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FALL 2017

INSIDE:

KAUA`I KUPUNA KAUA`I TEEN KAUA`I SPORTS Fall Family Fun Festivals!! Cover Winners, Savannah & Maddison Hubbard/KauaiFamilyMagazine.com


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Welcome to Kaua`i Family Magazine! Kaua`i’s Go-To Resource for Engaging Families

It’s BACKTO-SCHOOL TIME! Now that the school year has started, we encourage all parents to be especially aware of how our children travel to and from school this issue. You can read more about Traffic Safety Tips for children who walk, ride bikes, or travel by car or bus and why we consider this topic so important, (page 18). In this back-to-school–themed issue, you’ll find information on The ABC’S of a Successful School Year, 26 simple tips for a happy & healthy school year, (page 20). With Fire and Fall Prevention weeks coming up, we encourage you to read and follow the safety tips on (page 79) & (page 30). We hope this magazine will provide you with sound advice to your families health, safety, education and readiness at your fingertips. So turn the pages for more guidance and support. We look forward to continuing to be a trusted resource in all of your parenting experiences. Mahalo, Kauai for allowing Kauai Family to be a part of your ‘Ohana.

Chrissy

Chrissy Schechter, Publisher

chrissys@kauaifamilymagazine.com

We are proud to print at CREEL Printing Please recycle. Share Kaua`i Family Magazine with your `ohana and friends

CONTACT KAUAI FAMILY MAGAZINE 808-639-5656 PUBLISHER Kauai Family Magazine ADVERTISING SALES Chrissy Schechter EDITOR editor@kauaifamilymagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES advertising@kauaifamilymagazine.com

FALL 2017

Cover Photo Kauai Life, Photo & Film Contributors Hale Akamine, M.D. Kandi Bloss, RN Patrick Ching Monty Downs, M.D. Carolyn Jabs Malia Jacobson Randall P. Jaurequi, D.D.S Brooke Kanna Heide Smith Luedtke Gerald J. McKenna, M.D. Pam Molnar Mary Navarro, MA, LMFT Chef Mark Oyama Patricia Sanchez, D.D.S. Ku’ulei Vaughn Jasmine Yukimura Next Issue: HOLIDAY 2017 Advertising Deadline: October 1, 2017 Kauai Family Magazine is published quarterly as Spring, Summer, Fall and Holiday editions. Distribution:15,000 printed quarterly and Digital E-Editions. Public and Private Preschools, Elementary and Middle Schools, Hospitals, Medical and Health Clinics, Libraries, KIUC, Jamba Juice, Jack in the Box, Kauai Community Federal Credit Union, Retailers and Community Organizations. Subscription Rate: $16.00 for one year (4 editions) Subscribe at KauaiFamilyMagazine.com Copyright© 2017 Kauai Family Magazine All rights reserved. No portion of Kauai Family Magazine may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Kauai Family Magazine assumes no financial responsibility for errors in advertisements. COVER PHOTO Keiki Cover Winners, Savannah & Maddison Hubbard Photo by KAUAI LIFE, Photo & Film


contents

FALL 2017

12

Savannah & Maddison Hubbard enjoying the petting zoo.

Photo by KAUAI LIFE Photo & Film

FALL FEATURES

WHAT’S INSIDE

12

HARVEST AG FESTIVAL It’s a time for families to come together.

32

14

FALL FAMILY FUN FESTIVALS & EVENTS Fun for the Whole Family!

20

THE ABC’S OF A SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL YEAR Simple Tips for A Happy & Healthy School Year 42 8 NIGHTMARE TRIGGERS And How You Can Help 24 HOW TO BEAT BACK-TO-SCHOOL CLUTTER With this 3 Zone Approach to Organization

28

70

KAUAI KUPUNA How to Have Logical Conversations and Fun with Your CognitivelyImpaired Parent KAUAI KEIKI News That’s Worth Sharing: Fake news vs. Real news

KAUAI SPORTS KIF Fall Sports Schedules Surfing Champions

42

70

20

FALL 2017

5


Message from Mayor Caravalho & DOE Superintendent Bill Arakaki Aloha Kaua‘i! I hope all of our Kaua’i families enjoyed a fun and rejuvenating summer break! As we gear up for the Back to School season, I encourage everyone to be involved in our keiki’s lives – parents, kupuna, teachers, coaches, family and friends. Our bright and wonderful keiki are watching, listening and learning from us. It is our kuleana to set good examples and encourage them in positive ways. Mahalo to the publisher and contributors of “Kauai Family Magazine” for continuing to support our families by sharing important information, articles and available resources. I wish you all the best in the upcoming school year! Study hard, be safe and have fun! Aloha Pumehana,

Bernard P. Carvalho, Jr. Mayor, County of Kaua’i

Aloha! Welcome Back to the new School Year 2071-18! I am excited about the opportunities of the new school year as we continue our mission that the Kauai Complex Area:  “Empowers and guides schools to inspire and educate children to become adaptive, innovative, contributing members of their community.”   TOGETHER we will implement our Statewide Strategic Initiatives for a Wellrounded education for all students, Inclusive classroom practices, K-12 career readiness pathways, Leadership Institutes/leadership pipelines/ induction and mentoring, and Supportive student transitions. We must DO IT and DO IT WELL!   We also continue to look for “bright spots” in our complex area, schools and community partners that are making an impact for students. There is so much great examples of success going on in our schools and community that it is our obligation to learn from one another in order to scale this success. We are committed to Equity and Excellence for ALL students. We will integrate the unique Hawaiian values (Na Hopena A`O) and sense of place, equip students for local and global leadership and the ambitious community, career, and college goals of their choice. “We Care for and We Prepare ALL Students for Careers, College, and Citizenship in the 21st Century” Lastly, Mahalo to Kauai Family Magazine for their continued support to our families by sharing valuable information and resources.   “Together We Can!”Mahalo!

William N. Arakaki Kauai Complex Area Superintendent


Family Fun Favorites

presents

AUGUST 24-27, 2017 VIDINHA STADIUM

the Musical

Everyone’s favorite flying car comes to life in the musical adaptation of the beloved family film.

NOVEMBER 10th - 26th

Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. Sundays at 3 p.m. Lihue War Memorial Convention Hall TICKETS:

www.hawaiichildrenstheatre.org

or (808) 246-8985 8 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Four Days of Fun, Food, Farming & Great Entertainment for the Family HMSA Happy Healthy Keiki Parade Showtime Characters, Petting Zoo KIUC Keiki Talent Contest For full schedule of entertainment and keiki activities, visit

kauaifarmfair . org


Family Fall Festivals

Kauai Christian Academy’s 17th Annual

FALL FESTIVAL

Fri. and Sat., Oct. 27 and 28, 4 p.m. – 9 p.m. Family Fun in a carnival atmosphere!

Ono Food – Local Vendors Great Deals At Our HUGE Silent Auction!

The Kaua`i Japanese Cultural Society Presents

Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 9:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Kauai Memorial Convention Hall • Free Admission Soba makers from Japan will be demonstrating noodle making from scratch, cooking and sampling. Fun activities include, Iris folding, Calligraphy, and Bonsai. • Food, Entertainment, Cultural Activities For more Information

822-5353

Kauaijcs.org

Corn Maze! Pony Rides! Petting Zoo! Live Music! Bounce Houses! Hay Rides! Carnival Games! Enchanted Castle! Art Vendors!

On the Kauai Christian Academy Campus 4000 Kilauea Rd. Kilauea HI 96754

Visit www.kcaschool.org for more info

Sponsored by Hawaii Tourism Authority, County of Kauai, Office of Economic Development

FALL 2017

9


Visit Our Advertisers

Kauai Family Magazine is able to provide quality local content because of the continued support of our advertisers.

Support local businesses, and tell them you saw them in Kauai Family Magazine! Education & Schools St. Theresa School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Hawaii Technology Academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Kamehameha School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Kawaikini Charter School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Kahili Adventist Preschool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Kauai Christian Academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Na Kamalei Godly Play. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Dow AgroSciences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Kauai Complex Dept of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 23 Patrick Ching Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Health & Medical Services Aloha Pediatrics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Kauai Adult Day Health Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Garden Isle Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center. . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Stay at Home Healthcare Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Hale Kupuna Heritage Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Mary Navarro, MA, LMFT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Regency at Puakea Assisted Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 McKenna Recovery Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Crane Eye Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Hawaiian Island Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Lihue Pharmacy Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Wilcox Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Kuhio Pediatric Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Jason Blake Health Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Hawaii Smile Designs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 HMSA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Hawaii State Dept of Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Malama Pono Health Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Ohana Restoration Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Child & Family Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

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Sports, Camps and Music Garden Island Gymnastics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Kauai Dance Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Bandwagon Music Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 YWCA Girlz Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 KPAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Anaina Hou Mini Golf & Gardens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Keiki Karacters Parties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Festivals and Events Kauai County Farm Bureau Fair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Kauai Harvest Ag Festival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Kauai Christian Academy Fall Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Matsuri Kauai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Emalani Festival Kauai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Community Partners Servco Auto Kauai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Kauai Community Federal Credit Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Engineering & Contracting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Deja Vu Surf Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Grove Farm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Kauai Restorations & Cleaning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Hawaii Dairy Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Kauai Life Photo + Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Kauai Island Utility Cooperative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 County of Kauai Department of Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 County of Kauai on Elderly Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 County of Kauai Fire Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 County of Kauai Waste Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 County of Kauai Office of the Mayor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 County of Kauai Lifeguard Association. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 County of Kauai Department of Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 23 Kauai’s FM97. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Kauai Made Films. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60


Article Title

Pumpkin Waffles By Chef Mark Oyama

Ingredients All purpose flour. . . . . . . 1 1/2 cups (can use whole wheat flour) Baking powder. . . . . . . . 3 teaspoons Baking soda . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 teaspoon Pumpkin pie spice . . . . . 1 tablespoon Brown sugar. . . . . . . . . . 3 tablespoons Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/8 teaspoon Eggs, large. . . . . . . . . . . 2 each Pumpkin puree. . . . . . . . 1 cup Whole milk . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2/3 cup Vegetable or canola oil. . 1/4 cup

Preheat waffle iron. Mix all dry ingredients together in one bowl. Mix wet ingredients together in another bowl.  Make a well in the dry ingredients and add wet mix. Mix together and cook in waffle iron according to its directions. Serve with syrup, honey butter, chopped apples, craisins, blueberries or chopped nuts for added texture.

FALL 2017 11


Harvest Festival 4th 4th Annual Annual

A small child selecting his pumpkin. So large he needed help to carry it!

The 4th annual Harvest Festival promises to be even bigger this year! October 22, 2017. Waimea Canyon Park The Harvest Festival has quickly become a tradition the Kauai community looks forward to every year. The free event celebrates the Island’s rich agriculture history and is reminiscent of the festivals held by sugar companies at the end of the fall sugar cane harvest. It’s a time for families to come together. A time for rides and music, laughing kids and food, bales of hay and pumpkins. Hundreds and hundreds of pumpkins! Since its start, the Harvest Festival has featured pumpkins, which are given away

12 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

to Island families, courtesy of the West Kaua`i farming companies. It’s a kind of thank-you to the community, and it recalls the Mainland tradition of giving thanks for a good harvest. It was November 23, 1849, when King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, declared the first Hawaiian “day of public thanksgiving.” Although he made the


declaration around the time of the American Thanksgiving, he actually set the date for the celebration on December 31 that year.

tranquility and Union,” he said in his proclamation of Thanksgiving.

upon these shores, as individuals, as families and as a nation.”

