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K A LEO

VISUAL ISSUE Ser v i ng t he st udents of t he Un iversit y of Hawa i ‘ i at M ā noa si nce 1922

Visual issue: showcasing the artwork of Ka Leo’s staff photographers » more photos on kaleo.org

Time for Tea! East-West tea fest Features 12

Gender Roles Examining empowered women Opinions 15

W E DN E S DAY, O C T. 6 to T H U R S DAY, O C T. 7, 2 010

w w w. k a leo.org

Volu me 105 Issue 30

CHRIS MIKESELL/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


2 N EWS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

UH astronomer aids in discovery of Earth-like planet ERENIA T. M ICHELL Senior Staff Writer

Astronomers, including University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Nader Haghighipour, could say the stars were aligned for them when they recently discovered a planet with the capability to hold liquid water, similar to Earth. The planet was discovered on Sept. 29 with the use of telescopes at the W.M Keck Observatory on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. Haghighipour, an associate astronomer at the Institute of Astronomy here at UHM, worked with a team of scientists from themainland. Steven Vogt from University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) and Paul Butler of the Carnegie Institution of Washington led the team. Others included UCSC associate research scientist Eugenio Rivera, and Gregory Henry and Michael Williamson of Tennessee State University. The team met up about every two to three months on the Big Island when they were granted time to do their research

TIM RAWLE /FLICKR

The discovery of this new planet was made possible by the W.M. Keck Observatory, located on Mauna Kea, Hawai‘i. at the Keck facilities in Waimea. The team announced that the planet, nicknamed “g,” is of Earthlike size, and is orbiting a nearby star, named “Gliese 581,” at a distance that places it in the star’s “habitable zone.” This habitable zone means it can hold liquid water on its surface,similar to Earth. This also means that it can be

considered a “potentially habitable” planet. According to Haghighipour, habitability depends on many factors, such as fi nding planets with the same mass, size and surface temperature as Earth. Finding a planet with liquid water and an atmosphere are among the most important elements. “We have not seen many of

these planets. We do not have this technology. We use our computers and models to represent what we see,” said Haghighipour. “What we can say is that it’s similar to Earth, it is not unlikely for the planet to have the potential for life on Earth.” What is Haghighipour’s guess for finding more potentially habitable planets?

“It is really hard (to say). The conditions require many things. Current technology can’t answer that. The discovery of this one (planet) shows that our strategy was successful on focusing on small stars and planets. I’m reluctant to put down a percent- it would not hold any scientific value,” said Haghighipour. With the discovery of planet “g,” Haghighipour says this has been the biggest breakthrough in his area. He and his team are reluctant to pronounce this as the “first habitable planet,”however, and that they haven’t discovered a planet with aliens. “It’s just a planet with the capabilities to hold liquid water, and is similar to Earth,” said Haghighipour. “Stars like our sun are in (the) billions out in the galaxy. Many of them have planets like our solar system. In the context of our galaxy, billions of galaxies are out there - we can just imagine how much out there is like our own,” said Haghighipour. “Compared to what is out there, we are just a tiny, tiny spot.”

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

Peace felt project creates international connections LYNN NAK AGAWA News Editor

To participate in International Peace Week, Art 238 students created felted artwork to send to New Jersey and received artwork from the Netherlands. In addition to learning felting techniques, students of the ďŹ bers class researched and learned more about the communities they came in contact with. “The students (created) ‘tools’ for peace, using this as an opportunity to share experiences in Hawai‘i with our national and international partners while learning about other communities,â€? said Mary Babcock, assistant art professor and ďŹ bers chair. The artwork they sent to New Jersey resembled tools. Emily Sewell, a third-year ďŹ bers student enjoyed participating in the project. “Felting can be paralleled to peace making,â€? said Sewell. “Similar to peace making, it takes a lot of time and effort to make the pieces. “The project made me more aware of what an artist can say as a world statement. It’s good for the art

community to be exposed to different aspects of art, and this was a good way

COURTESTY OF MARY BABCOCK

Art 238 students create felt “tools� for International Peace Week. to give to the community,� she said. The art they received from the Netherlands was from a group of women from a northeastern

