIV wins again. Basketball7IEWMHIVWGSVIWERHYTHEXIW

Whats new?-GPEWWIW GSQTYXIVWERHWGLIHYPIW%PWS½RH SYXEFSYXXLIRI[JEGIWSRGEQTYW

Missions-QER]EVIGEPPIH JI[IVEVIGEPPIHXLVIIXMQIWGreat Women-XLI%GEHIQMG;SQIR´W 2IX[SVOGSQQMXWXSI\GIPPIRGI

Congratulations-&=9,GEQTYWXYVRWOpening SocialERRNVDOHGDQFHDQGLQĂ DWDEOHV

Sports

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Campus

PAGE ONE PHOTO BY RYAN BAGLEY

Campus

January 15, 2009

January 15, 2008

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS RIVERS PUZEY

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The third time’s the charm

campus

Campus-wide women’s group promotes excellence in academics

O

ne organization at BYU-Hawaii that many students may not be aware RILVWKH$FDGHPLF:RPHQ¡V1HWwork. Created in 2006, this advisory group is becoming more and more established. $FFRUGLQJWRWKHLU:HEVLWHWKLV network is composed of women from BYUH’s faculty and administrative staff who are “committed to excellence in teaching, research, creative work, service and administration our campus and beyond.â€? Helena Hannonen is currently the president of the Academic :RPHQ¡V 1HWZRUN $:1  5RVH 5DPLVYLFHSUHVLGHQWDQG/HLDORha Pakalani is vice president for communications. Pakalani, said they seek to “provide a leadership venue for women administrative staff and faculty; we try to enhance opportunities for networking to facilitate professional growth and career satisfaction, and we monitor and celebrate accomplishments.â€? One way in which this is accomplished is through monthly meetings where members can learn from and share with one another. Explaining the structure of the $:13DNDODQLVDLG´)RUQRZZH have appointed different sub-com-

mittees to help us accomplish our JRDOV DQG PRVW VLJQLĂ€FDQWO\ WKH appointment of the advisory board. :H KDYH PHW ZLWK 6KHUL 'HZ 0DU\ &RRN DQG :HQG\ :DWVRQ Nelson to discuss issues important to women who are mothers and career-women.â€? On the advisory ERDUG IRU WKH $:1 DUH 'HEELH +LSSROLWH :ULJKW %HWK +D\QHV DQG0DUJDUHW:KHHOZULJKWÂľ 5DP GHVFULEHG KRZ WKH RUJDnization has been busy at work. She said, “we have already accomplished many things, and we continue to strive to encourage women WRIXOĂ€OOWKHLUSRWHQWLDOÂľ5DPH[plained that the new creations of WKH:HEVLWHDQGDEODFNERDUGDFcount, through which women can communicate, are part of a greater effort to showcase and highlight the works of professional women. ´:HOLNHWRFDOORXUVHOYHVDWHDPÂľ VDLG5DP 2Q WRS RI WKLV 5DP H[SODLQV “Throughout the years, we have worked hard to establish ourselves as helpers in the community.â€? One of the organization’s most recent projects involved a trip to Micronesia to offer training and resource to a library in Yap. “The library was destroyed by a typhoon, so we helped with rebuilding and training the librarians on how to run and manage a library.â€?

Below: (L to R) Rose Ram, Helena Hannonen and Leialoha Pakalani, the current presidency of the BYUH chapter of the Academic Women’s Network.

– APRIL COURTRIGHT & MICHAEL WAITE

For the third time, Trevor Kaimikaua saw the words on the page in front of him: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Elder Kaimikaua, you are hereby called to serve as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. You are assigned to labor i n theâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Due to unusual c i rcumstances, Kaimikaua, a former BYU-Hawaii freshman now serving in the California Anaheim Mission, will serve in two different missions at three different occasions to serve for a full 24 months. .DLPLNDXDRULJLQDOO\IURP0DNDNLORUHFHLYHGKLVĂ&#x20AC;UVWPLVVLRQFDOO LQDVHFRQGDQGKLVĂ&#x20AC;QDOLQ ,Q.DLPLNDXDUHFHLYHGKLVPLVVLRQFDOOWRVHUYHLQWKH*XDWHPDOD&LW\1RUWK0LVVLRQDQGZDVWRUHSRUWWRWKH*XDWHPDOD0LVVLRQDU\ 7UDLQLQJ&HQWHURQ1RY([FLWHGE\WKHFDOOKLVSDUHQWVFDOOHGIULHQGV DQGIDPLO\WRJDWKHUWRJHWKHUWRVKDUHLQWKHLUVRQV¡VSHFLDO ´,ZDVH[FLWHGIRUKLPDQGKLVSDUHQWVEHFDXVHKH¡VDQRQO\FKLOGDQG WKHRQO\JUDQGVRQRQKLVIDWKHU¡VVLGHÂľVDLG/HLKD(QRVFRXVLQRI(OGHU .DLPLNDXDIURP0DNDNLOR %HIRUH KHDGLQJ WR WKH *XDWHPDOD 07& IDPLO\ IULHQGV DQG ZDUG PHPEHUVJDWKHUHGWRJHWKHUDWWKH+RQROXOXDLUSRUWWRVHH(OGHU.DLPLNDXDRIIRQKLVPLVVLRQ ´, IHOW VDG WKDW KH ZDV OHDYLQJ EHFDXVH KH¡V P\ RQO\ FRXVLQ RQ P\ PRP¡VVLGH,ZDVVDGWKDW,ZRXOGQ¡WVHHKLPIRUWZR\HDUVÂľUHFDOOHG .DOHL+RD3DFHKR +RZHYHU6LV\OLQD3HWHUVRQDFORVHIDPLO\IULHQGWRWKH.DLPLNDXDV¡ UHFDOOHG WKH PRPHQW ZKHQ WKH SKRQH UDQJ ZLWK VRPH VXUSULVLQJ QHZV DERXWWKHQHZPLVVLRQDU\´0\$XQW\&KDXQDDQVZHUHGWKHSKRQH6KH VWRRGWKHUHIRUDPRPHQWVLOHQWWKHQKXQJXSWKHSKRQH6KHWXUQHGWR PHDQGVDLGWKDW7UHYRULVĂ \LQJLQWRPRUURZPRUQLQJÂľVDLG3HWHUVRQ $IWHURQO\RQHZHHNRQKLVPLVVLRQ(OGHU.DLPLNDXDUHWXUQHGKRPH ´,IHOWWKDW,KDGWRWDNHFDUHRIVRPHSHUVRQDOWKLQJVEHIRUH,FRXOGFRQWLQXHP\PLVVLRQÂľVDLG(OGHU.DLPLNDXD´0\PLVVLRQSUHVLGHQWDVNHG LI,ZDQWHGWRGRLWLQWKH07&EXW,IHOWOLNH,VKRXOGMXVWUHWXUQKRPH DQGKDQGOHLWÂľ .HYLQ.DLPLNDXDKLVIDWKHUVDLG´,GLGQ¡WNQRZZKDWWRWKLQNZKHQ ,JRWDSKRQHFDOOIURPP\VRQDQGKLVPLVVLRQSUHVLGHQWVD\LQJKHZRXOG EHUHWXUQLQJKRPH,ORYHP\VRQDQGVXSSRUWKLPLQDQ\WKLQJGHFLVLRQ KHPDNHVÂľ ,QPLGVHYHUDOPRQWKVDIWHUUHWXUQLQJKRPH(OGHU.DLPLNDXD UHVXEPLWWHG KLV PLVVLRQ SDSHUV ´, JRW P\ PLVVLRQ FDOO DERXW WKUHH ZHHNVDIWHU,VXEPLWWHGLW,ZDVFDOOHGWRWKHVDPHPLVVLRQ*XDWHPDOD &LW\ 1RUWK 0LVVLRQÂľ VDLG (OGHU . ´7KLV WLPH , ZDV WR UHSRUW WR WKH 07&LQ8WDKÂľ (OGHU .DLPLNDXD UHSRUWHG WR WKH 3URYR 07& DQG VWD\HG WKHUH IRU WZRPRQWKVEHIRUHKHDGLQJWR*XDWHPDOD ´7KHVHFRQGWLPHDURXQGKHZDVHQMR\LQJKLVPLVVLRQDQGIHOOLQORYH ZLWKWKHSHRSOH,FRXOGVHHLQKLVOHWWHUVWKDWKLVWHVWLPRQ\ZDVJURZLQJ HDFK DQG HYHU\ GD\Âľ VDLG /HL$QQ .DLPLNDXD (OGHU .DLPLNDXD¡V PRWKHU 6WHYLH<DWHVRQHRI(OGHU.DLPLNDXD¡VIULHQGVVDLG´2Q0RWKHU¡V 'D\KHFDOOHGP\KRXVHEHFDXVHKLVZKROHIDPLO\ZDVWKHUHIRUD0RWKHU¡V'D\GLQQHUZHSXWRQ(YHU\RQHWKHUHJRWWRWDONWRKLPÂľ %XW<DWHV DGGHG WKDW RQ WKH:HGQHVGD\ DIWHU 0RWKHU¡V 'D\ (OGHU .DLPLNDXD¡VIDWKHUFDOOHGVD\LQJ7UHYRUZRXOGEHFRPLQJKRPHWKHQH[W PRUQLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JOCELYN FAUMUINA

