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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 to THURSDAY AUG. 29, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 2

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

GRIDIRON

UH vs. USC preview, pg. 2 Top six, pg. 4 & 13 Siasau Matagiese, pg. 15 Tailgating, pg. 16


PAGE 2 | KA LEO | WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

UH vs. USC

From the Editor’s Desk Joey Ramirez Sports Editor

USC: Marqise Lee

Hawai‘i: Taylor Graham

PL AY ERS TO K EEP A N E Y E ON

LOS ANGLES TIMES/MCT

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The junior wide receiver and kickoff k k ff returner willll return this season to head the Trojan attack. Lee finished fourth in the Heisman Trophy balloting and is set to be one of the favorites for this year’s award . The reigning Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year already shares or holds 22 USC records.

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games are about much more than the action on the field. The fans, and especially the student section, are the reason that football is the most popular collegiate sport in the nation. The Gridiron aims to provide content that will enhance this experience inside and out of the stadium. Find out this year’s plans for the Mānoa Maniacs student section and how they plan on giving the Rainbow Warriors some home field advantage. And, of course, stock up on tips for a Heismanworthy tailgate party. The players are strapping on their pads. The cheerleaders are practicing their routines. The band is memorizing its marching. Now it’s time for you to set up the Solo cups, read up with Ka Leo and get ready for some football.

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After months of anticipation, it is finally that time again. Hawai‘i football is back at last, and Ka Leo welcomes you to its first Gridiron issue of the year. The Gridiron is a special edition of Ka Leo that runs before every UH home game of the season. Whether you are a die-hard who bleeds green and white or can’t tell between a tight end and an end zone, the Gridiron has you covered. Everything that you need to know about the upcoming game can be found in the Gridiron. Just turn a few pages to find out who this year’s key players are or which freshman you should look out for. While each issue of the Gridiron is packed with stats, news and predictions about the Rainbow Warriors and their opponents, we also recognize that football

The Rainbow Warriors open their second stint under head coach Norm Chow with a huge task: taking down No. 24 USC. Hawai‘i will look to avenge last year’s 49-10 loss to the then-No. 1 Trojans. Opening the season against a ranked opponent provides the Rainbow Warriors an opportunity to put Hawai’i on the college football map.

“That’s what you want as a D-I program – you want to be able to showcase against the best,” senior safety John Hardy-Tuliau said. “We’re coming out there against the best, and we will prove ourselves against the best.” Hawai’i will look to show a strong performance against USC as it prepares for its second season in the Mountain West Conference. The first season under Chow yielded a disappointing 3-9 overall record and a 1-7 conference record.

FADI YOUKHANA Staff Writer

Read an extended version of this article at http://www.kaleo.org

FILE PHOTO

The former Buckeye will try to lead the team’s ofof fense past its disappointing previous season. Graham is a pro-style quarterback with a strong arm that has generated a lot of excitement in the offseason training camp. His play will be essential to the Rainbow Warriors’ success this season as he looks to carry out Chow’s system to a better offensive performance.


SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

PAGE 3 | KA LEO | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28 2013

GRIDIRON

TIME,

ANY

PLACE. SURFING AT SANDY BEACH...

WHAT A WIPEOUT! OUCH! MY HEAD!

INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING

?

Come learn about volunteer opportunities in the community at the Volunteer Fair!

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 10AM - 2PM on Hawai’i Hall Lawn

maniac?

ARE YOU A

ANY

Organizations like Bishop Museum, Hawai’i Nature Center, Ronald McDonald House, and many more organizations will be there! A Service Learning Program public announcement. For other volunteer opportunities contact Service Learning Program at #808-956-4641

SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAM

Pick up RIO Funding Applications at the ASUH ofďŹ ce today! Deadline: September 18th at 4:00 pm Interviews on September 20th and 21st.

RIO Mixer! September 3rd @ 4:30PM

A great opportunity to meet other RIOs and with CSOs and spend the evening with great company and food.

Manoa Maniacs is commied to inslling a sense of PRIDE, UNITY, and SPIRIT within the student body at UH Manoa. We hope to build CULTURE and create TRADITION by bridging the gap between UH Athlecs, students, and even the community.

WANT TO GET INVOLVED? Email us at uhmaniac@hawaii.edu YOU NEED HEALTH INSURANCE! for more information, go to:

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PAGE 14 | KA LEO | WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

Manoa Maniacs Rewards Program GET SOCIAL AND WIN PRIZES! IT’S FUN AND FREE! Sign up with your email address, link your social media accounts and start earning points! Use your points to purchase gear and enter contests.