In 2016, more than 5,000 people attended the Harvest Festival. They were treated to a petting zoo, waterslides, live entertainment, and ono food from local famers supporting local families. And more than 1,000 pumpkins were given away!

Through the years Kauai’s agricultural community, including the Kauai County Thanksgiving had been celebrated in the Farm Bureau, Hawaii United States for years, but it Lodging & Tourism didn’t become an official U.S. Association, Hawaii national holiday until President Crop Improvement Abraham Lincoln declared it Association, County so in 1863. of Kauai, and Family It’s a time for and Friends of Kauikeaouli and families to come together. Agriculture, has Lincoln envisioned sponsored the their thanksgivings A time for rides and music, Harvest Festival. as religious Dow AgroSciences, laughing kids and food, occasions. DuPont Pioneer Kauikeaouli asked bales of hay and pumpkins. and Hartung his citizens to Brothers Hawaii Hundreds and hundreds “assemble in their will continue to be several houses of of pumpkins! major supporters of worship on that day, to this event. Kauai Shrimp, render united praise to the Makaweli Beef, Kauai Coffee and Father of nations, and to implore His Kaneshiro Farms have also participated. favor in time to come, upon all who dwell

Lincoln used the occasion to refer to the American Civil War and to wish for its early end. He invited citizens to “commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, The 4th annual Harvest Festival mourners or promises to be even bigger this year! sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent So many pumpkins to choose with the Divine from…hmmm, which one purposes to the should I take home? full enjoyment of peace, harmony,

FALL 2017 13


Fall Family Fun Festivals and Events AUGUST

Relay for Life of North Shore Saturday, August 12th 3 p.m.-11 p.m. Waioli Park, Hanalei

Hawaii Sand Festival Saturday, August 12th 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE Hanalei Pier

Waipa Music & Mango Festival Sunday, August 13th 11:00 a.m.- 5 p.m. Halulu Fishpond at Waipa

Kaua‘i County Farm Bureau Fair

August 24th-27th at Vidinha Stadium Four days of family fun! Admission fee $5.00 for adults, $4.00 for seniors (65+), $2.00 for keiki 4-12, free for 3 & under. Kauaifarmfair.org for schedules

SEPTEMBER FREE Movie Night

Friday, September 1st 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Anaina Hou Community Park Kilauea

Kaua‘i Marathon Keiki Run Saturday, September 2nd 9:00 a.m. Grand Hyatt Kauai TheKauaiMarathon.com

Kaua‘i Marathon and Half Marathon Sunday, September 3rd 6 a.m.-12 p.m. Grand Hyatt Kauai TheKauaiMarathon.com

Kauai Psychic Fair

Saturday & Sunday September 16th & 17th 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Kauai War Memorial Hall

Kaua‘i Pow Wow

September 22nd-24th Free. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Kapa‘a Beach Park. A cultural Native American celebration

Kaua‘i Mokihana Festival September 24th - 30th. A seven-day event filled with Hawaiian culture and music maliefoundation.org

OCTOBER

FREE Movie Night

Friday, October 6th 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Anaina Hou Community Park Kilauea

Matsuri Kauai

Saturday, October 7th 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE Kauai War Memorial Convention Hall Kauai Japanese Cultural Society Celebration

Lihu‘e Christian Church Bazaar 

Saturday, October 7th 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the LCC social hall Local-style crafts, baked goods, sushi, quilts and more

The Coconut Festival Saturday & Sunday October 7th and 8th 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Kapa‘a Beach Park


Note: Dates and Times May Change Without Notice Please Call First to Confirm

Emalani Festival Kauai Saturday, October 14th 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Kanaloahuluhulu Meadow Kokee State Park An event honoring Queen Emma

Kauai Chocolate and Coffee Festival October 20th and October 21st Hanapepe Town

Senior Food and Craft Fair Saturday, October 21st 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE War Memorial Convention Hall

Harvest Ag Festival Sunday, October 22nd, 11 a.m. Hundreds of FREE pumpkins, waterslides, petting zoo, live entertainment, and ono food from local farmers supporting local charities. Free at Waimea Canyon Park

Wilcox Health Halloween Babies Parade

Proudly brought to you by Kauai Family Magazine

National Make a Difference Day Saturday, October 28th 7:30 a.m. at Lydgate Park A family workday suited to all ages

Kauai United Way’s Walk a Thon

Saturday, October 28th 8 a.m.-10 a.m. at Kukui Grove info@Kauaiunitedway.org

NOVEMBER Grove Farm Community Swap Meet Saturday, November 4th 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Grove Farm Puhi Park Free Admission 245-3678

Kaua‘i Veterans Day Parade

Saturday, November 4th Parade starts at 9:30 a.m. in Kapa‘a

CKTV Holiday Craft Fair

Saturdays, November 4th & 18th 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Cheifess Kamakahelei Middle School

Hawaii Children’s Theatre Presents

Friday, October 27th 12 p.m.-1 p.m. Wilcox Medical Center 245-1441

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang November 10th-26th Lihue War Memorial Convention Hall Hawaiichildrenstheatre.org

KCA Fall Festival Carnival

Old Koloa Sugar Mill Run

Kauai Christian Academy Friday & Saturday October 27th & 28th 4 p.m.-9 p.m., Kilauea

Saturday, November 11th 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Anne Knudsen Park 5K, 10K, 10-mile runs and non-competitive 5K walk www.active.com


Halloween Happenings Kaua`i Family Magazine wishes all our keiki a fun and safe Halloween night. Community Haunted House Fridays, October 13th, 20th, 27th 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, October 28 12-4 p.m. Kukui Grove $5 Adults, $3 Children (10 & Under) Kauai Harvest Ag Festival FREE Pumpkins, Rides, Petting Zoo!! Sunday, October 22nd 11am Waimea Canyon Park Wilcox Health Halloween Babies Parade Friday, October 27th 12 p.m.-1 p.m. Wilcox Medical Center

16 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Fall Festival Carnival Kauai Christian Academy Friday & Saturday October 27th & 28th 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Kilauea King’s Chapel Kauai Pumpkin Patch Carnival & Glow Show Saturday, October 28th 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. Hanamaulu Air Dome Sunday October 29th 5:30-8:00 p.m. King’s Chapel Eleele next to Ace Hardware Ghoulish Golf Halloween Tuesday, October 31st Anaina Hou Community Park, Kilauea Dress in costume & enjoy a free round of mini golf.


After School Activities & Camps Kauai Police Activities League (K-PAL) Boxing / Kickboxing, Wrestling Jiu Jitsu Self Defense Girls Self Defense / Awareness Class Ages: Boys & Girls Ages 5-18 Contact: Sergeant Lance Okasaki For Schedule & Registration: 808-241-1647, Kpal@kauai.gov

Bandwagon Music Center Music Lessons & Music Memberships! Ages: for all ages year round. Days: Monday-Friday Time: 2:00 p.m.(Lihue) 2:30 p.m. (Kilauea)

Garden Island Gymnastics

6:00 p.m. (both locations)

Fall Gymnastics Camp Dates: October 9th-13th 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Ages: 3 and up Cost: $189.00 for week. Daily drop in $42.00 daily Location: 1669-1675 Kuahale St, Kapaa, Contact: Karla P Villanueva-Bernal 808-635-3392 GardenIslandGymnastics.com GardenIslandGymnastics@gmail.com

Kilauea: Kauai Christian Academy center

Location: Lihue: Across from McDonalds

Contact: 808-634-4040 www.bandwagonstudios.com rockin@bandwagonstudios.

YWCA of Kauai Girlz Zone – Girlz Day Camp

Kauai Dance Center Ballet, Hip Hop, Lyrical, Spanish dance Ages: for all ages and abilities Days: Monday thru Saturday Time: 12:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Contact: Jennifer Bell-Grey Location: Nawiliwili/Lihue 3285 Waapa Rd Princeville community center 808-823-9588 www.kauaidancecenter.com info@kauaidancecenter.com

Ages: 11-15 This 4 night/5 day camp focuses on Hawaiian traditional practices & developing leadership skills. Girlz Tech Girlz Live Program Ages: 9-15 Designed to strengthen confidence, courage & communication skills. Contact: ywcakauai.org, 808-245-5959

FALL 2017 17


Article Title

Back to School Traffic Safety Tips By Kauai Police Dept

Servco Auto Kauai offers the following health and safety tips, and encourages everyone to be cautious as students return to class in August. The start of the school year is a time when children are at an increased risk of injuries caused by pedestrian, bicycle, school bus, or motor vehicle crashes.

TRAVELING TO AND FROM SCHOOL

Review the basic rules with your Keiki:

Walking to School

Bike

Consider starting/participating in a “walking school bus,” in which an adult accompanies a group of neighborhood children walking to school. Safe routes to school dates will be set at the beginning of the school year.

• Always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride. (required by law until 16)

Make sure your child’s walk to school is a safe route with welltrained adult crossing guards at every intersection.

• Bicycles must be walked across crosswalks

If your child is young or is walking to a new school, walk with them the first week to make sure they know the route and can do it safely.

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• Ride on the right, in the same direction as vehicular traffic. • Use appropriate hand signals. • Respect traffic lights and stop signs. • Wear bright colored clothing to increase visibility. • Know the “rules of the road.”

School Bus • Wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb. • Do not move around on the bus. • Check to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing the street.


Article Title

The message is proudly brought to you by

808-245-6978 • 2477 Ulu Maika St, Lihue, HI 96766 • Make sure to always remain in clear view of the bus driver. • Children should always board and exit the bus at designated locations that provide safe access to the bus or to the school building.

Tips for Motorists • All passengers are required by law to wear a seat belt and/or an age- and size-appropriate car safety seat or booster seat. • Do not text or talk on your cell phone while driving. • Slow down and obey all traffic laws and speed limits. • Be alert for school zones that have a reduced speed limit at designated times of the day. • Watch for school buses. Red flashing lights and an extended stop arm indicate the school bus is stopping to load or unload children. State law requires you to stop. • Keep an eye out for children walking in the street, especially where there are no sidewalks. • Be alert for children playing and gathering near bus stops and for those who may dart into the street without looking for traffic. • When backing out of a driveway or leaving a garage, watch for children walking or biking to school. • When driving in neighborhoods or

school zones, watch for young people who may be in a hurry to get to or away from school and may not be thinking about getting there safely.

Tips for Parents • Be a good role model. Always buckle up in the car, always wear a helmet when biking, and always follow pedestrian safety rules. Don’t text or talk on your cell phone while driving. • Supervise young children as they are walking or biking to school or as they wait at the school bus stop. • Provide your children with bright clothing so motorists can easily see them. • If your child is under four years old and weighs less than 40 pounds, make sure the child is properly buckled up in a weight-appropriate child safety seat in the back seat. Children, ages 4 to 8, weighing over 40 pounds and measuring four feet nine inches or less should ride in a booster seat. In addition, safety experts advise that all children under the age of 12 should ride in the back seat. • Make sure that your teen driver understands and obeys all traffic laws. Remind them texting or talking on a cell phone while driving is illegal. Photo by Lindsey Phelps FALL 2017

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The ABC’s of a Successful School Year By Pam Molnar

A successful school year is as easy as learning your ABCs. Check out these 26 simple tips for a happy and healthy school year. Accept new challenges – Push your child to go outside of his comfort zone. Encourage him to try activities, learn new sports, and make new friends. Breakfast – We all know breakfast is an important meal. If your child does not have time for a sit-down breakfast, provide on-the-go breakfast foods like muffins, fruit, or protein bars. Chores – Give your child a few jobs that you expect done each day before or after school such as making her bed or feeding the dog. A little bit of responsibility will go a long way. Downtime – Be sure to add free time to their schedule. These are the times your child can relax on the couch, play video games, or have a last minute pickup game with friends in the neighborhood. Exercise – Balance your child’s sedentary school day with plenty of exercise outside after school. Combine unstructured play with friends with a more structured team practice. Friends – Encourage your child to invite new friends over so you can get to know the person your child is spending time with. It is a great opportunity to meet the friend’s parents, too. Grab and Go Snacks – Your child will be hungry after school. Instead of grabbing a handful of cookies, provide them with pre-bagged healthy snacks that won’t interfere with the dinner hour. Think veggies and dip or hummus and crackers. Help your child, but don’t do it for him – We want our children to succeed, but they will never learn if we do it for them. It is okay to give suggestions, but remember that it is their name on the paper. Illness – It’s back to school and back to a room full of germs. Stock your child’s backpack or desk with tissues and hand sanitizer. Remind them to wash their hands and to sneeze into their arm. Join – Encourage your child to join activities at school. It gives them a sense of belonging and they will be more than just another face in the crowd.