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Look for: Third timeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the charm

GRAPHIC BY KATHLEEN MAJDALI & PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSE RAM

January 15, 2009

Seasider Men Continue Winning, Rise in Rankings

Sports

T

he BYU-Hawaii menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team moved into the eighth spot in the latest Division II poll of the National Association of Basketball Coaches, released Tuesday. The Seasiders rose one spot from the previous poll after winning three games last week to improve their record to 9-1. %<8+QHHGHGDODVWPLQXWHUDOO\WRĂ&#x20AC;QLVKRII UH-Hilo in the conference opener last Tuesday. Despite leading nearly the entire game, the Seasiders found themselves down 91-88 with just 1:28 to play. BYUH sandwiched a Lucas Alves block with a couple of baskets to take the lead, 92-91, DQG VHQLRU -HUPDLQH 2GMHJED Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHG WKH JDPH with two free throws after pulling down a crucial rebound with 1.4 seconds remaining in the game to seal the win. Alves, junior in exercise and sports science IURP %UD]LO ZDV KHOG VFRUHOHVV LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW KDOI EXW Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZLWK  SRLQWV WZR DVVLVWV DQG WKUHH blocks. Odjegba, senior in international business management from Florida, had 16 points, four assists one block along with a steal. Nathan Sims, ZKR JDUQHUHG 3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F :HVW &RQIHUHQFH 3OD\HU RI WKH :HHN KRQRUV IRU KLV SOD\ WKH SUHYLRXV ZHHN led the Seasiders in points, with 20, and rebounds, with nine. Sims, senior in history from California, added two assists, a block and two steals for the night. The Seasiders followed with another victory RYHU WKH 9XOFDQV RQ :HGQHVGD\ QLJKW WKLV WLPH dominating the non-conference game from start to Ă&#x20AC;QLVK%<8+ZDVRQĂ&#x20AC;UHLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWKDOIVKRRWLQJ SHUFHQWIURPWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGWRWDNHDOHDGLQWR the half. The Seasiders coasted in the second half, main-

Winning three more games this past week against UH-Hilo, BYUHawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mens basketball jumps up a spot to number eight on the NCAA Divisioni II coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; poll. Their record is now 9-1.

WDLQLQJDGRXEOHGLJLWOHDGWKURXJKRXWIRUDQ win. Alves didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for the second half to get started in this one, scoring 17 of his game-high 26 SRLQWVLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSHULRGRQVKRRWLQJIURPWKH Ă&#x20AC;HOG6LPVMRLQHG$OYHVDVWKHRQO\RWKHU6HDVLGHU WRVFRUHLQGRXEOHĂ&#x20AC;JXUHVZLWKSRLQWV7KH6HDsiders were directed offensively by Virgil Buensuceso, junior in pre-med from California, who dished out eight assists on the night. BYUH closed out the week with their second FRQIHUHQFHYLFWRU\WKLVWLPHRYHUWKH6HD:DUULRUV RI+DZDLL3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F$JDLQWKH6HDVLGHUVFDPH RXWVWURQJVKRRWLQJSHUFHQWIURPWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGLQ WKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWKDOIIRUDOHDGDWWKHEUHDN%<8+ also dominated on the boards, almost doubling the 6HD :DUULRUV  IRU WKH JDPH 7KH 6HDVLGHUV were effective in distributing the ball offensively; VL[SOD\HUVZHDULQJWKHFULPVRQJROGDQGJUD\Ă&#x20AC;Qished with double-digits in scoring.

