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Quirky collaboration Matt and Kim hit Aloha Tower Features 4

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W E DN E S DAY, F E B . 9 to o T H U R S DAY, F E B . 10 , 2 011

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Volu me 105 Issue 69

Senate Bill 120 aims to gut UH and state funds WILL CARON Editor in Chief

those organizations that would allow them to continue to operate under dire circumstances. “Especially with the way things are going, that cushion is super vital. For KTUH, our tower is getting ancient and there are issues with the wires that go from the KTUH air-room to the tower,” said Wayne Liou, the student general manager at KTUH. “If something does hit the fan, we won’t be able to fix it, because we won’t have that cushion.” The Student Activities and Programs Fee Board might be the most important CSO to students who are part of Registered Inde pendent Organizations. If SA PFB’s

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The future of the University’s Chartered Student Organizations (CSOs) and their co-curricular activities are at stake again as a new Senate bill would eliminate much of the special funds these organizations rely on. “In a sense it almost means we don’t publish Ka Leo. We don’t run a radio station. We don’t have student government unless you guys all do it for free, as volunteers,” said Jan Javinar, Director of the Student Life and Development office at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Senate Bill 120, introduced in January, would slash a myriad of special funds set aside by the state, including the university’s special fees fund, in order to help decrease the state’s $71.6 million projected defi -

cit. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Ways and Means Committee tomorrow at 9 a.m. in Capitol conference room 211. The 193-page bill was introduced by Sen. Malama Solomon and sponsered by Sens. Clayton Hee, Gilbert Kahele and Pohai Ryan. At deadline, all four senators were unavailable for comment. Their bill targets all revenues received by CSOs and student activity programs. “All the fees that [students] get charged by the university get deposited into that revolving fund. According to [SB120] as of June 30, 2011, at the end of the fiscal year, whatever balance is left there gets scooped and placed into the state’s coffers and then the fund gets deleted,” said Javinar. For CSOs, the univerity’s special fees fund provides a cushion for

See Senate enate bill, n next exx t pa ext pag page ge

HOW YOU C AN GET INVOLVED Submit written testimony for or against the bill. You can e-mail testimony at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/emailtestimony/. Attend the SB 120 hearing, scheduled to be heard by the Senate Ways and Means Committee on Thursday, February 10th at 9 a.m. in Capitol conference room m 211. Hearing notice: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2011/hearingnotices/HEARING_WAM_02-10-11_.HTM 02-10-11_.HTM Read the bill at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov /session2011/bills/SB120_.pdf

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2 N EWS Senate bill from front page

funds are hit by this bill, all the R IOs that depend on the organization for resources would also be affected. But CSOs do more than simply fund RIOs, print articles and deejay radio shows. “What the CSOs represent is the voice of the students. It’s an organized way for students to convey their needs and interests from [their points of view] to the university as a campus and without it, I think that loss of voice ... is a huge concern,” said Javinar. Associated Students of the Univerit y of Hawai‘i president A ndrew Itsuno agreed. “[SB120] is going to have a devastating impact on the UH system. It ’s going to be bad for student activit y programs,their f unding, and it will also af fect the facult y and UH’s status as a Research 1 institution.” But students said that more important is the cost to the realworld learning experience CSOs

provide to students. “If something big does hap pen, you’re talking about shutting down the station, so [their wouldn’t be] a real presence for us ... where we can get students in here to experience broadcasting. L earning about broadcasting, production, about the music industr y, about promoting events. A few of our old DJs have become promoters, and they might not have gone into that if they didn’t go through K TUH,” said Liou. A similar bill was discussed last year and would have harmed CSOs at UH Mānoa in the same way. What’s different this year is the sheer scope of funds slated for appropriation. Along with the UH special fees fund, the list includes the Hawai‘i Historic preservation special fund, the Spouse and Child Abuse special fund, library funds, the water resource management fund and a hundred other funds.

