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A K LEO T H E

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Volu me 105 Issue 3 4

BRIAN TSENG/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

WAC SHOWDOWN p. 6-9 “The Hawai‘i Warriors and Nevada Wolfpack are undefeated in the Western Athletic Conference coming into their WAC match up this Saturday at 5:30 p.m.”

BRYANT ON ‘D’ p. 7

POUND THE PACK p.10

“Warrior football cornerback Jeramy Bryant is a real-life superman...”

“If there’s any time to lay the smackdown on the Nevada Wolfpack, it’s this Saturday night...”

GRID IRON INSIDE -Page 6-


2 N EWS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org ADVERTISING The Board of Publications office is located on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall.

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Will Caron Managing Editor Davin Aoyagi Chief Copy Editor Nichole Catlett News Editor Lynn Nakagawa Assc News Editor Jane Callahan Features Editor Reece Farinas Assc Features Editor Alvin Park Opinions Editor Lindsy Ogawa Assc Opinions Editor Michael Brewer Sports Editor Russell Tolentino Assc Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Comics Editor Derick Fabian Design Editor Sarah Wright Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Joel Kutaka Web Editor Brett Hinkle Assc Web Editor Tony Gaskell Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henry-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@ hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

OHA debate features gubernatorial candidates

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Tuition waivers for Native Hawaiians emerged as one point of discussion for the two gubernatorial candidates. ETHAN PORTER KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

E THAN PORTER Staff Reporter On Tuesday, Oct. 12, gubernatorial candidates Neil Abercrombie and James “Duke” Aiona faced off in a debate sponsored by the Offi ce of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) and broadcast on OC16. The Lili‘u Room at the Hawai‘i Convention Center was filled with people, many of them wearing Tshirts or buttons, making no secret of the candidate they supported. Abercrombie emerged on stage with a wide smile and a shaka, shaking hands with each of the panelists, while Aiona walked to his podium, greeted by a louder crowd response. The candidates answered questions from a panel consisting of Amy Kalili, Clyde Namuo, and Shawn Ching. The debate was divided into three parts: the fi rst was focused on Native Hawaiian issues, where one panelist would ask a question to one candidate; the second was about general issues in Hawai‘i, where both candidates were allowed to

answer the questions, and the last part gave the candidates a chance to ask each other questions. Abercrombie gave his opening statement first, stating that OHA and Hawaiians are central to the State of Hawai‘i. “As Hawaiians rise,” he said, “all of Hawai‘i rises.” He cited Hawaiian involvement in the government since the 1959 Admission Act, and the legacy of the Aloha Spirit. He failed to mention Native Hawaiian resistance to the continued American presence. Aiona acknowleged his family, which was present at the event, mentioning his two children who are currently attending Kamehameha Schools, then began to speak of his experience as lieutenant governor. The University of Hawai‘i was brought up by Ching in a question directed at Abercrombie concerning tuition waivers for Native Hawaiian students. Ching said that, due to the University’s failure to pay for the ceded lands that the University occupies, OHA should be able to give tuition waivers. Ab-

ercrombie stated that tuition was too high for a public instituion, and all students need fi nancial support, not just Native Hawaiians. The rest of the debate was fi lled with Abercrombie stating that his administration will be different by using federal dollars that had not been tapped into. Aiona countered that the Lingle administration had used all funding available. The debate took a different turn with an inquiry about what the candidates would do if they were given a 24-hour break from the campaign. Aiona said that he is waiting for Nov. 3 to come so he can sleep in with his wife, unless her snoring wakes him. Abercrombie said that each day since the campaign started has been a perfect day, and he feels more energized than ever. It was quickly noticed that the politicians could not stop politicking. Overall, the debate had a light air, with the candidates each making jokes. The candidates shook hands, posed for pictures together, then headed home for the night.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

O’Carol an’s Farewell to Music Conceived C o and Performed by Patrick Ball

Saturday, October 23, 7:30 pm Orvis Auditorium UH M a ¯ noa Campus

Research finds discrimination against women who wear hijabs

Buy Your Tickets Today @ www.etickethawaii.com/orc.html Charge by Phone: 944-BOWS (2697) or Visit the Campus Center Ticket Of½ce For more information, call 956-8246 or visit www.outreach.hawaii.edu/community. A University of Hawaiʻi at Mâa noa Outreach College Production and a Mâa noa Arts and Minds event.