Buensuceso and Trenson Akana, senior in exercise and sports science from Molokaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i, led BYUH ZLWK  SRLQWV DSLHFH ZKLOH 0DUTXHV :KLSS\ sophomore in international business management from Fiji, cashed in on a double-double, scoring 12 points and pulling down a game-high 11 rebounds. The Seasiders were ranked as high as sixth in the national Division II poll during the winter EUHDNEHIRUHDORVVWRWKH:DVKEXUQ .6 ,FKDERGV dropped them to the twelfth spot. Six straight wins have put BYUH back into the top ten and they continue with conference play this week with an away game against Chaminade on Thursday night and a home game versus Notre Dame de Namur RQ6DWXUGD\%RWKJDPHVVWDUWDWSPZLWKWKH Chaminade game to be aired on local sports chanâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SAM AKINAKA nel OC 16.

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Above: Two of the sports greatest champions, Kelly Slater (L) and Gerry Lopez (R), on the awardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stage at the Billabong Pipeline Masters.

January 15, 2009

elly Slater rolled into to Oahuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pipeline shores to take control of the surf competitionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Billabong Pipeline Masters. Slaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win was his sixth out of an 11 event ASP tour for 2008. Slater also held the highlight of heats GXULQJ WKH VHPLĂ&#x20AC;QDOV DJDLQVW 7LPP\ 5H\HV 86$   5H\HV NQRZQ DURXQG WKH world for his expertise in riding barrel waves, emerged with a 9.10 during the last six minutes of the competition. It seemed WREHWKHLQHYLWDEOHZLQIRU5H\HV+RZever, Slater took the competition by scoring a 9.00 and a 10.00 in a space of three minutes. Slater has won 9 ASP world titles for himself. This is also his sixth time taking home the Pipeline trophy. This year Gerry Lopez designed the trophy in the shape of a surfboard.

PHOTOS BY RYAN BAGLEY & TRIPLECROWNOFSURFING.COM

Slater has earned the right to be in the Ă&#x20AC;QDOVRXWRIWLPHVLQ3LSHOLQH7KH last time Slater won the competition was in 1999. Slater also won Pipeline in 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. 6ODWHU PDWFKHG XS ZLWK &KULV :DUG 86$ RQWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOGD\+HSDGGOHGRXWWHQ WLPHV WR EHDW :DUG  DQG  LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW Ă&#x20AC;QDO  +RZHYHU 6ODWHU¡V RWKHU KHDWV EHIRUHWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOWRWDOHGVFRUHV and 19.40. +DG :DUG ZRQ 3LSHOLQH 0DVWHUV KH would have taken the entire Vans Triple Crown title for the season. However, due to DVHFRQGSODFHĂ&#x20AC;QLVK:DUGWRRNWKLUGSODFH in the end. Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joel Parkinson took the title. Parkinson held honors for riding a perfect 20.00 score at Pipeline, the second ever recorded with two wave scoring. The end of the Triple Crown also KHOSHG VHW WKH UDQNLQJV RI WKH$63:RUOG 7RXUIRU.HOO\6ODWHUZLOOFRPHQH[W \HDUUDQNHGĂ&#x20AC;UVWH[SHFWHGWRFRQWLQXHKLV streak. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BEN BUTTARS

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Campus

NEW CAMPUS N EWFACES FACESON ON CAMPUS Daniel Scott

Gregory Clark

ABOVE: is swapping desks with the English department chair, Ned Williams, for the winter and spring semesters. He is from Provo and went to BYU as an undergraduate and then later for an master’s degree – both in English. Later, he returned to school in New York for a doctorate degree in rhetoric and communication from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He describes the beginning of his teaching career as, “an accident,” he says, “my wife, Linda, and I moved to American Samoa where she was going to teach English at Samoana High School. They told me they wanted me to teach too. So I began teaching English there, liked it, and after two years I returned to BYU for graduate school.” He has also taught at Snow College and, after recieving his Ph.D. was hired to teach in the English department at BYU in Provo. He has directed the English composition program, the American studies program, has been English department chair, and is now associate dean of the College of Humanities. “This is a change for me to get back to more teaching and have a break from administration,” he said. The English departments of BYU Provo and Ha[EMMSJXIRTEVXMGMTEXIMRWLSVXJEGYPX]I\GLERKIW 3J EHNYWXMRK XS XLI I\GLERKI 'PEVO WEMH±%JXIV living in Samoa for two years, cockroaches and rust don’t bother us. We’re delighted with the friendliness of the community, and liveliness and intelligence of the students, and the familiar comfort of life on the islands.”

Cary Wasden

, new profesWSVSJ½RERGIERHIGSRSQMGWMWJVSQ7IEXXPI;EWLMRKton. Since moving to the island, he said he has encountered some surprises, “The biggest: the centipedes. It seems like an Indiana Jones movie!” Professor Wasden went to school at BYU Provo for his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and then to Ohio State University for his doctoral dissertation. He was on his way to a teaching position at BYU Idaho when he heard there was a need for professors here. “I have been shocked at the quality of students here. They are great. They are determined and willing to study hard. I am also surprised at the countries represented by the student body. We have students from Mongolia, India, China, Korea and many others. There is a real sense that the future of the church is being developed here. Having traveled to most of the countries represented by the student body, I am certain that the impact these students make on their home countries will be meaningful. I am honored to be part of it,” he said.

– Alyssa Herzinger

Kirby McMaster

LEFT: is a temporary computer and information sciences professor who will be here through the spring. McMaster is from Utah Valley and he received his education from BYU in Provo. ,I½VWXZMWMXIHXLI&=9,E[EMMGEQTYWEJXIV serving his mission in New Zealand. “They didn’t want us traveling the world on our way home but we were allowed to spend a day driving out to the school and newly-built PCC,” he said of his visit. He taught in New Zealand for ten years as well as holding a position at Weber State, where he retired. “I heard from a friend and faculty member here at BYUH that they were in need of a temporary teacher. So, we came out for this semester and spring,” he said.

Geoffrey Draper

LEFT: , a new professor in computer science, grew up near Detroit, Michigan. He completed his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at BYU Provo and his PhD at the University of Utah. He taught classes as a graduate student at the University of Utah. He came to BYU Hawaii because he thought of our campus as “the best of both worlds.” He says, “it has XLIKSWTIPGIRXIVIHIRZMVSRQIRXSJE'LYVGLEJ½PMEXIH school, and the perfect weather of a tropical paradise.” About moving to Hawaii he said, “I was pleasantly surTVMWIHXS½RHXLEXKVSGIVMIW[LMPIQSVII\TIRWMZIXLER SR XLI QEMRPERH EVIR´X EW I\TIRWMZI EW - XLSYKLX XLI] would be. There were no unpleasant surprises... I just love living here!”

