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A K LEO T H E

MONDAY, MAY 6 to SUNDAY, MAY 19, 2013 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 83

V O I C E

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Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Sophomore Brook Sedore.

Junior Kamilah Martin.

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Freshman Isaac Fotu.

Senior Amarens Genee.

MARC ARAKAKI / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior Paipai Falemalu.

Could UH athletics leave Division I? M ARC A R AK AKI Editor in Chief

All athletic teams at the University of Hawai‘i compete at the Division I level. In three years, “all” may turn into “none.” “If we’re not breaking even in three years, I really have to look at whether we will continue Division 1A athletics,” Chancellor Thomas Apple said. Apple is referring to the budget. According to the 2012 audited financial statements, the athletic department spent $33,505,129 while raking in $31,672,036, leaving the department in a $1,833,093 deficit. The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported that the current accumulated net deficit is $11.3 million as of January. Athletics Director Ben Jay was not surprised by Apple’s comment. “You can’t expect [the athletic department] to live and die off of the sale of tickets,” Jay said. “We have to get some additional support, or we gotta generate more revenue lines. “What [Apple]’s really talking about, and we’ve had this conversation – it’s the fact that we need to fund this athletic department the right way so that it can achieve what it needs to do. We have been perennially underbudgeting the real expenses of this department. That’s the reason why we are in the deficit. The actual budgets them-

selves haven’t been addressed, and you can’t expect it to live and die off of the sale of tickets. That’s not the way to budget.” While Jay has proposed many options to balance the budget, including reducing seat availability at Aloha Stadium for UH football games and taking a look at how it handles merchandising, Apple stressed that the funds need to come from donors.

taken that as an initiative. If moving forward, that’s something they want to do, and they want A K A to be a part of it, then yeah, we’ll do it to the best that we can.”

T R AV E L E X P E N S E S “We also have ... a burden no other athletics program in the country has, with maybe the exception of Alaska – we have to pay teams to come here and play us be-

“I will be looking for those other forms of support for athletics to really see that there are people who really do care. There’s one thing to say, ‘Go Warriors.’ It’s another to say, ‘Go Warriors – here’s my money.’”

- UH Mānoa Chancellor Thomas Apple “I will be looking for those other forms of support for athletics to really see that there are people who really do care,” Apple said. “ There’s one thing to say, ‘Go Warriors.’ It’s another to say, ‘Go Warriors – here’s my money.’” ‘Ahahui Koa Anuenue, the main fundraising organization for the athletic department, said that it will look into modifying fundraising strategies if needed. “I definitely think that A K A, if it’s tasked to do, will take a look at [trying to reach out to donors],” A K A President Vince Baldemor said. “We haven’t really

cause of the expense,” Apple said. “Our nearest road game for all of our sports is 3,000 miles away, so we have airfare and issues that none of the other athletics programs have.” More specifically, of its more than $33.5 million dollars in expenses, the athletic department spent $6,121,665 in travel and guarantees for visiting teams. “We need the public support,” Apple said. “We don’t have a culture of major gift giving to athletics. Most of the gifts to athletics have been transactional things – well, we’ll give you this check for $10,000, but we want good seats

and parking. We don’t have the million-dollar donor that most athletics departments have.”

S T U D E N T AT H L E T I C F E E

Apple also proposed the possibility of tasking students to fill the financial burden. Since spring 2011, UH M ā noa students have been paying a $50 athletic fee every fall and spring semester, which will remain the same in fall 2013. “As students, are you gonna come to the games? Are you willing to pitch in to help athletics? If in the end, this kind of threeyear window, if we don’t see support … students say we don’t wanna pay more; faculty say we don’t want money coming from academics to go to athletics; then the message I will get is that, ‘Well, it may be the only game in town, but it’s not an important one.’ Then we’ll make the decision,” Apple said.

Are you, as UH Mā noa students, willing to pay more to prevent the athletic department from dropping Division I competition? Post your answers on our Facebook page.


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NEW APP EASES TRANSIT PIERSON MACUGAY KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

A LEX BIT TER Associate News Editor A new smartphone application that tracks the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa’s Rainbow Shuttles around campus is UH’s latest effort to boost ridership on the transportation system. The application, which uses cellular networks to track the shuttles, was launched last month after UH Mānoa Commuter Services reached a contract agreement with Ride Systems, a Seattle-based company that has developed similar systems for shuttle services at other universities. “[Previously], it was difficult to use the shuttle just because if you couldn’t see it, you really didn’t

know when it was coming,” said Crysttal Atkins, UH Mānoa’s traffic demand management coordinator. “We had not had timed stops, except for the night shuttle. … That’s just too much guesswork.” Atkins added that the tracking system is the product of a larger challenge to create a strict, on-time schedule for the shuttles something that she acknowledges was “more complex” than originally thought. With the application available free for iOS and Android users via the respective app stores and to anyone with a computer at uhmshuttle.com, riders can view regularly updated locations for each of the shuttles, as well as estimated arrival times for each bus.

S AV I N G T I M E? In all, UH paid $15,960 for the app as well as the system of wireless transmitters that have been installed in the buses of the shuttle. The first year of tracking will be covered under contract with the option to renew for another two years. The Rainbow Shuttles are responsible for almost 250,000 rides each year around, to and from campus. While many of those occur between on-campus housing facilities and campus proper, Atkins said one goal that she and others have is to expand services to areas immediately around the campus. In particular, she feels that a new route to Mo‘ili‘ili is being

considered after the successful addition of the Wai‘alae route earlier this school year. Atkins attributes adequate ridership on such offcampus routes to the 43 percent of students, faculty and staff who live within a three-mile radius of UH. Despite being close to campus, Atkins said certain neighborhoods are largely forgotten by TheBus and other public transportation, thus creating an opportunity for the program to expand. “It fills a gap that the transit service doesn’t serve very well for those neighborhoods to campus,” Atkins said. Expanding the shuttles’ routes to include more off-campus destinations has been tried before. In 2006, a proposal that

originated in the ASUH Senate resulted in a pilot program that operated shuttles between UH Mānoa and Ala Moana. Ultimately, though, a lack of demand brought the routes to an end.

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Biggest UH news events COMPILED B Y CAITLIN K ELLY News Editor

STEVIE WONDER BENEFIT CONCERT CANCELLED A Stevie Wonder benefit concert for the University of Hawai‘i athletics program was cancelled on July 10, 2012, after it was discovered that the concert was booked through an unauthorized third party. Then-athletics director Jim Donovan was placed on paid administrative leave and later in a marketing position in the chancellor’s office. The State Senate committee on accountability questioned university administrators and released a report that provided several recommendations. Two men were arrested in connection with the stolen $200,000 deposit.

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Longtime Campus Security Captain Donald Dawson retired Aug. 31 after 18 years of service at UH Mānoa. Dawson worked extensively on the Sex Assault Task Force, which was established in 2006, and oversaw the implementation of the UH Alert System in 2009. On Dec. 10, 2012, CS announced that Sergeant Alberta Pukahi would be the first female CS captain. After working in CS for 25 years, Pukahi received the Top Cop award in 2011 for her work with sensitive sexual assault cases. Former CS Chief Wayne Ogino passed away on April 20, and Pukahi is also serving as acting chief until a replacement is found.