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Keep Trying – It is hard to see your child not get the role, position or grade that he hoped for. Encourage your child to pick himself back up and try again. Disappointment builds character and gives them the tools to succeed. Limitations – Only you know your child’s limitations. While being a part of extracurricular activities is important, sometimes they are overwhelming. It’s okay to say no to invitations and extra practice when you see your child is overwhelmed. Be Mindful of Others’ Feelings – Think before you say it and apologize if it comes out wrong. Practice “the more the merrier” when making plans and include new friends in your group Nutrition – Plan healthy meals ahead of time. Stock up on ingredients for quick healthy meals that your family enjoys. Save time by using the crockpot or prepping food ahead of time. Get Organized – Save yourself some sanity in the mornings by organizing things the night before. Lay out clothes, make lunches the night before, and put backpacks and shoes in the same place each night. Provide a good example – While words are important, your actions mean so much more. In other words, practice what you preach. Quality Time – It is easy to get wrapped up in the busyness of back to school schedules. Try to plan dinners together or have a family game night. It is important to stay connected and catch up on each other’s day. Rules – Remind everyone of the school year rules. Reestablish bed times, discuss the when, where, and how long for electronics use and what happens when mom and dad are not home. Social Media – Reconfirm what social media sites your child belongs to and check all passwords. Take time to talk – Open your schedule each day and let your kids know when it is a good time to come to you with problems and concerns. You will get more out of the discussion if you are both tuned in. Use their time wisely – As our kids get older, their commitments increase. Teach your child to use his time wisely by prioritizing so he will not be up at midnight doing homework. Volunteer – It is a great way to see what goes on at school, meet the teachers, and interact with the other parents. Even working parents can get involved by helping at evening and weekend events. Workspace – Establish where your child will do his homework. Is the kitchen table too distracting? Does he have a desk in his room? Choose a space that is quiet and has all the tools he needs. Xtra Help – Get a jump start on finding a tutor for your child. If she struggles in a subject, look for someone who can keep her on track this year. Year of…. – Help your child set achievable goals this year. Make this the year of straight A’s, perfect attendance, or lead in the school play. Zzzzzzs – Time to return to the school night bedtimes. It is hard to adjust to waking up early again so adjust it a little at a time. Listen to your body and go to bed earlier if you need it.

FALL 2017 21


F

From the

From the

With Children’s Librarian Ku’ulei Vaughan Lihue Public Library

Dig, Dogs, Dig, a Construction Tail.

By James Horvath.

Call #: E R Horvath, New Book - Easy Reader (Pre-K+) Top dog Duke and his crew of construction-worker dogs are hard at work building a new park. As they dig, haul, plow, and push, they find something buried in the ground. What will happen next? This energetic rhyming text will remind you of a modern take of Go, Dog. Go!

Radiant child, the story of young artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. By Javaka Steptoe

Call #: J B Basquiat St , New Book - Biography (Gr. 1-5) Randolph Caldecott Medal Award-2017 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award - 2017 This textured heartfelt picture book is of a 1980s cultural phenom artist. As a boy, he saw art everywhere: in poetry, books and museums, games and words, and the energy of New York City. The message is that art doesn’t have to be neat and clean (inside the lines) to be beautiful.

Frank Einstein, and the Antimatter Motor By Jon Scieszka

Call #: J Scieszka, Juvenile Fiction – book 1 (Gr. 3-5) Summer Reading Program 2017 Top Staff Pick Kid genius and inventor, Frank Einstein, designs an antimatter motor flying bike to win Midville’s Science Prize. However, rival T. Edison, his rival, steals the invention and his two robots, Klink & Klank! Who will help him now? Grandpa Al, will. This story has the right mix of science facts and silliness.

The Crossover

By Kwame Alexander Call #: J Alexander, Juvenile Fiction (Gr. 4-7) Nene nomination 2018, Newbery Medal – 2015, Coretta Scott King (author) honor book - 2014 This award-winning story told in verse is about twins Josh and Jordan, who are junior high basketball stars. With a former pro baller and coach dad, and an assistant principal mom, support is strong on the home front. However, both brothers must come to terms with rule-breaking on and off the court.

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State of Hawaii-Department of Education

2017-2018 Official School Calendar

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www.kauaischools.org

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Sponsored by:

Everything we value begins with our Keiki.

Celebrate Education!!!

Student’s Work Year 1st Semester August 7, 2017 to December 21, 2017

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August 7, 2017

Statehood Day August 18, 2017

Labor Day

September 4, 2017

Fall Break

October 9 -13, 2017

Veterans Day

November 10, 2017

Thanksgiving & School Holiday

November 23 & 24, 2017

Winter Break

December 22-Januray 4, 2017

Christmas

December 25, 2017


How to Beat Back-to-School Clutter With this three-zone approach to organization, your family can keep everything under control this year. Zone 1: The Launch Pad

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Designate a place near the door for hanging jackets and backpacks. Install hooks on the wall and use bins or cubbies to corral kids’ shoes. Label hooks and bins to clarify whose items belong where. Make the launch area part of your family routine. Encourage kids to hang their jackets and backpacks as soon as they enter the house after school, and to leave their shoes in the entry area. Items may be taken out for sports’ practice or homework time, but they should be returned after each use.

Give kids responsibility for making sure they have what they need for by adding a preflight check to their bedtime routine. Post a checklist of must-have items for each child to make it easy. Laminate the list so your child can check off items with a dry erase pen. Label them clearly with “What I need for school,” “What I need for piano,” and “What I need for soccer.” Putting everything in the launch pad at bedtime ensures your family can blast off fast after breakfast.

Online tools for school-life organization Cozi Calendar — www.Cozi.com

Allows you to color code each member of the family and syncs with other calendars automatically to ensure you’re all on the same page. An online grocery list ensures you always know what you need from the store. And it’s accessible on your smart phone. Soshiku — Shosiku.com Provides a color-coded to-do list of homework tasks and assignments, organized by due date. Allows kids to link up with classmates for collaborative projects, and sends text message reminders about tests and deadlines.

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By Heidi Smith Luedtke

Zone 2: The Homework Station

Work with your student to design a desirable homework space. Some kids prefer to do homework at the kitchen table where they can see what else is going on. Others might prefer a quiet corner in the bedroom. If your child has trouble concentrating for long periods of time, consider doing different kinds of homework in different spaces. A change of scenery can renew kids’ energy.

Gather homework supplies into a portable caddy. This might be a rolling cart or a lidded plastic bin. Stow scissors, tape, pencils, markers, glue sticks, erasers, rulers, a stapler and a calculator in the homework station. Invest in a file system your child can use to store old notes and assignments. On a monthly basis, encourage kids to excavate their backpacks, sort through binders and move materials from completed units into the home archive. This keeps materials handy for final exam study sessions and prevents backpacks from growing too heavy.

Zone 3: Information Central

Keep tabs on what’s happening with a centralized information station. A commonly used, easily-accessible part of your home, such as the kitchen or family room, is ideal. Your information center should include a master calendar everyone can see at all times. It can be either paper or electronic. The format is less important than the calendar’s comprehensiveness. Transfer all scheduled activities, both school and recreational, onto the master calendar, then toss the paper reminders. This decreases paper clutter and puts everything in one place, so you avoid scheduling conflicts.

Create a simple inbox/outbox system for each child in the information station. Teach your children to put any papers they bring home in the IN tray after school. Sort through the inboxes each evening. Write events on the master calendar, and sign papers as needed. Place items that need to go back to school in the child’s OUT tray. Before bedtime, each child should check his outbox and put papers into his backpack to return to school. At the end of the day, all the trays should be empty.

File kids’ art projects, essays and grade reports in expandable folders – one for each child each year. At year’s end, sort through papers with your child and toss unwanted items. Store the rest for safe keeping.

Grade Fix — www.GradeFix.com

Allows kids to enter the details of a class project and schedule steps to get it done on time. A great tool for breaking big assignments into manageable chunks. Evernote — www.EverNote.com An electronic system for collecting links, images, notes and quotes and keeping them all in one place. Overachievers can use the Peek app to turn class notes into self-quiz questions. How smart is that?

FALL 2017 25


K-12 Education Kamehameha Schools

The choice is yours! Campus program World-class curriculum rooted in Christian and Hawaiian values on Oʻahu, Maui and Hawaiʻi Island

Kipona Scholarship Need-based funds for students enrolling in participating nonKamehameha private schools

Apply for both options in one application. Apply by September 30, 2017 for the 2018-2019 school year. Kamehameha Schools policy on admissions is to give To learn more, visit preference to applicants of ksbe.edu/k12 or call Hawaiian ancestry to the extent permitted by law. 808-842-8800. Kamehameha Schools 1408 ADV-2017-2018 K-12 Education Campaign Kauai Family, Color 4.625"w x 3.75"h

Kahili Adventist Preschool has moved to Kapaa! • Accepting students ages 35 months through 6 years. • Full time and part time students accepted.

Hours of operation: 7:30 AM to 5 PM Monday – Friday

(808) 634-5423

kahiliadventistpreschool@aol.com Transportation available between Lihue and Kapaa

26 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


We provide the opportunity for every learner to Soar To Success: Spiritually, Academically, Physically, and in Service to Community. Strong academics, Christian based teachings, and 21st century technology are tools we use to create tomorrow’s leaders.

Preschool - 8th grade Nationally Acclaimed Renaissance Lighthouse School Tuition assistance is available

sttheresakauai.com Find out more about the future of learning and see if HTA is the right fit for your family. Call or visit our website today!

myhta.org 808-676-5444 n Statewide Public Charter School n Tuition-Free n HTA’s Blended Learning Model o   Face-to-Face Instruction o   Virtual Instruction  o   Independent Learning

FALL 2017 27


NEWS THAT’S WORTH SHARING:

How do you make a good decision or form a sound opinion? For most adults, the answer is obvious. Find the best information you can from sources that have proven reliable in the past. For young people, things may not be as clear. By age 18, it’s estimated that 88% get much of their news from what’s shared on Facebook and other social media. Unfortunately, according to a highly publicized Stanford University study, many kids aren’t able to evaluate what they find. “Many assume that because young people are fluent in social media they are equally savvy about what they find there,” notes Professor Sam Wineburg, lead author of the report. “Our work shows the opposite.” Difficulty detecting bias Middle schoolers didn’t understand the difference

between reported news and “sponsored content.” High school students assumed that an unattributed photo proved the truth of a story. And college students couldn’t detect the bias in a tweet. So what should parents do? Social media means that children—and adults– are becoming information sources for each other, so we need to take on some of the tasks that used to be done by editors. Start by talking to your children about what deserves to be shared online.

