Page 1

A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27 to TUESDAY, JULY 3, 2012 VOLUME 107 ISSUE 6

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

Need Money for College? www.facebook.com/HawaiiNationalGuard

www.kaleo.org

UH taro patch will be showcased in Smithsonian Festival EMI A IKO News Editor

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s kalo (taro) farm, Ka Papa Lo‘i ‘o Kānewai, will be showcased in Washington, D.C., as part of a ten-day festival starting on June 27. The Smithsonian Folklife Festival is a program commemorating the 150th anniversary of the founding of land-grant universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and seeking to put research into action in the areas of agriculture and food, health care, sustainable living, urban and rural revitalization, and education. More than one million people are expected to attend this annual event. UH Mānoa is among 20 public land-grant universities to be featured in the festival. Uluwehiokapulapulaikalaakea Cashman, a student majoring in ethnic studies and minoring in Hawaiian language, is headed to D.C. to participate in the festival to bring these partnerships to life through demonstrations, discussions, and hands-on activities via the campus kalo patch.

B R I N G I N G H AWAIʻI TO D.C .

WWW.KALEO.ORG

“We hope to be showcasing some of the values and practices associated with Ka Papa Lo‘i ‘o Kānewai,” said Cashman in an email interview. “As a representative of Native Hawaiian programs at a land-grant university, our goal is to showcase an example of cultural practices that integrate connections between our natural environment, native people and indigenous plants to support viable

COURTESY OF UH MĀNOA

Graduate student Kaulana Vares preps the lo’i exhibit for the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. food resources and other sustainable outcomes in Hawai‘i.” Cashman is one of the 80 people participating in the showcase from Hawai‘i, including a 25 -member hula hālau from Hawai‘i Community College. The lo‘i exhibition will be a four-feet by six-feet irrigated area with mounds of mud that support the kalo plantings and other native plants. This structure will also help to set the scene of a traditional lo‘i, said Cashman. “It is our hope that appreciation and value for our cultural practices is realized and that this example can be relatively ap-

plied to similar contexts beyond Hawai‘i,” said Cashman. “Kalo cultivation in lo‘i is not only about raising kalo as a staple food. There is so much more cultural and genealogical significance to kalo for Native Hawaiians.”

G ROW I N G H I S T O RY Since 2007, Kānewai has provided experiential, cultural and educational opportunities for students and the community by promoting Hawaiian language and encouraging the revitalization of traditional Hawaiian values, concepts, and practices through the collection of kalo.

i

Read it in Print or Online

www.kaleo.org

2445 Campus Rd., Hemenway Hall 107 • 808-956-7043

All Hawaiian kalo varieties can trace its lineage to the first kalo plant, named Hāloanakalaukapalili. “Stories and lessons associated with them include the importance of ancestral connections, aloha ‘āina or mālama ‘āina, as well as reciprocal responsibilities of family to respect, care and provide for each other,” said Cashman. “These cultural practices associated with lo‘i cultivation portray meaningful examples of Hawaiian culture.” Cashman and other students will also prepare kalo to make poi and will put on other cooking demonstrations that include traditional Hawaiian delicacies such as raw fish and limu. “I feel honored to be a part of this project, as a first year student, traveling not only with a small group, but with larger group of Hawaiian programs supported by the UH systems and executive leaders,” said Cashman, who will be traveling to the east coast for the first time. “ I’m excited for this great opportunity to meet other land-grant universities and to see their work and how they connect with their communities and how they have made an impact as well.” Along with the mini kalo patch, UH will also build an aquaponics garden and demonstrate non-instrument navigation with the Hawaiian star compass chart. Native Hawaiian dances, Hawaiian languages, and healing practices will also be showcased in the festival.

Scan this QR code for more information on the Smithsonian Festival.

Report

NEWS

REDESIGNING RAIL

Caldwell discusses rail, UH autonomy

FEATURES

0 -12 f t. 0-2 f t. 0 - 3 f t. 3 - 5+ f t.

