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A K LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ser v i ng t he st udents of t he Un iversit y of Hawa i ‘ i at M ā noa si nce 1922

Clever clocks Rolling when ready Features 3

Shipping for students Resident hall revises policy Opinions 7

W E DN E S DAY S E P T. 8 to T H U R S DAY S E P T. 9, 2 010

w w w. k a leo.org

Volu me 105 Issue 18

Voting season commences for ASUH senators

ever, candidates who are running in colleges or schools with a smaller student population may bypass this requirement by being directly nominated on the senate floor. To learn more about ASUH and what seats are up for this election, visit their website at http://asuh.hawaii.edu. Student packets were due Tuesday, Sept. 7 at the ASUH office. Contact ASUH at asuh@hawaii.edu or by phone at (808) 956 - 4822. ASUH office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

ERENIA T. M ICHELL Senior staff writer The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i (ASUH) will hold their fall special elections to elect new senators for current seat vacancies that represent the various colleges and schools on campus. Elections will be held from Tuesday, Sept. 21 through Tuesday, Sept. 28 on the UH Information & Services Portal (MyUH). For students looking to get involved with the university, ASUH offers the opportunity to represent undergraduate students by helping out in the decision-making process of important issues that affect the UH Mānoa student body. Andrew Itsuno, ASUH president, points out that a result of that process is the new student Several ASUH members gather for a meeting during the Fall 2009 semester. U-PASS program, which enters its third semester this fall. said Itsuno. “We work together to dressing student need. “The U-PASS is a great exam“If there’s a need, we’ll advo- advocate for the whole school, and ple (of how senators can make a cate for students. They’ll also be the school they are representing.” difference),” Itsuno said. “There representing a specifi c college — Itsuno would like to promote stuwas a student need to get afford- that’s why it’s so important to be dent voting during the week of Sept. 21. able transportation and now we represented. And that’s why I en“I encourage the student all have the $20 pass.” courage students to run for their body to get involved, but to also Itsuno believes that when it college,” said Itsuno. partake in elections. Getting incomes to students running for a Though senators are elected volved should be looked at as a senate seat, anything is possible. to represent a college or school on civil responsibility, and getting “Basically, the main objective campus, Itsuno says a senator’s seat involved makes for a better comis advocating for students. The has objectives to represent their col- munity,” said Itsuno. sky is the limit, you can basically lege and the student body as one. ASUH holds special elections do anything,” he said. “I think it plays into both, you at the beginning of each semester According to Itsuno, the main do want to advocate for your col- to fi ll vacancies in the senate that responsibility for senators is ad- lege, but you’re doing it for both,” occur when students leave at the

JOEL KUTAKA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREW ITSUNO

end of a semester. Elections occur three times a year, with a general election taking place once a year during the spring semester, when all seats are open for election. In order for a student to run, he or she must be a full time (12 or more credits) undergraduate student at UH Mānoa, and have a cumulative GPA of at least a 2.0. Interested candidates should obtain an application packet at the ASUH office, located in Campus Center 211A. As part of the process, candidates must obtain 25 signatures from students in their college. How-

A S U H PA R T I A L T U I T I O N AWA R D S F O R FA L L 2 010 Applications for awards up to $1,000 are available in the ASUH office, Campus Center 211A. Full-time (12 UH Mānoa credits), classified students demonstrating academic achievement (cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher), high financial need, and unique situation are encouraged to apply. Those who receive financial aid are encouraged to meet with a financial aid advisor to determine if the award will affect aid. Applications are due at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 24. ASUH senators, past and present, and ASUH staff are ineligible to apply.

Island gubernatorial race: Candidate’s Corner Candidate Bio NAME: NEIL A BERCROMBIE AGE: 72 EDUCATION: M ASTERS IN SOCIOL OGY, P H D IN A MERICAN S TUDIES

As the Sept. 18 primary election for governor approaches, staff writer Ethan Porter went to fi nd out more about the men behind the giant posters. Today’s interview features former U.S. Congressman Neil Abercrombie.

