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Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 13 2013

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sports

Track and field team irate with unfinished athletics complex JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor Every weekday morning at 6 a.m., Kayla Kirk is at Clarence T.C. Ching Field, preparing herself for the Rainbow Wahine track and field team’s upcoming season. And every time she looks toward upper campus, she is reminded that she practices in the shadow of an unfulfilled commitment – the Clarence T.C. Ching Athletics Complex. “It is disappointing as an athlete to not have the promises of a new facility met,” Kirk said. “Every day I have to walk by the construction, and it is just a constant reminder of how far behind we are.” In April, University of Hawai‘i officials reported the complex could be finished by October 2013. Members of the Rainbow Wahine track and field team said they were told construction would be done by the end of summer. Now, the NCA A has stepped in and threatened to withhold certification, which could lead to sanctions that include UH teams being banned from NCA A tournaments.

Athletics Director Ben Jay has sought an extension from the NCA A and said that the bottom f loor, which hosts locker rooms and offices, must be opened by Jan. 28. The rest of the complex must be open by February, by order of this latest extension.

F RU S T R AT I O N O N A L L F RO N T S In 2008, the Ching Foundation donated $5 million to the University of Hawai‘i Athletic Department – the largest gift its ever received. However, construction on the project did not begin until 2012, after Regents approved $3 million in bond rev-

Every day I have to walk by the construction, and it is just a constant reminder of how far behind we are. - Kayla Kirk, sophomore track and field runner “It ’s frustrating that the locker rooms haven’t been completed yet, especially because our old locker rooms were torn down before the new ones had even begun to be built,” said Heather Delgado, a junior runner on the Hawai‘i track team. “ We haven’t been given any updates on when it will be completed, and for now, we are sharing locker rooms with the public.”

enues meant to expedite the process. Despite these extra funds, T. Iida Contracting Ltd. has informed UH officials that the Dec. 31, 2013, completion date will not be met. Last Wednesday, a Board of Regents committee took action in response to the NCA A’s latest threats by ordering an immediate audit of the $13.39 million project. “Anytime someone breaks a rule, there

should be a punishment,” Delgado said. “But on the other hand, the Athletics Department shouldn’t have to take the brunt of the blame. Promises from the department and the contractor weren’t met, and that’s why we don’t have a locker room.” With the project still under construction, members of the Hawai‘i cross-country and track and field teams are using public lockers and carrying their belongings with them. “I just hope that it is done soon,” said Louise Mulvey, a junior runner on the track team. “Right now, it’s pretty difficult to fit everything I need in the small lockers provided in the women’s locker room. So I find myself having to lug around a lot of my gear, which by the end of the day can get really heavy.” While the construction of the complex has been associated with UH’s Title IX plan to seek gender equality in athletics, some say that the project has had the opposite effect. “The construction that involves football or any other men’s team seems to be finished a lot quicker,” Kirk said. “It is just really disappointing that we aren’t able to enjoy the quality of facilities that these other teams have.”


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 13 2013

Twitter @kaleoohawaii | news@kaleo.org | Noelle Fujii Editor | Fadi Youkhana Associate

News Writers set sail for Graduate student receives international ‘Voyages’ sustainability award

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT BREWER

NOELLE F UJII NEWS EDITOR

Post-doctorate researcher Robert Brewer won the 2013 Graduate Student Research on Campus Sustainability Award for his dissertation on the results of the Kukui Cup Energy Challenge at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. “It’s an honor to win the award from AASHE (Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education), and really it reflects the work of the whole Kukui Cup team,” Brewer said. Brewer’s dissertation, “Fostering Sustained Energy Behavior Change and Increasing Literacy in a Student Housing Energy Challenge,” included a demonstration of increased energy literacy as a result of the challenge, the discovery of fundamental problems with the use of baselines for assessing energy competitions, the creation of two open-source software systems and the creation of an energy literacy assessment instrument. “So what Robert did was study the impact of the Kukui Cup, and he learned about the impact of the educational portion of the challenge and that students who participated in the Kukui Cup did learn more about energy issues than those that didn’t,” Information and Computer Sciences professor Philip Johnson said. The results were based on data collected in 2011 and have been used to improve the Kukui Cup in 2012 and 2013. “For example, because of the problems my dissertation revealed in using a traditional static baseline for evaluation, we have switched to a dynamic baseline,” Brewer said.