APPLE BEGINS CAMPUS-WIDE CONVERSATIONS Chancellor Thomas Apple sent out a campus-wide email on Oct. 8, 2012, asking for input on university improvements. After receiving hundreds of emails, he held the first of three campuswide conversations on Oct. 22, 2012, to discuss those concerns with students, staff and community members. The most frequent responses were those regarding facilities, campus safety, academic rigor and sustainability. More forums were also held on Nov. 19, 2012; Dec. 3, 2012; Jan. 28; Feb. 22; April 5 and April 29, with UH System President M.R.C. Greenwood making an appearance at the December forum.

GRADUATE STIPENDS INCREASED

At a Graduate Student Organization meeting on Dec. 6, 2012, Apple announced that graduate stipends would increase in fall 2013 and fall 2014 to minimums of $17,496 and $19,000, respectively. GSO was also given $75,000 to be disbursed through its grants and rewards program. The current minimum salary is about $13,000. GSO President Tom Robinson said it’s a start and that he will continue to work with Chancellor Apple.

BEN JAY NAMED ATHLETICS DIRECTOR On Dec. 7, 2012, Apple announced that Ben Jay would succeed Donovan as athletics director. Jay is a former Ohio State executive associate athletics director for finance and operations and managed an operating budget of more than $100 million. Jay began work on Jan. 14. Donovan has since accepted an AD position at California State University-Fullerton.

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of the 2012-2013 year BILLS INTRODUCED TO CURB UH AUTONOMY State Sen. Donna Mercado-Kim introduced six bills that would put new limits on the University of Hawai‘i President and Board of Regents. The bills stemmed from recommendations from the Senate’s Special Committee on Accountability in the midst of the “Wonder Blunder.” If passed, the bills would reduce the power of top administrators. One measure would strip Greenwood of her power as chief procurement officer for construction contracts at the university, while another would require the BOR to undergo annual training on policies.

Congratulations UH Graduates!

LETTING GO OF RAINBOWS On Feb. 13, Jay announced that all University of Hawai‘i men’s sports teams would be known as the Warriors and all women’s sports teams would be known as the Rainbow Wahine. The decision to eliminate the “Rainbow” nickname from men’s sports is effective July 1. Jay explained that from a branding and marketing standpoint, UH sports teams needed to cut down on the number of names they have. He also said that uniform colors would be changed to green and white to promote consistency.

BOR PASSES SEN. INOUYE TRIBUTE On Feb. 21, the Board of Regents approved a package to name four entities in the UH system in honor of the late Sen. Daniel Inouye. The entities include UH Mānoa’s The Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), UH Hilo’s The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, UH Maui College’s The Daniel K. Inouye Allied Health Center and Kauai Community College’s The Daniel K. Inouye Electronics Technology Building. Inouye passed away on Dec. 17, 2012, after being elected to represent Hawai‘i in the U.S. Senate in 1962.

Best of luck in your future endeavors!

MIZUSAWA WINS SECOND ASUH PRESIDENT TERM ASUH President Richard Mizusawa won the race for a second term in office on April 17. Mizusawa received 63 percent of the vote, while New Leadership Slate candidate Ian Ross came in second with 31 percent and former ASUH Sen. Ryan Mandado received 6 percent. Vice President Francesca Koethe also won a second term with 64 percent of the vote, while NLS candidate Carter Koch trailed behind at 36 percent. Secretary Emily Murai received 70 percent of the vote as opposed to NLS candidate Megan Wharton’s 30 percent.

MOORE HALL BURGLARIES Moore Hall was burglarized twice in a one-week period. On the morning of April 19, it was reported that seven offices were broken into and six computers were taken. Two more computers were stolen on the night of April 23. Pukahi explained that a guard has been contracted to secure Moore Hall at night and that security measures such as security cameras in strategic locations and increased training of officers are in the works.

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Monday, May 6 2013

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Fast brain food for finals fuel GARLIC SOY B E AN S

WALNUT BANANA BRE AD

NOELLE F UJII Staff Writer

Garlic soybeans are an easy and healthy snack to make. Due to their simplicity, these are great to make if you’re living in the dorms and have access to limited resources. According to nutraingredients-usa.com, the peptides found in soybeans can improve brain circulation. Soybeans are also low in carbohydrates, so they won’t make you feel tired, and the garlic adds a little spice and savory flavor to the dish. INGREDIENTS: 1 16-oz bag of frozen pre-cooked soybeans 1 Tbsp vegetable oil

2 tsp sea salt 1 garlic clove AV L

DIRECTIONS: 1. Rinse the soybeans in warm water. 2. Pour the vegetable oil in a medium-sized pan and heat. 3. Add in the soybeans. 4. Stir around the soybeans until they have almost thawed for about 10 to 15 minutes. 5. Mince the garlic to desired size. Add them to the soybeans and let them cook. 6. Once the garlic is a dark golden brown, add in sea salt while the soybeans are still cooking. This will allow the beans to soak up the flavor. The amount of sea salt you add depends on how salty you want the beans to be. 7. Once the soybeans are thawed, take the pan off the stove, add more sea salt if you wish and let them cool.

NOELLE FUJII / KA LEO L HAWAI‘I

XYZ

/ FL

ICK

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K ELLY SLOAN Staff Writer

Take a break from the books and bake some comfort food. Banana bread will give you energy to stay awake all night. This recipe contains walnuts, which are said to be brain food, and only takes about an hour to make. INGREDIENTS: ½ cup sugar ½ cup brown sugar 1/3 cup canola oil or vegetable oil 1 cup mashed ripe banana (about 3 medium-sized bananas) 2 eggs

1 ½ tsp vanilla extract 1 cup walnuts, in halves or large pieces 1 cup whole-wheat flour ½ cup all-purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp baking powder

DIRECTIONS: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease and flour a 9x5-inch loaf pan. 2. In a large bowl, combine sugar, brown sugar and oil. Blend with a fork or whisk until smooth. Add mashed banana, eggs and vanilla, and stir or whisk again until completely mixed. Stir in the walnuts. Set aside. 3. In a separate bowl, combine the whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking soda, salt and baking powder and mix well. Slowly add to the banana mixture and stir just until the wet and dry ingredients are thoroughly combined, with no streaks of unblended flour. 4. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and spread evenly. Bake about 1 hour. To test if it is done, take a wooden skewer or sharp knife and insert it into the center of the loaf. If done, the skewer or knife should come out clean, or with just a few moist crumbs on it, but no raw batter. If necessary, bake about five minutes longer. 5. Remove from the oven and cool in the pan for about 15 minutes, then turn the loaf out and onto a rack to cool to room temperature.


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Study buddies: more harm than good? SAR AH NISHIOK A Opinions Editor There are many ways to learn new material, and partnering with another person may be one of them. In addition to the social benefits of studying with a friend or classmate, there may be legitimate educational gains to be had. Before you start scheduling study dates, however, think carefully about whether a study buddy is right for you.