4

HEART BEATS Professor develops musical CPR method

OPINIONS

5

KEEPING KEIKI

Young immigrants protected from deportation

SPORTS

8

FRIENDLY FOES

Rival UH teams still stay friends

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY N: W: S: E:

2

N: W: S: E:

0 -1 f t. 0-2 f t. 1- 3 f t. 2- 5 f t.

FRIDAY N: W: S: E:

0 -1 f t. 0-1.5 f t. 0 - 3 f t. 1- 3+ f t.


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

News@kaleo.org | Emi Aiko Editor | Kim Clark Associate

News

Lunch: Tues - Fri 11 am to 2 pm Dinner: Nightly 5:30pm to 10pm 808-735-1122 1137 11th ave #205 Honolulu, HI 96816 www.himalayankitchen.net

Invites You to Attend an Advance Screening of

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Davin Aoyagi Managing Editor Jaimie Kim Chief Copy Editor Paige Takeya Assc Chief Copy Editor Brandon Hoo Design Editor Beth Dorsey Assc Design Editor Justin Nicholas News Editor Emi Aiko Assc News Editor Kimberly Clark Features Editor Alvin Park Assc Features Editor Maile Thomas Opinions Editor Shayna Diamond Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincey Greenheck Special Issues Editor Ariel Ramos

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal Marketing Director Reece Farinas

Thursday, June 28th, 2012 • 7 pm • Consolidated Ward

Mayoral candidate Kirk Caldwell’s views on rail and the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa boil down to three words: doing it better. “I do believe, just like in our individual lives, we [should] always try to do it better,” said Caldwell in an interview with Ka Leo.

BUILD RAIL BETTER Caldwell applies this perspective to rail, outlining several improvements to the current rail plan. “We need to have less of a visual impact. ... I want to redesign the system within town, moving columns so they’re blocked by buildings so it doesn’t block visual access,” explained Caldwell. Caldwell compared his plan for rail to current mayor Peter Carlisle’s. “I would say Peter Carlisle’s working on the project that I got going along with [former mayor] Mufi Hannemann. But here’s where we do [disagree]: ... I believe we can build rail better.” Caldwell outlined the costs for the $5.27 billion rail project, claiming that $1.55 billion would come from the federal government and that the rest of it would come from an excise tax, of which tourists pay one-third of the total. “You know how much [Honolulu county will be paying] for the total project? Forty-eight percent … that’s a good deal for us.” Caldwell admitted that the rail plans proposed were not perfect. “The perfect rail system should be underground. For $20 billion we can have perfect ... We’re building the good; it’s not perfect.”

D I S M I S S I N G C AY E TA N O ʼS A LT E R N AT I V E S Caldwell dismissed the bus rapid transit system proposed as an alternative by former governor Ben Cayetano.

“He [Cayetano] has no plan. He needs to have a plan, just like there’s a rail plan. Where’s his plan? How’s he paying for it? ... We don’t have answers.” Caldwell summarized his feelings on the anti-rail group by saying, “These guys are against mass transit, plain and simple. It’s a bait and switch. ... It’s a scheme to just get you not doing anything.”

ON UNIONS AND THE UNIVERSITY

Caldwell also criticized Cayetano’s stance on the university with regards to views expressed on the UH Mānoa faculty’s union. “I’m not an anti-union guy, and I think there’s a need for unions in all forms of business, including the faculty level, and I don’t have a problem with that. I know that Ben does,” Caldwell said. “What Ben may not have talked about is under his tenure, for the fi rst and only time in the history of this place ever, there was not only a strike by public school teachers but by the university system.” Caldwell stated that the university needed a greater level of autonomy from the state legislature. “If I had it my way, I would make it an autonomous entity. Yes, it’s a public institution. Yes, it needs state money and federal money, and of course, research grants. But I believe that part of the state tax revenue should be given to the university.” Caldwell also pointed out that standards would then need to be set to ensure accountability on the part of the university. “Is it grad rates? Is it a GPA thing? Is it the number of people that apply? ... You probably have some ideas.” eb

E x c l us

iv

W

www.ppllikeusmovie.com IN THEATRES JUNE 29th

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Kara McManus, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

DAVIN AOYAGI Editor in Chief

e

No purchase necessary. Present your valid UH ID at the BOP Business Office after 1:00 pm Wednesday, June 27th to get your complimentary pass!