This is an edited transcript: an original edited version as well as the complete interview can be read online at www. kaleo.org/news. See Candidate’s Corner, page 5


2 F EATURES

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Looking for a place to feed your body and your soul? Join us for Sunday worship 9 am (time

Your new fat obsession T H E FAT G R E E K Open every day from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 3040 Wai‘alae Avenue

will change to 10 am on September 12).

Fellowship hour immediately follows worship and always features ono food. Small groups starting this fall. We are the church behind Starbucks across E. Manoa Road from the Manoa Market Place.

Some delicious dishes: Shawarma ($10) Gyros ($8) Souvlaki ($10) Spanakopita ($5) Feta Cheese and Greek Olives ($6) Merguez Sausage ($5) The Fat Greek Kabob Special ($12.95)

Manoa Valley Church

2728 Huapala Street Honolulu, HI 96822 Questions? Call the church office at 988-3271 or check us out at www.manoavalleychurch.org

KIMBERLY SHASTID / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Fat Greek restaurant is located near the Hawaiian Studies buildings and is open for lunch and dinner.

brought to you by TEXT FIRST AND L LAST NAME TO 9 953-8716 FOR VIP

$99 Bottles of Goose $3 Heineken $5 Jäger Bombs RELAXED DRESS CODE

18 AND UP STUDENTS WELCOME

2010 Manoa Jazz and Heritage Festival featuring the Larry Carlton Trio with Robert Shinoda & Friends and the Punahou Jazz Band Saturday, Sep 25; 6:00 pm Andrews Amphitheatre

Tickets on sale now: www.etickethawaii.com, Campus Center Tickets, Stan Sheriff Box OfÄce Information: www.outreach.hawaii.edu A production of the University of Hawaii at M¯anoa Outreach College supported by Baus Engineering. Funding provided by

H AIYA SARWAR Staff Writer A short walking distance from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is a restaurant called The Fat Greek. Though it’s small in size, it’s big in fl avor. “We basically just use all fresh ingredients and everything is made from scratch daily,” said manager Greg Derham. Capturing the essence of Mediterranean cuisine, The Fat Greek is a place to eat on the go for UH students. Though it is technically a restaurant, they operate more like a fast food joint - but this fast food is healthier than most. T hey may have named themselves af ter a fat Greek, but there’s hardly anything about this place that will make you fat, except possibly eating too much of their honeydrizzled baklava. This joint’s food is not only healthy, it’s also naturally delicious. The food here is rich with

old-fashioned spices and the nutrition most modern fast food seems to have lost. As Derham points out, “We

don’t use fl avor enhancers, and we only use healthy ingredients, like pure olive oil ... fresh garlic, fresh lemon juice.” The menu offers meaty dishes such as the shawarma and the traditional souvlaki. The savory beef and lamb shawarma, for example, is wrapped up in a warm and thick

Check out http://www.thefatgreek.net/ for the entire menu pita loaf that is unlike any typical grocery store brand. The infusion of the herbs and spices gives it that extra edge. The meat in every dish is tender and juicy. Some plates are portioned generously, and many entrees come with a fresh garden salad. For hungrier men and women, the King’s Platter will give you a sampling of many different dishes The Fat Greek has to offer. The King’s Platter includes chicken, fish, and lamb souvlaki meat, gyros, falafel, shawarma, garlic shrimp, pita bread, tzatziki and house hot sauces. But as great as their meaty dishes are, there are plenty of vegetarian options as well. From the baked spanakopita to the feta cheese with Greek olives, the vegetarian dishes will surely knock you out of your toga. So the next t ime you’re al most broke and feeling hungr y, go to T he Fat Greek for some a f fordably homemade food “ like Papa used to make.”


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Alarm clock proves ‘you snooze, you lose’ A LVIN PARK Associate Features Editor With classes back in session, students nationwide are attempting to pry themselves out of bed to little avail. But when it’s time to awaken, it’s best not to “abuse the snooze.” Clocky, an alarm clock with functioning wheels, will ensure that you’re up and alert in time for that 8:30 a.m. class. Designed and created by M.I.T. graduate student Guari Nanda, Clocky is an alarm clock with a twist. Knowing that students hit the snooze button over and over again with no intention of getting up, Nanda designed Clocky to roll off your nightPHILLIP TORRONE / FLICKR stand and scamper away in Using its set of wheels, Clocky will roll off your nightstand and run away if you hit the order to force you to get out of snooze button one too many times. bed to shut it off.