T H E KU KU I C U P E N E RGY C H A L L E N G E Brewer and Johnson developed the Kukui Cup Energy Challenge along with George Lee, Computer Science Ph.D. student Yongwen Xu and Computer and Information Sciences Ph.D. student Michelle Katchuck. Students in residence halls compete to see which f loor or building can use the least energy, while earning points by learning

about energy and sustainability. They started the work in 2010 and held the first Kukui Cup in the Hale Aloha Towers in 2011. A second UH Mānoa Kukui Cup was held in 2012. Brewer and his colleagues also assisted Hawai‘i Pacific University and the East-West Center in running their own Kukui Cups. “We situated the Kukui Cup in higher education for a few reasons,” Brewer said. “First off, as

in 2007 to pursue a Ph.D. in Computer Science. “There are many departments at UHM doing world-class work on climate change, such as SOEST,” Brewer said. “As a computer scientist, I wanted my research to help mitigate the problem.”

F ROM H AWA Iʻ I T O C O L O R A D O Brewer moved to Hawai‘i in 1992 after gradu-

In CS, we can create software and make it available to anyone in the world with Internet access. That’s a powerful way to make the world a better place. - Robert Brewer, post-doctorate researcher university researchers, residence halls are an obvious and convenient place to conduct research. The support and cooperation of UH Mānoa Student Housing has been essential to the success of the Kukui Cup. Involving students living in residence halls also made sense because one of the core ideas of the Kukui Cup is that education must be integrated into these types of competitions for them to help foster changes in behavior.” Johnson said Brewer’s dissertation had an impact on how the Kukui Cup was run. “The dissertation has had a significant impact on the way that we do the Kukui Cup now,” Johnson said. “It has indicated that, to me at least, his research indicates that it’s very important to combine education with the game, you know, kind of competition stuff.” About four years ago, the Collaborative Software Development Laboratory was awarded a three-year grant for about $400,000 by the National Science Foundation to investigate ways to create positive behavioral change with respect to energy usage, according to Johnson.

S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y I N H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N Brewer said he knew he wanted his research to directly address the problems of climate change and sustainability when he returned to UH Mānoa

ating with a B.A. in physics from Reed College in Portland, Ore. While living in Hawai‘i, he received his master’s in Information and Computer Sciences from UH Mānoa and co-founded the Internet Service Provider, LavaNet. “I like computer science because it combines the beauty of mathematics with practicality of engineering,” Brewer said. “In CS, we can create software and make it available to anyone in the world with Internet access. That ’s a powerful way to make the world a better place.” Since graduating in 2013 with a Ph.D. in Computer Science, Brewer has moved to Denmark, Colo., where he is a post-doctorate researcher in the Computer Science department at Aarhus University for the next two years. He is currently working on the EcoSense project, which aims to use data from sensors in smartphones and buildings to make people more aware of their environmental impact and to help foster changes in behavior. “My focus is on a dormitory in Aarhus that has been instrumented with a variety of sensors, making it into a living lab for energy behavior research,” Brewer said. “My work on the Kukui Cup has provided me with a great foundation to contribute on the EcoSense project.” To find out more information about the Kukui Cup, go to kukuicup.org.