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Point out that false and biased information comes from many sources— deceptive advertising, satirical websites or organizations with an agenda. And then there’s “click bait”—tidbits so astonishing, outrageous or implausible that people click and share without thinking. These so-called stories are created simply to generate revenue. No one, including kids, likes to be duped by bad information. To help your child develop the savvy to evaluate what they


FAKE NEWS VS. REAL NEWS find online, talk regularly about how important it is to be skeptical and ask the following questions: Is it worth reading? According to a study at Columbia University, 59 percent of links shared on Twitter have never actually been clicked. Kids show respect for their friends by sharing only things that they were willing to read or watch. Fake news sites in particular count on mindless sharing. Who stands behind it? Encourage kids to track stories back to the website where they originated. Check the “About Us” page and scroll down the home page to find out who owns the copyright to the material. Look at the URL. Some fake news sites reel in the unsuspecting with addresses that are deceptively close to legitimate sites. Point out extensions—.gov is a government agency, .edu is colleges and universities and .ru is a site that originates in Russia. (A complete extension list is available at Webopedia, tinyurl.com/48t5r). What’s the source? Help children understand sources by talking about

By Carolyn Jabs com helps users track down photographs to see if they’ve been manipulated.

who they trust at school. Some kids are genuine authorities in different areas—they know the stats for the sports team or can tell you when assignments are due. Others have a reputation for spreading rumors or even telling lies. The same thing is true online. A story is worth sharing only if it comes from reliable sources. The sources should be named and, in most cases, there should be more than one. They should be people who are qualified to have an opinion because they’ve studied the topic, done research, or have relevant experience.

What’s the tone? Many online stories are designed to trigger strong feelings such as fear, anger or even hatred. Encourage your child to pay attention to words that manipulate or inflame emotions. Point out that people should be especially careful about sharing stories of this kind. The question should always be: will sharing this make the world a better place? Much of what’s shared on social media isn’t serious, and kids don’t need to apply this level of scrutiny to animal videos or other playful posts. At the same time, we all should be aware that we are using information we get through social media to make decisions about social, political and health issues. As the Stanford researchers put it, “Never have we had so much information at our fingertips. Whether this bounty will make us smarter and better informed or more ignorant and narrow-minded will depend on our awareness of this problem and our educational response to it.

Can the story be confirmed? Anyone can say anything online. Teach kids to Google stories and authors to find out whether anyone else finds them credible. A story that appears in one place or is based on a single tweet should be discounted. You can also point older kids to websites that help differentiate good information from bogus claims. Healthnewsreview. org evaluates stories about medical research. Politifact. com and Factcheck. org try to verify claims by politicians. Tineye.

FALL 2017 29


Take Control of Your Health:

6 Steps to Prevent a Fall Every 11 seconds, an older adult is seen in an emergency department for a fall-related injury. Many falls are preventable. Stay safe with these tips! Find a good balance and exercise program

Look to build balance, strength, and flexibility. Contact your local Area Agency on Aging for referrals. Find a program you like and take a friend.

Talk to your health care provider Ask for an assessment of your risk of falling. Share your history of recent falls.

Regularly review your medications with your doctor or pharmacist Make sure side effects aren’t increasing your risk of falling. Take medications only as prescribed.

Get your vision and hearing checked annually and update your eyeglasses Your eyes and ears are key to keeping you on your feet.

Keep your home safe Remove tripping hazards, increase lighting, make stairs safe, and install grab bars in keyareas.

Talk to your family members Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay safe. Falls are not just a seniors’ issue.

PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

COUNTY OF KAUAI AGENCY ON ELDERLY AFFAIRS


kupuna KAUA`I

INSIDE: How to Have "Logical" Conversations With Your Cognitively-Impaired Parent Benefits of Healthy Eating As You Get Older Addiction 101: Detoxification Photo by Lindsey Phelps


Article Title

Photo by Lindsey Phelps

How to have “logical� conversations and fun with your cognitively-impaired parent Stressed-out, exhausted and at the brink of tears (which generally spills over once they start sharing) is not an unusual scenario. At least not in my office when adult children at near wit’s end seek understanding and answers in dealing with their senior-seasoned, cognitively-impaired parents. They pour out streams of stories I dare say we can recapture some of these good times but first we need to gain interspaced between deep sighs and soft an appreciation of the sobs - the battles over baths and the pursed When parents start science of the mind. In very generalized terms, lips of parents when slipping into mild we can classify the mind pills are presented; the cajoling that turns cognitive impairment into two categories: the mind and to threatening then to then dementia, by emotional pleading. And the worst the thinking mind. The of worlds, when the definition there will emotional mind would 95% of what goes turbulence of frustration be degradation of include leads to bitterness and on in our brain without both their thinking us being aware. It would resentment. The once secure bonds of love, and emotional minds. be the origins of our emotions, the how and laughter and sacred moments privileged only to those who why we feel fear, love, hate, anger, joy, etc., same common family experiences begin even our sense of ethics. The emotional to weaken. mind would a mixture of our personality

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By, Dr. Hale Akamine

Photo by Lindsey Phelps tendencies (temperaments) upon which are built our stored experiences (memories) even from infancy. The thinking mind (5%) would be that part where deliberate, (hopefully) logical, planning would occur of which we’d be aware (say, doing a math problem). Let me give you an example. I left the westside of Kauai (Kekaha) soon after high school and made my first trip outside Hawaii to Colorado. I pursued my university education, subsequently work, spending a total of nine years there. Yet, I never fully got over how wrong it was to enter into people’s home with shoes or flip-flops (slippers!). When my lessenlightened, first-time, guests to my place needed to be instructed to remove their shoes, they were shocked (even irritated, how dare!). When asked why, I couldn’t logically say because we do it in Hawaii. Instead, I told them because I would have to sweep, vacuum and/or shampoo the flooring and I’m lazy and this is my house! While my reasoning (my thinking mind), was logical, it was just defending my emotional mind! Why? There’s nothing wrong (illegal, unethical, sinful, etc.) with wearing footwear in the house (about

325 million people in the US do!) but my experience being raised for 18 years in the culture of Kauai made it feel wrong. When parents start slipping into mild cognitive impairment then dementia, by definition there will be degradation of both their thinking and emotional minds. Generally, what is first noticed is loss of short-term memory (needed in both emotional and thinking mind) and later confusion and illogical behaviors. Thus, in a sense our parents’ personality have changed and to appeal to them in the way we’ve always done would become increasingly futile. w The next time I’ll discuss how to engage your parents with aloha again. Dr. Hale Akamine, is the executive director of Family Ministries Center and a licensed clinical psychologist for over 25 years.

For more Infomation: (808) 742-7591, info@halekupuna.com

FALL 2017 33


Benefits of Healthy Eating As You Get Older! By Jasmine Yukimura, Adult Day Health Center Eating well is vital for everyone at all ages. Whatever your age, your daily food choices can make an important difference in your health and in how you look and feel. Eating Well Promotes Health and Energy

active you are. Check with your doctor or registered dietitian.

Eating a balanced mix of foods every day has many health benefits. For instance, eating well may reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, bone loss, some kinds of cancer, and anemia. If you already have one or more of these chronic diseases, eating well and being physically active may help you better manage them. Healthy eating may also help you reduce high blood pressure, lower high cholesterol, and manage diabetes.

Food Choices Affect Digestion

By consuming enough calories -- a way to measure the energy you get from food --you give your body the fuel it needs throughout the day. The number of calories needed depends on how old you are, whether you’re a man or woman, your height and weight, and how

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Your food choices also affect your digestion. Not getting enough fiber or fluids may cause constipation. Eating more whole-grain foods with fiber, fruits and vegetables or drinking more water may help with constipation.

Make One Change at a Time To eat healthier, you can begin by taking small steps, making one change at a time. You might take the salt shaker (or soy sauce) off your table. Switch to whole-grain bread, seafood, or more vegetables and fruits when you shop. Eating well isn’t just a “diet” or “program”, it is part of a www lifestyle that you can adopt now and stay with in the years to come.


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FALL 2017 35


Power Into Improved Oral Health

By Randall P. Jaurequi, DDS Hawaiian Island Dental

Tips On How to Brush With A Rotating Electric Toothbrush You can achieve better plaque removal and gingivitis reduction with an electric toothbrush that utilizes oscillating-rotating technology than with a regular manual toothbrush. This brushing action is different from ordinary manual toothbrushes, as it does the job of brushing for you. And, powered toothbrushes are a great option for individuals with arthritis or with manual dexterity challenges.

Step 1.

Hold the brush parallel to the floor, against the side of your teeth.

Step 2.

Guide the brush head slowly

from tooth to tooth following the curve of the teeth and gums. You don’t need to press hard or scrub, just let the powered toothbrush do all the work. Hold the brush head in place for a few seconds before moving on to the next tooth.

Step 3. Guide the brush head to all parts of your mouth including the insides, outsides, chewing surfaces, and behind your back teeth. Refer to the brushing instructions supplied with your electric toothbrush for additional information. Be sure to talk to your Dentist if you have questions about choosing a powered toothbrush.

Nicole Brede, General and Orthodontic patient “I feel really good about my dental treatment here, staff are great and very accommodating.”

Providing dental care for the entire family, from keiki to kupuna since 2001 Dr. Randall P. Jaurequi General Dentist

Member of the American Dental Association, Hawaii Dental Association, and Kauai County Dental Society.

808.245.8866

4370 Kukui Grove Street, Suite 211, Lihue Hawaii 96766 www.hawaiianislanddental.com • info@hawaiianislanddental.com Office Hours: Mon-Thurs; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. by Appointment; Closed Sun.

36 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Addiction 101: Detoxification

By Gerald J. McKenna, MD, DFASAM, DLFAPA

Our island families struggle with addiction. Whether the nationally recognized opioid epidemic, alcohol, marijuana, benzodiazepines, methamphetamine, cocaine or a combination of these and other substances, it is right here in our backyard. A professional substance use evaluation is an essential first step and medically managed drug withdrawal (detoxification) can be a critical second step to the treatment and recovery process of addiction.

detoxification can usually be completed on an outpatient basis with buprenorphine and naloxone, a medication manufactured in pill or sublingual film.

Another medication, Vivitrol (Naltrexone), is a long acting time release injection that is administered monthly Medically managed to reduce craving from both alcohol and to substance withdrawal block the effects of (detoxification) can be a opiates.

It can be dangerous to suddenly stop sedative drugs like alcohol and tranquilizers. With these substances, inpatient medically managed critical second step to propel For methamphetamine withdrawal can avert the treatment and recovery dependence, there fatal consequences. process following the first are no current When hospitalization detoxification protocols, step of a professional is unavailable, limited but antidepressant outpatient detoxification substance use evaluation. medications can be can be accomplished used to help address as long as a capable the symptoms of the withdrawal process. caregiver is able to monitor and administer medications prescribed by a In all these detoxification/withdrawal physician. management protocols, research indicates For opioid dependence –which is a part of counseling as a necessary tool for the recovery process. our national opioid epidemic —

38 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Ke Ala Pono-Kauai

Call For Help Now 246-0663 Private Comprehensive Addiction Treatment The McKenna Recovery Center provides you a broad scope of private and confidential addiction evaluation and treatment expertise and resources in one place to address the complex needs of your loved one. Despite the limited access to psychiatrists on Kauai, you will benefit from a full time physician and nurse practitioner with indepth experience with addiction and psychiatry.