“It all started because I like my sleep,” said Nanda in an interview with CNBC. “I can never get out of bed on time and so for me, I just needed a physical way to drag me out of bed and Clocky was the first thing that came into my mind.” If students fi nd themselves hitting the snooze button more than once, Clocky will automatically trigger its wheels and roll off to a safe distance while emitting shrill alarm beeps that are reflective of R2-D2. Drowsy students can either rub the sleep out of their eyes and hunt Clocky to turn it off, or slam their pillow over their heads in an attempt to drown out the jarring cacophony. “The idea is you never know where it’s going to go,” said Nanda in her interview. “You have to get out of bed and look for it and in that process you wake up.”

Users can set their single-use snooze time between 0-9 minutes. If users opt for no snooze preference, Clocky will automatically start rolling away immediately with no snooze-usage. For folks who like the more conventional alarm clock style, users are able to disable Clocky’s wheels so that it remains stationary when it goes off. Due to its smaller size, Clocky is able to roll off heights of up to 3 feet, roll around freely on both wood and carpet, and comes in a variety of colors.

Clocky is available in almond, chrome, raspberry and aqua. Students can order Clocky online at Clocky.net for about $40, excluding shipping.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LYNN NAKAGAWA ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Candidate’s Corner: talking story with former congressman Neil Abercrombie I NTERVIEW CONDUCTED E THAN PORTER Staff Reporter

Ethan’s interviews are part of a three-part series including interviews with Mufi Hannemann and James “Duke” Aiona.

BY

Ethan Porter: What is the role of the governor inside of the state government? Neil Abercrombie: T he governor should be a catalyst. T he object, at least this seems to me, of any governor should be to disappear. To provide leadership as opposed to managership. This election really is a referendum on leadership: having a vision for the future, not being caught in the status quo or the business as usual, particularly political business as usual with regards to the university. The governor has an obligation, it seems to me, as well as an opportunity to be the medium through which the capacity to think critically and act on our creative capacities is carried forward. E.P.: We at UH are feeling the crunch of budget cuts: teachers are being let go, class sizes are increasing, and tuition is getting higher every year. As governor, how do you plan on helping the University?

N.A.: I’m glad you put it in terms of the budget because you’re making my case for me. The way we’re going at this is completely backwards. You don’t start with a budget and then what you’re going to cut or not cut. You start with your basic values and your values lead you to your priorities. Once your values and priorities are established, then your programmatic outcomes or programmatic avenue will become clear. Why not use the technology; the hardware and the software that’s out there right now to completely redefine the way we teach?

PL ATFORM AND VOTING RECORD: NEIL ABERCROMBIE

Civil Unions: Supported HB 444 (Civil Unions Bill) Traffic: Pro-rail and super-ferry

potential

Homelessness: Calls for an inter-government approach to work with State, County, and the private sector to find solutions. Also wants to rebuild the mental health system BRIAN TSENG/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Former U.S. Representative Neil Abercrombie speaks during an interview at his campaign headquarters in Ward Warehouse. Abercrombie resigned from Congress to run in the 2010 Hawai‘i gubernatorial election. And what we teach, and when we teach it? When I first came to the university, it was statehood (1959) and we were on a six-day week. Why aren’t we on a sevenday week? Why are we on weeks at all? Why do we not have hours and times and offerings of classes that meet the modern world? Fifty years ago, people went to school for four years and graduated. How many people go to school for four years and graduate right now? Not very many. My first thought is, I take the budget as it is; I’m not going to ask the Legislature for a dime more. You’re not going to see me whining and weeping in public about how there’s not enough money. You take whatever the money is and you spend it efficiently and effectively, and the way you get efficiency and effectiveness is you figure out what your mission is, what your values are, what priorities do you have