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Many Muslim women wear headscarves, known as hijabs, as expressions of their personal freedoms or religious commitment. ERENIA T. M ICHELL Senior Staff Writer

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University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Professor Sonia Ghumman, an assistant professor of management at the Shidler College of Business, has studied the effects on Muslim women who wear hijabs, or headscarves, here in the United States. Ghumman’s paper, “The downside of religious attire: The Muslim headscarf and expectations of obtaining employment,” looked at the expectations that women who wear hijabs have regarding future employment opportunities. Ghumman’s research surveyed 219 American Muslim women on their job-seeking experience. “We gave them four different job ads for four different job types, and we asked them what are their expectations of getting this job - it could be a physician or a waitress, and given this job ad, read it, and tell us what do you think, do you think you’re going to get this job, (and) what are your expectations,” said Ghumman. In general, Ghumman said her research found that, compared to American Muslim women who fore-

go wearing the headscarves, those who wore the hijab were much less likely to expect to be hired. Compared to women who didn’t wear the hijab, they had much higher expectations of obtaining jobs. “Hijabis, given their stigma, and many other things associated with the stigma, are less likely to be pulled expectations for job offers,” said Ghumman. And what exactly is a “hijabi”? According to Ghumman, it’s just a woman who wears a headscarf. Ghumman’s study found that 10 percent of women who wear hijabs were concerned about applying for work and 88 percent said they were not willing to take off their hijabs when applying for work. “I found that the women who do wear it, the majority of them are unwilling to take it off, it’s not something that can be compromised, it’s not something you can ask them to take off,” said Ghumman. In Ghumman’s study a participant answered with, “I will not compromise my beliefs, especially for a job offer, or asked, in order to get to work, as I would take this matter to a higher level due to discrimination and harassment.”

Ghumman, whose background is Muslim, did her research for two different reasons. One, she had a couple of friends who were hijabis, and while Ghumman was in high school and applying for jobs during the summer to make some extra income, her friends wouldn’t apply because they believed they wouldn’t get hired. The other reason was the social and political context of her topic at the time she conducted her research. France and many other European countries were considering a ban on the headscarf; France actually went through with it. According to a report by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC, 2003), there was a 153 percent increase in workplace discrimination claims by Muslims after the 9/11 attack in New York City. In Ghumman’s study, Muslim women were asked, “Why do you choose to wear the hijab even after 9/11?” One answered, “After 9/11 many people had questions about Islam. Wearing the hijab, I gave them someone to approach to ask those questions. I consider myself highly educated, and am therefore willing to answer those questions in a calm manner and hopefully enlightened.” In another response, it was simply put, “Because it is a command from Allah (God).” “There’s a difference between being proud to wear it and realizing there’s a stigma. They’re very different things,” said Ghumman, “These women, the overwhelming majority of them, if you were to ask them to take it off, they would absolutely not. It’s not even an option. For many of them it’s not even about religion - it’s beyond that. It’s an expression of their own freedom. Just like people dress a certain way, people have tattoos, colored hair, for many of them it’s almost like a statement like, I live in America, it’s absolutely okay for me to express myself, and this is one way that I can express my Muslim identity to people.”