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town called Loppersum. Babcock said they received a book of felt artworks from the group of peace artists as well as unexpected surprise cookies. “The cookies went over really well; we basically got a care package,� said Babcock. The students sent back macadamia nuts. The information the class sent to their peace partners included topics such as the value of Hawai‘i, what ho’oponopono is, and a description of ancient healing traditions of Hawai‘i. “(The project) seemed to really bring people up to be creative and work with one another. Because it was a gift, there was a different care that was put into the ideas and creation of the piece,� said Babcock. Sewell agreed that it was good to give back instead of creating artwork for herself. The mission of the Peace Felt 2010 project is to “promote peace and connectivity among nations, loving kindness among individuals, and gratitude in our hearts and our consciousness.� The exchange was conducted in conjunction with International Day of Peace on Sept. 21.

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4 N EWS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

Fair offers students involvement options C HRISTA BALINGIT Contributing Writer

The annual Student Involvement Fair provides students with information about various extracurricular organizations and the opportunity to become more involved. “Getting involved in your community is very beneďŹ cial. It helps you connect. It helps you succeed academically. It opens you up to resources. When getting hired, employers will hire people they already know,â€? said graduate student Michelle White, who is an educational administrations major working to help set up the fair. “It helped me feel connected. I’ve gotten to know people I hope to work with someday,â€? she continued. White interns at the Student Life and Development OfďŹ ce (SLDO) and has beneďŹ ted from her attendance at previous years’ fairs. Sponsored by the SLDO, Chartered Student Organizations (CSOs), and Registered Independent Organizations (RIOs),

the fair is designed to recruit students in a fun atmosphere. Expect music, food and prizes for students interested in joining one of the many organizations the University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa has to offer. There are currently six CSOs on campus, including the Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i, Board of Publications, Broadcast Community Authority, Graduate Student Organization, Campus Board Center, and the Student Activity and Program Fee Board. Student fees help to support these six organizations, so students are strongly encouraged to participate. CSOs and RIOs will be available during the fair to explain what they have to offer. Currently there are more than 200 active RIOs that provide leadership, public service, and activism opportunities for students wishing to become more involved. There are also organizations involving religion, ethnicity, culture, service, academics, advocacy, sports

and social activites. Student Life Services Associate Mike Kockler, who is in charge of putting the fair together, highly encourages students to get involved in the community. “I would like to see as many students as possible get involved. We wish to create the awareness of the different things that happen on campus,â€? Kockler said. “The fair gives them an opportunity to participate in organizations where students can personally beneďŹ t as well as serve others.â€? Students who wish to pursue certain interests will ďŹ nd the Student Involvement Fair a good place to do just that. If a student can’t ďŹ nd an organization that interests them, they are welcome to start a new organization.

DANIEL JACKSON Staff Reporter

then escalated into pushing, shoving and scratching.

S U N DAY, O C T. 3 At around 2 a.m., a student reported being assaulted after an altercation between a group of students on a Hale Aloha Lokelani balcony and a group outside below. According to a witness, the group on the ground hurled insults and rocks at the group on the balcony, who threw objects, including a glass bottle, at the group below. As one student from the balcony tried to exit the elevator into the lobby, he was allegedly choked and punched in the face by members of the other group, who had gained access to the building.

F R I DAY, O C T. 1 A 160 GB iPod, valued at $300, was reported stolen from an unlocked white BMW parked in Zone 22 of the parking structure.

G E T I N VO LV E D Campus Center When: Oct. 6 and 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Go to www.manoa.hawaii.edu/studentlife for more info on organizations and for a current list of RIOs.

SAT U R DAY, OC T. 2 A domestic disturbance was reported at Hale Wainani between two students who, according to the couple, had an argument over what type of sushi to make, which

A 2003 red and black Sym DD50 mo-ped, valued at $650, was reported stolen from the Holmes Hall bike rack. The mo-ped had been secured by a U-lock, which was also taken.