We are your One Stop Shop for addiction evaluation and treatment:  We serve you and your loved one with a medical and spiritual approach to problems with alcohol, prescription medications, and other drugs  You have the expertise of a full time medical director who trained in Harvard, board certified in psychiatry and addiction medicine, with 35+ years experience  Your senior citizen with medication or alcohol problems could see a nurse practitioner with psychiatric, addiction, and geriatric experience  Your adolescent will be counseled by a former high school counselor dually trained in addiction counseling  Adult and Adolescent Programs  Medication Assisted Detoxification and Medication Assisted Treatment are possible and considered, as appropriate  You, the family are included in the process from the start and receive education and support for everyone to heal

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“I want my family to have the best possible health care – the best.” At HMSA, we’re committed to providing the highest quality health care to the people of Kauai. We’re always working to make sure you have access to Hawaii’s best physicians, hospitals, and clinics. Find your HMSA health plan at hmsa.com/quality.

1010-7648


8

Fright Night Nightmare Triggers

and how you can help The early school years are a prime time for nightmares. For many children, nightmares peak between ages 5 and 8, thanks to an increasingly active imagination, fantasy play and newly acquired social awareness. Parents can pave the way for sweeter dreams by learning about the top “nightmare triggers,” events or situations likely to bring on bad dreams.

Tricky Transitions

Starting a new school or daycare, beginning a new class or sport, or being away from a parent or other caregiver can contribute to a child feeling a temporarily helpless. These feelings can bring on nightmares. When children have a lot of nightmares, it’s not uncommon that there are a lot of changes going on at home.

How to help: Discuss life transitions with your child, preferably in advance. Encourage your child to talk about things that may be bothering him or her. Dream Danger

Scary or unsettling experiences like car accidents, injuries or other real-life traumas can be nightmare fodder for children. The death or a relative of pet, or a divorce in the family can also cause emotional distress that plays out in the form of bad dreams.

How to help: After scary or traumatic experiences, encourage creative

expression in the form of journaling or drawing. Art and creative play can help children communicate and process troubling emotions.

Rated N for ‘Nightmare’

Media research firm Nielsen reports that elementary-school-age children watch 28 hours of television per week. All of those hours clocked in front of the boob tube can contribute to nightmares, especially if kids watch intense or troubling content. The central themes of many children’s stories — separation from or loss of parents and friends, or evil people hurting innocent ones — are very commonly upsetting.

How to help: Don’t allow your child to view troubling, intense scenes on television, particularly before bedtime.

42 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


By Malia Jacobson

Under Pressure Music or dance recitals, tests at school, and sports games can bring on excitement, worry — and nightmares. Dreams are often an opportunity to relieve pressures of the day. When there are big demands placed on a child, dreams become a time to replay anxiety or stress over the event.

How to help: Any time your child is facing a transition, special challenge, or new experience, stick to an earlier bedtime and spend extra time winding down and relaxing before bed. New Place, New Faces A trip on the amusement park ride, a long-awaited airplane trip, a longedfor visit with faraway cousins— new experiences, even enjoyable ones, can trigger nightmares. The first time a child does something, it’s nearly always stressful. The brain reprocesses that stress at night in the form of a nightmare.

How to help: Limit new-experience stress by following an exciting “first”

with a familiar, comforting activity — after a child’s first roller-coaster ride, wind down with a leisurely walk or relaxing tunes.

Late-bedtime Boogeyman When kids stay up too late, nightmares can come calling. That’s because sleep deprivation results in the fitful, poor quality sleep that can trigger bad dreams.

How to help: Ensure that your child gets enough sleep. Most children aged 5-8 need between nine and 11 hours per night.

Pills and Chills Parents are often surprised to learn that medications intended to improve their child’s health can have a detrimental effect on sleep. Mood-altering medications, including antidepressants and medications for ADHD, can negatively impact sleep or trigger nightmares, particularly when taken over a long period of time.

How to help: Talk to your doctor about any medications your child takes and ask how you can minimize any negative effects on sleep. Discomfort Drama

When kids toss and turn because of a too-hot bedroom, ill-fitting PJs or an old, saggy mattress, bad dreams are more likely to happen. Fortunately, the most common discomfort-related nightmare trigger — sleeping too hot — is easily remedied by removing a child’s socks, switching to lighter-weight pajamas or removing a heavy blanket.

How to help: Keep the bedroom quiet, dark, and cool — between 60 and 68 degrees is ideal. During warmer months, switch to lighter-weight pajamas and remove heavy blankets.

FALL 2017 43


Oh Baby! Wilcox Health Provides a Wealth of Resources for Expectant Parents

By, Kandi Bloss, RN

Wilcox Health is making it easier for expectant families to access the information they need to prepare for baby with a wealth of online resources. hours, etc. – and also allows moms to pre-register for their hospital stay and for childbirth classes,” Bloss explains. The Childbirth & Parent Education free four-week class series discusses body condition, relaxation and breathing techniques, along with common questions such as warning signs, cesarean birth, postpartum issues, breastfeeding, and medications and hospital procedures. Earlier this year, Wilcox welcomed the release of Hapai, a mobile health app that helps mom and baby stay healthy during and after pregnancy.

In response to the high volume of breastfeeding questions, Bloss started a Breastfeeding Hui at Wilcox Medical Center.

The free support group meets from noon to 1:30 p.m. on the first and third Friday “The next generation gathers their of every month information from the in the Childbirth internet more than books, so having an These medically backed Classroom. It is free and open to moms app that is readily tools give parents accessible and makes with newborns and it easy to access reliable, evidence-based babies up to 12 information makes months old. information they perfect sense,” “While it’s great says Registered can feel confident to have so much Nurse Kandi Bloss, a information so about following. childbirth educator, easily available, we international should not believe board-certified everything we read on the internet. These lactation consultant and certified lactation in-person classes and medically backed counselor at Wilcox Medical Center. tools give parents reliable, evidenceWilcox also created an online baby kit based information they can feel confident expectant parents can download to about following,” Bloss says. better prepare them for their childbirth experience at the medical center. To learn more about any of these classes “The baby kit has all our general hospital information – visiting hours, cafeteria

44 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

or to download the Hapai app, go to WilcoxHealth.org.


Focusing on

Life,

Long-Term Care, and Medicare Insurances Jason Blake

808-652-5210 jblakekauai@gmail.com Fax: 877-504-9376

Call for a free consultation.

Come In and Get Your Flu Shots Today!

Kapaa Pharmacy has moved!

Located in the Primary Care Clinic of Kauai, Office of Dr.’s Sonido, Lanson, Bautista and Yap. 3216 Elua Street, Lihue HI 96766 Phone: 808-246-6900. Our hours: Mon-Fri 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Accepting Kaiser, HMSA, Caremark, EUTF, Silver Scripts, Most Medicare D Plans, United Health, Aloha Care, AARP, Tricare-Express Scripts, & Medco

Lihue Pharmacy Group:

3216 Elua Street, Lihue Lihue Clinic Pharmacy • 246-6900

Lihue Professional Pharmacy

3420-B Khuio Hwy, Inside Kauai Medical Clinic • 245-3800

Lihue Pharmacy

4491 A Kolopa Street, Lihue Next to State Farm. • 246-9100

FALL 2017 45


Co-parenting

What Is Co-Parenting? While couples may choose to part ways, their relationship as parents never ends. Healthy co-parenting is divorcing or separating in such a way that you try to avoid the animosity or hurt feelings and be present for your kids. Co-parenting is about rising above those feelings and working with your ex to both be there for your kids.
 It’s a very small minority of divorced parents that can truly do collaborative co-parenting, where they work together and get along completely for the sake of the children. More parents should aim for low-conflict co-parenting instead. You need to manage the conflict, at least when it comes to sharing the parenting duties with your ex.

15 Tips to Make Co-Parenting Work
 Communicate with your ex Respectfully

try email or a service, such as OurFamilyWizard.com


Be respectful to your ex. Talk in a civil tone, without sarcasm conveyed by your tone, words or body language. Remember, they also want what is best for your children and you want your ex to talk and act respectfully with you, too.

Respect Your Ex’s Time With the Kids

Talk Directly to Your Ex

1 2

Go right to the source instead of talking to your ex “through” your kids. Communicate directly with each other. If you can’t have a civil conversation,

46 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Be respectful of the other parent’s time with the children. Don’t intrude on the children’s time with their other parent by calling or texting too frequently. Avoid scheduling special children’s activities on the other parent’s time without first clearing it with your ex.

Make and Follow a Plan

3

Create and rely on a clear parenting plan


By Mary Navarro, MA,LMFT

that spells out in detail how various issues will be handled. The more detailed, the less you have to fight about…. • • • • •

phone calls exchange of clothing when a child is sick homework to do or done drop off and pick up…. And who can do it if you are not available?


4

Take the Blame or at least do not openly criticize your ex

It’s easy to blame your ex, but “peace” suggests you don’t. When people blame the divorce on the ex-partner, hurt feelings will come out. You don’t want the kids to feel the animosity about your ex when they are with you.

Stop the Leaks

5

Parents need to watch what they say when their kids are around. No blaming the other parent for things -- for example, “We can’t buy you those new hockey skates because dad didn’t give us enough money.” Do not “badmouth” your ex.

Keep Conflict at Bay

6

When there is any kind tension or conflict in the home, kids sleep poorly. And sleep affects every aspect of a child’s life. Keep conflict to a minimum in both homes and let your kids sleep easy.


Be Consistent

7

Both parents need to make sure that the kids’ schedules are pretty much the same at both houses. Sometimes things like sleep and bedtimes get a little loose, but when sleep is compromised, kids can get into trouble in all areas of their lives.


Team Sports activities…

8

Before signing up your child to play on a sports team, coordinate with your ex. Not only will there be shared expenses,

but kids must be transported to practices and games during the weeks with each parent. Please cooperate when the activity is one your child really wants to participate in.

9 10

School: Homework, meetings, etc.

Be sure to help your child complete all school assignments on time. Make sure all information sent home from the school gets communicated to the other parent.

You CAN Have It Both Ways!

You do not have to have the same rules for the kids in both houses, but explain that the rules are different at Daddy and Mommy’s houses. (At Daddy’s house you can drink coke and at Mommy’s house you cannot.)


Agree on the Big Things

11

You need to agree on the big issues. If you find you and your ex-partner cannot agree on an important decision, such as a school choice, consult with an expert who can offer objective advice about what is best for your child.


12 13

Don’t Complain About Your Ex

Avoid the temptation to say negative things about your ex to your child or to use children as messengers or sounding boards for your complaints about your ex.


Talk Directly to Your Ex

Go right to the source instead of talking to your ex “through” your kids. Communicate directly with each other. If you can’t have a civil conversation, try email or a service, such as OurFamilyWizard.com


Forgive! Your kids will thank you for it.

14 15

FALL 2017 47


ATTENTION YOUNG ARTISTS!! Fall Art Contest Senildto ema

5th ber 1 e book by

1

Ocftyoou wililnwa ibnytPhatsrick

o One nu and Hnd Friend Ho hing a C

How to draw the Bullfrog:

2

They are smooth and green skinned compared to toads that are brown and bumpy skinned. Bullfrogs were brought to the islands as a source of food.

Step 1: First form up the frog using ovals and circles. Remember to press softly at this stage in case you need to erase lines. Step 2: Next outline the frog adding details at this stage. Step 3: Finally color the frog using crayons or colored pencils. Tada! Email your art to: info@kauaifamilymagazine.com by October 15th. One of you will win the book Honu and Hina by Patrick Ching and Friends.