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

Caldwell weighs in on rail, advocates a more autonomous university

W

∙ BYOB no corkage. ∙ Indoor & outdoor seating. ∙ Live entertainment!

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

‘Do it better’

e

“Good food for good time”

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

iv

Authentic Nepalese & Indian Cuisine

V O I C E

E x c l us

T H E

eb

K A LEO

To view video clips of the interview, go to kaleo.org


News@kaleo.org | Emi Aiko Editor | Kim Clark Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

News These guys are against mass transit, plain and simple. It’s a bait and switch. ... It’s a scheme to just get you not doing anything. This article is part of a three-part series covering the candidates for mayor of Honolulu County. Ka Leo interviewed mayoral candidate Kirk Caldwell on June 19, 2012. To watch the interview, go to kaleo.org

Angry g y beaver? beaver

We can help!

JUNE COMBO SPECIAL FULL LEGS & UNDERARMS

$65.00

COMBO SPECIA SPECIALS AVAILABLE

The Wax Center IN PUCKS ALLEY

W/ STUDENT ID

Wa lk-in sW elco me

2600 S. King Street Suite 101 Honolulu, HI 96826, Appointment Line: 840-3199

& Invites You to Attend an Advance Screening of

NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

E x c l us i eb

v

W

e

e

W

Kirk Caldwell has served in public office for six years, compared to 28 years of public service on Ben Cayetano’s part and 26 years of public service from Peter Carlisle.

These letters were spelled out by the power of a tiny microbot designed by UH electrical engineering students. Their work placed second in the 2012 Mobile Microrobotics Challenge in May. Want to learn more? Check out the story at kaleo.org

Monday, July 2nd, 2012 • 7 pm • Consolidated Ward No purchase necessary. Present your valid UH ID at the BOP Business Office after 1:00 pm Wednesday, June 27th to get your complimentary pass!

http://www.theamazingspiderman.com IN THEATRES JULY 3rd

eb

E x c l us

iv


Features@kaleo.org | Alvin Park Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

U S A B L E BY A L L Inaba’s CPR technique involves two steps n

ntest o Instagramed Co Join the KaKaLe Instagram conthem ing hold be will Leo Starting next week, ies. Winners content or upcoming mov tests based on the issue’s w us @uhkaleo. Follo e. mor and es pass ie can receive prizes like mov

Get a FREE Blueberry Banana Nut Oatmeal of equal or lesser value with purchase of any blueberry Banana Nut Oatmeal

Inaba hopes that hands-only CPR will give people the confidence they need to reach out and help those who need it. “It’s better to push too hard than not hard enough,” Inaba said. “People are usually too scared to push hard because they might hurt the victim. But you can’t hurt someone who is already dead, so you might as well push hard and give them the chance to survive.”

O N E B E AT AT A T I M E T here are several stories about how people’s lives were saved by Inaba’s method. In 20 09, Debra and Christo pher Bader were walking in the woods when Christopher s udde n l y collapsed.

ve

In the 70’s, actor John Travolta adorned his signature white suit and moved his muscles to the famous Bee Gees hit “Stayin’ Alive.” Nearly 40 years later, the song is more than just a disco beat – it is, indeed, helping people stay alive. Alson Inaba, a physician and professor at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, developed a hands-only CPR technique that features chest compressions matched to the beat of “Stayin’ Alive” back in 2005. Little did Inaba know that his tip of teaching the correct rates for chest compressions based on the song would soon b become a life-saving life -saving phenomenon and b used worldwide. be “A couple of months after, I got emails from fr rom people all over the world,” Inaba said. “They “T They told me how they taught the technique te echnique in their classes.”