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY RYAN BAGLEY

Audrey Thompson

BELOW: is BYUHSA’s new Vice President of clubs and organizations. Thompson is a senior in International Cultural Studies from California, and recently returned from serving a mission in Bolivia. She loves helping people, and after graduating in December, hopes to work with a program for troubled youth. Previous to being part of BYUHSA, Thompson was in the Samoan Club presidency. “Being in a presidency opened my eyes to the way things work from the other side, and I want to help things work for the clubs,” Thompson said. With the quick turnaround of presidencies in clubs, training doesn’t always get done. Thompson will be implementing some changes regarding Saturday training for club leaders that will help campus events like WorldFest and Foodfest function more smoothly. “There is sometimes miscommunication between clubs and within clubs,” she said. “I want it to be comfortable for the clubs to come talk, and be able to make these fun for their members.” If students would like to start a club, they should contact Thompson. They will be required to turn in EGPYFSJ½GIVVIKMWXVEXMSR form, a club constitution and an advisor agreement from a member of BYUHawaii faculty or staff. Preparations for the upcoming WorldFest are keeping Thompson busy. WorldFest is taking place this week and she encourages students to participate, join clubs, learn new things and perform in Culture Night this March.

LEFT: is a new professor in biology this semester. He and his wife are from Sacramento, California. He completed courses for his undergraduate at Ricks College, as well as here at BYU Hawaii, and studied at UC Davis to get a doctorate degree in chemistry. Although he has taught previously, as a graduate student as well as for part-time night classes, this is his ½VWXJYPPXMQIXIEGLMRKTSWMXMSR Professor Scott is new to the faculty but not the island. He and his family have been living in Kaneohe for two years as he has been doing postdoctoral research at the University of Hawaii. Scott and his family think of Hawaii as “a place of destiny.” They have been pleasantly surprised by the amount of friends and friends for their children they have met in the last two years. He said, “the decision to be here was one of prayer and we feel that it is such an honor to be here.”

RIGHT:

campus

A

new campus computer lab opened at BYUHawaii to accommodate students’ needs this January to much praise and gratitude. The lab, which is located in classroom 133 of the Aloha Center, features 26 independent Dell computers, each boasting the same productivity software and operating systems as the Windows-based computers in the Joseph F. Smith Library. The computers are also compatible with both the Windows and Apple-based computers around campus. The computers were installed in the Aloha Center “to alleviate the crowding that ocFXUVDURXQGPLGWHUPVDQGÀQDOV week” in the other computer labs, David Lucero said, the director of BYUH Student Activities and Leadership.

After a research project to see if the lab would be used and needed, the department embarked on a $20,000-plus investment to install the computers and renovate the room, involving upgrading ventilation to ensure that the room stays cool enough for the computers. Some students criticize the use of Dell computers. Christian Evans, junior in biology from Colorado, wishes the lab utilized Apple computers instead. “They are much easier to work with, especially since I have a MacBook myself and do work on both.” He continued, saying that since many students use Apple computers, they would have made more sense in the new lab. In spite of this, the computers remain fully compatible with productivity software available for Apple computers. Dustin Geddes, senior in accounting from Utah, now works in the computer lab after being transferred from the JFS Library. “I like working there. It’s quiet,” Geddes said. “I think having the new lab is a good idea because more computers are always nice.”

— Brett Evans January 15, 2009

January 15, 2009

DESCRIPTIONS BY KARLY ZOBRIST

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

Ke Alakai • The Leader

0 5


Campus

NEW CAMPUS N EWFACES FACESON ON CAMPUS Daniel Scott

Gregory Clark

ABOVE: is swapping desks with the English department chair, Ned Williams, for the winter and spring semesters. He is from Provo and went to BYU as an undergraduate and then later for an master’s degree – both in English. Later, he returned to school in New York for a doctorate degree in rhetoric and communication from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He describes the beginning of his teaching career as, “an accident,” he says, “my wife, Linda, and I moved to American Samoa where she was going to teach English at Samoana High School. They told me they wanted me to teach too. So I began teaching English there, liked it, and after two years I returned to BYU for graduate school.” He has also taught at Snow College and, after recieving his Ph.D. was hired to teach in the English department at BYU in Provo. He has directed the English composition program, the American studies program, has been English department chair, and is now associate dean of the College of Humanities. “This is a change for me to get back to more teaching and have a break from administration,” he said. The English departments of BYU Provo and Ha[EMMSJXIRTEVXMGMTEXIMRWLSVXJEGYPX]I\GLERKIW 3J EHNYWXMRK XS XLI I\GLERKI 'PEVO WEMH±%JXIV living in Samoa for two years, cockroaches and rust don’t bother us. We’re delighted with the friendliness of the community, and liveliness and intelligence of the students, and the familiar comfort of life on the islands.”

Cary Wasden

, new profesWSVSJ½RERGIERHIGSRSQMGWMWJVSQ7IEXXPI;EWLMRKton. Since moving to the island, he said he has encountered some surprises, “The biggest: the centipedes. It seems like an Indiana Jones movie!” Professor Wasden went to school at BYU Provo for his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and then to Ohio State University for his doctoral dissertation. He was on his way to a teaching position at BYU Idaho when he heard there was a need for professors here. “I have been shocked at the quality of students here. They are great. They are determined and willing to study hard. I am also surprised at the countries represented by the student body. We have students from Mongolia, India, China, Korea and many others. There is a real sense that the future of the church is being developed here. Having traveled to most of the countries represented by the student body, I am certain that the impact these students make on their home countries will be meaningful. I am honored to be part of it,” he said.

– Alyssa Herzinger

Kirby McMaster

LEFT: is a temporary computer and information sciences professor who will be here through the spring. McMaster is from Utah Valley and he received his education from BYU in Provo. ,I½VWXZMWMXIHXLI&=9,E[EMMGEQTYWEJXIV serving his mission in New Zealand. “They didn’t want us traveling the world on our way home but we were allowed to spend a day driving out to the school and newly-built PCC,” he said of his visit. He taught in New Zealand for ten years as well as holding a position at Weber State, where he retired. “I heard from a friend and faculty member here at BYUH that they were in need of a temporary teacher. So, we came out for this semester and spring,” he said.

Geoffrey Draper

LEFT: , a new professor in computer science, grew up near Detroit, Michigan. He completed his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at BYU Provo and his PhD at the University of Utah. He taught classes as a graduate student at the University of Utah. He came to BYU Hawaii because he thought of our campus as “the best of both worlds.” He says, “it has XLIKSWTIPGIRXIVIHIRZMVSRQIRXSJE'LYVGLEJ½PMEXIH school, and the perfect weather of a tropical paradise.” About moving to Hawaii he said, “I was pleasantly surTVMWIHXS½RHXLEXKVSGIVMIW[LMPIQSVII\TIRWMZIXLER SR XLI QEMRPERH EVIR´X EW I\TIRWMZI EW - XLSYKLX XLI] would be. There were no unpleasant surprises... I just love living here!”