It's easy to submit your art for our contest. eMail us, and include your name, age, grade, school and phone number. 48 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

3


Article Title

Summer Winner! Michaela Devenecia Age 9, Grade 4 Wilcox Elementary School

Kaua’i Family Magazine thanks all the young creative artists for their participation. Everyone’s a winner with us!

Humpback Whale | Honorable Mentions

Adeline Bechard Age 10, Grade 5

Katon Shimatsu-Gaspar Age 4 Kamehameha Pre-school Kaumakani

Kaylee Tokuda Age 8, Grade 3 King Kaumualii Elementary

Kulia Makaneole Age 6, Grade Kindergarten Wilcox Elementary School

Aysen Shimatsu-Gaspar Age 7, Grade 2 Eleele Elementary School

Sophia Woods-Henry Age 8, Grade 2 King Kaumuali'i

Stella Fornari Age 7, Grade 1 Wilcox Elementary School

Zackary Elijah Corpuz Grade 1 Wilcox Elementary School

FALL 2017 49


ArticleAnnounce Title Your Baby’s Birth! Announce Your Baby’s

!

It’s easy - and FREE - to announce your baby’s arrival and have a wonderful keepsake. Email baby’s photo, name, date of birth and time, weight, parents’ names to: births@KauaiFamilyMagazine.com.

Caleb-Jai Albert Makana Cruz Born:April 10,2017 Weight: 6lbs 13oz 19 inches Parents: Shana & Frank Cruz Jr. Siblings:Seraph-John & Matthew-James

Dacey-Joy Hi'ileikapaepaepohakuikealohamaluhiamehepulelehuamakamae Wainohiakamakakehau Moanaikamakahiki Gonzalez Born: December 30, 2016 Time: 5:30PM Weight: 6lbs 1oz Length: 21 Inches  Parent: Kainani Gonzalez 

Ronson Anthony Ka’imipono Contrades Born: June 6, 2017, 8:55am Weight: 7lbs, 10.8oz Length: 19.5 inches Parents: Ronald and Leiana Siblings: Trevor, Katie, and Reiana

Pyper Makanamaiku’ukaikunāne Kumiko Kalaluhi Born: March 24, 2017 7:25am Weight: 6lbs 2ozs Length: 18.75 inches Parents: Kelsie Kashima & Jarren Kalaluhi Siblings: Big brothers Kekoa & Hinano Big sisters Nohea, Meileah and Lyric

Sand Tanan Erikson Sandblom Born: June 22, 2017 Weight: 8 lbs Length: 20.25 inch Parents: Marissa and Erik Sandblom Siblings: Såfina and Swede

50 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com 50 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Article Title Dax Bertram Steinberger Born: February 24th, 2017 10:45 am Weight: 7 lbs 11 oz Length: 21.5 inches Parents: Jenalin and Marc Steinberger Big Sister: Finnley Steinberger

Revan-Drax Kairel Kamaehu Pajela Anderson Born: April 7, 2017 • Weight: 6lbs 4oz Length: 18.25 inches Parents: Ka’iulani Pajela and Oren Anderson Siblings: Conner, Xailea, Xavier, Xaelyn, Cazpian, and Trenton

Maverick Kenzo Kalihiwai Sokei-Lutz Born: May 13, 2017 Time: 11:04 pm Weight: 8 lbs 3.4 oz Parents: Heather Sokei & Stevie Lutz

Photos by Shelby Longley

SPRING FALL 2017 2017 5151


Halloween

Doesn’t Have to Be Scary for

Teeth!

By Patricia Sanchez. D.D.S. Kuhio Pediatrics Dental

Don’t deprive your child of the Halloween experience. Here are a few hints to teach healthy dietary and oral hygiene habits during this time of year: Enjoy trick or treating and allow your child to indulge, once you are home go through the candy with your child and let them choose a limited amount, the rest you can donate, give away or swap at a dental office. Not all treats are created equal! Use the grid bellow from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry to help your child choose the more teeth appropriate treats.

Eat candy with a main meal, avoiding sugar during snacks reduces the amount of acid attacks per day, also an increase in saliva during meals will help to wash away the acid faster. Brush before going to bed! During bed time our saliva production decreases leaving our teeth unprotected from the acid attacks. Make sure that your children brush at least twice per day for two minutes and floss once per day.

Let the MOUTH MONSTERS Help you sort your treats TREATS TO AVOID The chewy, sticky candies get stuck in the grooves and crevices of the teeth making it hard for saliva to wash them away which leads to tooth decay. Sour candies have a high acidity content which breaks down tooth enamel, ma king teeth susceptible to a Mouth Monster invasion.

GUMMIES CARAMEL SOUR CANDY BUBBLE GUM

BETTER TREAT CHOICES

BEST TREAT CHOICES

Better choices include milk chocolate and snacksize packets of pretzels or crackers. These options are less sticky and do not have high acidity, therefore are less harmful to teeth than gummies, caramels or sour candies. However, it’s important to limit snacking overall because a child’s dental health depends less on what they eat and more on how often they eat it.

Dark chocolate contains antioxidants that can inhibit bacteria from sticking to the teeth, preventing infections in gums and battling tooth decay. Sugar-free gum made with xylitol promotes the growth of tooth-protective, non-acidic bacteria which can make it nearly impossible for bacteria and plaque to form.

MILK CHOCOLATE PRETZELS CRACKERS

52 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

DARK CHOCOLATE SUGAR-FREE GUM


Patricia Sanchez, D.D.S. 808-378-4869

Email: office@kuhiopediatricdental.com 3-3359 Kuhio Hwy. • Lihu’e Hawai’i 96766 Fax: 808-320-3329

www.kuhiopediatricdental.com

Christ Memorial Episcopal Church

Aloha Pediatrics

Serving Kauai islandwide from Kalaheo! Same-day Appointments Available!

New Patients Welcome!

“Committed to providing quality healthcare to Kauai’s keiki!” Located at 2469– C Puu Road, Kalaheo. Behind Kalaheo Steak and Rib House. Formerly Dr. Raelson’s office.

Na Kamalei Godly Play

All Are Welcome! Sundays, 9 a.m. 2509 Kolo Road, Kilauea, HI 96754

808-482-4824

ChristMemorialKilauea@gmail.com www.ChristMemorialKauai.org

Hours: Mon, Tues: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Wed: 9 a.m.-Noon Thu, Fri: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Phone: (808) 652-0048 or (808) 353-3953

Aloha Pediatrics 2469-C Puu Rd., Kalaheo Mailing address: P.O. Box 457, Kalaheo, HI 96741 Website: www.alohapediatricskauai.com Email: alohapediatrics@gmail.com

FALL 2017 53


SO. . .WHO’S FM97’S BIGGEST WINDBAG?

Beau Acoba

Ron Wood

BB Choi

Whoever it is, these guys share one thing in common. They all play the island’s best music! Wake up to Ron Wood in the morning. Spend your middays with Beau Acoba. And drive home with BB Choi in the afternoon. Play fun contests, win valuable prizes, enjoy great news and entertainment… on Kauai’s first radio choice FM97 at 96.9!

Still Kauai’s 1st Radio Choice.


Support for Restoring Goals for You and Dr. Catherine Long, Ed.D., LMFT, CSAC Your Ohana! Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist After being away for 30 years living on Maui, Dr. Catherine Long, has returned home! She would like to continue the work she left on Maui in supporting individuals, couples and families move through painful situations.  “Intimate relationships inevitably encounter conflicts that lead us to questioning the health of our relationship or betrayal issues that leave us helpless, fearful, and confused, destroying trust and faith in our union without guidance and support”, says Dr. Long  Dr. Long provides substance abuse and mental health assessments, anger management, domestic violence

intervention, substance abuse, addiction and relationship counseling.  Also offered are culturally appropriate parenting classes and negotiations for parent custody and visitations.  Peace and safety is obtainable. Recovery and sobriety exists. Being capable parents is possible. We can have the forever kind of love! She looks forward to working with you and your ohana.

HANA RESTORATION CENTER RESTORING PEACE IN KAUAI FAMILIES

Specializing in:  Family Abuse & Violence  Substance Abuse & Addiction  Relationship Challenges  Parental Conflicts (custody and visitation plans)  Parenting Classes 4504 Kukui Street (Dragon Building), Suite#8, Kapaa, Hi. 96746

(808) 298-6555

Dr. Catherine Long

Keikiclubhouse@msn.com

Ed.D., LMFT, CSAC Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

Most insurance, including Quest, accepted Hawaii MFT #228

FALL 2017 55


KAUA`I

TEEN

By Brooke Kanna

Be Inspired â?‹ Be Innovative â?‹ Be You

y M g n i t i Wr y e n r u o J

For as long as I can remember, I was the girl that always had a story to share with someone, whether it was about my day at school or an exciting dream I just so happened to remember! To this day, not much has changed. In Elementary school, I found myself writing scripts for plays that I wished to direct, and in Middle school I continued writing scripts, but for short films instead. I was always sparking up new stories that I wanted to tell, asking peers to read my content so that I could get feedback and make improvements. I joined the Advanced Media Productions class at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in seventh grade, and from then on I became a part of the world of broadcast!

56 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

In high school I joined the media program as well, where I produced numerous stories for Hiki No and Olelo Youth Exchange, and it was then when I realized that this was the pathway I wanted to pursue in life. People have told me that finding a sustainable career in the film and broadcasting industry is hard to do. I took their words to heart and thought that maybe if I tried exceptionally hard to get involved in media, then I could get somewhere.


I’m currently not taking any “media productions” classes in school, however I am still involved with Olelo, Hiki No, and PBS Student Reporting Labs with Mrs. Aiwohi. the media teacher at Kauai High school. She’s always giving updates on what competitions are coming up that we can submit stories to, one being the PBS Student Reporting Labs Journalism Academy. Each student that wanted to

apply had to produce a 1-3 minute video entry explaining why our application should be considered. Being a girl from Hawaii, I thought my chances of being selected as one of 20 students nationwide were slim. However, I decided to go for it because I believe you never know, unless you try. I wrote the script and shot list for my video, and spent a whole day filming. I tried to be as creative as I could with whatever I had to do because I wanted to make my video entry stand out. I viewed previous entries from students that got accepted in the years past, and they all had a similar style, which was where the applicant was sitting in front of the camera in an interview fashion talking about why they would be a good consideration for the academy. I wanted

FALL 2017 57


Kauai Teen

to change the game with my video, so I went on to make it more of a personal narrative rather than a head-on interview of myself. I thought that I was taking too big of a risk because I hadn’t seen anyone break away from the interview style, but when Mrs. Aiwohi called me in for some news, she had said that they selected only one student from our school out of the three that applied, and my heart skipped a beat! She

names. I was so shocked and excited that my heart skipped another beat! This past summer of 2017, I was flown over to Washington, D.C. for a week where I had the amazing opportunity to meet students just like me from all over the country and learn from some of the greatest journalism mentors of PBS. Prior to flying out to D.C., my group members and I had several discussions about the

❋ “I decided to go for it because I showed me the list of names that had been selected to go, and sure enough, “Brooke Kanna” was among those

58 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

story we were going to produce while we were in D.C.. Our story was about the families of the Fish Market, which ended up showing how the families are pulling through with business, despite the heavy, 2.4 billion-dollar development along the waterfront. We went in thinking it was going to be an easy story to do, but we were wrong. We definitely had challenges during the script writing and story development itself because we weren’t quite sure what story we wanted to share. We got to learn incredible techniques and tips from professionals


Kauai Teen

regarding editing and storytelling before jumping on the project. We spent a half-day shooting out at the Fish Market down at the Wharf, which happens to be the oldest continuous fish market in America. Then, spent hours upon hours trying to sort through the important elements of the story. Evidently, everything came together as we sat for nearly eight to twelve hours editing and finalizing our story.

believe you never know, unless you try" ❋ During this stressful, yet exciting journey, I learned that sometimes you just don’t know what to expect, and that’s not a bad thing. I learned to keep your mind open to the possibilities that may occur, because you never know where it might lead you. I learned that friendship is one of the most valuable things you can ever have, because the right friends will make you feel like you’ll always have someone to turn to. These lessons will stick with me for the rest of my journey, and that’s not just through high school and college, but through life.