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR PAIGE JINBO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Expansion project brings late-night coffee, green movement to campus LYNN NAK AGAWA Senior Staff Writer When the construction for the Campus Center Expansion Project is complete, students can look forward to enjoying a new campus coffee shop. The coffee shop is slated to be open till the later hours to accommodate evening students who want to get their caffeine on campus. “It’ll give students the opportunity to have a late-night coffee shop and study area that is on campus and safe, and it’ll be another venue for student groups to utilize,” said Rich Kodama, Campus Center Board President. The CCB is working on a number of reforms, including spearheading a one-card system project for UH Manoa students. The system is meant to give the student ID multi-purpose functions. It would also let CCB see the de-

mographics at athletics events, allowing them “to better serve the students,” said Kodama. The CCB is also creating a sustainability policy for the Campus Center complex. This is part of the board’s commitment to a “green” lifestyle. In addition to continuing recycling containers at Campus Center, the new recreation center will utilize natural light and breeze and will incorporate green roofs into the design. The recreation center is slated to fi nish in December 2012. However, Kodama believes CCB is not limited to its work in Campus Center. “I would like to note is that the Board is involved with so much more than just the campus center complex, but it’s involved in things that affect the entire campus — in particular, to revolutionize the campus. It truly is an exciting time to be on the board, and it is an honor to have

this opportunity to serve our constituents,” said Kodama.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

F EATURES 3

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Free money for school A NDREA DECOSTA Staff Writer February 15 marks the fi rst of many due dates for students pursuing academic and vocational programs to apply for grants and scholarships. A few hours invested in applications could add up to much needed cash to pay for academic essentials. Students at UH have an abundance of scholarship opportunities, ranging from degree-specific to community affiliation awards, based on both merit and financial need. A primary source of funding is the UH System, which is working to decentralize services for its 10 campuses in order to enhance customer service and the distribution of awards. “We find that many local students don’t apply for aid at the same levels as other states,” said Associate Vice President of Student Affairs Karen Lee. “The desire is to encourage all students to apply for financial aid and scholarships from as many

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sources as possible.” Additional sources of funding are available through the UH Foundation, a private nonprofit that provides philanthropic support, manages private investments and nurtures donor and alumni relationships. “Students are central to our universities, and many donors are passionate about helping students access a quality education and graduate on time,” said foundation spokesperson Margot Schrire. “ They recognize the critical role scholarship support makes in the lives of so many students.” During the 2010 -2011 academic year, the UH Mānoa campus awarded more than $3.7 million in grants and scholarships to 1,273 students — approximately $3,000 per recipient. UH system-wide distributions totaled $9.5 million in grants and scholarships based on merit and financial need. In addition to programs available through the UH System

and the Foundation, students are encouraged to seek funding through outside sources, such as the Hawai‘i Community Foundation. Like the UH Foundation, HCF is also a non-profit fund management agency that assists individuals, organizations and businesses with their grant and scholarship programs. “There are many ways donors can create scholarships,” said Schrire. “Many donors choose to build a legacy that will benefit students for years to come through planned and estate gifts.” Ke Ali‘i Pauahi Foundation provides a range of funding for various levels of education, such as support for non-traditional students, as well as merit and financial aid awards. Though the fund does have programs with preferenc e for Nat ive H aw a i ia ns or alumni of Kamehameha Schools, applications are available to all interested students. Others, like the Outrigger See Scholarships, page 5

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Daring duo comes to Honolulu “...the best açaí bowl on Oahu.”Honolulu Advertiser UH students receive 20% off of their café order with this coupon. Offer expires 31 March 2011. May not be combined with other offers.

KA L E O O H AWAI ‘I ANNO U NC E S AN ADVANCE SCREENING Thursday, February 10th, 2011 • 7:00 pm Ward 16 Theatres

COURTESY OF MATT AND KIM

Musicians Matt Johnson and Kim Schifino are known for extreme antics during music videos and concerts. They will perform at the Waterfront at Aloha Tower on Thursday, Feb. 10. E VA AVERY Staff Writer

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A HAPPY MADISON PRODUCTION A FILM MUSIC BY DENNIS DUGAN “JUST GO WITH IT” SUPERVISIONMUSICBY MICHAEL DILBECK BROOKS ARTHURBASEDKEVIN GRADY BY RUPERT GREGSON-WILLIAMS FLOWER” STAGE PLAY BARRY BERNARDI ALLENSCREENPLAY COVERT TIM HERLIHY STEVE KOREN PRODUCEDON “CACTUS SCREENPLAY BY I.A .L. DIAMOND BY ABE BURROWS BARILLET AND GREDY BY ALLAN LOEB AND TIMOTHY DOWLIDIRECTED NG BY ADAM SANDLER JACK GIARRAPUTO HEATHER PARRY BY DENNIS DUGAN

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No purchase necessary. Present your valid UH ID at the BOP Business Office after 3:00 pm Wednesday, February 9th to get your complimentary pass!