0 4

Ke Alakai • The Leader

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RYAN BAGLEY

Audrey Thompson

BELOW: is BYUHSA’s new Vice President of clubs and organizations. Thompson is a senior in International Cultural Studies from California, and recently returned from serving a mission in Bolivia. She loves helping people, and after graduating in December, hopes to work with a program for troubled youth. Previous to being part of BYUHSA, Thompson was in the Samoan Club presidency. “Being in a presidency opened my eyes to the way things work from the other side, and I want to help things work for the clubs,” Thompson said. With the quick turnaround of presidencies in clubs, training doesn’t always get done. Thompson will be implementing some changes regarding Saturday training for club leaders that will help campus events like WorldFest and Foodfest function more smoothly. “There is sometimes miscommunication between clubs and within clubs,” she said. “I want it to be comfortable for the clubs to come talk, and be able to make these fun for their members.” If students would like to start a club, they should contact Thompson. They will be required to turn in EGPYFSJ½GIVVIKMWXVEXMSR form, a club constitution and an advisor agreement from a member of BYUHawaii faculty or staff. Preparations for the upcoming WorldFest are keeping Thompson busy. WorldFest is taking place this week and she encourages students to participate, join clubs, learn new things and perform in Culture Night this March.

LEFT: is a new professor in biology this semester. He and his wife are from Sacramento, California. He completed courses for his undergraduate at Ricks College, as well as here at BYU Hawaii, and studied at UC Davis to get a doctorate degree in chemistry. Although he has taught previously, as a graduate student as well as for part-time night classes, this is his ½VWXJYPPXMQIXIEGLMRKTSWMXMSR Professor Scott is new to the faculty but not the island. He and his family have been living in Kaneohe for two years as he has been doing postdoctoral research at the University of Hawaii. Scott and his family think of Hawaii as “a place of destiny.” They have been pleasantly surprised by the amount of friends and friends for their children they have met in the last two years. He said, “the decision to be here was one of prayer and we feel that it is such an honor to be here.”

RIGHT:

campus

A

new campus computer lab opened at BYUHawaii to accommodate students’ needs this January to much praise and gratitude. The lab, which is located in classroom 133 of the Aloha Center, features 26 independent Dell computers, each boasting the same productivity software and operating systems as the Windows-based computers in the Joseph F. Smith Library. The computers are also compatible with both the Windows and Apple-based computers around campus. The computers were installed in the Aloha Center “to alleviate the crowding that ocFXUVDURXQGPLGWHUPVDQGÀQDOV week” in the other computer labs, David Lucero said, the director of BYUH Student Activities and Leadership.

After a research project to see if the lab would be used and needed, the department embarked on a $20,000-plus investment to install the computers and renovate the room, involving upgrading ventilation to ensure that the room stays cool enough for the computers. Some students criticize the use of Dell computers. Christian Evans, junior in biology from Colorado, wishes the lab utilized Apple computers instead. “They are much easier to work with, especially since I have a MacBook myself and do work on both.” He continued, saying that since many students use Apple computers, they would have made more sense in the new lab. In spite of this, the computers remain fully compatible with productivity software available for Apple computers. Dustin Geddes, senior in accounting from Utah, now works in the computer lab after being transferred from the JFS Library. “I like working there. It’s quiet,” Geddes said. “I think having the new lab is a good idea because more computers are always nice.”

— Brett Evans January 15, 2009

January 15, 2009

DESCRIPTIONS BY KARLY ZOBRIST

http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

Ke Alakai • The Leader

0 5


The third timeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the charm

campus

Campus-wide womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group promotes excellence in academics

O

ne organization at BYU-Hawaii that many students may not be aware RILVWKH$FDGHPLF:RPHQ¡V1HWwork. Created in 2006, this advisory group is becoming more and more established. $FFRUGLQJWRWKHLU:HEVLWHWKLV network is composed of women from BYUHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faculty and administrative staff who are â&#x20AC;&#x153;committed to excellence in teaching, research, creative work, service and administration our campus and beyond.â&#x20AC;? Helena Hannonen is currently the president of the Academic :RPHQ¡V 1HWZRUN $:1  5RVH 5DPLVYLFHSUHVLGHQWDQG/HLDORha Pakalani is vice president for communications. Pakalani, said they seek to â&#x20AC;&#x153;provide a leadership venue for women administrative staff and faculty; we try to enhance opportunities for networking to facilitate professional growth and career satisfaction, and we monitor and celebrate accomplishments.â&#x20AC;? One way in which this is accomplished is through monthly meetings where members can learn from and share with one another. Explaining the structure of the $:13DNDODQLVDLG´)RUQRZZH have appointed different sub-com-

mittees to help us accomplish our JRDOV DQG PRVW VLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQWO\ WKH appointment of the advisory board. :H KDYH PHW ZLWK 6KHUL 'HZ 0DU\ &RRN DQG :HQG\ :DWVRQ Nelson to discuss issues important to women who are mothers and career-women.â&#x20AC;? On the advisory ERDUG IRU WKH $:1 DUH 'HEELH +LSSROLWH :ULJKW %HWK +D\QHV DQG0DUJDUHW:KHHOZULJKWÂľ 5DP GHVFULEHG KRZ WKH RUJDnization has been busy at work. She said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we have already accomplished many things, and we continue to strive to encourage women WRIXOĂ&#x20AC;OOWKHLUSRWHQWLDOÂľ5DPH[plained that the new creations of WKH:HEVLWHDQGDEODFNERDUGDFcount, through which women can communicate, are part of a greater effort to showcase and highlight the works of professional women. ´:HOLNHWRFDOORXUVHOYHVDWHDPÂľ VDLG5DP 2Q WRS RI WKLV 5DP H[SODLQV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Throughout the years, we have worked hard to establish ourselves as helpers in the community.â&#x20AC;? One of the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent projects involved a trip to Micronesia to offer training and resource to a library in Yap. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The library was destroyed by a typhoon, so we helped with rebuilding and training the librarians on how to run and manage a library.â&#x20AC;?

Below: (L to R) Rose Ram, Helena Hannonen and Leialoha Pakalani, the current presidency of the BYUH chapter of the Academic Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Network.