LEARN MORE AT uhmaniacrewards.com

official uh student tailgate party area

Come out and enjoy UH Football with free parking for the first 250 vehicles with two or more UH students in the vehicle. Also, music, contests, and fun-filled activities! Shuttle buses will be available during every home game to transport UH students to and from the stadium.

The first 500 UH students to arrive at the Tailgate Party (starts at 3pm) will receive a Manoa Maniacs rally towel!


SPORTS@KALEO.ORG TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

PAGE 15 | KA LEO | WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 2013

GRIDIRON Senior defensive tackle Siasau Matagiese made 21 tackles last season. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Born to Lead Jeremy Nitta Associate Sports Editor

In sports, coaches always have a couple of players that they call “reliable.” Often, this player is one who coaches praise for working hard, giving effort and making their teammates better. Meet senior defensive lineman Siasau Matagiese. The native of Waimea, Kaua‘i, better known as “Saui” by coaches and teammates, has emerged as the unquestioned leader of the Rainbow Warriors and the defensive line. “He makes my job a little bit easier,” defensive line coach Lewis Powell said. “Instead of just telling the guys what to do, I can tell them, ‘Here, this is what you’re supposed to do.’ He’s a senior. He knows what it takes to get it done on and off the field.”

BECOMING A RAINBOW WARRIOR The road to the Rainbow Warriors hasn’t been an easy one for Matagiese. After graduating from

Waimea High School, Matagiese attended Portland State for a year before transferring to Hawai‘i. Matagiese sat out a season due to NCAA transfer rules, then earned time as a backup in his sophomore year. He got a starting role as a junior, but injuries robbed him of playing time, costing him a pair of games. Still, he is grateful for the lessons he learned during that time. “I wouldn’t trade that experience for the world,” Matagiese said. “I got to see many places and meet new players and play under some great coaches. And right now, I get to play under some even better coaches. I feel that it’s an honor to play under Coach (Norm) Chow and his staff.” LEADING BY EXAMPLE Earlier this year, Matagiese was named to the team’s leadership council, a collection of players elected by the team to represent the squad.

“As a leader, he shows everybody how to do things,” Powell said. “He’s always the first in line. He’s a good leader on and off the field. He gets good grades, and he takes good care of his body in the training room.” That type of dedication by Matagiese stems from his perception of what being a leader truly means. “A lot of people say it’s natural and that leaders are born, not made,” Matagiese said. “But for me, I take it on my shoulders as a big responsibility. When I’m out there, I can’t make any mistakes. Coaches always say that before you can correct someone else, you have to make sure that you’re doing the right things and that you’re doing your job to the best of your abilities. So for me, I take it as a huge responsibility to make sure that I have myself down first before I correct anyone else or help the coaches.” Outside of football, Matagiese has found himself continuing his

leadership roles with a different set of people, as he has spent a portion of the summer working at Palama Settlement in Kalihi. “Once the kids fi nd out what you do, they embrace you, but they also hold you to high standards,” Matagiese said. “They let you know that they look up to you. Everything you do off the field as well affects those kids. When I’m out with my friends or out around town, I remember to hold myself accountable for my actions. Especially because I know that the younger generations are looking up to me.” FINAL CAMPAIGN This season, Matagiese has exited fall camp entrenched as a starter on the defensive line and has earned the respect of all those around him. “He’s exciting to watch because he plays with good passion and energy, and I think he’ll

be good for us this season,” Powell said. “He’s going to continue to be a leader. Hopefully he remains healthy, and everything should be fi ne.” But statistics and honors mean little compared to how he handles his role as a leader. “I’m so excited to see not how I do, but how the team does,” Matagiese said. “Everyone is killing it in the offseason and the summer. We even had guys living with each other so they could be here to make the workouts. That shows how serious everyone was taking this season, especially me. “But I just have to lead this team. I have to take control when it’s needed. I’m going to lead these boys through the season not only when it’s easy, but when things get hard on us. My biggest goal is only making sure this team does good. Everyone deserves it because they’ve all been working hard.”