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

F EATURES 5

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

Films that hit home highlight Hawai‘i’s problems

PHOTO COURTESY OF HIFF

James Joshua Goodson directs “Aikea,” the short film about Kainoa, a young man struggling to lead a positive lifestyle despite the challenges he faces from his drugaddivited friends and family. “Aikea” is one of several University of Hawai‘i’s Academy of Creative Media films being featured on the Hawai‘i International Film Festival’s ACM Night on Friday, Oct. 22, 2010 at 6:00. M AY SALCEDO Staff Writer

The Hawai‘i International Film Festival (HIFF) celebrates its 30th anniversary with 225 “East meets West” fi lms. Among them, two of the fi lms, “Chasing Rainbows” and “Aikea”, deal with political issues facing Hawai‘i’s community today.

R E C O N C I L I N G R A I N B OW S Hawai‘i is ground zero for the battle between evangelical churches and civil union protagonists. Concerning the hot topic, which sparks friction between both groups, Greg Aldermann is now seeking reconciliation for both sides through his film, “Chasing Rainbows.”

“Chasing Rainbows” is an 85-minute motion picture that chronicles the issues dividing the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) and church communities. The fi lm takes a non-biased approach when documenting this modern-day “battle” and analyzes the thinking processes, lives, and emotions of both sides. The audience has the opportunity to hear from a diverse group, including prominent psychologists, clergy, families, students, and people randomly chosen off the streets of O‘ahu. Interviews with Lt. Gov. Duke Aiona and Lynn Finnegan feature their opinions on the issue as well. In the end, the goal is for the audience to have heard enough facts of the current situation to decide for

themselves how they feel about civil unions. “Basically, we just want the audience to be able to really think, to be willing to discuss the issues cogently, intelligently, and respectfully,” said Aldermann, who claims neutrality in the situation. “Chasing Rainbows” will hold its debut this Saturday, Oct. 16 at 7:30 p.m. and Thursday, Oct. 21 at 3:30 p.m. at the Regal Theatres Dole Cannery. The viewing will be followed by a live discussion-based forum on civil rights and civil unions in the Architecture Building at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) on Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m. Greg Aldermann, who has been in the filmmaking business for over 20 years, was born in Los

Angeles but grew up in Hawai‘i. His first entry into media was an internship with the local Hawai‘i ABC affiliate (KHVH TV) at the age of 16. In addition to producing and directing films for other people, Greg also partnered with his wife, Fawn Aldermann, and produced two independent films: “Finding Sandalwood” (aired on PBS in 2007) which documents the story of the Chinese in Hawai‘i, and “Shanghai Exodus” (2009) which envisions the history of Shanghai through the eyes of a Caucasian settler. Greg currently has his own production company, A2media, and recently started Agape Film Partners.

W H O K E A S?! A 13-minute short film, “Aikea” goes through the journey of a man

who decides to live a drug free life but is surrounded by family and friends who desire otherwise. The movie manifests from the current meth problem facing Hawai‘i, which, as of 2007, ranks #5 in the nation for meth use by people age 12 and older, according to the Hawai‘i Meth Project. Kainoa, the fi lm’s protagonist, decides to turn his life around and be a surf instructor, but is unsupported and judged by his drugusing friends and family. The fi lm takes the audience to the heart of the “HI life” by exposing the prevalence of drug use in Hawai‘i, rediscovering the bond between two people, and exploring how courage is taking a stand to care. “When you refl ect on your life, (it) leads to maturity as well as courage to stand up to things you don’t want to do anymore,” said James Joshua Goodson, the director of “Aikea.” The movie premieres at Dole Cannery Mall next Friday, Oct. 22 at 6:00 p.m. Although James wrote the story because he has friends in his life who are going through the same problem, when asked what inspired him to produce “Aikea,” he explained it was a 7-year-old boy name Leka who had an abusive meth-user as a father. “(The father’s) a good guy at heart but meth does stuff to you to make you not the person you are,” said James. To this day, James does not know what became of the boy, or if his father turned his life around. James is currently a fi lm student at UHM. He got his fi rst camera in high school and started to fi lm surfi ng when he moved to O‘ahu. He was a full-time real estate agent but quit that job to go back to school and study ��� lm. Josh will be graduating this December.