P RO S Out of politeness to your study partners, you might feel pressured to stay on top of your work and not procrastinate so that you won’t drag them down or waste their time. For people

who have a hard time focusing, this may be the reason to get a homework partner. Being obligated to be quiet and not distract others may be what you need to stay on task. Additional people mean additional explanations. If you do not understand part of the course material, you will be able to ask your buddy or work through the problem as a team. Having company is good for morale. Working with another person can also reduce stress levels from isolation. Quizzing yourself is hard, but having another person ask you questions is much easier. While you are on your own, it is tempting to “cheat” and read your notes instead of memoriz-

ing, but having someone else there will keep you accountable and serious about studying. Two-person study groups are easy to keep track of and do not require a huge study space. Three-person groups are still small enough to work with but large enough to start dividing research or note-taking work.

CONS Two slackers don’t make a great student. Studying with friends is fun but not always productive. Inviting a classmate that you are friendly but not friends with is a good way to balance your group and prevent ridiculous wastes of time. Nominate one of your buddies to keep everyone on task, or make a schedule that everyone agrees to follow.

Not every study buddy is a great tutor. Some people may understand the material well, but can have a hard time explaining it to anyone who isn’t the professor. If you are expecting help with understanding content, ask a classmate who pays attention in class – the friend who sits next to you and talks all class may not be the best source of information. Even the best of friends may be study enemies. Even if you get along in social settings, people can have incompatible study habits. If you like to listen to music but your friend likes a quiet room or your friend studies in their underwear and that makes you uncomfortable, you should find a different study buddy.

ILLUSTRATION BY NICHOLAS SMITH / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Campus Center the Center of Campus

GRADUATING STUDENT LEADERS SHARE THEIR INSIGHTS ON LEADERSHIP SUCCESS As summer approaches, the school prepares to send off graduates into the real world. We asked our graduating seniors to share a few words of wisdom before leaving. What is an important thing you learned from being a part of the Campus Center Board? “An important thing I learned from being a part of Campus Center Board is time management and multi-tasking. Planning events requires a lot of coordination and the ability to handle different tasks at once.” –David Doucette, CCB Activities Council Member What do you recommend to other students concerning involvement on campus? “The enrichment you receive from being involved outside of the “classroom” is far more rewarding and valuable then what you learn within your classes. … [T]he college experience is all about learning who you are and what you love to do.” –Alycia Kiyabu, CCB Member What is your most memorable moment during your time spent on the board? “Leading the Mānoa Laughs event this past Fall semester… I had to work extremely hard to hype up the event, and bring in a comedian that I knew would have a great appeal to UH Mānoa students.” – Mitchell Sakuda, CCB Activities Council Member Do you wish you joined earlier? If yes, why? “I joined as a sophomore and was able to enjoy 3 great years with the board. My first year as a freshmen was really a chance for me to explore and find where I could flourish and grow.” - Michelle Tagorda, CCB President

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11

Study on a schedule Saturday 9:00am 10:30am 11:30-11:45 12:30pm 1:00pm 2:00-2:15 3:00pm 3:30pm 4:45-5:00 6:30pm 7:45pm 10:00pm 10:30 12:00am

wake up, breakfast study chemistry break lunch study chemistry break snack study sociology break dinner gym shower study chemistry sleep

NICOLYN CHARLOT Associate Features Editor Finals are coming up, and that means intimidating amounts of studying. Before you rip open your books and flip to random pages in a frantic attempt to learn a semester’s worth of material in a single night, slow down and consider writing a study schedule. Here are a few steps to help you start the process.

G E T A B L A N K C A L E N DA R OF FINALS WEEK Figure out when your finals are. You can determine when each final will be by looking at your syllabi or by visiting manoa.hawaii.edu/records/ final_exam/spring_2013.html. There’s no point in only studying for chemistry on Sunday night if you have biology and math on Mon-

day. Add the dates and times of your finals to the calendar. Write down any other important dates on the calendar that you cannot miss (sports events, etc.). This way you will be able to clearly see all the time slots available for studying. Write down events that may seem obvious, such as meals, showering and sleeping. If you forget to take the little stuff into account, you’ll wind up with less time to study than you thought. Rank how difficult or easy your classes are, so you know which ones you will need to study for longer, especially if you have more than one on a single day. Take these difficulty levels into account when making your schedule or you might waste time studying for your easiest exam. Try to give yourself time to study for a final at least two days before you have to take it. Cramming five minutes before the test will not help you learn anything; if you have

a little more time, you’ll be able to absorb more information. Create short blocks of time for studying. Don’t say you’ll spend five hours on history because that isn’t going to happen with all the wonderful things on the Internet out there. Instead, say you’ll spend half an hour to an hour on history, then take a half hour break, then start on something new for another half hour to an hour. Study breaks are important, and they should be included in your schedule so you don’t forget them. Schedule some fun time besides short study breaks. If you spend 12 hours studying the day before a final, even if you get enough sleep, you will be completely burned out when you sit down to take it. Spend a lot of time studying, but don’t spend all of it studying. Knowledge is important, but so is sanity. Stick to the schedule. It may seem tedious and annoying, but it will help you. It is only for one week, after all – until next semester.

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12 Reduce stress during finals K ELLY SLOAN Staff Writer Before you start studying, try these tips to help relax and organize your train of thought. They will help you feel more organized, confident and energized to be successful during fi nals.

Fun ways to study

Studying is a requirement, but it doesn’t have to be a chore. Giving yourself an incentive to study other than getting a good grade can increase your productivity. It may be too late in the semester to develop good long-term study habits, but these tips might help organize your cram sessions for finals week.

READING

Place a gummy bear or some other piece of candy on every few paragraphs in your textbook, and do not eat them until you have read all the text up to that point. Healthy foods like fruits or vegetables also work, as long as whatever you pick is a genuine treat. Alternatively, offer to pay yourself a nickel or some other small amount for every page of a book you read; after 60 pages, you’d “earn” $3 to buy a treat like a Starbucks drink or some junk food. Don’t offer yourself something that takes time, like a TV show episode or a movie, as you will quickly lose track of how much time you have left to do your reading, and you may not fi nish it.

WRITING If you’re a cat lover, then Written? Kitten! is for you. This website, located at writtenkit-

ten.net, will show you a new picture of a kitten after every 100, 200, 500 or 1000 words you type in the box. Remember to enable cookies in your browser, in case you forget to save your essay in another document. Write or Die is the exact opposite of a fun way to study and works by gently reminding you to continue writing if you stop for a certain period of time. If you continue to slack off, it can play annoying sound effects or even delete the work you have just done. All of your punishments are customizable for optimal annoyance and effectiveness. The iPad version of this app is free, but the Adobe AIR version, which can be installed on almost any computer, costs $10 at writeordie.com/buy.

Yoga is practiced for better physical, mental and spiritual health. When you feel your mind is full of clutter, and you aren’t getting anywhere while studying, yoga will recharge your batteries. Yoga includes various forms of breathing and meditation techniques that can help “restart” your thinking process. Also, yoga is a great form of exercise that can help release stress. Look up quick videos on YouTube and get started.