With everything I’ve gained through this experience, I can confidently say that I have grown to become a better writer and a better storyteller than I was before I attended this academy. Once I graduate high school, I can only hope that I will have produced numerous amounts of stories for PBS, and that I will have gotten my name out even further in the broadcast world. Honestly, I’m not too sure what opportunities will be in store for my future, but I know that the possibilities are endless. I just have to keep my mind wide open.

FALL 2017 59


60 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


We specialize in Braces and Invisalign® for Children & Adults

LOCATION: 4347 Rice St. Ste 201 Lihue, HI 96766 (808) 874-9229 Complimentary Consultation • No Referral Needed Walk-Ins Welcome www.hawaiismiledesigns.com • info@hawaiismiledesigns.com Most insurances accepted

$500or Invisalign

Towards Orthodontic ® Treatment

• Coupon is only valid if presented at consultation consultation appointment. • Treatment must be started and completed in our office. • New patients only. No cash value. Expires October 31, 2017

FALL 2017 61


DIRTY CARPETS? S U R F H AWA I`I

25

OFF

one regular-priced item Kauai’s Family Surf Shop. Drop in!

www.dejavusurf.com

Organic cleaning products 2-3 hour drying time ● Tile and stone cleaning ● Upholstery cleaning ● Oriental rug cleaning ● Mold remediation ● Water damage

Offer valid on one regular-priced item at Deja Vu Surf Hawaii in Kapaa or Kukui Grove Center, and excludes gift cards, boards, fins, GoPro, GoPole, Hydro Flask, Maui Jim, Nixon, Oakley, SP Gadgets, and OluKai merchandise. Offer may not be combined with any other discount or used on prior purchases. Original coupon must be surrendered at the time of the offer redemption.

808-346-7344 www.KauaiRestoration.com

62 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


LOVE NOTES

A Free Relationship Workshop for Youth LOVE NOTES is geared towards older teens and young adults who are at risk of an unplanned pregnancy, troubled relationships, or who are already pregnant or parenting.

LOVE NOTES aims to help young people make wise relationship and sexual choices—choices that will help them, rather than create barriers, for achieving their education, employment, relationship, and family goals. To sign up for the next session please contact Brandi Bartholomew at 808-246-9577

Malama Pono Health Services is delighted to serve the Women of Kauai with our Women’s Wellness Clinic. We offer a variety of women’s services including pap smears, pregnancy testing, birth control, breast exams, mammogram referrals, family planning referrals, and STD/HIV/HEP C testing and treatment. We now accept insurance as well as offer low cost options for uninsured and under insured patients.

Need Help? Turn to Us.

To schedule an appointment please call 808-246-9577 or visit us at 4366 Kukui Grove Street, Suite 205 Lihue HI, 96766. Check us out on the web at www.mphskauai.org

FALL 2017 63


Kauai Sustainable Living Puhi Metals Recycling Offers Free Electronic Recycling Six Days per Week The County of Kaua‘i would like to take a moment to highlight a great recycling program and local company that strives to go the extra mile to support waste diversion on Kaua‘i! Resource Recovery Solutions, Inc. (RRS) operating out of the Puhi Metals Recycling Center is contracted to accept and recycle scrap metals including vehicles and appliances, and have expanded their operations to include free electronic waste (eWaste) recycling at no extra cost to taxpayers or businesses. In 2016, RRS crunched the numbers and did their research on companies they could partner with that would process Kaua‘i’s eWaste in a safe, sustainable, and economically feasible manner. RRS found and partnered with IMS Electronic Recycling based out of Washington. They are ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001,

and R2 certified, meaning they strive to provide the highest quality processing available. Currently, Puhi Metals ships out about 15 tons of eWaste a month. Our goal is to increase participation and to exceed 30 tons per month. We urge businesses and residents to take your eWaste to Puhi Metals and take advantage of this free program. Puhi Metals is located at 3951 Puhi Road and is open Monday to Saturday, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please visit the county website, www.kauai.gov/ewaste, or call 245-6919.

Accepted items: • Computer Systems & Accessories • Office Equipment • Small Appliances

• Audio & Video Equipment • Handheld & Household Devices • Power Tools

Visit www.kauai.gov/eWaste for a detailed list 64 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Recycle on Kauai Sponsored by the County of Kauai Programs shown here are for residents only, except where noted.

CORRUGATED CARDBOARD

(flatten cardboard)

STEEL & TIN CANS

NEWSPAPER

PLASTIC & ONLY

GLASS BOTTLES & JARS

ALUMINUM CANS, FOIL, PIE/FOOD PANS

MIXED PAPER: JUNK MAIL, MAGAZINES, PAPERBACK BOOKS, FOOD/SODA BOXES, PAPER BAGS & ENVELOPES

Recycling Bin Locations HANAPĒPĒ HANALEI KAPA‘A KEKAHA KĪLAUEA

Refuse Transfer Station 4380 Lele Road Hanalei Transfer Station 5-3751 Kūhi‘ō Highway Kapa‘a near the football field 4900 Kahau Road Kekaha Landfill 6900-D Kaumuali’i Highway Kaua’i Community Recycling Services* 5-2723 Kūhi‘ō Hwy Open Tuesday & Friday • 8 am–4 pm ONLY

LĀWA‘I

Lāwa‘i behind U.S. Post Office 2-3675 Kaumuali’i Highway

LĪHU‘E

Līhu’e in back of Kmart • 4303 Nāwiliwili Road

PO‘IPŪ

Brennecke’s Beach Broiler 2100 Hoone Road

WAIMEA

Waimea Canyon Park 4643 Waimea Canyon

*Commercially generated items accepted

FREE Electronic Waste Recycling Recycle your electronics 6 days a week at the Puhi Metals Recycling Center located at 3951 Puhi Rd. Monday-Saturday 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Free to residents and businesses. See the County website at www.kauai.gov/ewaste or call 245-6919 for more information.

Compost at Home Call for a free compost bin, 241-4841 FRUIT & VEGETABLE SCRAPS, EGGSHELLS, COFFEE GROUNDS, CARDBOARD, LEAVES, SHREDDED PAPER, YARD WASTE

More recycling programs available - see website www.kauai.gov/recycling or call (808) 241-4841


Be Conscious of Your Water Usage By Kauai Dept. of Water

Water conservation should be a daily, year-round habit to help in conserving our island’s most precious resource. Here are some tips and ideas on how to conserve water all season long: ADJUST YOUR SPRINKLER/ IRRIGATION SYSTEM: Adjust your sprinkler timer and remember to turn it off when it rains. REDIRECT GUTTER SPOUTS TO LANDSCAPE AREAS: Turn the down spout of your gutter towards your garden or landscape areas during rainy season. INSTALL WATER EFFICIENT FAUCETS: Replace your shower head and faucets with water saving devices. Install aerators and flow regulators to make your home conservation-friendly.

MONTHLY LEAK CHECKS: A small leak in your home can account for over 10,000 gallons of water waste per month! Schedule a monthly inspection of your home’s faucets, toilets, showers and irrigation systems. SEASONAL GARDENING: In the fall, take advantage of the anticipated wet weather and plan to grow crops that will enjoy and thrive in the cooler climate. Be a responsible water user. Use water wisely and make every drop count! Visit www.kauaiwater.org for more water conservation tips.

Got GotLocal LocalMilk? Milk? Hawai‘i Hawai‘i Dairy Dairy Farms Farms believes believes in in providing providing opportunities opportunities for for ourour island island keikikeiki to thrive, to thrive, including including access access to fresh, to fresh, locallocal milkmilk that’s that’s sustainably sustainably produced. produced. To learn To learn moremore about about our proposed our proposed pasture-based pasture-based dairydairy farm,farm, sign sign up today up today at: at: www.HawaiiDairyFarms.com. www.HawaiiDairyFarms.com.

66 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Here are

5 water conservation tips to remember daily:

n Turn off the water while brushing your teeth.

n Make every flush count. Don’t use the toilet as an ashtray or wastebasket. n Limit showers to 5 minutes. n Wait until you have a full load before using your automatic dishwasher. n Water your plants in the early morning or late afternoon.

Water has no substitute‌Conserve it! www.kauaiwater.org

FALL 2017 67


Photo by Chase Dell, Nicaragua

FUN • FRIENDS

COMPETITION


sports KAUA`I

Gabriela Bryan 2017 USA Surfing America Girls U16 National Champion

INSIDE: 2017 KIF Fall Sports Schedules Kauai Red Raiders Baseball State Champions Gabriela Bryan and Ryan Beavers National Surfing Champions Ocean Safety: CPR Techniques Photo by Marina Miller.


Photo by Cory Ida. Gabriela Bryan, Kilauea HI 15 years old School: Homeschool 2017 USA Surfing America Girls U16 National Champion recently retuned home, and we caught up with her to ask her a few questions!

Q: What is a typical day for you? A: Most of my days consists of doing

school in the morning, then going for a surf, after that I usually go to a workout class, then probably surf again. To end the day I usually hang out with friends.

Q: Where do you see yourself in five years?

A: I see myself winning WSL Qualifying

Series events, and qualifying for the WSL Championship Tour.

Q: What is the best advice you have ever been given?

A:

The best advice I have ever been given is to always look at the positive, and don’t give up on your dreams.

70 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Q: What inspires you? A: Watching the Pro Surfing on TV, and

seeing the way that they surf inspires me to try new things and really perfect the things that I already know.

Q: How did you feel after winning your national title at Surfing America?

A:

It felt Amazing, it was definitely something I had been working to achieve. And to finally reach one of your goals is the best feeling ever! I would also like to give a big Mahalo to everyone that supports me, I wouldn’t be here without you!


Photo by Taylor Beavers

Rylan Tide Beavers Age 11 Hanalei Elementary School -6th grade

2017 National Scholastic Surfing Association Champion in the Open Mini Groms division. Rylan got started in surfing with his parents. We spent a lot of time at the beach and always had him in the water. We would push into small waves when he was little, and he started standing up. All kind of snowballed from there. He really took to surfing and always wanted to be in the water.

Q: When did you start surfing? A: I was 2 when I stood up on my first wave. My dad pushed me in to a super small wave and I stood up. But I really started catching waves on my own when I was like, 7 or 8.

Q: What do you enjoy most about surfing?

A: I like surfing with my friends and family. I just feel good when I'm in the water.

Q:

You also compete correct? When

did you start competing?

A: I started doing the fun contests when I was 8. I started doing doing Surfing America two years ago, and this was my first year doing the NSSA.

Q: You guys also did a side trip while you were in California?

A: Yea, we went to Nicaragua Q: How were the waves? A: Waves were so good! Lots of

barrels. The water is so warm! Its like bath water.

Q: Have you traveled anywhere else to surf?

A: Yea, I've also been to Bali and El

Salvador to surf. My dad is always looking for somewhere to check out

Q: Is there anything else your would like to say?

A: Thanks to Kauai Family Magazine.

Thanks to my parents, my sponsorsRVCA, Minami surfboards, Wanted Dream, Hanalei Surf Co and Sandy Grom Hawaii. Thanks to all my friends and all the people who have helped me get this far!