Check out the website below for information on other upcoming films: http://hiff.org/program/ index.php/films/


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

Warrior, Wolfpack showdown JOE F ERRER Senior Staff Reporter

The Hawai‘i Warriors and Nevada Wolfpack are undefeated in the Western Athletic Conference coming into their WAC match up this Saturday at 5:30 p.m. But only one will leave Aloha Stadium that way. The Warriors (4-2, 2-0 WAC) have won two straight WAC games, notching wins over Louisiana Tech and Fresno State. Nevada (6-0, 1-0 WAC) is ranked No. 19 in the AP poll. Nevada senior quarterback Colin Kaepernick, a four-year

starter, leads an offense that has compiled the second most yards in Division I, with 545 per game. “They have some incredible athletes – some of the best in the nation - but we gotta stop them,â€? said junior linebacker Corey Paredes, who leads the team with 73 total tackles through the ďŹ rst six games. “Coach Aranda (Warrior defensive coordinator) is going to give us a good game plan and hopefully we play it out.â€? Senior cornerback Jeramy Bryant said defense will be key for UH if they want to win.

BRIAN TSENG/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

UH junior quarterback Bryan Moniz leads the nation with 388 passing yards per game. See WAC Showdown, page 9

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

Bryant kicks defense into gear K IYOMI UEDA Senior Staff Reporter Warrior football cornerback Jeramy Bryant is a real-life superman. Bryant attends early-morning football practices, is in graduate school, attends football meetings and raises a family on top of it all. The senior cornerback is in his final season of eligibility with the Warriors and has already earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology. This semester, he is enrolled in graduate courses and is making a name for himself on the Warrior defense, while helping his wife KeShauna raise their two daughters, Kayana and Kennedy. Bryant and his wife are also expecting a third child, due at the end of this month. Bryant joined the Warriors after two seasons at Los Angeles Harbor College in California, where he was named the team’s 2007 defensive back of the year and was named first-team all-conference. “I came to the University of Hawai‘i because of the family atmosphere and because the weather reminded me of Southern California,” Bryant said. “I also came because I felt like this is the place God was pointing me toward.” In his fi rst season with the Warriors, Bryant appeared in three games before being sidelined for the remainder of the season due to an injury. He was later granted a medical hardship allow-

BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior cornerback Jeramy Bryant is tied for first nationally with four interceptions. He is also enrolled in graduate school courses and raising a family.

ing him to play two full seasons. In Warriors’ 2008 season opener against Weber State, he recorded two tackles and one interception. During the 2009 season, Bryant appeared in 10 games, making nine starts and recording 45 tackles. At the start of this season’s fall camp, associate head coach Rich Miano said Bryant had

“been making a tremendous amount of plays” and would likely become a starter. This season, he has started all six games and is racking up defensive statistics. He also has 21 tackles and is tied for fi rst in the nation with four interceptions for 96 yards this season. Bryant recorded the team’s fi rst interception this season,

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which he returned for 23 yards against Charleston Southern. He also recorded an interception against Louisiana Tech for 15 yards, as well as two against Fresno State for a total of 58 yards. His second interception against Fresno State resulted in a 48-yard touchdown. As the halfway mark for this season approaches, Bryant is al-

ready considering his future plans. Most athletes focus on becoming professional athletes or moving on to their careers, but Bryant plans to go where his faith takes him. “After the season I plan to go to the next place God points me to,” he said. “There are a few things I would like to pursue and one of them is becoming a minister.”

Come by after 12p.m.to get your free tickets! First come, f irst served.


G RIDIRON

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

Join the winning team!

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Do you love sports and want to go behind the scenes and talk to University of Hawai‘i players and coaches? Do you want to join in postgame press conferences, as well as report on games and events on campus and statewide?