E X E RC I S E In a time of stress and frustration, exercising to relieve tension is best to make you feel happy and motivated. Exercise increases the

FOOD

What you eat and drink is one of the most important factors to successful studying during finals. Without a good source of carbohydrates and protein, your brain can’t function at its greatest potential, and you may experience low blood sugar or become moody. Eat a proper breakfast the morning of your exams for a boost of energy to start your day. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water.

POSITIVITY

Your mind is going through a lot of work and absorbing a bunch of information that can sometimes take a negative toll on your mental and physical health. Think positive. When you are constantly thinking about how much you have to study and all of the work you haven’t done, you will stress out more. Organize your study material and set a study schedule.

REVIEWING L ook at your f lashcards, read through your notes for an hour, then do something else: set a timer for 15 minutes and take a walk, a nap or stop to eat something while the information settles in, and then quiz yourself on the material you have reviewed. If you cannot remember an answer within five seconds of asking yourself a question, study that material carefully and take another short break. A fter you’re finished reviewing for the day, go to sleep – don’t distract your brain with video games or movies.

LULULEMON ATHLETICA/FLICKR

SAR AH NISHIOK A Opinions Editor

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

YO GA

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Page 14 | Ka Leo | Monday, May 6 2013

Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager

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15 Late night study munchies A RIEL R AMOS Special Issues Editor With finals upon us, it can be easy to forget to eat until it’s late and most places are closed. Check out these nearby campus eateries or make these smoothie recipes for some fuel to keep on studying.

PHO KITCHEN

E N E RGY- BOOS T I N G SMOOT H I E This smoothie combines chocolate and nut butter to revitalize your body. Feel free to use whatever nut butter you want – even Nutella works well. Nut butters are high in protein, nutrients and unsaturated fats. Most are also low in carbs and trans fatty acids while containing no gluten or dairy.

INGREDIENTS:

Located right next to Café Kaila, Pho Kitchen is often overlooked. But, it serves up some of the best pho on the island, with add-ins from vegetable, beef, chicken and seafood broths to brisket, tendons, shrimp, tofu, beef tongue, beef balls, crab balls, kim chee and wonton. This place is known for its pho, so skip the rice plates. The best part is that you get a huge bowl for less than $10.

2 Tbsp cocoa powder 2 Tbsp of your choice of nut butter 1 ripe banana 8 oz non-fat vanilla Greek yogurt 4-6 ice cubes Sprinkle of cinnamon TIP: Sprinkle cinnamon on the top for extra spice.

BANANA G I N GE R E N E RGY S HAKE

Address: 2919 Kapi‘olani Blvd. Hours: Mon-Sun 10 a.m.–11 p.m. Contact: 808-735-8488

Bananas are naturally fat and cholesterol free, high in potassium, good for nutrient absorption and a source of Vitamin C, Vitamin B-6, manganese and fiber. Besides boosting your immune system, ginger aids with digestion and nausea and is known to help reduce flatulence, inflammatory issues and congestion.

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SHABU SHABU KING

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Shabu Shabu K ing offers more than 14 broth selections, including shoyu broth, mixed mushroom, sake, healthy herb and tonkotsu broth, all from $5.95 to $10.95. You choose vegetables and meats and pay per plate, which range from $2 to $5. It also has a special deal where you can get a free appe tizer and free dessert. Address: 2700 S King St. Hours: Mon-Thu 4 p.m.-12 a.m.; Fri-Sat 4 p.m.-1 a.m. Contact: 808-951-7878

S U S H I B I S T RO S H U N

INGREDIENTS: 1 cup milk of your choice 1 ripe banana ½ cup yogurt ¼ tsp fresh ginger, peeled and grated 4-6 ice cubes

PUCK777/FLICKR

TIP: Add two tablespoons of honey or syrup for added sweetness if needed.

B R A I N - BOO S T I N G SMOOT H I E Bananas are high in antioxidants, dopamine and serotonin. Dopamine aids in memory retention and focus, while serotonin lifts mood and helps to control appetite, memory and learning. The blue pigments in blueberries contain anthocyanins that increase brain function. Both fruits assist in protecting the brain from stress as well. Apple juice defends memory and brain health by preventing the loss of an important neurotransmitter called acetylcholine.

Hidden away in an alley-like location, Sushi Bistro Shun can be easy to miss. Inside the small restaurant, there are wooden tables and benches, a sushi bar and an alcohol bar. The seafood is fresh and tasty, and the allyou-can-eat sukiyaki for $25 a person is a great deal considering the quality of the meats and vegetables. The staff is friendly and attentive, always refilling drinks and checking up on you. Address: 1914 S King St. Hours: Tue-Sat 5:30 p.m.-12 a.m.; Sun 5:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Contact: 808-941-1333

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INGREDIENTS: 1 ripe banana ¼ cup blueberries ½ cup apple juice

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TIP: Use a frozen banana and or frozen blueberries to give yourself an icy treat.

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Page 16 | Ka Leo | Monday, May 6 2013

Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager

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17

Finals fashion SAMANTHA BAUMGARTNER Staff Writer Given the many stresses of fi nals week, wardrobe should not be on the list. Here are some tips and looks to stay comfortable and fashionable for this fi nals week.

LADIES

GENTS

Opt for something that can keep you comfortable like yoga pants or Soffe shorts. These options are great because they come in an array of colors and can be easily matched with shoes and a shirt. Wear slip-on shoes like Sperry’s or Toms. Use minimal make-up and put your hair in a ponytail: Summer is quickly approaching, and things are warming up.

A good board-short or any type of breathable leg-wear is perfect for moving from class to class quickly. Although it is acceptable outside to go shirtless, try to keep the shirts on for this week, then head off to the beach. A good choice to keep cool without taking the shirt off is a fun tank top, like one from Billabong’s Andy Davis line.

CHASEN DAVIS/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Ejay Tumacder Computer engineering

BOSUSF/ FLICKR

Student University of San Francisco

Dress to impress at your interview K ARISSA MONTANIA Staff Writer When preparing for an interview, you want to make an impression with your resume and your appearance. Here are a few tips on dressing the part for a job interview.

TOPS Keeping tops conservative and appropriate are key for creating a successful interview outfit. Blouses with buttons or collars are conservative and comfortable. For men, choose long-sleeved dress shirts and be sure to iron them, as you don’t want to show up with wrinkles. Both men and women should keep the colors of your tops neutral, as you don’t want bright neon colors to distract the interviewer from what you are saying. CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Tess Carson Biology

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Jarren Soong Hawaiian Studies

Remember, the key to fi nals week is to stay calm and collected. Do not restrict yourself with tight clothing, and you’ll be good to go on any test. Good luck, and have a safe summer.

B O T T OM S It’s best to keep your bottoms as modest and conservative as possible. For women, choose knee-length pencil skirts or dressy pants that fall to the heel. When wearing a pencil skirt, you want to make sure the proportions of your outfit are balanced, so pair the skirt

with a shirt that can be tucked in at the waist-line and doesn’t fall over. Pants are best paired with blazers and blouses for the outfit to appear structured. Skirts don’t have to be neutral if the tops are neutral, but don’t wear neon colors. A maroon red or burgundy purple would be a nice color for a skirt with the neutral top. For men, pants or suits are the right option for looking well-dressed and business savvy. Men and women’s pants should be kept black, navy or gray to be cohesive with the entire outfit.