that can be used by people with no prior medical or CPR training. The fi rst step is to call 911 for immediate medical assistance. The second is to align your hands in the center of the victim’s chest and push down hard and fast to the beat of “Stayin’ Alive.” The technique was created by Inaba as a way to teach his students, in an entertaining and memorable way, how to perform CPR on a person who had just experienced sudden cardiac arrest. After learning from The American Heart Association that 100 compressions per minute was most effective when performing p g arrest victim, CPR on a cardiac that it was Inaba realized about the same number of “Stayin’ beats found in Alive.” He timed it and found correct. his theory was

E x c lusi

E x c lusi

M AILE THOMAS Associate Features Editor

eb

tended Read an ex is article at version of th leo.org a http://www.k

Debra remembered hearing about the method on the radio. So while on the phone with paramedics, she did compressions on her husband while singing “Stayin’ A live.” She kept it up for 15 minutes before paramedics finally found them. Christopher is alive and well today. But Inaba remains humble about his life -saving technique. In the first week of June, he traveled to New York City to celebrate the launch of a national campaign for his CPR method at the A H A’s CPR Awareness Week. Inaba says y he doesn’t see himself as a hero and instead grants the title to the people who have helped saved lives due to his idea. “I don’t like the limelight,” Inaba said. “I just want people to have confidence to perform hands-only f rm fo CPR C R to give othCP ers a second chance at life.” ch

COURTESY OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

Professor Alson Inaba poses with disco dancers at the kickoff event of the American Heart Association’s CPR Awareness Week.

Why Should I Hire you? Do you like business, marketing and promotions? Then check out the options at Ka Leo. We are recruiting Public Relations Representatives for our growing programs.

Redeemable at:

July 31,2012

ve

W

UH professor helps victims ‘stay alive’

W

Features

eb

Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

Apply Today!

808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs


Opinions@kaleo.org | Shayna Diamond Editor

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

New law protects immigrated youth

WWW.KALEO.ORG

Opinions Apartment for Rent

i

2445 Campus Rd., Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043

t or in Prin

Online

t rg Readwiww.kaleo.o

Next to UH. 2bdrm/1 full bath. Includes utilities (water & electric only). Partly furnished. $1200/month. Deposit $1200. For 2 people only. No smoking. No pets. Contact Laila Lee at 595-2582

Apartment for Rent

Seeking Employment

Near Kapahulu: Rainbow’s, Zippy’s, KFC, Jack in the Box, Busline. Room w/ bath separate entry. Includes utilities. $650/mo.

BOOK KEEPER, PAYROLL/PAY RECEIVER

Call 734-2864. Leave a message.

For more info, contact our Recruit Dept. at: ceglarek009@gmail.com

Salary Commensurate Should be a computer literate

+RPHRI+DZDLÂľLÂśV0RVW $XWKHQWLF6RXWKHUQ&RRNLQJ $ XWKHQWLF6 6RXWK AL SEIB/LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT

2II

Students rally in downtown Los Angeles to express their support for the Obama administration’s decision to stop deportation proceedings for qualified undocumented immigrants. SAR AH NEAL Staff Writer

The Obama administration has recently announced that the Department of Homeland Security will stop deportation proceedings for undocumented immigrants that meet certain qualiďŹ cations. In spite of the raucous response from right-wing ofďŹ cials, this move does nothing but good things for a vulnerable sect of America’s population, including Hawai‘i.

A FA I R P R E M I S E The law seeks to aid a speciďŹ c group of undocumented immigrants: the young. If they were brought to the United States as children, have no criminal record and have contributed to the social fabric of America by succeeding in school or military service, then they are eligible for a reprieve from the deportation processes. Individuals seeking this exemption must prove that they entered the country before the age of 16, have lived here for at least five consecutive years and are under 30 years old. Those meeting these requirements will receive a two-year deferment on their deportation proceedings and will be eligible for a renewable work permit.

This decision will spare an estimated 800,000 to 1.4 million young immigrants from deportation. It will halt deportation proceedings for people like Jose Antonio Vargas, a journalist whose family brought him here illegally at the age of 12. Vargas did not know he was undocumented until he tried to obtain a driver’s license at 16.