associated with that. In instruction the priority is the education, the capacity to think critically, and the priority is to facilitate instruction. E.P.: What is the biggest problem facing Hawai‘i today? N.A: Education. I don’t see it as a problem so much as I see it as a challenge. And I’m not trying to be cute with you, of course. Saying that it’s a problem, it’s as if you’re here and it’s over there, whereas if it’s a challenge, it’s with you. And that’s why I think that education and preparing people for the 21st century in terms of the critical thinking skills they’re going to need. It ’s cr ucial to whether or not we’re going to be able to keep people in the islands w ithout hav ing to leave the islands

in order to pursue any dreams they might have of ut ilizing their f ull capacit y. E.P.: Where do you see the State of Hawai‘i in four years, so by the next election? N.A.: Starting November 3, in four years, we have to have restored public confidence in education, pre-K through post-graduate. We need to be visibly on our way to energy independence, environmental sustainability with regard to our infrastructure and our flora and fauna, water, land issues. Food security, importing less food, what I consider an agriculture renaissance, and a complete redirection away from a plantation mentality. (Headed) toward entrepreneurial niche-farming that provided realistic opportunities for young people to go into farming as a business.

Hawaiian Sovereignty: Voted to pass Akaka Bill three times, supporter of gathering and water rights, wants to increase federal funding to Hawaiian programs Public Education: Wants to make the superintendent of the public schools a Cabinet level position; give more power to individual schools, and focus on early education Economy: Plans to utilize federal funding to create new jobs, increase self-sustainability on food and energy, and improve transparency on government spending

Candidate’s Corner

Complete edited version and full transcript both available at kaleo.org/news.


O PINIONS 7

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR CHRIS MIKESELL OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Students bust box ban

Opinions writers wanted! Contact Chris Mikesell at opinions@kaleo.org for more information.

Our Feeding Study Needs Your Help! Meat eaters needed for 8 week study Dinner provided Mon-Fri for eight weeks on campus (est. $400 value) Study period: September 2010 - May 2011 Compensation of $210 in gift cards

You may qualify if you: regularly eat beef, are 18+ years, do not smoke tobacco, take no medications, and are in good health. For more info: call 586-3007 or email: meatfeedingstudy@crch.hawaii.edu

CHRIS MIKESELL / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Hale Noelani Assistant Residence Director and Psychology graduate student Kathleen Tran fields apartment resident concerns about package policy at a community council meeting in the Wailani Resource Center on Sept. 1. The resource center, set up in the former Wainani F lounge, houses events specifically tailored to apartment residents.

Other campus departments could learn from how Housing adapts to student feedback

through the front desk by signing the waiver form available to all other dorm residents, came as a surprise to many students.

C HRIS M IKESELL Opinions Editor

Beginning today, Hale Noelani and Hale Wainani residents can sign a waiver form at the Wailani Community Desk on the ground floor of the Noelani C building to enable the front desk to be able to accept packages from private carriers on their behalf. SHS anticipates that they will be able to begin accepting private carrier packages on September 13.

Deny students their shipping options at your own peril. That’s what 20 on-campus apartment residents took 90 minutes to communicate to their residence directors last Wednesday in an apartment community council meeting. The rule apartment residents were protesting, which stipulated that apartment residents were unable to accept any private carrier packages

DONʼT FORGE T THE FORM

The policy itself, however, is several years old. Nick Sweeton, Associate Director of Student Housing Services, confi rmed that the rule in question has been on the books since before he came into the department in 2009. It was just being enforced inconsistently until the merger of Hale Wainani and Hale Noelani into a single complex this semester. Apartment residents should give the Housing team credit – when the policy began being enforced in earnest at the beginning of the semester, Housing decided to hold last week’s feedback meeting in response to student complaints. And it only took Student Housing Services half a day to anSee Dorm shipping, next page


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR CHRIS MIKESELL OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Dorm shipping from previous page

$1 OFF ON ANY PURCHASE over $5

MANOA MARKET PLACE 2752 WOODLAWN DR. 988-4310 European Style Bakery

Not to be used with any other offers and one coupon per customer.