A 2005 black Vento mo-ped, valued at $700, was reported stolen from the Gateway House mo-ped rack. The mo-ped had been secured with only the ignition lock.

T H U R S DAY, S E P T. 30 A gray 2010 Trek bicycle, valued at $400, was reported stolen from the Ching Field makai-side bike rack.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

Gothic whimsies and dangerous doodles abound in ‘Musings of Mystery’ JUSTIN NICHOLSON Staff Writer The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Art Gallery is currently showcasing works by the king of doodling, Edward Gorey (1925-2000). This exhibit is a must-see for anyone that has a tendency to sketch random objects on a notebook when spacing out. Be careful when looking closely at the textures Gorey creates with a pen, because you will realize what is achieveable during your professors’ lectures, and you might never tune out an instructor again. Gorey illustrates strange-looking people, animals (especially cats), odd creatures that he makes up, and gothic images of subjects

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V O I C E

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in perilous situations. These drawings are usually accompanied by a humorous or nonsensical caption that is said to mock Victorian writing. He is known as an illustrator more than a writer, but there is something to be said for his ability to make eerie images appear funny in very few words. An international audience celebrates Gorey’s legacy; his works are available in 15 languages. He is in a rare class of artists that is able to appeal to many demographics — from children to rock stars. Gorey’s influence on music ranges from writing lyrics and designing an album cover for the punk rock band The Freeze, to collaborating with the London-

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, columnists, contributors and editors who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please come to the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henri-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

based cabaret band The Tiger Lillies on the Grammy-nominated album “Gorey End.” A Gorey cult following exists in the gothic music scene, and the jazz composer Michael Mantler wrote musical adaptations of Gorey works for one of his albums. There are many artifacts from Gorey’s diverse portfolio at the UH Art Gallery: posters from the 1977 revival of the play “Dracula” (where Gorey worked as the costume and set designer), Gorey’s hand-stitched dolls of his creatures, the animated intro to the PBS series “Mystery!“ and hundreds of illustrations. Gorey’s body of work inspires multiple art forms. All age groups adore it, and many cultures appreciate it. Anything so universally liked must contain some sort of universal truth. The truth is that if you give a person a pen and paper — from any age group or corner of the world — he or she will doodle. Explain that to your instructor the next time you’re told to

GOREY INFO University of Hawaiʻi Art Gallery Sept., 26 to Dec. 10 Admission is free and open to the public. For more info visit www.hawaii.edu/artgallery or call (808) 956-6888

quit doodling and pay attention.

COURTESY HAWAII.EDU /ARTGALLERY

“Unstrung Earbrass with Fantod” by Edward Gorey, featured at the University of Hawaii Art Gallery. Open from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday and noon to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday.

Capturing the waves: the photography of Colin McGillivray H AIYA SARWAR Staff Writer Bodyboarder Colin McGillivray decided to turn his love for the ocean into a career of artwork. “I actually started to get into photography in high school; it was around the time when I first started bodyboarding. I thought it was crazy to be able to capture pictures of waves,” said McGillivray. A 20 09 Universit y of Hawai‘i at Mānoa graduate, McGillivray discovered his passion for photography in

high school. Inspired by bodyboarding, he began his journey to capture the beaut y of what he experienced in the waves. “I realized that no one wave is ever the same, and to capture that particular moment in time, with all of the ocean’s power and beauty, was what I wanted to do,” he stated. “I started out just shooting here and there and only really shot from land; it wasn’t until I got into college that I broke my bank and went all out into water photography.” Looking through his collection, his passion for the sea is

evident. He has created mesmerizing shots capturing the magic of waves and wave-rider culture. In fact , the photos t ake indepth r isks both literally and f ig urat ively. His photos indi cate a deeper underst anding of the sea, because they cap t ure perspect ives that only an exper t could see. “The purpose of my photography is to be able to capture moments in time that never occur again,” McGillivray explained. “To see that one barreling clean wave just breaking perfect for that split second, and then poof,