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APRIL COURTRIGHT & MICHAEL WAITE

For the third time, Trevor Kaimikaua saw the words on the page in front of him: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Elder Kaimikaua, you are hereby called to serve as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. You are assigned to labor i n theâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Due to unusual c i rcumstances, Kaimikaua, a former BYU-Hawaii freshman now serving in the California Anaheim Mission, will serve in two different missions at three different occasions to serve for a full 24 months. .DLPLNDXDRULJLQDOO\IURP0DNDNLORUHFHLYHGKLVĂ&#x20AC;UVWPLVVLRQFDOO LQDVHFRQGDQGKLVĂ&#x20AC;QDOLQ ,Q.DLPLNDXDUHFHLYHGKLVPLVVLRQFDOOWRVHUYHLQWKH*XDWHPDOD&LW\1RUWK0LVVLRQDQGZDVWRUHSRUWWRWKH*XDWHPDOD0LVVLRQDU\ 7UDLQLQJ&HQWHURQ1RY([FLWHGE\WKHFDOOKLVSDUHQWVFDOOHGIULHQGV DQGIDPLO\WRJDWKHUWRJHWKHUWRVKDUHLQWKHLUVRQV¡VSHFLDO ´,ZDVH[FLWHGIRUKLPDQGKLVSDUHQWVEHFDXVHKH¡VDQRQO\FKLOGDQG WKHRQO\JUDQGVRQRQKLVIDWKHU¡VVLGHÂľVDLG/HLKD(QRVFRXVLQRI(OGHU .DLPLNDXDIURP0DNDNLOR %HIRUH KHDGLQJ WR WKH *XDWHPDOD 07& IDPLO\ IULHQGV DQG ZDUG PHPEHUVJDWKHUHGWRJHWKHUDWWKH+RQROXOXDLUSRUWWRVHH(OGHU.DLPLNDXDRIIRQKLVPLVVLRQ ´, IHOW VDG WKDW KH ZDV OHDYLQJ EHFDXVH KH¡V P\ RQO\ FRXVLQ RQ P\ PRP¡VVLGH,ZDVVDGWKDW,ZRXOGQ¡WVHHKLPIRUWZR\HDUVÂľUHFDOOHG .DOHL+RD3DFHKR +RZHYHU6LV\OLQD3HWHUVRQDFORVHIDPLO\IULHQGWRWKH.DLPLNDXDV¡ UHFDOOHG WKH PRPHQW ZKHQ WKH SKRQH UDQJ ZLWK VRPH VXUSULVLQJ QHZV DERXWWKHQHZPLVVLRQDU\´0\$XQW\&KDXQDDQVZHUHGWKHSKRQH6KH VWRRGWKHUHIRUDPRPHQWVLOHQWWKHQKXQJXSWKHSKRQH6KHWXUQHGWR PHDQGVDLGWKDW7UHYRULVĂ \LQJLQWRPRUURZPRUQLQJÂľVDLG3HWHUVRQ $IWHURQO\RQHZHHNRQKLVPLVVLRQ(OGHU.DLPLNDXDUHWXUQHGKRPH ´,IHOWWKDW,KDGWRWDNHFDUHRIVRPHSHUVRQDOWKLQJVEHIRUH,FRXOGFRQWLQXHP\PLVVLRQÂľVDLG(OGHU.DLPLNDXD´0\PLVVLRQSUHVLGHQWDVNHG LI,ZDQWHGWRGRLWLQWKH07&EXW,IHOWOLNH,VKRXOGMXVWUHWXUQKRPH DQGKDQGOHLWÂľ .HYLQ.DLPLNDXDKLVIDWKHUVDLG´,GLGQ¡WNQRZZKDWWRWKLQNZKHQ ,JRWDSKRQHFDOOIURPP\VRQDQGKLVPLVVLRQSUHVLGHQWVD\LQJKHZRXOG EHUHWXUQLQJKRPH,ORYHP\VRQDQGVXSSRUWKLPLQDQ\WKLQJGHFLVLRQ KHPDNHVÂľ ,QPLGVHYHUDOPRQWKVDIWHUUHWXUQLQJKRPH(OGHU.DLPLNDXD UHVXEPLWWHG KLV PLVVLRQ SDSHUV ´, JRW P\ PLVVLRQ FDOO DERXW WKUHH ZHHNVDIWHU,VXEPLWWHGLW,ZDVFDOOHGWRWKHVDPHPLVVLRQ*XDWHPDOD &LW\ 1RUWK 0LVVLRQÂľ VDLG (OGHU . ´7KLV WLPH , ZDV WR UHSRUW WR WKH 07&LQ8WDKÂľ (OGHU .DLPLNDXD UHSRUWHG WR WKH 3URYR 07& DQG VWD\HG WKHUH IRU WZRPRQWKVEHIRUHKHDGLQJWR*XDWHPDOD ´7KHVHFRQGWLPHDURXQGKHZDVHQMR\LQJKLVPLVVLRQDQGIHOOLQORYH ZLWKWKHSHRSOH,FRXOGVHHLQKLVOHWWHUVWKDWKLVWHVWLPRQ\ZDVJURZLQJ HDFK DQG HYHU\ GD\Âľ VDLG /HL$QQ .DLPLNDXD (OGHU .DLPLNDXD¡V PRWKHU 6WHYLH<DWHVRQHRI(OGHU.DLPLNDXD¡VIULHQGVVDLG´2Q0RWKHU¡V 'D\KHFDOOHGP\KRXVHEHFDXVHKLVZKROHIDPLO\ZDVWKHUHIRUD0RWKHU¡V'D\GLQQHUZHSXWRQ(YHU\RQHWKHUHJRWWRWDONWRKLPÂľ %XW<DWHV DGGHG WKDW RQ WKH:HGQHVGD\ DIWHU 0RWKHU¡V 'D\ (OGHU .DLPLNDXD¡VIDWKHUFDOOHGVD\LQJ7UHYRUZRXOGEHFRPLQJKRPHWKHQH[W PRUQLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JOCELYN FAUMUINA

Story continues on kealakai.byuh.edu

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Look for: Third timeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the charm

GRAPHIC BY KATHLEEN MAJDALI & PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSE RAM