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING Wednesday, September 8 • 7:00 pm Ward 16 Theaters

nounce via e-mail that the policy was going to be reversed. Imagine if every department on campus were that responsive. There are, however, other lessons to be learned from last Wednesday’s meeting. What ended up being more surprising than the sudden enforcement of an existing, yet largely ignored, policy, was that student employees fielding questions from residents that night seemed helpless to do anything about it. The RAs and residence directors in attendance were just as surprised as the students. According to the residence directors fielding student concerns last week, they had only received notice of the change of enforcement a week before move-ins. Also, as student employees, they weren’t authorized to speak on behalf

of the University, yet they were being subjected to questions from students who felt – and justifiably so – that they were entitled to answers about who made the decision to stop their UPS and FedEx packages, and why. To their credit, Housing’s student representatives were at least able to articulate to residents the fact that they were able to do little to fi x the situation other than take notes and fi le a report. But that left students at the meeting feeling like it was more of a dead end than a forum for student input. Other campus departments can learn more from that community council meeting besides students’ choice of shippers. If other departments want to commit to taking student feedback seriously, they not only need to act as quickly as Housing did but they also need

to ensure that they have an offi cial voice at meetings so that students have someone that can be held accountable for getting results. Without it, students aren’t getting the entire package.

PAC K I N G T H E PAC K AG E S To accommodate the increased load of student mail, the package storage area is set to be modified between now and the launch of the new package service. Not all dorms are equal when it comes to storage space. SHS plans to increase the amount of space available for apartment resident packages by at least 500 percent, but plans are still being finalized as they make changes to the office.

DORM PACKAGE STORAGE SPACE Gateway House Hale Aloha Towers Wailani Complex

138.6 ft2

232 residents

0.6 ft2 per resident

450 ft2 (each)

260 residents

1.7 ft2 per resident

88 ft2

1174 residents

0.1 ft2 per resident

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

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Present your valid UH Student ID at the BOP Business Office after 1:30 pm Wednesday, September 8 to get your complimentary pass!

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EDITORIAL Opinions Editor Chris Mikesell Editor in Chief Will Caron Sports Editor Russell Tolentino Managing Editor Davin Aoyagi Assc Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Chief Copy Editor Ellise Akazawa Comics Editor Derick Fabien Assc Copy Editor Nichole Catlett Design Editor Sarah Wright News Editor Lynn Nakagawa Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc News Editor Jane Callahan Web Editor Brett Hinkle Features Editor Reece Farinas Video Editor Mike Brewer Assc Features Editor Alvin Park ADVERTISING Business Office parallel to the bottom entrance of the Bookstore.

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henri-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.


EDITOR DERICK FABIAN

Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010 CO M I C S @k aleo.org

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10

puzzles • classif ieds • horoscopes

Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Mangesh Sakharam Ghogre ACROSS 1 Bit of cat chat 5 Phobia

9/8/10

10 Cell signal strength indicators 14 __ mater 15 Unconventional

Horoscopes By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clements Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s birthday (9/8/10). This birthday marks a change in direction, as you understand your creative desires more fully and use both facts and passion to fulfill them. Some of your best opportunities come through social contacts, so brush off your formal attire and join the party. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most

16 Atty.-to-be’s challenge 17 Indian princess 18 Flightless birds 19 Where some descents start 20 Elite socialite 22 Place for a finance major 24 Dick and Harry’s leader? 25 __ name: computer ID 26 “__ size fits all” 27 Delivery method 31 Russian coins 33 Grinders 34 1960s Canadian prime minister Pearson 36 Pound of poetry 37 Planned attack times 38 Middle __ 42 Ironic tales’ tails 44 Sharapova of tennis 45 Low parts 48 Online investing 50 Bambi’s aunt 51 “Baseball Tonight” channel 53 Like some stocks, for short 54 Camera lens ratio 56 Bare wear 60 Wasatch Mountains ski resort 61 Body-care brand named from the Latin for “snow-white” 63 Sch. with Riverside and I rvine campuses 64 Soup vegetable 65 Stunning weapon 66 Tableland 67 __ majesty 68 Like some bars 69 Pitt in films DOWN 1 Kate of “We Are Marshall” 2 Airline to Ben-Gurion

challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 6 -- Attention shifts to financial matters. Accept an opportunity to move an investment, only if you trust the source of information. Ask a female. Taurus (April 20--May 20) -- Today is a 7 -- A female researched the material you need. Use that work to inspire your efforts. You get lucky in the process of turning obstacles to opportunities. Gemini (May 21--June 21) -- Today is a 7 -- A female provides research information that revolutionizes your work. This could include new computer programs or online resources. Think

3 Prefix with bus 4 Oxford vests 5 Moola 6 German coal valley 7 Riviera season 8 Emirate natives, mostly 9 Menu heading 10 Not at all scintillating 11 Comparable to a cucumber 12 Punk rock icon Joey 13 Inscribed slabs 21 Young ‘uns 23 Rock’s Mötley __ 25 Yet to be had 27 Revolutionary Guevara 28 “Oh yeah? __ who?” 29 Misjudge 30 Auto pioneer 32 Bit of a fairy tale trail 35 Process: Abbr. 37 Begs to differ 39 Jackie’s “O” 40 Sloth, for one 41 Price indicator 43 Hall of Fame NFL coach Ewbank 44 Dillon of “There’s Something About Mary” 45 Happen to 46 Shakers founder 47 Pan-fries 49 Prayer beads 52 Trojan War king 55 Brand 56 Computer nerd 57 “Happy birthday” writer, perhaps 58 Org. that reaches for the stars? 59 “I’m __ it’s over” 62 Brandy letters

www.kaleo.org for solutions

big. Cancer (June 22--July 22) -- Today is a 5 -- Although you have some bright ideas for the future, today you benefit from sticking to practical matters. A female suggests changes that produce fortunate results. Leo (July 23--Aug. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- You draw people closer to you now, as you overcome work obstacles easily. More opportunities open to you because you use your imagination. Think big. Virgo (Aug. 23--Sept. 22) -- Today is a 6 -- Feminine magnetism plays a huge role today. Your partner feels lucky and so should you. Flowers or chocolates

8 6

2 8 5 3 5 7 6 2 1 3 8 7 9 6 8 4 7 5 7 2 6 3 5 4

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

MEDIUM

may be called for. Give and receive. Libra (Sept. 23--Oct. 22) -- Today is a 9 -An associate poses a creative question, and you have plenty of suggestions. This changes your direction but not your intention. Scorpio (Oct. 23--Nov. 21) -- Today is a 6 -- Fortunate feedback from coworkers points you in a new direction that promises greater cooperation. Use their ideas as much as is practical. Sagittarius (Nov. 22--Dec. 21) -Today is a 6 -- Friends are divided about your sincerity. To convince them, light up your language with words that demonstrate movement. Then they get

9

# 90

your direction. Capricorn (Dec. 22--Jan. 19) -- Today is a 6 -- Some things you were taught as a child just don’t work in today’s world. A female shows you how to change your mind for the better. Empower yourself. Aquarius (Jan. 20--Feb. 18) -- Today is a 5 -- Use all your knowledge to plan a social event you’re sure will make an impact. Then enlist the help of a female who’s been there and done that. Pisces (Feb. 19--March 20) -- Today is a 7 -- A female provides research results that impact your work in a positive way. Now you have an opportunity to sway the group enthusiasm.