I M M I G R AT I O N I N H AWA IĘť I This decision is bound to have an effect in Hawai‘i. Though our state’s remote location prevents a huge illegal immigrant population from building up, an estimated 30,000 Hawai‘i residents, coming from Mexico, China and the Philippines, are undocumented and likely to beneďŹ t from the law. Hawai‘i legislators have proposed SB 2163, which would allow undocumented students to attend University of Hawai‘i system schools at the resident-tuition rate and receive state-funded ďŹ nancial aid. An estimated 1,300 students will beneďŹ t from this law if it passes. Many eligible students will also beneďŹ t from the Obama administration’s decision to stop deportation proceedings.

S E A RC H I N G F O R VO T E S? Obama’s opponents accuse him of using this issue to garner

support from America’s Latino community for the upcoming election, but the reality is that the president enjoyed their favor even before this announcement. Though it is true that Obama has faced dissatisfaction among Latinos due to his strict policies on immigration, Obama still received 2/3 of the Latino vote in 2008. Republican opponent Mitt Romney has been struggling for popularity among groups with high immigrant populations’ due to his predicted unfriendly policies. It is likely that Obama would have retained the support of the Latino demographic even without this shift in policy. This move will increase Obama’s likeability among certain groups, but it really is more a reaction to our Congress’ inability to work together than a play for votes. The 112th Congress has been overwhelmingly unproductive and uncooperative, unable to pass laws at a rate comparable to that of previous sessions. This temporary reprieve from deportation protects those harmed by Congress’s stalemate on immigration policies. It is nice to see the administration and individual states taking action, since Congress has been unable to do so.

ZYDOLG,'RQ7XH Z Z

8QLYHUVLW\$YH LQ3XFNÂśV$OOH\ %HKLQG9DUVLW\

 ZZZNLVVP\JULWV\DOOFRP

Custom Tees

+2856 6XQGD\DPSP 0RQGD\&/26(' 7XHV:HGDPSP 7KXUV)ULDPSP 6DWXUGD\DPSP

Surf Outlet

Looking for New Graphic Designers and Artists for Their Own Clothing Lines. CUSTOM SHIRT DESIGNS & STICKERS Official carrier of Hinano Bags, SUP, Surf and Body Boards Surfvivor Media, Inc. 94-1388 Moaniani Street Unit 202 Waipahu, Hawaii 96797 Phone: (808) 676-0700 www.surfvivor.com


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043

CROSS

K A LEO T H E

2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 808•956•7043

Get the latest news and updates by checking our facebook page.

WORD PUZZLE

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week.

ACROSS 1 Bombards with junk email 6 Bk. after Proverbs 10 Lingering effect 14 Colorado snowboarding mecca 15 Laze 16 Phenom 17 Davis of “Commander in Chief” 18 Un-PC purchase? 19 Grain that’s rolled 20 Cause a major snafu 23 Educator LeShan 24 Wear a long face 25 Kicked out 28 2011 PGA Player of the Year Luke 30 Barrister’s deg. 31 Clinch, in slang 32 Spacely Space Sprockets employee 36 Part of PGA: Abbr. 39 Rating from Moody’s 40 Elusive 41 Pioneer 10 or Voyager 1 46 Shipping magnate Onassis 47 Benz- finish 48 Quaint love letter opener 52 Dollar deal? 54 Make better 56 Flagstaff-to-Tucson dir. 57 Umbrella-carrying Disney character 60 Pop star 62 Pop 63 Gullible 64 Ear piece 65 Works on the road 66 Chair designer Charles 67 Light beer ad word 68 Persian for “king” 69 Bar shot DOWN 1 Went south, in a way