S H O E S A N D AC C E S S O R I E S To capture the attention of the interviewer, choose a fun pair of shoes to wear to your interview or a statement necklace. The shoes you wear should be subtle heels or flats for women and dress shoes for men – intriguing print or colors will give your outfit personality. Handbags for women should be structured and large enough to carry your resume and portfolio. The same applies to men, so bring a briefcase with a cool touch such as buckles. Women and men’s belts can be worn as a statement piece rather than in a practical way. Colors such as silver or black are always good options that don’t take away from the ensemble.


18

Summer movies to look out for

JOSEPH H AN Associate Chief Copy Editor

ʻ T H E H A N G OV E R PA R T I I I ʼ (M AY 24)

ZADE ROSENTHAL/PARAMOUNT PICTURES/MCT

ʻS TA R T R E K I N T O DA R K N E S S ʼ (M AY 17 ) J.J. Abrams has another “Star Trek” movie to release before moving on to “Star Wars.” Captain Kirk (Chris Pine), Spock (Zachary Quinto) and the rest of the Enterprise crew must confront the crisis coming from a subversive and chaotic force within their own organization. Kirk must chase the still unnamed villain (Benedict Cumberbatch) and protect his crew against further destruction.

The Wolfpack returns – Phil (Bradley Cooper), Stu (Ed Helms) and Alan (Zach Galifianakis) – in what looks like a redemption from the previous film in this final installment. On their way to accompany Alan to rehab, the gang runs into a big bad played by John Goodman, who holds Doug hostage ( Justin Bartha) until they can find the wild Mr. Chow (Ken Jeong).

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ʻM A N O F S T E E Lʼ (J U N E 14) Zack Snyder helms the latest – and from the recent trailer, the most promising – Superman reiteration from the help of Christopher Nolan and screenwriter David S. Goyer. “Man of Steel” explores Superman’s (Henry Cavill) origins from Krypton and Smallville and how he must confront his identity, having the responsibility to be more than a man, especially when General Zod (Michael Shannon) arrives to capture him. This just may be the most anticipated film of the year.

Based on the 2006 novel written by Max Brooks (don’t expect a faithful adaptation onto the silver screen), a zombie pandemic threatens the fate of the world, and it seems like only United Nations employee Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) can help stop it. Expect hoards of fast-paced action, global decimation and a lot of running undead. This will not be your typical zombie film.

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PAC I F I C R I M (J U LY 12) Guillermo del Toro returns with large-scale fi ghts between giant monsters and Jaegers, massive robots controlled by two pilots that were created to combat these forces of mayhem. Mankind faces the threat of apocalypse unless former pilot Raleigh Becket (Charlie Hunnam) and Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi) can team up to protect the world with their last line of defense in a colossal showdown. Michael Bay, step aside.


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How to write a resume and cover letter CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor Creating a resume and cover letter is a craft. It’s not easy, takes time and involves constant tweaking and improvement over time. Follow this simple template and the accompanying tips for an effective resume and cover letter that will catch an employer or hirer’s eye, and get their stamp of approval.

When using bullet points and phrases as opposed to sentences, do not add a period to the end Make your headings clear. Hirers spend less than 10 seconds on your resume, and their eyes go straight to your education and work experience. Make it easy for them to find it. If your major GPA is higher than your cumulative, list each separately. Use block format when formatting your letter. As much as possible, address your letter to a person. Never use “To whom it may concern.” If no name is given, address it to the company’s human resource manager.

Make sure your name stands out on the page. Bold it and make it a few font sizes larger. Be sure that your email address is appropriate. It’s probably best to use your UH email address. When listing multiple colleges that you’ve attended or jobs that you’ve held, put them in reverse chronological order. If you have held a lot of jobs, only include the ones that are most relevant or the ones that you have stayed at the longest. Be sure that the organization is at least somewhat related to the job you are applying for. Listing that you were the party planner for the Frisbee Club won’t score you any points.

GENERAL RESUME AN D COVER LET TER-WR ITI N G TI PS: A resume and cover letter should never exceed a page. If you find that you have too much content, keep what is most relevant and valuable. Be concise and leave white space; too much text deters the reader. There is no set format for a resume or cover letter. Find the one that fits your needs the best, and don’t be afraid to tweak it further. Always have two people read through your resume and cover letter. They will catch errors that you’ve missed and may offer insight into things you haven’t considered. If you’re handing in a print copy of your resume and cover letter, print it on resume paper and make sure that the watermark is facing the right way. If you are emailing it, save the documents in PDF format and name it appropriately.


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22

What employers look for CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor It’s a tough market out there – so instead of blindly applying for jobs and hoping for the best, arm yourself with knowledge of what employers look for in their prospective employees and mold yourself to fit that standard. Every employer is different, but here are a few things that everyone wants, and you should make sure to have.

LONG -TERM POTENTIAL Training employees consumes both time and money. A new employee is a huge investment, and an employer can only hope that you make up for this investment and then some by becoming a productive contributor. If you make it clear that you are not looking to stay with this job for an extended period of time, don’t expect to get hired.

A G O O D G PA

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E F F E C T I V E C OM MU N I C AT I O N Communication skills, both spoken and written, are one of the most coveted by employers seeking new hires. Ef fective communication is needed when dealing with anyone – from customers and clients to suppliers, fellow employees and superiors – especially because the workforce is so diversif ied. Being able to clearly convey information and thoughts to many dif ferent people through dif ferent media is a necessit y.

C U LT U R A L M AT C H Cultural match is a deciding factor for many employers. They must evaluate whether you fit into their company culture and how well you will mix and work with their current employees as well as themselves. From an employer’s perspective, they can spend 40 hours or more a week with whomever they hire, so it really comes down to whether the employer likes you as a person and can see themselves spending that much time with you.

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i News Editor R E L E VA N T WO R K O R E X T R AC U R R I C U L A R S

You may have heard that having a college de gree on your resume – re gardless of your GPA – is all that matters, but this isn’t true. W hile a GPA doesn’t say ever y thing, it reveals a lot about a person’s work ethic and commitment to qualit y work and per formance. Employers look for candidates with high GPAs because it means that they are willing to work hard to achieve that distinction and that they probably know their stuf f better.

It’s hard to stand out among a stack of other resumes that have roughly similar GPAs. This is where work experience, internships and clubs – particularly those related to your major or career field – can distinguish you from the rest. Employers look for a person involved in these types of things because it shows that you’re already exposed to your intended career field, that you are self-motivated to engage yourself in extra activities and that you can manage your time between these obligations and school.

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Page 24 | Ka Leo | Monday, May 6 2013

Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager

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25 Graduate school timeline PAIGE TAKEYA Managing Editor

DEBORAH MANOG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Not sure when you should be starting your grad school prep? If you’re planning on going to a graduate program at the University of Hawai‘i, refer to this timeline so you can ensure you never miss a deadline.

JUNE-AUGUST

Is grad school for you? PAIGE TAKEYA Managing Editor

A bachelor’s degree is already a form of higher education – but going for a master’s degree or a doctorate is taking things a step further. Tacking on an extra two to six years onto your academic career is no light decision. Here are some of the pros and cons of graduate school to help guide you.