it’s gone, never to occur again in the same manner - to capture that moment in time and be able to share it with not only people that are familiar with the ocean but the general public. Being able to show everyone the beauty that is all around us in Hawai‘i that sometimes is seldom thought about or seen is amazing.” Though McGillivray’s main focus may initially appear to revolve around waves and wave riders, this action photographer’s passion for taking pictures follows him wherever he goes. His works range from a vari-

ety of sports to a variety of people. While at UH, McGillivray shot a range of unique and emotional sports photos for Ka Leo. His talent and disposition for capturing unforgettable images are evident in every photo he takes. But as the photographer said, “I think that photography is about constantly learning. Even if you think you know it all, there is still some other angle or technique that is just waiting to be learned.” Check out McGillivray’s collection at: http://www.colinmcgillivray.com/


6 VISUAL I SSUE

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 Ansel Adams once said that “A photograph is usually looked at - seldom looked into.” What you hold in your hands is a collection of stories, ideas, beliefs, perspectives, feelings, thoughts and memories from some of Ka Leo’s staff photographers. While I have asked each of them to present and interpret their photos, I believe, as my grandfather once said, “A good photograph speaks for itself.” Each photograph will “say” something different to each person, and that’s the awesome thing about photos and art in general -- the experience is different each time you view it. While we as the photographers may do our best to portray what we see, or “hear” at the moment, it could be interpreted very differently by someone else. So I encourage you, viewer, to not just look at the photographs in this Visual Issue, but look into them, and to listen to what each photograph has to say.

NIK SEU Photo Editor

NIK SEU/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

KEISUKE TAKAHASHI / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

(Above) I tried to capture the wired feeling. There are many students at the University of Hawai‘i - perhaps too many - and from a high perspective, they look like a little insects, or miniature figures.

BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

(Left) A man preaches his religion emphatically in the middle of Wall Street.

O’Carol an’s Farewell to Music Conceived C o and Performed by Patrick Ball

Saturday, October 23, 7:30 pm Orvis Auditorium UH M a ¯ noa Campus

MEET LOCALLY BORN AND SPIRITUALLY GIFTED ARTIST LANI JOHNSON Her paintings range from Hawaiiana, Dimensional, to Spiritual.

Buy Your Tickets Today @ www.etickethawaii.com/orc.html Charge by Phone: 944-BOWS (2697) or Visit the Campus Center Ticket Of½ce For more information, call 956-8246 or visit www.outreach.hawaii.edu/community. A University of Hawaiʻi at Mâa noa Outreach College Production and a Mâa noa Arts and Minds event.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 “Yellow fish” I spotted this Commerson’s Frogfish at Kahe Point, O’ahu the first week of September. I was diving down to get a closer look at what I thought was the brightest yellow coral I had ever seen, but to my surprise, the yellow coral turned out to be a frogfish. Frogfish are barely recognized as fish. Most snorkelers pass them over without a second glance, believing them to be rocks or coral. I can’t imagine the number of times this has happened to me.

ALEXANDER DANIELS/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“The Orange Cowrie” After waking up for a sunrise snorkel, I was surprised to find a multitude of Flamingo Tongue Snails right on the reef behind the resort in Grand Cayman. The orange and black on the shell is actually part of the snail. I didn’t realize this until I touched one and the orange and black spots retreated into the shell! The shell itself is white with a tinge of orange and resembles a cowrie shell.

ALEXANDER DANIELS KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Staredown” The clash between the freedom that a bird represents (in his capacity to fly) and the bars cutting across this image compels me, in that it’s visually interesting... and after all, isn’t that what photography is all about, visual interest? DOYLE MOELLER KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Surfer” This silhouette photo of a surfer was taken on Magic Island. NATSUMI ASANO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

9

“Biker” This silhouette photo was taken on Magic Island. NATSUMI ASANO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

KEENAN FONG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Stuck” I took this photo for my photo class back in Florida. It is a picture of my past boyfriend and my theme was about reflections and the different/skewed perceptions that mirrors and reflective objects give off. This picture gives a looking forward, yet stagnant feeling.