PAGE 16 | KA LEO | WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

Mānoa Maniacs to offer ‘tailgate area’ at Aloha Stadium

FILE PHOTO

Jeremy Nitta Associate Sports Editor Toward the end of last season, the student section at Aloha Stadium began to grow empty. The list of reasons by students also began to grow, with excuses like “I don’t have a ride” or “I don’t have friends to go with” or even “It’s boring, and I have nothing to do there.” In an effort to combat those excuses and get students back at the games, the UH athletics department and the Mānoa Maniacs are now offering a tailgate area designated for only UH students at the stadium. “We’re trying to get the students engaged in school spirit,” said Cory Enriques, marketing assistant for the athlet-

ics department. “We’re trying to give them something to do that let them meet other students and interact. We’re trying to get them out there to support the team and the program and just build some excitement and tradition for them.” The plan is to offer students a new experience at football games to keep them entertained. “They’re going to have a huge area near the entrance to the stadium where different student groups like KTUH will have deejays, live bands and be able to serve food and beverages there, including alcohol,” Enriques said. “There will only be one entrance/exit for students, where they will have to show their student ID to get in and their personal IDs if they want to drink. The

FREE

vendor will be Centerplate, who will be supplying the service. “In the tailgate area, there will be lots of activities for the students. I know one of the games they were thinking of was Monster Pong, which is like beer pong with buckets and whiffle balls instead. So students will get a chance to enter a drawing to participate in the games. There’s hopefully going to be some tables and chairs there for them to sit, but it will be free for UH Manoa students, and only UH students will be allowed in the area.” Those aren’t the only perks being offered to UH students. “Right outside the tailgate area, there’s going to be a parking lot area that we have blocked off,” Enriques said. “There’s going to be 250 stalls, so students coming to the

game can park there. As long as they have two or more students in their car, they can get in and park in the lot for free. “We’ll also be set up near when the buses drop off students. The bus service will be bringing students from the UH campus and the dorms, so there will be no excuse for students who don’t have a ride to the stadium.” After last season’s disappointing student attendance, Enriques said he hopes that this will help spark a revival in the student body. “The UH athletic department purchased the area for the students,” Enriques said. “We have this area, so now it’s up to the students to come out and fill it.” For those not driving, buses to the game will depart at 3:30 p.m. from Dole Street in front of Frear Hall.

VISIT HAWAIIATHLETICS.COM FOR SEASON SCHEDULE S

ADMISSION

RAINBOW WARRIOR FOOTBALL #HawaiiFB Thursday vs. #24 USC @ 5:00 p.m. (SEASON OPENER)

RAINBOW WAHINE VOLLEYBALL #HawaiiWVB Friday vs. #1 Texas @ 7:30 p.m. (SEASON OPENER) Saturday vs. UTEP @ 8:30 p.m. Sunday vs. San Diego @ 5:00 p.m.

AND FOLLOW US ON

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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 to THURSDAY, AUG. 29 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 2

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

follow our

T W IT T E R : @KALEOOHAWAII for BREAKING

NEWS, UPDATES, WEB EXCLUSIVES & VIDEO COVERAGE.

Greenwood’s leave of absence FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

A LEX BIT TER Senior Staff Writer As University of Hawai‘i System President MRC Greenwood enters the final days of her tenure as the university’s top administrator, it’s unclear what her plans are for the immediate future. Although more than a month has passed since the Board of Regents approved a year-long leave of absence and a part-time position on UH’s medical research faculty for Greenwood, no details about what the president will do during her time away from campus have been divulged. “ The specifics of what she will be doing during her year’s unpaid leave from UH and during the projected annual six months away from the UH medical school have not been determined at this time,” UH spokeswoman Lynne Waters said in an email. Under the deal approved at the Board’s July 18 meeting, Greenwood will take a one

year unpaid leave of absence as soon as Interim President-designate David Lassner takes over the position on Sept. 1. The deal also included a place at UH’s John A. Burns School of Medicine, where Greenwood is expected to aid in the creation of a center to study diabetes and obesity at the school. That faculty researcher position includes an annual salary of $293,640, but the outgoing president will receive only half of that each year because she has agreed to work only half of each year at JA BSOM. At just less than $147,000, Greenwood’s salary will be a fraction of the current $475,000 that is paid to serve as UH’s president. The new rate will put her at or close to the top of the pay scale at the medical school, where the median annual salary for a full professor is $202,019, according to data in the UH Professional Assembly’s Salary Comparison Database.