OPP ENS ENS IN TH THEA EATRE TRESS 2.11.11 First come, first served. A valid UHM student ID is required--valid for Spring 2011; NO EXCEPTIONS on day of giveaway. No phone calls. One pass per person. Supplies are limited. One pass admits two.

Not many musicians can say they got away with filming their music video buck naked in Times Square. Then again, East Coast natives Matt and Kim are not exactly conventional musicians. When they started their duo, Kim Schifino couldn’t play drums and Matt Johnson couldn’t play piano. As of now, they have just finished touring Australia and are headed to Honolulu to shake up the Waterfront at Aloha Tower on Thursday. “It doesn’t always come down to music that inspires us, it’s really about people around us … Whether it’s in music, or it’s in art, or photography, if we have a friend who’s doing cool shit, we want to do cool shit. It’s basically how it works,” said Johnson via a phone interview about the inspiration behind their music. All of Matt and Kim’s music is adventurous and fast-paced. As for their music videos, there’s never a dull moment. Take the video “Lessons Learned,” which involves Matt and Kim stripping down in Times

Square as multiple cops attempt to arrest them. Were the cops a setup and were they really naked? “Oh yeah!” Johnson said, chuckling. “It was February in New York … It was not a great time to take all your clothes off and it took a lot of convincing on my half to get Kim into the idea, but fi nally when we did it, she admitted that it was a good idea.” Luckily, with their cover-up permit to fi lm a Web promotional video that allowed them to dress inappropriately for the weather, they were not arrested. Some people are apparently so inspired by their creative videos that they had one person climb onto their stage naked during the Coachella Festival in California in an attempt to re-enact “Lessons Learned.” In another festival in Norway, after shooting their “Yea Yeah” video where people tossed food at them, the entire audience began to throw things at them as they played the song. “It didn’t really pan out as I expected, sort of a disaster,” Johnson said. “I don’t even know who brings an industrial roll of paper towels or really heavy things to a festival, but it can really knock things over.”

If you’re too broke to go to the concert on Thursday, it might be wise to consider Johnson’s advice: “Enough foot rubs will get you anywhere in this world.” At least that’s what he said to convince Kim to do the video for “Lessons Learned” — not an easy task if you’ve seen how she fights in their newest video “Cameras,” which could be rated R for violence. What can we expect for the upcoming concert here in Honolulu? Matt mentioned that Kim sometimes gets up and dances on top of the crowd’s hands, and that they will be packing balloons for sure. If curiosity gets the better of you or if you’re an avid fan, you shouldn’t miss out. According to Johnson, UH students should “come if they’re ready to party.”

BAMP PROJE CT PRE SE NT S: MATT & KI M

Opening act: The Jump Offs Waterfront at Aloha Tower Thursday Feb. 10 7 - 11 p.m. GA: $25 VIP: $45 www.bampproject.com


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Scholarships from page 3

Duke Kahanamoku Foundation offer both academic and athletic scholarships (limited to water sports), including team grants, which can be used to defray the cost of equipment and travel not covered by the school. Many grantees, like UH Mānoa student Pa‘ahana Kincaid, have traveled a long way on their educational journey, and an award provides both a financial and moral boost. Kincaid, who returned to pursue her degree in social work after a family break, received an award from the Women’s Campus Club. “I’m so honored and proud,” said Kincaid during the Jan. 24 Women’s Campus Club award lunch. “It means so much to me

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

to know that there are others out there who care.” And for those who don’t believe in a “free ride,” all qualified grant and scholarship money is completely tax-free for students in a degree-seeking program. A Federal Application for Federal Student Aid is not mandatory, however, grant managers like the UH Foundation and HCF require students to submit their FAFSA in order to develop a more comprehensive student financial aid package. “One of the key elements to being a successful applicant is to apply early … the payoff is worth it,” said Lee. “UH has a wide variety of scholarships and it is our goal to award every dollar.”

TIPS Start early Gather letters of recommendation from non-family members Take time to write a thoughtful essay State your educational goals and personal background Include volunteer or community service Apply often — you can’t win an award unless you apply!