P RO : YO U W I L L B E I N T E L L E C T UA L LY S T I MU L AT E D.

In high school, your teachers tell you that only the cream of the crop get into college. Depending on how rigorous admissions standards are at your school, this may be true, though you’ll likely have concluded by now your peers come from a large scale of intellects. But a good graduate school will admit only the best of the best. If you apply to and get into a prestigious program, you can rest assured that your peers are there for a reason, and you can expect to have to maintain your A-game to remain near the top of the class. If you seek constant academic and intellectual stimulation, a graduate environment will be great for you.

C O N : S O MU C H WO R K Whether graduate courses are inherently more difficult than undergraduate work is debatable. If you’ve gotten into

grad school, after all, then you’re already producing top-notch essays and research. But what grad school does have is rigor. It is common for grad classes to assign hundreds of pages to be read in a week – the same level and degree of reading that you would have a semester to do as an undergrad. You will be expected, also, to come to class having prepped fully for each lesson, and bluffing your way through things may not be feasible. If you’re trying to balance being a student with a full-time job, then your life will be that much harder. Exceptions and extensions may be more difficult to come by at this level.

P RO : H I G H E R D E G R E E S E Q UA L H I G H E R PAY Generally speaking, having a master’s degree or a doctorate means that future employers will pay you more for your expertise. You will enter the job market with an advantage over those who only have bachelor’s degrees or high-school diplomas. For example, if you plan on becoming a public school teacher in Hawai‘i, your starting pay will be $42,509, assuming you have a bachelor’s degree and completed a state-approved teacher education program. But if you have a master’s, you can make $45,909, and a doctorate will net you a starting salary of $54,741.

Look at potential programs and evaluate their admissions requirements and tuition. Evaluate your life and whether this is something you want to do. Even if you’re not sure, take your standardized tests now – like the GRE and the LSAT – so your scores will be in early, just in case.

C O N : A P O S S I B LY WO R T H L E S S I N V E S TM E N T The key to earning more money is being able to find a job. While the job climate has improved since the height of the recession, there is still a high chance you might not find employment. If you received a degree in a particularly obscure field, your chances might decrease even further. There just isn’t a huge market out there for ancient Greek Ph.D. students. While you may love the subject you study, it is key to make sure that other people have use for your skill set. Over-qualifi cation might also harm you if you try to get jobs that have less stringent admission standards. If the job only requires a high school diploma, and you come in with a Ph.D., you just might not be hired.

SEPTEMBER Determine which program you will apply to. Make plans to retake your tests if your scores are low.

OCTOBER Start prepping your required documents. Ask your professors for letters of recommendation before the rush hits. Begin drafting a statement of objectives (if required).

NOVEMBER Take care of paperwork now: Turn in your Graduate Admissions Application to the Graduate Division, arrange for your transcripts to be sent and pay your $100 application fee.

P RO : YO U M I G H T O N LY H AV E C L A S S O N C E A W E E K Seminar courses tend to meet only once a week, leaving you more time to unwind and get your work done on the other six days.

DECEMBER Collect your letters of rec and finalize your admissions essays. Edit everything until it’s flawless.

C O N : C L A S S I S U S UA L LY AT LEAST 2.5 HOURS Less frequency equals more intensity. Fifty-minute classes fly by, but a class three times that length takes its time. If you take a night class, you might also learn how easy it is to start drifting off at 8 p.m. during a particularly titillating lecture.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY Turn in your program application and wait. The good news will probably come in March or April.


26

A Work at K LEO PAIGE TAKEYA Managing Editor

There’s no need to head far from campus if you’re looking for summer work – Ka Leo needs you. As the student-run campus newspaper and second largest publication on O‘ahu, we offer a variety of opportunities for students, ranging from writing, editing, photography and design positions to advertising and public relations experiences. Students who have worked at Ka Leo have gone on to nab internships and jobs at Honolulu Magazine, Hawai‘i News Now, Midweek, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and much more. Real-life experience aside, you get to hang out with the coolest people on campus and join a family away from home. Signing up is as easy as heading over to kaleo.org/jobs and filling out an application. If you have questions, email editor@kaleo.org or advertising@kaleo.org. You can also come to Hemenway 107 and fill out an application in person. This may be our last spring issue, but we’ll be back again in the first summer session – and we hope that you will be here with us. Still not convinced Ka Leo is right for you? Here are some testimonials from current staffers as to what Ka Leo has done for them.

I’m the farthest thing from a journalism major, but ... Ka Leo has given me leadership experience that I couldn’t have gotten otherwise. I’ve been able to work with people from ... different majors, whether it be English or sociology ... and it gets you ready to work in the real world while making some good friends.

[The best part is] getting your clips. It’s a very professional environment. It gives you a lot of opportunity that you wouldn’t have anywhere else, a lot of … creative freedom, and the people you work with are just super open and understanding.

Joey Ramirez Sports Editor

Caitlin Kuroda Features Editor

It’s real experience. You get to deal with real deadlines … Your expectations are real. You’re supposed to act professionally, and I think it’s good preparation.”

It’s very relaxed here, it’s friendly. It’s a good working environment for both sides. Everyone keeps you on track, lets you know what you can improve on. You also get to know a lot of people. … You get to know the whole inside of what’s going on here, too.

Nicholas Garrett Advertising Graphic Designer

Shawntrelle Sookla Administrative Support

After working at Ka Leo for three years, the best thing has been the people I’ve been able to meet and the experience ... especially the opportunity to be able to lead. It’s definitely been a learning experience, and it’s revealed … what I can do and what I need to work on. Overall, I’m thankful for the opportunities, the people and Jay Hartwell.

Nik Seu Photo Editor

S CA N T H I S Q R C O D E TO FI LL O U T O U R O N LI N E AP P LI CAT I O N . PHOTOS BY CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

As an account executive, I interact … and work with businesses outside of school. I work with sometimes big companies, sometimes local companies, and you get to meet different kinds of people in business. … It’s interesting to see how to get over objectives, how to create a marketing plan, to help businesses reach out to students and get more people coming to their restaurants, stores.

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Top 10 moments in UH sports COMPILED

BY

JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor

ALL PHOTOS FILE PHOTOS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

1) Rainbow Wahine water polo wins Big West (4/28/2013)

6) Ben Jay hired as athletics director (12/7/2012)

Having already won the school’s first regular season conference title, the ‘Bows also took home the Big West Tournament crown with an unforgettable 5-4 double overtime victory against No. 6 UC Irvine. Senior attacker Monika Eggens paved the way for UH with four goals, including the game-winner with 44 seconds left in the extra period.

Following the departure of Jim Donovan, UH Chancellor Tom Apple appointed Ohio State’s Ben Jay as athletics director. Jay’s tenure has been highlighted by his call for upgraded athletic facilities and the controversial decision to standardize all men’s team names to “Warriors” beginning in July.