Although Greenwood explained in an email announcing her resignation last spring that she looks forward to having time to spending time with her family, “to write, teach and do some policy work,” university officials declined to provide specifics on what she will do for six months out of the year. Greenwood, who resigned as the Provost for the University of California System after allegedly creating jobs for family and friends within that institution before coming to UH, is spending her final days as president attending special events in honor of her retirement, including a kīpaepae ho‘oku‘u, or “release ceremony,” held at UH Hilo on Aug. 23. Meanwhile, the Board of Regents is moving ahead with the search for Greenwood’s replacement, indicating that they may try to fi nd a qualified candidate with “a strong connection to Hawai‘i” before looking for candidates outside of the state.

TOP THREE HIGHEST ADMIN SALARIES

AT A GLANCE

Dean of John A. Burns School of Medicine $479,760 UH System President $427,512 UH Cancer Center Director $391,416 as of 2012 according to uhpa.org


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Aug. 28 2013

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Features@kaleo.org | Jackie Perreira Editor

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Aug. 28 2013

Features

Kicking off fall concerts

SHELBY SAMORI Contributing Writer Your summer may be over, but that doesn’t mean your concerts are. While Summer Wonderland, The Cure and other concerts ended their tours, new ones fl ood O‘ahu’s venues every month. In anticipation of your new semester, here are a few things to look forward to.

SEPT.

6

THE SLACKERS WITH GO JIMMY GO AND THE BLUE RIBBONS

If you want a change of pace from the hip-hop scene, this band is the one to do it. Originating from Brooklyn, N.Y., The Slackers have been producing Ska music since 1991. Having existed for more than two decades, this band has produced 13 albums at a steady rate and continues to grow. All ages are welcomed to this venue, and there is a bar for those of age. If you’re not the sitting-still type, Brian’s has you covered. Multiple pool tables and arcade games are available for you while you listen and socialize.

ADAM ANT BY MARKDUMONT.FLICKR

SEPT.

14

Where: Hawaiian Brian’s Showroom, 1680 Kapi‘olani Blvd. When: Sept. 6, 8:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Cost: $20 Ages: All

ADAM ANT

Almost 18 years since his last album, Adam Ant released his latest album in January 2013 and will be performing as part of his comeback at The Republik. Despite his absence in the music world, many of Ant’s albums were successful, including “Kings of the Wild Frontier,” which remained on the UK Album Chart for 12 weeks as number one. Located on Kapi‘olani Avenue, The Republik is within a close distance from UH. In addition, the structure is within walking distance to those already at Ala Moana Shopping Center who plan on stopping by after. No food is allowed at this event. Where: The Republik, 1349 Kapi‘olani Blvd #30 When: Sept. 14, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Cost: $35 Ages: All accompanied by an adult

GO JIMMY GO BY JUSTIN ORNELLAS.FLICKR

SEPT.

20

LESS THAN JAKE

Less Than Jake is a ska punk band that formed in 1992 in Florida. The group released its first album, “Pezcore,” in 1995 and has since founded its own label. After its show at The Republik, Less Than Jake is set to have 32 more shows before the end of the year. The band’s newest album, “See the Light,” will be released on Nov. 12. For more information about the group and its upcoming shows, go to www.lessthanjake.com.

LESS THAN JAKE 2 BY VICTORIA MORSE / FLICKR

Where: The Republik, 1349 Kapiʻolani Blvd. When: Sept. 20, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Cost: $26 Ages: All accompanied by an adult


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Aug. 28 2013

Opinions@kaleo.org | Tim Metra Editor

Opinions

K R O W O T T ? N O A W KA LE FOR Gain skills in reading, writing, editing and communication.

Email editor@kaleo.org

Peace to the ‘War on Styrofoam’

Styrofoam manufacturers said the Department of Health’s report that styrene could cause cancer was “completely unjustified by the latest science,” according to ABC News. FILE PHOTO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