This is the opportunity for you to explore the world of sports from a different perspective while gaining the experience that can help you in every field of study. BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Warrior football team is on a three-game winning streak. They are 4-2 overall and 2-0 in the WAC.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

WAC showdown: BATTLE OF THE UNDEFEATED from page 6

“They make a living off of undisciplined defenses,” said Bryant, of Nevada’s dive-option running game. “We’re going to try to bring discipline Saturday night.”

time he’s done,” McMackin said. No small feat, considering former UH quarterbacks include Timmy Chang, the NCAA’s all-time lead-

They’re really starting to understand and for the first time ... they are starting to play our style again.

OFFENSE ON FIRE

Hawai‘i also has a prolific offense. They are ranked sixth in the nation with 497 total yards per game. Junior quarterback Bryant Moniz leads the country in total yards with 388 yards per game. Offensive coordinator Nick Rolovich, a former UH quarterback, is high on Moniz’s intelligence and leadership. “(Rolovich) feels that if (Moniz) continues to improve ... he could be the best guy that’s ever run this (offense) by the

“I’m really proud of our front seven. I’m proud of our force,” McMackin said. “They’re really starting to understand and for the

ing passer and Colt Brennan, third all-time in career passing yardage.

D E F E N S E M A K I N G P L AYS The Warrior defense has come around in the last three games. After playing Colorado in week three, the defense only had one sack and zero interceptions. They have recorded eight sacks and eight interceptions since then.

fi rst time in three years they are starting to play our style again.” Bryant is tied for fi rst in the nation with four picks, including one against Fresno State, where he returned 48 yards for a touchdown to seal the victory. “It felt good,” Bryant said of his crucial touchdown. “Just seeing our stands and our side being packed and them waving me in –

that was awesome.”

GA I N I N G R E S P E C T The Warriors have won three straight games, but junior linebacker Aaron Brown said they still must prove themselves. “We’re the underdogs every week,” Brown said. “(But) we’re a good team and we are a force to be reckoned with.” And a win against No. 19 Nevada would boost Hawai‘i’s national respect and bring them one step closer to their goals of winning a bowl game and a WAC title. “We’re starting to believe now,” McMackin said. “We’re starting to believe in one another, we’re starting to believe we can play with anybody in the country.”

PAC K I T VS T H E PAC K The University of Hawai‘i athletics program is launching its “Pack It vs. The Pack” campaign in an effort to sell out Aloha Stadium on Saturday. Students are encouraged to wear commemorative white Tshirts that can be purchased for $10 at Rainbowtique, the bookstore, as well as on game day at Aloha Stadium, while supplies last.

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G RIDIRON

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

S P O R T S C OMM E N TA RY

Warriors should say ‘aloha’ with a pounding Nevada and Fresno State both announced in August that they will be leaving the WAC for the MWC. Currently, the WAC and its two defectors are in mediation to determine whether the schools can leave after this season or if they must wait until the following season. WILL CARON KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

R USSELL TOLENTINO Sports Editor

If there’s any time to lay the smackdown on the Nevada Wolfpack, it’s this Saturday night. After all, this is Nevada’s farewell to Aloha Stadium, Warrior football fans and Hawai‘i. And besides, they deserve it. Everything the WAC could and should have been was destroyed by Western Athletic Conference (WAC) “comrades” Nevada and Fresno State. In late August, the Salt Lake Tribune reported that BYU, of the Mountain West Conference (MWC), wanted to go independent in football and move its other sports to the WAC. Reports also said MWC mem-

bers UNLV and San Diego State would leave the MWC for the WAC if BYU left. This would have made the WAC 11 members strong and could have left the MWC, a conference made up of WAC defectors, decimated. But WAC commissioner Karl

and BYU began, BYU said they’d only come to the WAC if its membership was intact. To ensure this, Benson made every WAC member (except Boise State, who had already announced its plan to leave for the MWC) sign a $5 million buyout clause to prevent any school from leaving when

(Saturday is) another chance to hammer another WAC-defector ... Benson said he knew the MWC would counter and try to keep BYU from leaving by offering the WAC’s stronger programs MWC membership – making the WAC, as a football conference, as weak and unattractive as possible. When talks between the WAC

the MWC countered. As expected, hours after news broke about BYU, Fresno State and Nevada received MWC invitations. Later that evening, both schools simultaneously announced their plans to leave the WAC and join the MWC.