2) Parnaby breaks UH win record (4/19/2013) Senior pitcher Kaia Parnaby surpassed Melissa Coogan’s school record with her 33rd victory of the season against Cal Poly. The Australian limited CP to four hits, no walks and one run, while striking out six. Parnaby currently leads the nation with 35 wins.

7) Rainbow baseball stuns No. 3 Cal State Fullerton (4/26/2013) After going 1-10 in its past 11 games, Hawai‘i pulled off the biggest upset of the year when it took down the thirdranked Titans 4-3. Junior shortstop Austin Wobrock provided an improbable game-winning RBI as his check swing in the eighth inning accidentally made contact with the ball and brought home junior right fielder Conner George.

3) Rainbow Wahine volleyball completes perfect Big West season (11/23/2012)

8) Warrior volleyball claws its way into playoffs (4/13/2013)

Led by first team All-American Emily Hartong (13 kills), the ‘Bows swept UC Riverside to conclude their fourth consecutive undefeated conference season. The 2012 Senior Night was capped off with a marriage proposal to defensive specialist Emily Maeda, who was the sole honoree and had eight digs.

With its season on the line at UC San Diego, Hawai‘i did not disappoint as it earned a postseason bid with a five-set thriller led by sophomore outside hitter Brook Sedore’s careerhigh 31 kills. The Warriors almost pulled an even bigger shocker in the MPSF Tournament as they fell in five sets to No. 1 BYU.

4) Rainbow Wahine basketball reaches postseason (3/18/2013)

9) Rainbow Warrior basketball wins at the buzzer (1/3/2013)

After a decade-long postseason drought, the Hawai‘i women’s basketball team was invited to the WNIT after posting a 17-13 record and going 13-5 in the Big West Conference. Three days later, the ‘Bows fell in the first round 61-49 at San Diego.

After Cal State Fullerton’s D.J. Seeley tied the score at 88 with six seconds left, the ‘Bows turned to junior guard Garrett Jefferson, who ran the length of the court and got off a floating jumper as time expired to take down the Titans.

5) Rainbow sailing competes in National Semis (4/28/2013)

10) Warrior football finishes on a high note (12/1/2012)

The UH coed sailing team partook in the ICSA National Semifinals for the first time since 2010. The ‘Bows reached 269 points in the Western Division, which fell 38 short of qualifying for the National Championship Finals.

Despite beginning its 2012 campaign 1-9, Hawai‘i was able to win its final two games, culminating in the season finale against South Alabama. The Warriors outgained the Jaguars 410-166 in total yardage en route to the 23-7 victory.


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30 Hawai‘i is making its fourth trip to the NCAA Championships. It finished fourth in its previous three trips. VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

‘Bows set sights on National Championship JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor

After playing 30 matches this season, only three more lie between the Rainbow Wahine water polo team and a national championship. However, seven of the country’s best teams await the ‘Bows in Boston, and each one will show no mercy the moment play starts in the NCAA Championships. “ There’s always gonna be those initial nerves, even for me as a coach,” head coach Maureen Cole said. “We just had them do as they did this past weekend and really focus on all the individual little things along the way, and not really think about the big picture. Because if you think about each moment, it’s not as overwhelming as thinking about the NCA A Championships.”

S TAY I N G F O C U S E D Hawai‘i (21-9, 6 -1 Big West) won the program’s first conference tournament on April 28, but Cole, who was named Big West Coach of the Year, refuses to get caught up in the success.

“We had a great weekend defensively, and that’s the reason why we won the tournament,” Cole said. “We held the teams to the fewest amount of goals that we’ve held any team all year. And NCAA’s no different. Our defense needs to get better. We’ll be playing stronger teams from the MPSF [Mountain Pacific Sports Federation], if we are lucky to get that far. It always come down to defense.” The focal point of UH’s defense is junior goalie Amy Carlson, who finished third in the Big West with 7.49 goals allowed per game. She and her team stepped it up even further in the conference tournament by surrendering just 11 goals in three matches. “We’ve changed our defense a lot, but I don’t even need to help them that much,” Carlson said. “They did such a good job last weekend. It was incredible. I couldn’t even take credit for anything last weekend. The defense was absolutely spectacular. I hope to see the same defense in Boston.” However, the ‘Bows are just 2-4 against teams in the NCAA Tournament this season. In addition, they have given up an average of 11 goals in those games.

“We’ve played all but two teams that are in the tournament,” Carlson said. “You kinda know what to expect. I watched a lot of them play at the Olympics. So it’s gonna be tough, but it comes down to defense.” Still, opponents have their own weapon to worry about when facing UH: senior attacker Monika Eggens. The British Columbia native led the Big West with 90 goals this year, which was 13 more than UC Davis’ Carmen Eggert, who finished second and played in two more games. Eggens averaged a hat trick with 3.1 goals per match and also led the ‘Bows with 50 steals en route to being selected as Big West Player of the Year. “She’s one of the best shooters in the world,” Carlson said. “It’s so fantastic to have her. But it’s the whole team around Monika that puts her in the spots that she gets to. … She gets put in ordinary situations, and she makes them extraordinary.”

TA K I N G D OW N T H E TRITONS Hawai‘i will be tested from the start, as it drew Western Water Polo Association champion UC San Diego in the fi rst round. The

Tritons have won 11 of their last 12 matches since a visit to Honolulu that sent them home with zero wins and three losses, including a 9-6 defeat at the hands of UH. “It could be a completely different team than we saw here,” Carlson said. “They had traveled and then they played us the day after they got off the plane. Time difference might have been a factor. But you never know. You go in like you’re playing the top-seeded team.” UCSD has an arsenal of weapons at its disposal, including junior utility player Sarah Lizotte, who ranked third in the WWPA with 78 goals. Meanwhile, goalie and Punahou grad Courtney Miller led the conference with 308 saves, which was 51 more than the next on the list. While those two handle the offense and defense, respectively, sophomore attacker Jolene Guiliana takes care of both with her W WPA-leading 57 assists and her team-best 64 steals. “No question, they’re gonna come out fired up,” Cole said. “That’s just the nature of their team. The coach does a great job of that. We definitely can’t overlook them. They’re a strong team.”

Like its opponent, Hawai‘i has also found itself scorching hot recently. The Rainbow Wahine are currently riding an eight-game win streak, which has featured an average score of 12-7. “We’ve played eight very good teams,” Carlson said. “It was tough – they weren’t eight easy wins. It’s definitely a confidence builder, but we can’t get too cocky going into NCAA’s.” “We’re confident right now,” Eggens said. “We just want to make that winning streak 9, 10 and 11. We’ll just keep working and winning.”

UPCOMING GAMES NCAA Championships Opening Round No. 4 Hawai‘i vs. No. 5 UC San Diego (Friday, 1 p.m.) Semifinals UH* vs. No. 1 USC or No. 8 PomonaPitzer (Saturday, 11:15 a.m.) Championship UH* vs. No. 2 Stanford, No. 3 UCLA, No. 6 Princeton or No. 7 Iona (Sunday, 11:15 a.m.) Single elimination tournament featuring a consolation bracket.