2 Bogus 3 Theoretical proto-person 4 Item in a diner host’s stack 5 “Made from the Best Stuff on Earth” drink brand 6 Yale of Yale 7 Night sky streaker 8 Tiger’s weapon 9 “Hey Lover” rapper 10 Furry sci-fi critters 11 Chew out 12 Googler’s success 13 Parts of lbs. 21 Big fuss 22 Not minding one’s manners 26 Green sci. 27 Turn down 29 Lambs: Lat. 30 Jet giant 33 Hard to come by 34 Reason for braces, perhaps 35 Ready to drive 36 Cracked a little 37 “You betcha!” 38 Damage control efforts, imagewise 42 Sports group 43 Joins up 44 Epps of “House” 45 This puzzle’s title, based on the starts of 20-, 32-, 41- and 57-Across 49 Alaska native 50 Love letter sign-off 51 Take back to the lab 53 Mah-jongg pieces 54 Many-headed monster 55 PayPal funds 58 Wordsmith Webster 59 James of “The Godfather” 60 Below par 61 One may be fawning

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

WAN T TO THE SWE KNOW W LL IS H DOIN AT G? FOLL OW US @

kale

ooha

waii

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043

READ IT IN OR

PRINT

ONLINE www.kaleo.org

V O I C E


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

Comics


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 27 2012

Sports

A year-round rivalry UH Mānoa and UH Hilo duke it out M A RC A R AK AK I Sports Editor Perhaps a hypothetical head-to -head match between the UH Mānoa and UH Hilo golf teams is 2-2. UH Mānoa led 2-1 after the collegiate golf season, but after UH Hilo Vulcan Nick Matsushima’s runner-up fi nish in last week’s Mānoa Cup, it’s back to even. “Defi nitely – they [UH Mānoa] challenged us at our [UH Hilo] home course and we won; and we challenged them at their home course and they won,” Matsushima said. “When we went up to the mainland, they won. Coming down to the Mānoa Cup, luckily I made it to the fi nals and of all the college guys, I made it one of the highest.” UH Mānoa’s highest finisher in the tournament was Jared Sawada, who just completed his senior season with the Warriors. Sawada’s final-four appearance was the best of his career. A lthough the Mānoa Cup wasn’t a part of the NCA A collegiate season, both players represented their universities by wearing respective apparel. “I take a lot of pride in playing for four years here and I really enjoyed my time here,” Sawada said. “When I wear this gear, I kind of feel like ‘the man’.” “It feels pretty good just to know that I belong to a school and representing them,” Matsushima said. “Wearing the hat, it shows that you’re grateful that you went there.”

S I M I L A R TA L E N T A lthough UH Mānoa (Division I) and UH Hilo (Division II) participate against different levels of competition, both schools can agree that they both have nearequal talent levels.

“Looking over my four years, there was always a little more pressure on us,” Sawada said. “They play really well and they could even play in Division I.” “I know when we played a tournament at Pasatiempo [Golf Club in Santa Cruz, Calif.] they kicked our butts, but for the most part, playing golf in our junior golf days, most of our team is pretty equal,” Matsushima said. “But I think the practice facilities at Mānoa are a little better than Hilo.”

SISTER SCHOOLS For players from UH Hilo and UH Mānoa, the rivalry can best be described as friendly. “Corey Kozuma [sophomore at UH Hilo] – we still golf even though we’re not on the same team,” Sawada said. “Like [last week] we played, but we’re still competitive against each other.” If it wasn’t for Warrior sophomore David Saka, chances are Matsushima wouldn’t be a UH Hilo Vulcan. “I actually heard there was a spot open on the team from David Saka’s father,” Matsushima said. “And then I emailed [Hilo] coach [Earl] Tamiya and then after that he was going to have me as a walk-on, but then he wanted to give me a small scholarship just so I felt like I was on the team.” But nonetheless it’s still a rivalry and when asked about whenever UH Mānoa and UH Hilo play against each other Sawada said, “[We’re] definitely a lot more rooting for Mānoa to beat Hilo.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF 808GOLF.COM

One month after completing his collegiate eligibility, Jared Sawada continued to represent UH at the 104th Mānoa Cup two weeks ago. He reached the semifinals, though he lost to eventual champion Matthew Ma.

When I wear this gear, I kind of feel like ‘the man’.

Ka Leo Issue  

Ka Leo Issue