MIKO WALCZUK/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Sakura Scatter” While studying in Seoul, South Korea I met up with another photographer from France named Paul. We worked together in the studio trying various themes. The first photo was taken when all the cherry blossoms were in bloom, so much so that I just took a big scoop of blossoms that fell from the tree and gave it to Paul to throw in the air.


10 PORTFOLIO

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

After School Special:

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KA LEO O HAWAI‘I ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING Thursday, October 7th • 7:00 pm Ward 16 Theatres

PETER PARK / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“ Brah, check out dat wave...” I took this shot of kids just enjoying the beach and kicking it with friends.

Present your valid UH Student ID at the BOP Business Office after 1:00 pm Thursday, October 7th to get your complimentary pass!

OP ENS ENS IN THEATRE TRESS OCTOBER 8th First come, first served. A valid UHM student ID is required--valid for Fall 2010; NO EXCEPTIONS on day of giveaway. No phone calls. One pass per person. Supplies are limited. One pass admits two.

PETER PARK / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Charging In” The rippah killing it at Sandy beach.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

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KEISUKE TAKAHASHI / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

I took this picture in Chinatown when they had a Chinese New Year festival.

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KIMBERLY SHASTID / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Blue Eyes” My brother and I rented a mo-ped and went on a five-day long road trip through Costa Rica. We got lost looking for the crater of the volcano Rincón de la Vieja and ended up finding a hidden waterfall where we met this dog. I captured him gazing up at me.

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12 M AY SALCEDO Contributing Writer From the direction of the bowl to the angle of your hand, the tea ceremony involves rituals that implement precise execution of each movement. The washing and wiping of the bowl has a stepby-step procedure and is done according to tradition during the Japanese tea ceremony. Diane Chen, a student involved with the tea club, explained a few exceptions. “Once you get past the stepwise fashion, there’s room for artistic expression,” she said. Before the tea is offered, sweet desserts are usually eaten to counteract the bitter flavor of the tea, so that both flavors merge harmoniously on the palate. The host never faces the guests during the preparation; instead, the host looks to the garden outside. Even the guests must sit perfectly still in toe-numbing positions on tatami mats. Self-discipline is required to remain seated the entire time while watching the host prepare tea. “Ichigo ichie” or “one time,

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR NIK SEU ASSOCIATE JOEL KUTAKA PHOTO @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

Brewing up harmony with chado

THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I MUSEUM / FLICKR

Tucked behind the East-West center, in the Japanese Garden. The teahouse is where the Japanese Tea Club meets every Friday and Saturday. one opportunity,” is the philosophy used by the UH Japanese Tea Club. The club meets twice a week at the Japanese gardens to practice “chado,” or tea ceremony. Tea is either served thin or thick, which is in stark contrast from your

downtown café corner. Thick tea is taken from only high-quality tea leaves and has the consistency of poi. Once known as the only “true” tea for ceremony, thick tea is only served during formal situations requiring the utmost eti-

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quette. Thin tea is taken from the top leaves of the tea plant and has a slightly powdered consistency that is weaker in fl avor than thick tea. Thin tea is served at afterparties and social events that promote conversation but still require tea-ceremony etiquette. The Japanese Garden is tucked away behind the East-West Imin Center. Walk down the stone-paved pathway and you’ll find yourself at a cottage tucked behind green flora. Cristina Giesse, a teaching assistant for the tea class and active member of the club since fall of last semester, said that the cottage was purposely built there because tea-houses are always built away from houses and other buildings so that one can get away from the “dirty world.” “There’s a lot of aesthetic appreciation going on at the moment,” said Giesse, during a practice tea ceremony. In addition to weekly tea ceremony practices, the club pairs up with the Japanese Cultural Center at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

to serve tea-lovers from Japan at an event called the Summer Seminar. The club also holds a tea ceremony for New Years called “Joyagama.” This event is by invitation only and the students prepare and serve thin tea. Following the event is the Jan. 12 ceremony called “Hatsudatte” or “fi rst tea serving,” where thin tea is served to guests who come back after the Joyagama. Classes are also offered for credit and provide in-depth analysis of culture and history through the practice of tea.