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$5.00 per day (up to 3 lines); $1.25 for each additional line. All caps and/or bold will add 25% to the cost of the ad. Place an ad in four (4) consecutive issues and receive the fourth ad free! In Person: Stop by the BOP Business Office. Phone: 956-7043

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www.kaleo.org

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classifieds@kaleo.org 956-9962. Include ad text, classification, run dates and charge card information. Send ad text, classification, run dates and payment to Board of Publications, Attn: Classifieds P.O. Box 11674, Honolulu, HI 96828-0674

HANG LOOSE! Learn More About Hawaiian Sovreignty

Take “Hawaiian Sovereignty in Pacific Context” (ES 455C w/ HAP, WI, O focuses)

FALL 2010 EXTENSION Sept. 17 - nov. 19 FRIDAYS 5:30PM 9:30PM

REGISTER @

www.outreach.hawaii.edu

Have a dental cleaning, check-up for dental decay & gum disease. Come in for a dental hygiene screening. UHM Dental Hygiene Clinic Hemenway Hall, Rm 200 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 8:30 - 11:30 am 1:00 - 3:30 pm


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Familiar competitors

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from page 12

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Irvine (2-3) on Thursday and San Diego State (5-1) on Friday. All matches are at 7 p.m. at the Stan Sheriff Center. Both the other schools have local connections as well. San Diego State is led by former Rainbow Wahine All-American Deitre Collins-Parker, who is in her fi rst season as the head coach of the Aztecs. Collins-Parker led Hawai‘i to two consecutive national titles in 1982 and ’83 and was one of six players named to the NCAA Women’s Volleyball 25th anniversary team in 2005. For UC Irvine, senior outside hitter Larissa Nordyke (Punahou ’07) leads the team in kills with 40. Senior outside hitter Kari Pestolesi’s parents, Tom and Diane (Sebastian), both played volleyball at UH in the 1980s under head coach Dave Shoji, who also coached the men’s team from 1978 to ’85. The Aztecs’ only loss is to Western Athletic Conference member Utah State and UC Irvine is coming off of straight set losses against Stanford and Marquette. Hawai‘i is looking to rebound from a fi ve-set loss to No. 8 USC last Sunday. The Rainbow Wahine know that they need to tighten up their play to win. “Just to give it our all every point,” said sophomore middle blocker Brittany Hewitt. “Can’t let up and (we need to) keep the energy high.” Senior libero Elizabeth Ka‘aihue is hopeful for their upcoming play. “I’m looking forward for another tournament because I know we’re getting better,” Ka‘aihue said. The ’Bows played fi ve freshmen last weekend and Shoji is still deciding whether or not to continue with his young lineup. “We’re awfully young out there,” Shoji said. “I’m not sure if we’re a top ten team if we’re playing four freshmen at the same time. So that’s the real dilemma. If we go young we could be good at the end but it won’t be pretty for a long time.”

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Freshman middle blocker Emily Hartong and junior outside hitter Kanani Danielson jump to block USC‘s Katie Fuller. Hartong is one of five freshman on the Rainbow Wahine roster.

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KA LEO O HAWAI‘I ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING Thursday, September 9 • 7:00 pm Ward 16 Theaters

JOEL KUTAKA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Free admission from page 12

percent) in the lower G and F levels, and Les Murakami Stadium with 225 seats (5.2 percent) for students. If a student attended each home baseball game at $5 per ticket (last season’s cost), the accumulated ticket cost would be over $150 for the season. With the $50 athletic fee students will save approximately $100 just on baseball games alone. Seats are first come, first served. Students will have their validated ID scanned at entrances and must have them available for reoccurring validation in student sections. “Our hope is that student attendance will rise with the convenience of being able to enter the game simply by showing valid identifi cation,” Clapp said. But there are some drawbacks.

Students are not permitted to save seats, and they will not be permitted back into the stadium if they exit. This could force students to get to games earlier than they would if they had secured a seat with a ticket, or end tailgating sooner in order to get a seat. Questions dealing with how the games might become more chaotic due to increased student attendance have also been voiced. Clapp said the concern would be addressed. “Our plans include providing additional ushers in the student seating area to assist students with locating the available seats and to address any issues,” Clapp said. “We expect that students will continue to demonstrate aloha when attending athletic events.”

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Present your valid UH Student ID at the BOP Business Office after 1:30 pm Thursday, September 9 to get your complimentary pass!

OPP ENS ENS IN TH THEA EATE TERRS SEPTEMBER 10 First come, first served. A valid UHM student ID is required--valid for Summer 2010; NO EXCEPTIONS on day of giveaway. No phone calls. One pass per person. Supplies are limited. One pass admits two.