L IZI A NDERSON Staff Writer Hawai‘i Review has relied on original submissions for the bulk of its material for 40 years. Keeping in line with tradition, this anniversary issue has a theme entitled “Voyages.” “It’s an inherently Pacific theme (that) speaks to our position here in the Pacific Ocean. The idea of journey and how any kind of epic story is usually about going out and having a new task. … It’s not just about crossing water; it can be about going across mind space and personal development,” editor in chief Anjoli Roy said. Hawai‘i Review expects a broad spectrum of submissions due to the immense possibilities the theme presents. Those who are interested in submitting should keep in mind that the piece needs to relate back to the theme, or it will not be considered. “We really like the energy that you get when you have a themed call for materials just because it seems like there’s a natural cohesion that comes together when you force people to adapt what they are working on to a call. … It creates a net that holds the issue together,” Roy said. Although the HR has been present for decades, its staff is always searching for fresh ways to energize the journal. “We have a really great designer who thinks outside the box. … I think that the print journals will be these really beautiful objects,” Roy said.

Submissions can be entered online at bit.ly/submit2HR by Dec. 15.


Twitter @kaleoopinions | opinions@kaleo.org | Doorae Shin Editor

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 13 2013

Opinions

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Drones and the War on Terror

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According to Pakistan’s Ministry of Defense, 2,227 people were killed in 317 drone strikes since 2008. I AN ROSS Contributing Writer While former President George W. Bush’s legacy will be defined by his initiation of the War on Terror, President Barack Obama has now defined the war’s legacy. During the last decade, the United States has proven it has an enormous technological advantage over its geopolitical adversaries.

C I V I L I A N O R T E R RO R I S T ? Since 2010, the U.S. has conducted active military bombardment with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, commonly known as drones. During this period, drones have operated in Libya, Yemen, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and possibly the Philippines. Despite being touted as the heights of innovation in targeting, drone strikes lead to an unknown number of civilian deaths. This is one of many significant consequences of drones, and the negative effects they have are a necessary part of the conversation. According to the Conf lict Monitoring Center, drone strikes have been occurring since 2004, though it is unclear which were for military bombardment and which were for covert operations. Since the initiation of the

drone strikes, about 3,000 people have died. Civilian causalities are often miscalculated and largely underestimated, as the Obama administration defines all military-aged males as combatants, and operations that kill these young males are seen as successful strikes. Human Rights Watch directly contradicts the Obama administration’s claim that civilian causalities are on the decline. They report that since 2009, 57 of the 82 people targeted and killed by drones in Yemen have been civilians. One particularly gruesome massacre occurred in Nangarhar, A fghanistan, where drone strikes killed 47 civilians, mostly women and children, at a wedding ceremony. In May, The New York Times quoted a Pentagon official who estimated that the current conf lict could continue for another 10 to 20 years. It is unlikely that the role of drones will become superf luous to this global conf lict within that timeframe, so determining the regulations and procedures of targeted strikes becomes paramount.

ligence Agency utilize drones. Currently, the CIA is essentially the coordinator of entire wars in multiple countries – a role that is historically and practically outside their purview. Recognizing this problem, Obama has pledged to transition this role away from the CIA and to the military. The goal should be to eliminate, or at the least, limit harm to civilians. Sixteen-year-old Malala Yousafzai, a major figure for women’s rights, visited the White House last month. She expressed concerns that drone strikes are fueling terrorism because “innocent victims are killed in these acts, and they lead to resentment among the Pakistani people.” While evidence on this is mixed, there comes a point when civilian deaths cease to become a mere matter of long-term strategy in the War on Terror and enters the realm of human rights abuse. Drones also contribute to increased anxiety and psychological trauma in targeted communities. In Pakistan, the use of drones seems to be winding down; the number of strikes has declined from the height of 122 in 2010 to 23 as of this year, according to the New American Foundation. ReguC H A N G I N G P R AC T I C E S lations on drone strikes are also In conjunction with convenbeing tightened. The NAF found tional military branches, the that under Bush, 33 percent of Joint Special Operations Comstrikes in Pakistan killed civilians, mand and the Central Intelwhile that number has declined to