DEADLINES The UH Foundation Feb. 15, 2011 11:59 p.m. HST http://www.uhfoundation.org/ https://www.star.hawaii.edu:10012/ Hawai‘i Community Foundation Feb. 25, 2011 5:00 p.m. HST http://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/scholarships UH System Scholarship Mar. 1, 2011 4:00 p.m. HST http://www.hawaii.edu/finaid/scholarships/system/index.html The Duke Kahanamoku Outrigger Foundation Athletic – Team/Individual Feb. 15, 2011 (postmarked) Scholarship April 1, 2011 Athletic Event Aug. 15, 2011 http://www.dukefoundation.org/ Ke Ali ‘i Pauahi Foundation April 1, 2011 4:30 p.m. HST http://www.pauahi.org/scholarships

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ADVERTISING The Board of Publications office is located on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall. Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henri-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

What is your position on SB120?

S TEFANIE BARBOSA Sophomore, Journalism KTUH Promotions “We always hope for new facilities at KTUH, but we don’t have the money. We have to raise funds because we don’t receive the amount of money we’d like to. This puts us in a situation that’s worse off.”

E THAN YOUNG Senior, Engineering “I would be OK with the legislature taking a percent of the money if it’s for a legit reason. I think we would need a representative to negotiate a reasonable amount.”

Senate Bill 120, introduced on Jan. 21 by Sen. Solomon and sponsored by Sens. Hee, Kahele and Ryan, proposes repealing dormant funds and transferring the money to the state of Hawai‘i. Some of the intended cuts would impact UH tuition and fees, libraries, student activities, and research and training.

A MY NGO Junior, Graphic Design “I defi nitely don’t agree with the proposals. We already have problems that the university can’t fi x.”

“From Abercrombie’s State of the State [Address], it seemed like we were going to expect a lot of cutbacks.”

R ICHELLE PARKER Sophomore, English

NICK TSOI Sophomore, Pre-Pharmacy PPA member “It will hurt RIOs [Registered Independent Organizations] that provide students with networking opportunities, but then again it’s for the good of the state.”

I NTERVIEWS

C HELSEY NAK ANISHI Senior, Speech and Communications Golden Key Secretary

“It’s completely underhanded. I found it really hard to understand the bill. If they’re going to do something that bold, there should be some transparency.”

BY REECE FARINAS, FEATURES EDITOR

PHOTOS BY SHINICHI TOYAMA

IVAN C HIK Senior Biology Golden Key International Honors Society, Director of Publicity “ This is devastating for clubs. A lot of activities for students won’t be available anymore. Hopefully we can get some people down to the hearing.”


O PINIONS 7

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Save our school Oppose Senate Bill 120 OPINIONS DESK

Imagine a university with no clubs and student-led organizations. Such a thought seems inconceivable, as student life would essentially cease to exist. Sen. Malama Solomon, however, believes otherwise. Solomon is the introducer for SB120, which would, according to an ASUH e-mail, “delete the university’s tuition and fees special fund as well as the UH student activities revolving fund, which includes all revenues received by Chartered Student Organizations and student activity programs from student activities and programs.â€? The extracurricular activities on campus have already struggled in recent years due to the recession. According to the Capacity and Preparatory Review Report prepared for the university’s accreditation, “MÄ noa, like many public research universities, has been faced with increasing resource constraints and leadership continuity challenges that have impacted our ability to undertake campus planning that fosters community engagement and student learning.â€? In spite of these challenges, student life has  ourished. With over 200 Registered Independent Organizations on campus, ranging from the Debate and Forensics Society to the Pre-Medical Association, to CSOs like KTUH and ASUH, there are extracurricular activities available for every student on campus. This bill would adversely affect all of these groups in one way or another. In the short term, we’d observe a university with students who would leave campus immediately after classes due to the lack of activities. Extracurricular activities and clubs are important for keeping students

involved in the university. These activities that build the university’s community provide students with hands-on experiences and networking that students can include in resumes and apply to future careers. The long-term effects, could be harmful to the entire local community. Anna Koethe, ASUH vice president, said, “If SB120 passes, it could be extremely detrimental to the future of student-led programs on campus. CSOs may be in danger of no longer being able to put forth funding efforts. ASUH specifically may have difficulty offering programs such as partial tuition awards, research grants, graduate test prep awards and R IO funding. If students enjoy these opportunities, I highly encourage them to strongly oppose SB120.� Clubs that promote professional networking and provide community service are fundamental towards improving the community and providing a stable base for future professionals. Without these groups and others that help to better students, the quality of students produced by the university and sent into the workforce will decline. We have the potential to save our school; it’s our obligation as students to do so.