MO R E I N F O Japanese Tea Club: Meets every Friday 2 to 5 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to noon at the teahouse in the Japanese Garden. Tea Classes: ASAN 323: The Way of Tea in Japanese History and Culture, Offered Fall & Spring. Earn three credits & DH requirement. ASAN 324: Chado-the Way of Tea Practicum. Offered Spring only. Earn 2 credits & covers DA requirement.


13

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010 CO M I C S @k aleo.org

EDITOR DERICK FABIAN KC Fong

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14

puzzles • classif ieds • horoscopes

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

10/6/10

By Mike Peluso ACROSS 1 Dance fundamental 5 Spreading trees

9 Cosmic payback 14 __-up: slow Web connection 15 Bubbly label name

Horoscopes By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clements Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s birthday (10/6/10). Dust off your numerous talents and put them to use now. Independent ideas applied to household projects produce brilliant results. Your personal desire for greater financial comfort pushes you to excel in fulfilling career responsibilities down to the last detail. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest

16 Like some kites 17 Menlo Park middle name 18 Former credit card giant 19 Shakespeare’s title Athenian 20 Eagle 23 Big pix: Abbr. 24 Reagan era prog. 25 Ball club 28 Pancho was his sidekick 30 Running independently 32 Trite 33 Eagle 37 Leg-shaving alternative 39 “Science Guy” Bill 40 Baking soda target 41 Eagle 46 Tint 47 Composer Berlioz 48 WWII blockade vessel 50 Joseph of ice cream fame 51 Tic __: mint 53 Sale condition 54 Eagle 59 Ambulance attendant 62 Cathedral section 63 “Dark Angel” actress Jessica 64 Worship 65 Bring up 66 Diver’s haunt 67 Au courant, with “in” 68 Ancient Persian 69 Ilk DOWN 1 Nebr. neighbor 2 Roofer’s piece 3 Whence icicles hang 4 Does a cabinetmaking task 5 Harris of country

day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 5 -- Is it dangerous to strive for more power? Only if you let desire diminish your capacity to think logically. Resolve problems for a win-win. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 5 -- People around you seem to respond to energy you can’t even perceive. To understand their motivation, ask questions that deliver logical answers. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 5 -- As your thinking matures, you see practical changes that transform the results into a magical success. Set it free to really grow it.

6 They may be pierced 7 See 32-Down 8 Pierces 9 Destructive 2005 newsmaker 10 Zealous 11 Part of most eyeglasses 12 “Little Red Book” author 13 Ex-Texas governor Richards 21 Check sent with a ltr., e.g. 22 Adored one 25 Sanskrit for “awakened one” 26 Enjoyed Denny’s, say 27 Girardi’s predecessor as Yankee manager 28 Scratched 29 Stupidity 31 “That’s __”: “Uh-uh” 32 With 7-Down, feeling better 34 Toledo-to-Detroit dir. 35 Port on the Firth of Clyde 36 Sen. counterpart 38 Road to nowhere, metaphorically 42 Spied 43 Schlep 44 Like monastic life 45 Cleanup hitter’s stats 49 Annual Hollywood gala, with “the” 52 Amulet 53 Syrian leader 54 Take on 55 Fencing sword 56 Stick on the table 57 Opposite of unter 58 First president to take up golf 59 Pin cushion? 60 University URL ending 61 Put on

www.kaleo.org for solutions

Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 6 -- A favorite person makes demands today that seem unreasonable at first. Once you get rolling, you see exactly how to accommodate their wishes. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 5 -Someone at work decides they want their own way. If you don’t care, let them have it, at least for today. Otherwise, careful, logical explanations are needed. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- A younger person applies considerable pressure about practical matters. You may need a trip to the store for the right uniform or gear. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