Backstabbing at its best. As for the $5 million buyout clause they committed? It was originally reported by ESPN and other media outlets that all the WAC schools had signed the clause. But according to the Reno Gazette Journal, Nevada offi cials only “verbally” agreed to sign, although the majority of WAC members and offi cials thought they had signed in writing. Fast forward two months and BYU has decided to move its sports to the West Coast Conference, the WAC is scrambling for members and Hawai‘i is contemplating what to do with its sports programs. As for the MWC, Nevada and Fresno State, their futures are stable. Therefore, I’d assume

they’re happy. Nevada is ranked No. 19, has a 6 -0 record and owns impressive wins over California and BYU. So yes, Saturday night is an opportunity for Hawai‘i to notch a quality win in front of its fans and gain national respect. But beyond that, it’s another chance to hammer another WACdefector, like last week’s 49-27 win over Fresno State. “A man is only as good as his word,” is a common quote. But what does it say about collegiate athletics when a university’s own officials don’t hold to theirs? Remember, Saturday’s match up between Hawai‘i and Nevada is more than just a game. It’s personal. It’s about pride. It’s a chance to deliver a welldeserved pounding.


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G RIDIRON

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

BEER PONGIN’ AT TAILGATES Pregame fun at Aloha Stadium University of Hawai‘i football fans play beer pong in the parking lot of Aloha Stadium prior to a Warrior football game.

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Parking lot gates at Aloha Stadium open at 12:30 p.m. The lower lot opens at 11:30 p.m.

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Parking at Aloha Stadium is $5. BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

GAME INFO TICKETS UH Mānoa students with a validated UHM ID have limited free admission to the game. First come, fi rst serve. Regular student–price tickets are $12 with a validated UHM ID.

B U S I N F O R M AT I O N For every home game, six buses (48 seats each) will depart from Dole Street, in front of Frear Hall and Gateway House, prior to start of game. Buses will begin leaving at 3:15 p.m. First come, fi rst serve.

They will return to the same point, departing Aloha Stadium 30 minutes after the conclusion of the game.

PA R K I N G Parking lot gates at Aloha Stadium open at 12:30 p.m., while the Lower Hālawa Lot opens at 11:30 a.m. Parking is $5. There is alternative parking at Leeward Community College ($2 per vehicle) and Kam Drive-Inn ($5 parking). A shuttle will run from 1 p.m. to one hour after the game. Parking is also available at Radford High School ($5), but without shuttle service.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR DERICK FABIAN COMICS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

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puzzles • classif ieds • horoscopes

Friday, Oct. 15, 2010

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Kelsey Blakley ACROSS 1 A popular one is modeled after the Winchester rifle 6 Three-time A.L. MVP

Horoscopes By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clements Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s birthday (10/15/10). A power figure has tried to dominate recently. The coming year provides the potential to work with your current team and maintain independence at the same time. You may choose to work from home, at least part time. Stay in touch with valued associates.To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0

the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is an 8 -- Focus your conscious attention on significant others, and manage scheduling any work issues. You might indulge a hidden desire to break loose. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 7 -- A dramatic argument requires all your creativity to resolve. The fireworks don’t hurt anyone. Put out lingering sparks with ice cream and soft words. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 9 -- As you put the pieces of a project together, your imagination transforms the goal as well as the results. Take the path less traveled.