FALL 2017 71


Proud to Sponsor the 2017-2018 Fall KIF Sports Schedules

FOOTBALL - 2017-2018 Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Thur.

7/27/2017

Pre-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

7:00 p.m.

8/5/17

Maui VS Kapaa

Maui

JV 4:30 p.m., Varsity 30 min after JV

8/5/17

Kauai VS Kam-Hi

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

8/12/17

Waimea VS Pac-5

Hanapepe Stadium

Varsity 7:00 p.m.

Sat.

8/12/17

Kapaa VS Konawaena

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

8/12/17

Punahou VS Kauai

Punahou

JV 12:00 p.m.

Sat.

8/12/17

St. Francis VS Kauai

Kaiser HS

Varsity 4:30 p.m.

Fri.

8/25/17

Waimea VS Kauai

Hanapepe Stadium

JV 5:00, Varsity 30 min after JV

Fri.

9/1/17

Kapaa VS Waimea

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

9/8/17

Kauai VS Kapaa

Vidinha Stadium

JV 12:00 or 5:00, Varsity 30 min after

Sat.

9/16/17

Kauai VS Waimea

Vidinha Stadium

JV 12:00 or 5:00, Varsity 30 min after

Sat.

9/23/17

Waimea VS Kapaa

Hanapepe Stadium

JV 12:00 or 5:00, Varsity 30 min after

Sat.

9/30/17

Kapaa VS Kauai

Vidinha Stadium

JV 12:00 or 5:00, Varsity 30 min after

Sat.

10/7/17

Waimea VS Kauai

Hanapepe Stadium

JV 12:00 or 5:00, Varsity 30 min after

Sat.

10/14/17

Kapaa VS Waimea

Vidinha Stadium

JV 12:00 or 5:00, Varsity 30 min after

Sat.

10/21/17

Kauai VS Kapaa

Vidinha Stadium

Tue.

10/28/17

KIF Playoff - If needed

11/7/17

Post-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

Sat.

Nov. 4

Div. II First Round

TBA

TBA

Sat.

Nov.11

Div. II Semi Finals

TBA

TBA

Fri.

Nov. 17

Div. II Championships

Aloha Stadium

TBA

Pre-Season Sat.

Regular Season Fri.

JV 5:00, Varsity 30 min after JV

7:00 p.m.

State Tournament

72 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


GIRLS VOLLEYBALL - 2017-2018 Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Tue.

Day

8/8/2017

Pre-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

6:00 p.m.

Wed.

8/30/17

Waimea VS Kauai

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kapaa

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Island

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Kapaa

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Waimea

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Waimea

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Island

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Kapaa

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kauai

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Kauai

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Island

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Sat.

9/2/17

Wed.

9/6/17

Sat.

9/9/17

Tue.

9/12/17

Fri.

9/15/17

Tue.

9/19/17

Playoff, If Needed

Fri.

9/22/17

Playoff, If Needed

Tue.

9/26/17

Kauai VS Waimea

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa Vs Island

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea Vs Kapaa

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kauai

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa Vs Kauai

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Island

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea Vs Kauai

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kapaa

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Island

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Kapaa

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island Vs Waimea

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Fri. Tue.

9/29/17 10/3/17

Fri.

10/6/17

Tue.

10/10/17

Fri.

10/13/17

6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Mon.

10/16/17

Playoff, If Needed

6:30 p.m.

Tue.

10/17/17

Playoff, If Needed

6:30 p.m.

Wed.

10/18/17

Playoff, If Needed

Wed.

11/7/17

Post-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

5:00 p.m.

Oct. 25-28, 2017

Host: ILH

Week 17

State Tournament Wed-Sat

FALL 2017 73


CROSS COUNTRY Article Title - 2017-2018 Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Tue.

8/8/17

Pre-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

6:00 p.m.

Sat.

9/9/17

Waimea HS Invitational - TBD

Waimea

7:30 a.m.

Sat.

9/16/17

Week 1

Waimea

7:30 a.m.

Sat.

9/23/17

Week 2

Kapaa

7:30 a.m.

Sat.

9/30/17

Week 3

Kauai

7:30 a.m.

Sat

10/7/17

Week 4

Island

4:00 p.m.

Sat.

10/21/17

KIF Championships

Island

7:30 a.m.

Tue.

11/7/17

Post-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

5:00 p.m.

Host: KIF - Island School

Week 17

State Championship Sat.

10/28/17

Bowling - 2017-18 Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Tue.

8/8/17

Pre-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

6:00 p.m.

Thur.

9/7/17

Week 1

Lihue Lanes

5:30 p.m.

Thur.

9/14/17

Week 2

Lihue Lanes

5:30 p.m.

Thur.

9/21/17

Week 3

Lihue Lanes

5:30 p.m.

Thur.

9/28/17

Week 4

Lihue Lanes

5:30 p.m.

Thur.

10/5/17

Week 5

Lihue Lanes

5:30 p.m.

Thur.

10/19/17

Week 6

Lihue Lanes

5:30 p.m.

Tue.

11/7/17

Post-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

5:00 p.m.

State Tournament Thur.-Fri. 10/26-27/ 2017 Host: KIF

Week 17

74 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Photos courtesy HHSAA Baseball D-II

C H E A T M A T P S IONS 7 1 0 2 Kauai Red Raiders

Kauai High School’s varsity baseball team defeated No. 3 Damien Memorial in the championship game of the Wally Yonamine Foundation Baseball Championships – Division II state tournament at Les Murakami Stadium in Honolulu to win the school’s third baseball state title.

Congratulations to Red Raiders head coach Hank Ibia and the entire Red Raiders Baseball Team.


Article Title Ocean Safety

CPR Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation

A magazine oriented towards our Kauai youth may seem like an unlikely place to run an article about CPR, since it’s very unlikely that any of you will need CPR performed on you in the near future. However, it’s not nearly so unlikely that you might find yourself in a situation where you performing CPR could save someone’s life. Maybe even a family member’s life. Recognizing this, our Kauai County Fire Department has a program in which they teach 6 graders at all of our schools how to perform CPR. If any of you were 6th graders last year, I’m sure you remember that Firefighters Justin Shinn or Aaron Hawthorne or Jayson Pablo went to your class one day and demonstrated excellent CPR, and had you practice it. (Or maybe it was the ROTC cadets whom they trained up who in turn were your trainers). And any of you who will be 6th graders this year -- keep an eye open for these men. I have to tip my hat to Dave Walker, now a retired Fire Captain, who was the visionary for this. Also, a $30,000 supporting grant from HMSA has allowed this program to flourish.

76 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Sponsored by: Everything we value begins with our Keiki. Celebrate Education!!

By Monty Downs, M.D. President Kaua`i Lifeguard Association

“recoil”, where you make sure you let You may or may not know that I myself the breastbone return all the way to it’s am an ER doctor and I get to see original and normal position after every people who are brought into the ER compression. If you don’t allow for good by ambulance after they collapsed and recoil, the underlying heart doesn’t get who get community-CPR. In the last a chance to fill up with blood, with the 10-15 years there have been some major result that the blood you’re trying to developments in CPR technique and I pump out (to the victim’s brain) with your have noticed a very significant increase in compressions won’t be effective, what we call “good outcomes” because of these developments, and because of If you’re a 6th grader, you will get the ever-increasing number of people tired within a minute or two and your in our community who are aware of compressions will lose their effectiveness. these developments So that’s another thing and who know how to you have to know: perform excellent “high In the last 10-15 Namely, assuming performance” CPR. there are at least 2 of I myself won’t undertake in this piece to describe all the elements of excellent CPR. For this you can google “high performance CPR.” Or much better yet take a course. I will, however, point out a few highlights.

years there have been some major developments in CPR technique and I have noticed a very significant increase in what we call “good outcomes…”

The first principle is “push hard and push fast.” “Hard” means pushing the breastbone in 2.4 inches in an adult. (This is 1.5 inches in a child or infant or 1/3 the AP chest diameter). Try and get a measuring tape to measure 2.4 inches. It’s a lot! It often means you break someone’s ribs -- which is why you DON’T want to do it until you’re sure that the person doesn’t have a pulse! “Fast” means 100 compressions per minute. If you can get the BeeGee’s song “Stayin’ alive” into your head, that’s the rhythm and pace. Then there’s a term called

you there, switch your positions regularly and frequently.

Breaths? This is a bit of a tougher one. Many people are fearful of putting their lips to the collapsed-person’s lips in order to try and deliver a breath. For this reason, breaths have become deemphasized unless you have a bag-and-mask (such as Lifeguards and Firefighters have) or another such breathing rescue apparatus. Furthermore, performing excellent compressions-only CPR is much more effective than if you interrupt compressions for an attempt at mouth to mouth -- unless you have a good 2 person team that’s working well together. Hey, I’ve already gone into much more Continued on next page

FALL 2017 77


Ocean Safety Continued

detail than I intended to. The way to really learn the details is to take a course. You’ll get a course if you’re going into 6th grade, and otherwise you can call the American Red Cross at 245-2919.

Additionally , our Junior Lifeguard program just purchased a “Resucie Annie” mannequin, and you Junior Lifeguards will have gotten hands-on experience with this by the time this article comes out.

In the last year I have seen an instance where family gave CPR to a parent who collapsed, it was 7 minutes before Firefighters arrived. The Firefighters arrived and applied their defibrillator (and this is a whole other part of the resuscitation story, since there are an ever-increasing number of defibrillators in stores and shopping centers around Kauai, thanks to Hanalei Rotary.). The parent’s heart responded to the defibrillator, and he came back to life and is now leading a normal life with his family. Oh Wow! You may one day find yourself being part of a scenario like this. In a way I hope not, it’s not a stress-free situation. But if you do, and if you are prepared for it, it may go really well for you and it may be a highlight of YOUR life as well as of course the near-victim’s life. Have a good school year, whatever grade you’re going into!

LIFEGUARDED BEACHES Haena Beach. . . . . . . . . . . Northshore, Haena

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Hanalei Pavillion. . . . . . . . . Northshore, Hanalei

Lydgate Beach. . . . . . . . . . Eastside, Wailua

Hanalei Bay Pine Trees . . . Northshore, Hanalei

Poipu Beach. . . . . . . . . . . . Southshore, Poipu

Kee Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northshore, Haena

Salt Pond Beach. . . . . . . . . Westside, Hanapepe

Anahola Beach. . . . . . . . . . Eastside, Anahola

Kekaha Beach. . . . . . . . . . . Westside, Kekaha

78 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Article Title

In a fire, seconds count.

Seconds can mean the difference between residents of our community escaping safely from a fire or having their lives end in tragedy. For more information about n Draw a map ofusfa.fema.gov your home with smoke alarms, visit

all members of your household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit. n Practice your home fire drill twice a year. Conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in your home, and practice using different ways out.

n Make sure the number of your home is clearly marked and easy for the fire department to find. n Close doors behind you as you leave – this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire. n Once you get outside, stay outside. Never go back inside a burning building.

n Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them.

This message is proudly brought to you by the Kauai Fire Department


healthier is our family taking care of yours There’s no need to leave Kaua‘i to receive quality maternity care. From childbirth education to lactation consultation, labor management and newborn care, the experts at Wilcox Health are here for you. We even offer a free maternity app called Ha¯pai. Download yours to get the tools and resources every growing family needs. Call 245-1441 to schedule a tour and learn more, or visit WilcoxHealth.org/Maternity.

A FREE maternity app

#LiveHealthyKauai

Kauai Family Magazine Fall 2017  

Kaua'i's Go-To Resource for Engaging Families

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