4 6 3 8

1 6 2

5 5 8 7 4

Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

6 9 9 7

3 MEDIUM

6 -- Take care of your own nutritional needs. Assume the role of chef at home, perhaps, and go out for lunch with friends somewhere fabulous. Healthy food can be delicious. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 5 -- A neighbor or sibling challenges you to a dual of practical words. Your best tactic is logic as you respond to their emotions. Keep yours out of it. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 6 -- Exert your will and apply physical effort to a housekeeping project. You’ve thought this through. Now get others to cooperate for fabulous results. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today

2

1 5 5 1 8 4 1 7 #2

is a 5 -- Take control of your own responsibilities. Others want to tell you what to do. Be respectful. You don’t have to do it their way. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 5 -- A dramatic dream had you tossing and turning. Now see how it applies to today’s agenda. Maybe your subconscious is trying to tell you something. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 5 -- Group activities pose problems for one person with petty objections. Resolve the difficulties by acknowledging their position. It helps to be heard.

Classifieds The BOP Business Office (to the right of the UH Bookstore lower entrance)

Monday-Friday 9a.m.-5p.m. Deadline: 4 p.m. two days before publication. Payment: Pre-payment required. Cash, in-state checks, money orders, Visa and MasterCard accepted.

WANTED Administration Student Assistant The University of Hawaiëi Foundation is seeking a Student Assistant to provide support to the Foundation Vice President for Administration/ Chief Financial Officer & the Associate Director for Compliance & Administration. Must be enrolled half-time or more within the UH system, possess strong analytical, logical & problem solving skills. Good verbal & written communication skills, proficient in Microsoft Office Word, Excel & Powerpoint. Proficient in Microsoft Office Visio & Adobe Acrobat a plus. Quick learner. Mon-Fri, 19 hours max per week. Starting salary: $8.50/ hour. To apply, email letter of interest & resume to Joy.Watanabe@uhfoundation org. Located on UH Manoa campus

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$5.00 per day (up to 3 lines); $1.25 for each additional line. All caps and/or bold will add 25% to the cost of the ad. Place an ad in four (4) consecutive issues and receive the fourth ad free! In Person: Stop by the BOP Business Office. Phone: 956-7043

Driver Wanted Must be available from 3PM to 5PM during the week.Three to Four daysper week. Pick up two sons at Noelani School (Manoa)- drop off atSports practice Manoa District Park. Mature responsible femalepreferred. $20 per hour. Contact Mike at mike@sappfitness.net

Egg Donors Needed. Must be healthy 19-30 year old non-smokers. All Ethnicities. Help a Couple Become a Family! Generous Compensation.

President’s Office Student Assistant The University of Hawai’i Foundation is seeking a Student Assistant to provide support to the Foundation President’s Office and front office. Must be enrolled half-time or more within the UH system. Proficient in Microsoft Office, quick learner, able to multi-task, good verbal & written communication skills required. Mon-Fri, 19 hours max per week. Starting salary: $8.50/hour. Located on UH Manoa campus. Email letter of interest & resume to Joni.Kohama@uhfoundation.org

HELP WANTED Bartenders Wanted! Up to $300/day. No exp necessary. Training provided. Age 18+ ok. 800-965-6520 x172

Contact: conceptionsdonation@gmail.com

E-Mail: Fax: Mail:

classifieds@kaleo.org 956-9962. Include ad text, classification, run dates and charge card information. Send ad text, classification, run dates and payment to Board of Publications, Attn: Classifieds P.O. Box 11674, Honolulu, HI 96828-0674

WORK WANTED Looking for a part time offer where you can earn extra income at your own flexible schedule plus benefits that takes only little of your time. Requirements * Should be a computer Literate. * 1-2 hours access to the internet weekly. * Must be Efficient and Dedicated contact us with your resume for more details and job information at eheatherallbeautycosinc@gmx.com Hurry.don’t wait! This great opportunity is limited so contact All Beauty Cosmetics Inc. today!