January 15, 2009

Seasider Men Continue Winning, Rise in Rankings

Sports

T

he BYU-Hawaii menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team moved into the eighth spot in the latest Division II poll of the National Association of Basketball Coaches, released Tuesday. The Seasiders rose one spot from the previous poll after winning three games last week to improve their record to 9-1. %<8+QHHGHGDODVWPLQXWHUDOO\WRĂ&#x20AC;QLVKRII UH-Hilo in the conference opener last Tuesday. Despite leading nearly the entire game, the Seasiders found themselves down 91-88 with just 1:28 to play. BYUH sandwiched a Lucas Alves block with a couple of baskets to take the lead, 92-91, DQG VHQLRU -HUPDLQH 2GMHJED Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHG WKH JDPH with two free throws after pulling down a crucial rebound with 1.4 seconds remaining in the game to seal the win. Alves, junior in exercise and sports science IURP %UD]LO ZDV KHOG VFRUHOHVV LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW KDOI EXW Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHG ZLWK  SRLQWV WZR DVVLVWV DQG WKUHH blocks. Odjegba, senior in international business management from Florida, had 16 points, four assists one block along with a steal. Nathan Sims, ZKR JDUQHUHG 3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F :HVW &RQIHUHQFH 3OD\HU RI WKH :HHN KRQRUV IRU KLV SOD\ WKH SUHYLRXV ZHHN led the Seasiders in points, with 20, and rebounds, with nine. Sims, senior in history from California, added two assists, a block and two steals for the night. The Seasiders followed with another victory RYHU WKH 9XOFDQV RQ :HGQHVGD\ QLJKW WKLV WLPH dominating the non-conference game from start to Ă&#x20AC;QLVK%<8+ZDVRQĂ&#x20AC;UHLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWKDOIVKRRWLQJ SHUFHQWIURPWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGWRWDNHDOHDGLQWR the half. The Seasiders coasted in the second half, main-

Winning three more games this past week against UH-Hilo, BYUHawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mens basketball jumps up a spot to number eight on the NCAA Divisioni II coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; poll. Their record is now 9-1.

WDLQLQJDGRXEOHGLJLWOHDGWKURXJKRXWIRUDQ win. Alves didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for the second half to get started in this one, scoring 17 of his game-high 26 SRLQWVLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSHULRGRQVKRRWLQJIURPWKH Ă&#x20AC;HOG6LPVMRLQHG$OYHVDVWKHRQO\RWKHU6HDVLGHU WRVFRUHLQGRXEOHĂ&#x20AC;JXUHVZLWKSRLQWV7KH6HDsiders were directed offensively by Virgil Buensuceso, junior in pre-med from California, who dished out eight assists on the night. BYUH closed out the week with their second FRQIHUHQFHYLFWRU\WKLVWLPHRYHUWKH6HD:DUULRUV RI+DZDLL3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F$JDLQWKH6HDVLGHUVFDPH RXWVWURQJVKRRWLQJSHUFHQWIURPWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGLQ WKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWKDOIIRUDOHDGDWWKHEUHDN%<8+ also dominated on the boards, almost doubling the 6HD :DUULRUV  IRU WKH JDPH 7KH 6HDVLGHUV were effective in distributing the ball offensively; VL[SOD\HUVZHDULQJWKHFULPVRQJROGDQGJUD\Ă&#x20AC;Qished with double-digits in scoring.

Buensuceso and Trenson Akana, senior in exercise and sports science from Molokaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i, led BYUH ZLWK  SRLQWV DSLHFH ZKLOH 0DUTXHV :KLSS\ sophomore in international business management from Fiji, cashed in on a double-double, scoring 12 points and pulling down a game-high 11 rebounds. The Seasiders were ranked as high as sixth in the national Division II poll during the winter EUHDNEHIRUHDORVVWRWKH:DVKEXUQ .6 ,FKDERGV dropped them to the twelfth spot. Six straight wins have put BYUH back into the top ten and they continue with conference play this week with an away game against Chaminade on Thursday night and a home game versus Notre Dame de Namur RQ6DWXUGD\%RWKJDPHVVWDUWDWSPZLWKWKH Chaminade game to be aired on local sports chanâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SAM AKINAKA nel OC 16.

6ODWHUZLQV3LSHOLQH0DVWHUV

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Above: Two of the sports greatest champions, Kelly Slater (L) and Gerry Lopez (R), on the awardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stage at the Billabong Pipeline Masters.

January 15, 2009

elly Slater rolled into to Oahuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pipeline shores to take control of the surf competitionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Billabong Pipeline Masters. Slaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win was his sixth out of an 11 event ASP tour for 2008. Slater also held the highlight of heats GXULQJ WKH VHPLĂ&#x20AC;QDOV DJDLQVW 7LPP\ 5H\HV 86$   5H\HV NQRZQ DURXQG WKH world for his expertise in riding barrel waves, emerged with a 9.10 during the last six minutes of the competition. It seemed WREHWKHLQHYLWDEOHZLQIRU5H\HV+RZever, Slater took the competition by scoring a 9.00 and a 10.00 in a space of three minutes. Slater has won 9 ASP world titles for himself. This is also his sixth time taking home the Pipeline trophy. This year Gerry Lopez designed the trophy in the shape of a surfboard.

PHOTOS BY RYAN BAGLEY & TRIPLECROWNOFSURFING.COM

Slater has earned the right to be in the Ă&#x20AC;QDOVRXWRIWLPHVLQ3LSHOLQH7KH last time Slater won the competition was in 1999. Slater also won Pipeline in 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. 6ODWHU PDWFKHG XS ZLWK &KULV :DUG 86$ RQWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOGD\+HSDGGOHGRXWWHQ WLPHV WR EHDW :DUG  DQG  LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW Ă&#x20AC;QDO  +RZHYHU 6ODWHU¡V RWKHU KHDWV EHIRUHWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOWRWDOHGVFRUHV and 19.40. +DG :DUG ZRQ 3LSHOLQH 0DVWHUV KH would have taken the entire Vans Triple Crown title for the season. However, due to DVHFRQGSODFHĂ&#x20AC;QLVK:DUGWRRNWKLUGSODFH in the end. Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joel Parkinson took the title. Parkinson held honors for riding a perfect 20.00 score at Pipeline, the second ever recorded with two wave scoring. The end of the Triple Crown also KHOSHG VHW WKH UDQNLQJV RI WKH$63:RUOG 7RXUIRU.HOO\6ODWHUZLOOFRPHQH[W \HDUUDQNHGĂ&#x20AC;UVWH[SHFWHGWRFRQWLQXHKLV streak. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BEN BUTTARS

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January 15, 2009

Volume 87 â&#x20AC;˘ Issue 1

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ryan Anderson ART DIRECTOR Erynn Vierra COPY EDITORS Amanda Hansen Karen Hemenway Sam Akinaka