DOOR AE SHIN Staff Writer Say hello to the first semester since the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus banned expanded polystyrene foam products at dining locations. EPS foam, better known as Styrofoam, has been a hot topic recently, as hundreds of cities, counties and even countries like Haiti and China are passing bans and regulations on the controversial product. Just a few months ago, styrene, a main component in EPS foam, was classified as “reasonably anticipated to be carcinogenic.” It was also directly linked to neurological and respiratory illnesses. EPS foam is one of the most commonly littered products, and it is almost never recycled; in most cases, it isn’t even recyclable. A lightweight product, EPS foam fl ies away and breaks into small pieces easily, making it harder to clean up and easier for animals to ingest. Last February, the front page of Ka Leo focused on Styrofoam at UH Mānoa while a petition was gaining momentum throughout

the spring semester. The same day that article ran, Chancellor Tom Apple and the administration responded in support of a potential ban on EPS foam at UH Mānoa. As students of the Surfrider Foundation at UH Mānoa campaigned for support, gaining more than 1,000 signatures online and in paper, a draft policy was written with the help of the Mānoa Sustainability Council. With input from all stakeholders on campus including Food Services, Sodexo and the Chancellor’s Offi ce, as well as input from experts and community members from organizations such as Styrophobia and the Surfrider Foundation, a policy was submitted for approval. The “War on Styrofoam” lasted a few months and came to a peaceful end. On April 2, a policy was approved, and the ban on EPS foam was passed just in time to kick off Earth Month. Immediate changes may not be seen, but in writing, the policy requires all new vendors to provide food service products other than EPS foam, giving priority to encouraging reusable and compostable (plant-based) products. Current

vendors can only renew contracts by agreeing to the new policy. So, though we may see Styrofoam around campus here and there, be assured that it will be gone soon enough. As a state, Hawai‘i’s movement toward environmental stewardship is more apparent than ever before. We are the first state to ban plastic bags, and there is an ever-growing use of renewable energy in homes and businesses. Attempts have been made to ban EPS foam at the state level earlier this year, and environmentalists across the state will continue to push for similar initiatives in the future. With attempts to make UH Mānoa a model for sustainability, there is a strong commitment to environmental justice that is growing every year. With a system-wide sustainability policy in the works for all of UH, policies like this are part of the future of our campus and campuses across the islands.

Scan this QR code to look at the policy banning EPS foam.


Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Aug. 28 2013

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Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Aug. 28 2013

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PAGE 12 | KA LEO | WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

Rainbow Warrior offense looks for a fresh start Blake Tolentino Web Specialist

Freshman running back Steven Lakalaka was named to the all-state team in high school as a junior and senior. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Freshman running back Aofaga Wily finished his Kahuku career with 4,205 rushing yards, the second-most in state history. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Last season, the beginning of the Norm Chow era ushered in sweeping changes to the identity of the University of Hawai‘i football team. Once known for its explosive “run ‘n shoot” offense, the team struggled to adapt to the drastic changes in philosophy Chow brought with him. One major change was the new focus on the ground game in lieu of the previous regime’s all-out passing attack. However, the running game was inconsistent. Now, with two of last year’s top three rushers no longer on the team and returning starter Joey Iosefa possibly sidelined for the season opener with a foot injury, two fresh faces will look to make an immediate impact.

FRESHENING UP THE BACKFIELD Running backs Steven Lakalaka and Aofaga Wily join the Rainbow Warriors after impressive senior campaigns in high school. Lakalaka enters as a former Gatorade Hawai‘i Football Player of the Year, coming off of a 1,154yard season with 12 touchdowns on 218 carries. Wily, meanwhile, was even more dominant at Kahuku High School with 1,744 rushing yards and 27 touchdowns on the season, earning recognition as the state’s Offensive Player of the Year. As remarkable as their highschool performances were, facing USC in their college debut presents a significant rise in competition. With the numerous offseason losses to the running back corps, both freshmen will need to adjust to the speed and physicality of the college game

immediately if the Rainbow Warriors hope to start the season with a solid offensive performance after last season’s disappointing output.

BUILT TO RUN Fortunately for UH, it seems that both running backs come equipped with the physical tools to shine. Lakalaka and Wily provide tangible upgrades in speed in the place of Iosefa and should provide the offense with a couple of dangerous weapons. Lakalaka has the build to perform a variety of duties, with enough strength to power inside and enough quickness to get to the edge, while Wily’s agility provides a perfect counter point to the bruising downhill running that Iosefa provides. Combined, the three give Chow a multitude of options in the backfield, with each presenting unique challenges for opposing defenses. Chow’s offense focuses heavily on the rushing attack, both as a primary source of offense and also for setting up the passing game. As the running game goes, so does the rest of the offense. With Iosefa still recovering from injury, Lakalaka and Wily will likely be relied upon to keep the offense going and will need to turn in strong performances if UH hopes to win early.

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2013 gridiron