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Call 956-7043 to place your ad here! Prices start at just $5 per day!


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE MICHAEL BREWER OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

O PINIONS 15

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010

Gender roles of empowered women A RIEL MONISMITH Contributing Writer In the eyes of society, a woman who tries to seize power for herself is dangerous. Our society still has gender expectations, and instead of being serious contenders in the realms of business and politics, women are often objectified. Despite the advancement of women’s rights and perception that women and men are equal, women still do not receive equal pay for the same work, are the primary victims of gender violence and sexual assault, and are objectified by the media to no end. Of course, there are women who become powerful and successful due to their intellect and work ethic. However, women who assume the responsibilities associated with a power position are monitored more closely than men. The expectations of these women are to act in a more “masculine” manner. For example, when Hillary

Clinton ran in the Democratic Party’s presidential primary in 2008, she received a disproportionate amount of media attention regarding on gender. Some worried that as a woman, she might be too “emotional” to be an effective leader. In terms of visual appearance, the less-feminine aesthetic adopted by Clinton, as well as many women in politics, was commented on. Many constituents thought she was a “bitch” or a “dyke,” simply because of her short hair and pantsuits. What those constituents did not seem to realize is that whether or not anyone will admit it, a woman is forced to assume a more masculine image in order to be taken seriously. Will anyone take a woman in a sundress with perfectly coiffed hair seriously if she walks into a boardroom meeting? My guess would be that the members of the board would start making coffee requests. “Legally Blonde” tells the story of a “girly girl” attending

Do you want to be happy? Do you want to overcome life’s problems? If yes, you’ve found the right place! The Ryuho Okawa Club, based on the works of Ryuho Okawa, will help you overcome problems and guide you to living a better life! Ryuho Okawa is one of Japan’s most famous authors, and many of his books have become million-sellers in Japan. Please feel free to contact Alex at 808-277-5297 or email: okamuraa@hawaii.edu

law school in fluorescent pink outfits with a miniature Chihuahua in her purse. The character, Elle Woods’ exaggerated, stereotypical feminine mannerisms demonstrate how ridiculous it truly seems in the eyes of society for a woman to be a part of such a traditionally mascu-

line institution. Elle Woods and Hillary Clinton both exemplify women who are no less capable, and no less deserving of respect than their male counterparts. The more feminine woman is ridiculous for attempting to be taken seriously, and the less femi-

nine woman still comes off as too harsh to be trusted. Theoretically, society has embraced feminist principles of equality, but in practice, a woman must downplay her gender in order to even have a fighting chance in traditionally male-dominated arenas.

Hillary Clinton is an example of an empowered woman being in the spotlight due to her gender. NRBELEX FLICKR

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The Ian MacMillan Writing Contest $5 for Best Short Story Fiction Submission $500 $500 for Best Poetry Submission $5 1sst, 2nd and 3rd place finalists in each category w be published in our 2011 spring issue. will A Anyone, including non-students, can submit th writing. their DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS DECEMBER 9, 2010 D Please visit Pl i i our website at www.hawaiireview.org for specific submission guidelines.

WAIKIKI LOCATION COMING SOON!


16 S PORTS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 (Left) Hawai‘i junior quarterback Bryant Moniz escapes a tackle by Louisiana Tech defensive end Matt Broha in the first quarter of the game at Aloha Stadium on Oct. 2. Moniz completed 42 of 58 passes with four touchdowns and a career-high 532 yards.

Healthy Japanese Man?

(Below) Hawai‘i senior slot receiver Greg Salas is tackled by two Louisiana Tech defenders as he scores on a 19yard pass play during the third quarter of the game at Aloha Stadium on Oct. 2. PHOTOS BY BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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October 6th, 2010 - Ka Leo O Hawaii  

October 6th, 2010 - Ka Leo O Hawaii

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