TA K E AC T I O N

Send written testimony to http://www.capitol.hawaii. gov/emailtestimony/ opposing the bill. Attend the SB120 Senate Ways and Means Committee hearing, scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 10 at 9 a.m. in Capitol conference room 211.

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Program Heads for Summer 2011, Fall 2011, and Spring 2012 Undergraduate and Graduate

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is now accepting applications for the following paid management positions:

Editor in Chief Ka Leo O Hawaii Student Newspaper

Editor in Chief Ka Lamakua

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Application Deadline: Friday, February 11, 2011, 4:30pm Contact Jay Hartwell • 956-3217 • hartwell@hawaii.edu

Or pick up an application from Ka Leo or the BOP Business Office (located ocean side of Hemenway Hall by Ba-le courtyard entrance)


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Excuse me while I check my BlackBerry ELLISE A K AZAWA Managing Editor Whether you’re bored at the bus stop, looking for the nearest ramen restaurant or need to check your e-mail, you probably have the same solution: reach for a smart phone. In fact, it seems as if everyone has or wants such a device. On Thursday, the Apple iPhone was available for pre-order to existing Verizon Wireless customers. The demand was so high that the company reportedly stopped taking orders after two hours. Despite their benefits, do smart phones enhance the quality of our lives? I’ll concede that there are great advantages to owning a

smart phone. Internet connectivity, the ability to edit Word documents and a built-in GPS make my BlackBerry a useful device most of the time. My love affair ends, however, when smart phones end up controlling our lives. While one can argue that we should control technology and not let technology control us, it’s much easier said than done. Cell phones in general, and smart phones in particular, have created a culture where we are expected to be available at all hours of the day. Suddenly, it’s become inexcusable not to check our phones constantly for new e-mails, texts or missed calls. w If you’ve gone surfi ng for a few hours or spent the weekend

camping in a remote area, you can safely expect to return home to a deluge of messages. Additionally, because our phones are so feature-laden, it’s become more enjoyable to play with them than to engage in actual human contact. If you’re waiting for a class to start or are taking or the elevator from the sixth fl oor rs to the ground fl oor in Saunders ur Hall, chances are you’ve got your iPhone, BlackBerry or Android-

ating device out. operating Don’t get me wrong – I’m not anticizing our pre-technology romanticizing

SHINICHI TOYAMA/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

past or yearning for the days when you had to call someone on a land line. Nor am I arguing that smart phones themselves are responsible for declining social connectivity. After all, if you’re using your phone to access Facebook or Twitter, or send your aunt a picture of your dog’s Halloween costume, then you are, in a sense, being social. I am, however, against how our phones have created a culture that is supposedly “always connected, always in contact.” Instead of loving technology in moderation, we have become enamored with our smart phones to the point of inanity. Until we learn how to control these devices, perhaps the smartest thing we can do with smart phones is press the “off” button.


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR ANN MACARAYAN COMICS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

AMES

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Work Overseas in Public Health:

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Peace Corps Info Session (Focus in Health Projects) Wed 2/16, 4:30PM Hamilton Library, Yap Room 1st Fl

Peace Corps 50th Birthday Bash Tue 3/1, 2-5PM Hemenway Hall Courtyd www.peacecorps.gov

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

956.0439 or pchawaii@hawaii.edu

6 2 3 9 3 7 4 1 9 4 8

1

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5

4

MEDIUM

3 8 5 7 6 9 7 2 3 8 1 # 39

you off track. Keep playing.

HOROSCOPES By Samuel A. Donaldson ACROSS 1 Utopian 6 Home censorship aid 11 Journalist’s last question? 14 “Au contraire!” 15 “You think I’m to blame?” 16 “If you even dream of beating me you’d better wake up and apologize” boaster 17 Spanish silver 18 “The Lion King” king 19 Londoner’s last letter 20 Raising 22 With 24-Across, infomercial appeal 24 See 22-Across 27 St. Louis landmark 28 Likely loser in war 29 Like stale jokes 30 Riches’ opposite 34 Struggle 35 “The change is yours” 38 With 49-Across, infomercial appeal 41 Conditional promise 42 Yves or Yvette, e.g. 43 Some votes 44 Clearasil target 45 “__ the G String”: Bach work 47 Chichén __: Mayan ruins 49 See 38-Across 54 Infomercial appeal 56 Verdi opera with a Shakespearean plot 57 “Yes, Yvette” 58 Nook download 61 Inflict, as havoc 62 Las Vegas-to-Salt Lake City dir. 63 Sparkle 64 “Do ___ to eat a peach?”: Eliot 65 MI and LA 66 Alan of “Little Miss Sunshine” 67 “So Much in Love” singers, with “The” Solutions at www.kaleo.org