11 percent under Obama. Previously, the policy of signature strikes in Pakistan proved especially controversial. While drone strikes are largely praised as precision attacks, strikes were used on anonymous individuals based on various metrics such as “pattern of life.” This allowed drones to target an individual based on locations traveled to, and a strike was often justified if one met in large gatherings of “military-aged males.” This practice has now ended in Pakistan. Recent White House policy changes on drones show promise. Still, what the president has done is codify the use of drones as a primary tool in the War on Terror. Today, drones make up 95 percent of targeted strikes as opposed to other methods like capture and kill missions, which was used to kill Osama bin Laden. While drones are the primary method of targeted strikes intended to kill terrorists, under Bush, a third of drone strikes were on militant leaders. Obama’s administration has shifted that number to lower than 13 percent. This indicates a major tactical change in the use of drones, as they are no longer used to decapitate the leadership but rather to collapse the network. Time will show which method is effective and which one better protects the lives of civilians.


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 13 2013

Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

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Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Sports

The highest level of exposure JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor

For one game – the Rainbow Warrior basketball team’s win over Western Michigan on Saturday – the toughest person on the floor wasn’t the seven footer or any of the players with sculpted biceps. It was a 60 year-old photographer, named Dennis Oda. Toward the end of the fi rst half, Hawai‘i point guard Keith Shamburger was forced out of bounds while going for a layup. As he crossed the baseline, his back smashed into Oda’s nose, which sent the Honolulu Star-Advertiser photographer’s head back into the table he was leaning on. A fter a few dazed moments, the man shooting his first basketball game in roughly four years realized he was leaving a “puddle” of blood on the court as it spewed from his nose. Stan Sheriff Center employees insisted that he seek first aid, but Oda wasn’t about to let the blood covering his clothing and seeping into his camera prevent him from doing his job. “I was thinking, ‘Is my nose broken? Eh, maybe it’s not,’” Oda said. “Then I thought, ‘Oh, it’s halftime, I gotta make deadline.’

They asked if I wanted to come to the medic right away. I said, ‘Right after I send my pictures.’” But Oda was in no hurry to seek treatment. He looked more like he ran into Freddy Krueger than Keith Shamburger, but Oda continued to shoot and edit photos through the first 12 minutes of the second half. It was only after having some fun with fellow photographers that he agreed to get his nose examined. “A couple of guys next to me were like, ‘Hey, look at him now. He’s taking selfies,’” said Warrior Insider’s Brandon Flores. “He’s over in the corner taking pictures of himself. Then he got the referee during one of the timeouts to take a group picture of the (photographers) sitting under the basket. The ref said, ‘That’s the first time in my 25 years of refereeing someone asked me to take a picture.’” As he sat on a cot provided by registered nurse Filomena Thompson, Oda’s cheerful attitude was unaffected by the blood on his clothes or the pain in his head. Instead, his attention was focused on his shirt that he brought back from the 2013 Women’s College World Series. He proudly reminisced on being able to photograph his niece, Kimberlee Souza, as she

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and the Washington Huskies made it to the NCAA semifinals and was determined not to get any blood on it. He could not have been much less successful. “( When I saw him) I thought, ‘He’s been through war,’” Thompson said. “I heard, ‘There’s blood all over the court.’ Oh my goodness. … When I heard ‘blood on the court,’ I was like, ‘Oh no, I gotta get there fast.’” Oda and Shamburger both agreed that the whole episode was accidental, but Shamburger claims there should be more restrictions on photographers. “That’s why I don’t think people who do pictures should be down there,” Shamburger said. “Because it’s dangerous on both sides. I could’ve hurt myself on that one, and he hurt himself. It’s more protection if they move farther behind the basket or something.” On the other side of the lens, Oda would not even consider taking himself an inch farther from the action. “You see a lot after about 37 years of photography,” Oda said. “I’ve been to riots in the Philippines and Korea where you had to put gas masks on and a helmet. You have to cover all your skin because the pepper gas is pretty corrosive. But I was never smashed up like this.”

Dennis Oda has covered events such as the Maroses’ exile and the eruptions of Kīlauea. COURTESY OF DENNIS ODA

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2013 november 13