12 S PORTS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 8, 2010

Island flavor in UH opponents

Students get in for free from Sept. 23 to end of semester Almost all University of Hawai‘i home games will be free for the rest of the fall semester to a select amount of UH Mānoa students with validated IDs. The policy goes into effect Thursday, Sept. 23, when the Rainbow Wahine volleyball team plays Utah State at the Stan Sheriff Center. “It’s for our students to benefit from a strong, visible sports program that enhances UH Mānoa’s image (and) encourages greater student participation in athletic events,” said associate athletics director Carl Clapp in an interview. On July 15, the UH Board of Regents approved a mandatory $50 student athletics fee for the Spring 2011 semester to all UH Mānoa students. With the fee, students next semester will have admission to all UH home games in the spring without having to purchase tickets. Although there was no athletics fee for Fall 2010, the rest of the semester’s free admission was implemented to see how the new system works. Free admission does not include NCA A postseason play or the Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic hosted by the men’s basketball team.

but it’s a good idea because it gives every student the same opportunities to attend games,” said junior anthropology major Andrew Rogers. Rogers also said he would attend more games this semester and next. “It’s pretty much a given now, no reason not to go with free admission,” he said. “I feel like this will be great for the athletic department. It will get more people to games which in turn will make it more fun to be at.” Senior Thomas Cosgrove said, “More students will try to attend games now that they don’t have to pay for tickets. With free admission, students who have to work and pay bills don’t have to worry about spending money on games.” And despite his opinion on how the athletics fee was passed, Seymour acknowledged some benefits. “The new policy could increase attendance as well as possibly spike UH pride among the student body,” Seymour said. Clapp noted another possible benefit. “Our student athletes appreciate the support of our students and the energy they bring to an athletic venue. Student attendance is very important in creating a home field, court advantage,” Clapp said.

STUDENT REACTIONS

HOW IT WORKS

Some students have expressed mixed feelings on the next semester’s mandatory fee. “I feel as though the school did try to keep the new fee under wraps, enacting this policy when the majority of the student body was not in school or off-island because of summer,” said Nicholas Seymour, a senior. Others see benefits. “Everyone has to pay for it,

According to Clapp, the purpose for the student athletic fee is to eliminate ticket costs for seats allocated to students to attend home contests and increase campus spirit. Aloha Stadium has reserved approximately 5,000 seats (10 percent of the stadium), the Stan Sheriff Center with 515 seats (5

JILLIAN BURMEISTER Staff Reporter

JOEL KUTAKA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior outside hitter Chanteal Satele hits the ball past USC outside hitter Katie Fuller on Sunday, Sep. 5, at the Stan Sheriff Center. The Rainbow Wahine lost the match in five sets. M ARC A R AK AKI Associate Sports Editor Junior outside hitter Chanteal Satele will see familiar faces across the net this weekend. Satele transferred to the University of Hawai‘i from Saint Mary’s College (SMC), in Moraga, Calif., last spring. On Saturday, the Rainbow Wahine will play SMC (52) in the fi nal day of the Verizon Wireless Volleyball Challenge. “We’re always excited. It’s

fun to play at the Stan Sheriff Center,” said SMC head coach Rob Browning. “ The Hawaiian fans are fantastic. They’re great supporters of their program, but they’re also gracious hosts and we like to play good teams”. Senior Kapua Kamana’o (Iolani ’07), the younger sister of former Rainbow Wahine All-American setter Kanoe Kamana’o-Kaaihue, is SMC’s setter this season. Last season, senior Megan Burton (Iolani ’06) was the school’s starting

middle blocker. “We love the connection we have with Hawai‘i,” Browning said. SMC began the season ranked No. 25, but fell out of the polls following losses to Long Beach State and UCL A. “We want to see where we measure up against the best and Hawai‘i is one of the best,” Browning said. No. 6 Hawai‘i opens with UC See Familiar competitors, page 11

See Free admission, page 11

September 8th, 2010 - Ka Leo O Hawaii  

http://files.kaleo.org/pdfs/KaLeo_2010-09-08.pdf