02/09/11 DOWN 1 Feedback 2 Actor Lundgren of “Rocky IV” 3 Troops encampment 4 Buzzing with activity 5 Advanced 6 Rd. Rabbits 7 X, to Greeks 8 “Mean” señor 9 Permeate 10 Gardening moss 11 Incentive for dangerous work 12 Acid used in soap 13 Volume component 21 International finance coalition 23 Polish Solidarity leader 25 Sierra Club founder 26 South Pacific island region 29 “__ the ramparts ...” 30 Lyon king 31 “__ Wiedersehen” 32 University of Montana athletes 33 Gregarious 35 __ dragon: largest living lizard 36 Wrath 37 French possessive 39 Back stroke? 40 Conflicted 45 On the job 46 Knucklehead 47 Desktop images 48 Needle 49 Neither stewed nor pickled? 50 Hardly cool 51 Twinkle 52 Trumpet sound 53 Joins, as oxen 55 Lake Tahoe’s aptly named Cal __ Casino 59 Egg: Pref. 60 Baseball’s Griffey (Jr., too)

By Nancy Black Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s Birthday (02/09/11). This year, you may resolve previously hidden issues from the past. There’s room for growth in many areas, especially around the home. Expect good news in real estate. Family comes close this year, sharing important experiences. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is an 8 -Opportunities for making money abound. Consider them carefully, and plan for a rainy day. After all, it wasn’t raining when Noah built the ark. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 9 -Everything lines up for you for the next couple of days. You’re very sensitive to your surroundings, soaking it all in. Enjoy what you have. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 7 -Your imagination runs rampant today. Don’t rein it in. Let it feed your future with possibilities, and see where it takes you. Write it all down. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 7 -It’s never too late to start planning or to find partnership in your community. Work together for a common goal and discover satisfaction. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- All of the exploration of the previous few days is paying off, with new career possibilities opening up. Don’t let the apparent ease throw

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 6 -New adventures lie in your path. Go ahead and take the challenge. Take a deep breath and take it all in. You deserve it. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- You may be surprised today by pleasant (yet perhaps shocking) news. Dream big, and then go after it with everything. Partnership produces results. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -You see opportunities for romance on the horizon. It’s up to you to either take them on or concentrate on work and developing new skills. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 9 -- Work seems extremely easy today. Take advantage of the situation to considerably reduce the height of your inbox. Take on those projects you’ve been avoiding. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 7 -Spend more imagination than money. Learn from young people. Add some romance to your ordinary routines. It’s as easy as lighting a candle or two. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 7 -You’re an inspiration to others. It’s a good day to investigate your family history. Ask an elder for advice. Listen intently, and capture details. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -Confidence builds. You’re winning admiration and feel the love. Now start learning what you need to know to get the results you want to accomplish.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

No pressure for Rainbows The Rainbows were picked to fi nish second in the WAC preseason poll. They received 30 points overall with two fi rst-place votes. Fresno State was picked to fi nish fi rst with 32 points and four fi rst-place votes. Junior second baseman Kolten Wong has been named to three preseason fi rstteam All-America teams. He is also the WAC Preseason Player of the Year. Joining Wong on the preseason all-conference team are senior designated hitter Jeff Van Doornum and junior pitchers Matt Sisto and Lenny Linksy. The ’Bows are also ranked No. 38 according to Collegiate Baseball Magazine’s preseason top 40. But despite the accolades, the goals this season are the same as every other – win the WAC and compete in the postseason. “That’s our goal and that’s what our expectation level is,” Trapasso said. “What we work for from September [fall workouts] on, is to win, basically accomplish what we did last year.”