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Page 32 | Ka Leo | Monday, May 6 2013

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33

Coach of the year: Laura Beeman

FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Under head coach Laura Beeman, the ‘Bows’ improved from 6-7 in the Western Athletic Conference in 2012 to 13-5 in the Big West in 2013. JEREMY NIT TA Associate Sports Editor After leading the Rainbow Wahine basketball team to its most successful record in seven years, it would be easy to become complacent due to success. But head coach Laura Beeman, fresh off a 17-14 season and a trip to the Women’s National Invitation Tournament, is far from satisfied and eager to take her squad even higher. “I’ve had time to reflect on the success and on the areas where we did good as a coaching staff, but more on the areas that we could improve upon that can make us become an even better program,” Beeman

said. “So, I think the wins were wonderful. Going to the postseason was wonderful. But the biggest success we had was getting the players to buy into our system, and they’re really believing in what we’re trying to do. We can be better next year, and that’s the exciting thing as I look back on the success we had and looking into the future at what we can really become.”

REBUILDING After inheriting a team that hadn’t had much success, Beeman brought her winning ways from Mt. San Antonio College, the University of Southern California and the WNBA’s Los Angeles Sparks to M ā noa.

“ W ithout sounding ar rogant , yes I expected it [success],” Beeman sa id. “It ’s just a result of me hav ing success ever y where I’ve gone. A nd it ’s not me, it ’s because I’m smar t enough to put good people around me, and they make me look good. But w ith this great st a f f, I k new that i f we made it through our preseason, and when I saw how the girls rebounded f rom that preseason, we k new we had a chance to make it through the Big West play.” A nd despite the team’s immediate success, Beeman feels it is far f rom what it can be. “I think we could add as many as six or seven wins on to our record from last

year,” Beeman said. “I think it ’s a combination of the old kids knowing our sys tem and us knowing the Big West and how it ’s changing. A nd I think if you add the players we’re getting, we can def initely add six or seven wins, do much better in the Big West Conference tournament and hopef ully make the NCA As and make a little splash. “So I think that if all the stars align, we can have a much better season, and that’s what you want for your team and for your program. The pressure is on, but I’d rather it be the pressure to continue to excel than the pressure to lose my job because I didn’t. So if I’m going to pick my poison, I want it to be to have a good season.”


34 Male athlete of the year: Mike Edwards

Female Athlete of the Year: Kaia Parnaby

Mike Edwards was responsible for 17 of the 57 passes defended by UH this year.

Kaia Parnaby has thrown 317 of the Rainbow Wahine’s 343 strikeouts this year.

FILE PHOTO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

FILE PHOTO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor

If there was one player to rely on during the Warrior football team’s dismal 3 -9 season, it was junior cornerback/ kick returner Mike Edwards. The Cleveland native earned the title of 2012 Mountain West Conference Special Teams Player of the Year as he led the nation with 1,215 kickoff return yards and was tied for tops in the country with three touchdowns. Despite play i ng just t wo yea rs at U H, E dwa rds a lso shat tered t he school record for most c a reer k ick re t ur n ya rds w it h 2 , 3 01, which was 39 0 more t ha n t he prev ious ma rk set by Mat t Ha rdi ng i n 19 9 5 .

Far from a one -dimensional player, Edwards was also selected as defensive co-captain by his coaches midseason. He led the Mountain West and ranked 13th in the nation with 17 passes defended, despite playing one less game than 11 of those ahead of him. In addition, he placed fourth on the team with 43 tackles, including 38 solo and five for loss. He also intercepted a pass in each of the Warriors’ final two games and forced a fumble in the season finale against South A labama. For his efforts, Edwards received the Alec Waterhouse Most Valuable Player Award at the team’s 2012 Na Koa Awards Banquet. Edwards elected to forgo his senior season in order to pursue a career in the NFL. On April 27, he signed with the New York Jets.

SYDNEY C HESTNUT Senior Staff Writer Kaia Parnaby can add Ka L eo’s Fe male Athlete of the year to her already lengthy list of accomplishments. Parnaby has gone from an average freshman pitcher to the ace in the circle, leading the ‘Bows to the top of the Big West Conference and national rankings. Thanks to Parnaby, UH has remained among the top 25 teams in the nation and held its own against powerhouse teams such as Washington, California and Baylor. She has been the backbone of the ‘Bows defense, throwing 35 of Hawai‘i’s 40 total wins, and has made 44 appearances this season and maintained a 1.51 ER A. Some of Parnaby’s most important

achievements are the permanent dents she has made in the record books of Hawai‘i softball. She earned a second place spot for most strikeouts, beating the mark of 261 previously set in 1995 by Brooke Wilkins. Also, Parnaby’s 317 strikeouts are still shy of Wilkins’ 1994 record of 324, but there is time to add to that total. Parnaby also broke the UH win re cord set by Melissa Coogan in 2003 and is now up to 35. Parnaby has worked hard in the past four years. She has doubled the amount of games she started in since her freshman year. Comparing her first-year stats to those of her senior season, Parnaby has nearly doubled the number of games she started while cutting her ER A in half and doubling her strikeouts.


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ACROSS 1 Soak up like a sponge 7 Iranian leader toppled in 1979 11 Chicago transit trains 14 “Hear hear!” 15 Roll down the runway 16 Accessory with a muumuu 17 Kind of deli roll 18 Squadron, e.g. 19 Bedevil 20 Blew a fortune 23 Twittering bird 25 Affectionate squeezes 26 Bat mitzvah scroll 27 Comedian’s asset 28 Comedian’s bit 29 “Consarn it!” 30 Emcee’s opening 32 User trying to get through a firewall 35 Prim and proper sort 39 Stretch (out), like a dog in the heat 40 Burning crime 42 Major blood lines 45 Letters on a tinkerer’s kit 47 Email attachment format 48 See-through 49 Utopia 51 Face-to-face exam 52 Protector of the president 55 Bi- minus one 56 Close margin at the track 57 “__ Fideles”: carol 60 Mohawk-sporting muscleman 61 “The Wind in the Willows” hero 62 “Hold your horses, will ya?” 63 Watch closely 64 “The __ the limit!” 65 Emphatic refusal, and words that precede the ends of 20-, 35- and 52-Across in a restaurant warning

DOWN 1 Pose, as a question 2 Poser’s neckwear 3 Heel type named for a dagger 4 Welles of “Citizen Kane” 5 Is sorry about 6 “Big” 23-Down cannon 7 Hurt, like a barb 8 Underwear brand 9 Revolving point 10 Calls it a night 11 “Mistress of the Dark” film hostess 12 Ogle 13 Trivial Pursuit wedges, vis-àvis the whole pie 21 Should, informally 22 Lugosi’s genre 23 Conflict that ended Nov. 11, 1918 24 Phone sound 28 Christening VIPs 29 Gives a thumbs-up 31 Roll call listing 33 “How adorable!” 34 More chilly 36 Age abbr. 37 Barista’s concoction 38 Jerk’s concoction 41 Niners’ org. 42 Presuppose 43 Storywriter known for irony 44 Quote by rote 46 To no avail 49 Test answer in a blue book 50 Scouts do good ones 51 Watery expanse 53 Stole 54 SSN, for example 58 X on a sundial 59 “The Name of the Rose” author Umberto

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Finals and Grad Spring 2013