71 Fire proof? DOWN 1 Mr. Olympia contestants’ obsessions 2 Risqué 3 Thin ornamental layer 4 Black light, briefly 5 Marshal under Napoleon 6 Good, except on the links 7 Eggbeater feature 8 Tip of Massachusetts 9 Beatnik’s address 10 Gilligan’s shipwrecked ship 11 Savanna grazer 12 River through Tours 13 Fly-by-night co.? 18 “It’ll never wash!” 24 Little cut-up 25 Bug like a 24-Down 26 Went off the deep end 27 God wounded by Diomedes in the “Iliad” 28 Wheels of Fortune? 32 Knock over 34 “Sands of Iwo __”: 1949 film 35 Med school subj. 36 “Mayor” author 38 Doctor’s orders, often 40 Stump 41 Plaque holder? 44 James’s “Westworld” costar 46 Time slice 49 Aristotle’s first element of tragedy 50 Home to many Berbers

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1 8 6 9 5 7 52 Annapolis newbies 53 Two-time Venezuelan president Carlos 54 Turn on __ 55 Intolerant 56 “__ Rae” 60 Early animal handler 61 Bit of force 62 Ret. fliers 65 Sumac from Peru

Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Introduce a new idea carefully, if you want cooperation from everyone on your team. Include enough details to ensure understanding. Add spice. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 6 -- Someone wants to run away and join the circus. Encourage them to think it through carefully: It may not be as much fun as it seems. Create something exciting at home instead. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 6 -- What seemed impossible last month suddenly comes together with ease. Your hard work pays off. You sought independence, and now you have it.

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

9 4

6 1 2 8

Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week.

3 6 9 7

8

Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

2

2 7

7 5 5 3 4 2 HARD

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Your individual interest and family demands require careful planning, if everyone is to get what they want. No detail’s too small to consider. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is an 8 -- You get more done today working from home. Use the travel time you save to create harmony and to complete artistic family projects. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 6 -- Send flowers. Be sure to include everyone’s name on the gift card. Bigger is better, to make a powerful impression. It pays off later. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is

#6

a 7 -- Positive feedback makes you feel better about a project that’s just started. Associates volunteer to help get things rolling. Accept their aid. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 7 -- A dream gets confirmed by a long-distance call. Because the answer is yes, you’re able to move forward confidently. All systems go. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -- A male wants to take the show on the road before the rest of you are ready. To slow down the process, ask for an extended break in the action.

Classifieds Rates:

The BOP Business Office (to the right of the UH Bookstore lower entrance)

Monday-Friday 9a.m.-5p.m. Deadline: 4 p.m. two days before publication. Payment: Pre-payment required. Cash, in-state checks, money orders, Visa and MasterCard accepted.

$5.00 per day (up to 3 lines); $1.25 for each additional line. All caps and/or bold will add 25% to the cost of the ad. Place an ad in four (4) consecutive issues and receive the fourth ad free! In Person: Stop by the BOP Business Office. Phone: 956-7043

WANTED

WORK WANTED

Buying books, comics, fast food toys, foreign coins & junk jewelry 440-4627

Looking for a part time offer where you can earn extra income at your own flexible schedule plus benefits that takes only little of your time. Requirements * Should be a computer Literate. * 1-2 hours access to the internet weekly. * Must be Efficient and Dedicated contact us with your resume for more details and job information at eheatherallbeautycosinc@gmx.com

HELP WANTED Bartenders Wanted! Up to $300/day. No exp necessary. Training provided. Age 18+ ok. 800-965-6520 x172

Hurry.don’t wait! This great opportunity is limited so contact All Beauty Cosmetics Inc. today!

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serving UH for 20 yrs.