WEB MASTER Jenna Chidester AD MANAGER Melody Chiang ADVISOR LeeAnn Lambert

STAFF WRITERS Ben Buttars April Courtright Brett Evans Mary Jantalert Trijsten Leach Marni Vail Karly Zobrist Jordan Flake PODCASTERS Lauren Woodbury

ART Rachel Au Ieong Terrence Kau Kent Carollo PHOTOGS Ryan Bagley INTERNS Shem Greenwood Kathleen Majdali

PUBLISHER Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

KE ALAKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;I is published weekly by: BYU-HAWAII PRINT SERVICES kealakai.byuh.edu

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Table of Contents

Editorial, & Photo Submissions, Advertising & Distribution inquiries: kealakai@byuh.edu Š Entire Contents Copyright 2008, Ke Alaka`i

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4-5

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7YV½RK-4MTIPMRI1EWXIVW7PEXIV wins again. Basketball7IEWMHIVWGSVIWERHYTHEXIW

Whats new?-GPEWWIW GSQTYXIVWERHWGLIHYPIW%PWS½RH SYXEFSYXXLIRI[JEGIWSRGEQTYW

Missions-QER]EVIGEPPIH JI[IVEVIGEPPIHXLVIIXMQIWGreat Women-XLI%GEHIQMG;SQIR´W 2IX[SVOGSQQMXWXSI\GIPPIRGI

Congratulations-&=9,GEQTYWXYVRWOpening SocialERRNVDOHGDQFHDQGLQĂ DWDEOHV

Sports

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Campus

PAGE ONE PHOTO BY RYAN BAGLEY

Campus

January 15, 2009

January 15, 2008

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS RIVERS PUZEY

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campus

Books and bouncing as the semester begins

T

he Opening Social is the Ă&#x20AC;UVW RSSRUWXQLW\ RI WKH semester to make new friends and dance the night away. It ransformed the Cannon Activities Center into a social event and Moroccan-looking bazaar. People were also sitting on the Ă RRU VXUURXQGHG E\ ERRNV MHZHOU\ clothing and other items for sale at the BYUHSA sponsored book sale. The bargain hunting was accompanied by blow-up jungle gyms on the other side of the room, and the nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HYHQWV HQGHG ZLWK WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW GDQFH RI the semester. Mixed emotions resulted from the Opening Social however, with complaints coming in about lighting, lack of space and a lack of food. However, Emily York, junior in International Cultural Studies from Michigan, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was extremely pleased with everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s company. I really saw some dancers come out that night and I felt joyous vibes bouncing

D

DURXQGWKHURRPÂľ Momomi Hannemann, senior in TESOL from Washington, left feeling a little ripped off after buying a $20 used 6th edition textbook. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really needed the 8th addition, but this was DOO,FRXOGĂ&#x20AC;QG%XW,GLGQ¡WWKLQNWKH RQOLQHZDVZRUWKLWÂľ 7KRXJKQRWHYHU\RQHZDVVDWLVĂ&#x20AC;HG with their purchases, some were appeased by the dance. 2I WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW GDQFH RI WKH VHPHVter, Theodore Davis, senior in Business from Utah said it was â&#x20AC;&#x153;the best one ever! It was fun and exciting and SUREDEO\WKHEHVWDWWHQGHGHYHUÂľ Pehrson Hawkley, senior in biochemistry from New Jersey, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The best part of the whole nightâ&#x20AC;Ś was the EDNHU\Âľ+DZNOH\ZDVUHIHUULQJWRWKH bake sale put on by a student in need fund raising for their tuition. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MARNI VAIL

Above: (L to R) Ryan Orm, Ronald Casaba and Jacob Auna bargain with fel-

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low students at the book sale during the &=9,7%3TIRMRK7SGMEP

BYU-Hawaii campus reaches 50-year mark

ec. 17, 2008, the Brigham Young University Hawaii campus â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that is, the actual physical plant â&#x20AC;&#x201D; marks 50 years to the day since President David O. McKay stood at the podium in the brand new auditorium, now named in his honor, and dedicated the core facilities of the Church College of Hawaii (renamed in 1974) that the labor missionaries had just completed. That morning, President McKay and Elder Mar-

,Q WKH DXGLWRULXP WKH DXGLHQFH Ă&#x20AC;OOHG HYHU\ seat, awaiting their arrival. Large louvers on the VLGHV ZKLFKKDYHORQJVLQFHEHHQĂ&#x20AC;OOHGLQ ZHUH opened so more people could watch, and loudspeakers were also set up for even more people in ion G. Romney of the Quorum of the Twelve, and the foyer and hallways. their wives, walked from Laie Elementary School Hawaii Governor William F. Quinn, Honolulu parting the long garlands of plumeria patterned Mayor Neal S. Blaisdell, Deputy Superintendent of after the greeting community residents gave King Territorial Schools Deal F. Crooker, and UniverKalakaua when he visited in 1874. They stopped for sity of Hawaii President Dr. Laurence Snyder were the unveiling of the mosaic mural above the foyer already on the stand. of the building now also named in his honor. The In his remarks, Gov. Quinn said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have no PXUDO KDG OLWHUDOO\ EHHQ Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHG MXVW D KDOIKRXU doubt that the Church College of Hawaii will serve before President WKH 3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F ZRUOG ZHOO Âł DV DQ HGXFDWLRQDO McKayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrival. center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just as heretofore Laie has been a Below: Fifty years ago, the Church College spiritual center; and that we, the Occidental SJ,E[EMM´W½VWXTL]WMGEPFYMPHMRK[EWHIHM- SHRSOH WKH 3RO\QHVLDQ SHRSOH RI WKH 3DFLĂ&#x20AC;F world will come and that the Church College cated by President David O. McKay. Today of Hawaii will make its contributions to the that same building bears his name. destiny of Hawaii which is so manifest in this 3DFLĂ&#x20AC;FZRUOGWREHLQWUXWKDOHDGHURIDOORI WKHSHRSOHVRIWKH3DFLĂ&#x20AC;FÂľ About two hours later, as President McKay began his remarks, he recalled that 38 years earlier ´ZH VWRRG DURXQG WKH Ă DJSROH DQG SOHGJHG DOOHJLDQFHWRWKHĂ DJVRGHDUWRDOORIXV¾³DVFHQH recreated in the mosaic mural. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MIKE FOLEY

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Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new on campus?

PHOTOS BY RYAN BAGLEY

January 15, 2009

Opening Social Book sale, dance ERHMRžEXEFPIW welcome students

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball jumps up in ranks January 15, 2008

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS RIVERS PUZEY

BYUH celebrates 50 years http://KeAlakai.byuh.edu

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Jan 15, 2009