RUSSELL TOLENTINO Sports Editor Last year, the Rainbow baseball team won the Western Athletic Conference Championship and reached the Regional Final of the NCA A Tournament. Quite a ride, but head coach Mike Trapasso has moved on. “The reality is this isn’t last year’s team. It’s a different team.” Trapasso said. “We’d like to carry over that momentum but in truth, the only pressure you feel is the pressure you put on yourself to perform.” He said the only thing he wants his team to take from last year is motivation. “You hope that [last year’s success] brings an expectation level that manifests itself in their daily work ethic, understanding what you’re working for and understanding how special it is,” Trapasso said. He said he also hopes last year’s players will take ownership of this year’s fortunes. “It’s our returning guys’ job from a leadership standpoint to share that with our new guys so they’ll work the same way,” Trapasso said. But still, there are high expectations for this year’s team.

A L UM N I GA M E FILE PHOTO/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore third baseman Pi‘ikea Kitamura is one of five starting position players returning to the Rainbow baseball team. They will play an alumni game Saturday.

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To work for Honolulu Gourmet Inc. sampling gourmet food products. $10/hour (own vehicle required) Send Resume to Jill@honolulugourmetfoods.com

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This Saturday the ’Bows will host their annual alumni game at Les Murakami Stadium. First pitch is set for 1 p.m.


12 S PORTS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 2011

this year’s nfl top 10 3. VICK IS SICK

GLENN VER ASCO Contributing Reporter

With the possibility of a lockout that could terminate the 2011 NFL season looming, it’s time to remember and relish 2010. Here are 10 stories to remember.

A fter serving a 19 -month jail sentence for illegal dog fighting, Michael Vick took over the Eagles starting quarterback position, posted a career-high 100.2 pass rating, led his team to the playoffs and won comeback player of the year.

1. PACKERS WIN

Green Bay defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 in Super Bowl XLV and reclaimed the championship trophy named after their legendary coach, Vince Lombardi. Aaron Rodgers was dubbed Super Bowl Most Valuable Player after throwing for 304 yards and three touchdowns.

2. FAVRE’S FINALE

Brett Favre has again announced his retirement and reports, including ESPN, believe he won’t go back on his word this time. His fi nal pass attempt was intercepted after a hard hit by Bills linebacker Arthur Moats.

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NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell warned players to avoid contact to their opponents’ heads and necks on Oct. 20, 2010, with the threat of increased fines and possible suspensions. Steelers linebacker James Harrison has been fined $100,000 this season for violations.

5. MEADOWLANDS MIRACLE Down 31-10 with 8:17 to play

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BRIAN TSENG/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Tennessee Titans kick returner Marc Mariani tries to get around Atlanta Hawks cornerback Brent Grimes during the Pro Bowl at Aloha Stadium on Jan. 30. against the New York Giants, Michael Vick and the Eagles scored four touchdowns, including a punt return by Desean Jackson in the final seconds, to give Philadelphia a 38 -31 win.

6. SNEAKY SEAHAWKS

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0 pm @ 10:30 am - 1:3 give aways, and entertainment s, om nd co s, free Game

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4. CRACKDOWN ON THE ‘SMACKDOWN’

They won the NFC West with a 7-9 record making them the first team in NFL history to win a division with a losing record. Seattle upset the defending champion New Orleans Saints at home before losing on the road to the Chicago Bears in the playoffs.

their second straight A FC Championship game. Gang Green has won four road playoff games over the past two seasons.

8. ‘TOM-TASTIC’

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady was outstanding during the regular season in setting the NFL record for most consecutive pass attempts (355) without an interception. He was awarded with his second career M V P honor.

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#O 3PONSOREDBY5NIVERSITY(EALTH3ERVICES(EALTH0ROMOTION0ROGRAM #AMPUS#ENTER!CTIVITIES#OUNCIL AND(AWAII0ACIFIC)SLANDS\#AMPUS#OMPACT

7. HEADLINE HOGGERS

Sideline tripping, drunk driving, sexual harassment and foot fetish videos couldn’t stop the New York Jets from advancing to

9. FOSTER KID

Undrafted running back Arian Foster found a home in Houston. He led the league this year in rush yards (1,616), rushing touchdowns (16) and yards from scrimmage (2,220).

10. ‘WACKSONVILLE’

With three seconds left in a tie game against Houston, Jaguars quarterback David Garrard tossed a Hail-Mary pass toward the end zone before overtime. Mike Thomas snatched the batted ball out of the air for a 50 yard touchdown and a win.

S E E W W W. K A L E O . O R G

FOR MORE PRO BOWL PHOTOS BY B RIAN T S E N G


Ka Leo Feb 9th