10 Narcissist’s obsession 14 Oil source 15 __ fide 16 Gin flavoring 17 Mentioned with a yawn? 19 Inn group member 20 __ trap 21 Like jellybeans 22 Memo header 23 Tightfistedness scale? 26 Swiffer WetJet, e.g. 29 Bereft 30 Jupiter, for one 31 Allen contemporary 33 Lollipop-licking cop 37 Ristorante staple 39 Explore deeply 42 Derelict, perhaps 43 Contest entry 45 Factor opening 47 Bucko 48 Goofs (around) 51 Battle preparation place, in metaphor 53 Like a centaur? 57 Actress Falco 58 Oarlock pin 59 Vanishing points 63 Outfits 64 Old enough to know better? 66 Send out 10/15/10 67 End of a lover’s ultimatum 68 Designated 69 Aussie sleep sounds? 70 European coal region

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

See us on yelp.com

14

Call 956-7043 to place your ad here! Prices start at just $5 per day!

E-Mail: Fax: Mail:

classifieds@kaleo.org 956-9962. Include ad text, classification, run dates and charge card information. Send ad text, classification, run dates and payment to Board of Publications, Attn: Classifieds P.O. Box 11674, Honolulu, HI 96828-0674


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE MICHAEL BREWER OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

O PINIONS 15

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

Wrap it up

Get one dollar off and a free drink with purchase of $6. Just show your student ID

NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

According to a study done by the Advocates for Youth, only 34% of females and 65% of males in Hawai‘i reported using a condom at last intercourse, the lowest percentage of any state in the U.S. L INDSY OGAWA Opinions Editor

National Coming Out Day was celebrated on Monday in the Campus Center, with handouts ranging from sexual health brochures to condoms, yet Hawai’i’s youth does not seem to have internalized the safe sex message. Trojan Brand Condom’s 2010 Sexual Health Report Card annually ranks the nation’s universities and gave the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa a C average. UH Mānoa fi nished 108th out of 141 schools, the same rank as 2009, and a slight improvement from 111th place in 2008. Yet UH has done better in earlier years, holding 45th place in 2006. The annual Trojan’s sexual health report cards measure 13 sexual health categories from each

university, including: student opinion of the health center, health center hours of operation, availability of sexual awareness programs, condom and contraceptive availability, sexually transmitted infection testing on campus, and website usability. While the report does not go into detail about the ranking, the majority of the information was based on online student polls showing possible inconsistencies. “(The Trojan report) is not a study ... All it is, is the number of students who happen to get to the Trojan website and take the poll. It’s a very select group,” said Kristen Scholly, the Peer Education Coordinator at Mānoa’s University Health Services. “It’s like clicking on an advertisement and seeing how many of those people use condoms. It’s not See Safe sex, next page

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16

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE MICHAEL BREWER OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 2010

Safe sex from previous page

accurate,” Scholly added. Regardless of the report’s accuracy, our university’s rank dropped considerably after 2006 — the same time as when UHM stopped conducting free on-campus HIV tests. Sexual health concerns also reach beyond UH’s campuses. A 2009 Health Youth Behavioral Risk Survey showed that chlamydia rates in Hawaiʻi rank among the top 10 in the nation with the highest rates occurring in people between the ages of 15 to 24. The survey also showed that less than half of Hawaiʻi’s teens received sexual education from a health care professional. According to the Hawaiʻi State Profi le from the Sexuality Information and Education Council in 2009, only 34 percent of females and 65 percent of males in Hawaiʻi report using condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse. This is in comparison to the average 54 percent of females and 69 percent of males nationwide. While sex is often casually discussed in college life, an uninformed and apathetic attitude on sex can lead to permanent consequences. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that $10 million will be given to the University of Hawaiʻi Health Center, which will partially be used by the Hawaiʻi Youth Services Network. But the urgency to begin safe sex practices can start now. Go out and buy a box of condoms.

U N I V E R S I T Y H E A LT H S E RV I C E S M Ā N OA 1710 East West Road, across the Marine Sciences Building and Watanabe Hall Open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. except from 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday. 808-956-8965 http://www.hawaii.edu/shs/ Welcome.html


October 15, 2010 - Ka Leo O Hawaii