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A K LEO T H E

MONDAY, DEC. 16, 2013 to SUNDAY, JAN. 12, 2014 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 40

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

Your step-by-step guide to surviving the end of the fall semester


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

TABLE OF CONTENT S

0406

0913

BRACE YOURSELVES

1417

04

Evolution of finals

06

All-nighters

KA LEO IN REVIEW

FOOD AND FITNESS

2023

09

Eat on the cheap

10

Avoid these foods

13

Bust a move

ACADEMICS

14-15 2013 in Ka Leo News

20-21 Does GPA matter?

16-17 The best from the photo desk

22

Take the year off

23

Get a job

2428

ATHLETICS 24

Diving in the Olympics

27

Sports during the break

28

Dumb jocks stereotype


Page 3 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Bianca Bystrom Pino Managing Editor Joseph Han Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Assoc Chief Copy Editor Kirstie Campbell News Editor Noelle Fujii Assoc News Editor Fadi Youkhana Features Editor Jackie Perreira Assoc Features Editor Karissa Montania Opinions Editor Doorae Shin Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assoc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Co-Photo Editor Chasen Davis Co-Photo Editor Ismael Ma Online Photo Editor Jessica Homrich Web Specialist Blake Tolentino

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Gabrielle Pangilinan PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Rebekah Carroll, chair; Nicholas Pope, vice chair; or Mechelins Kora Iechad, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

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THE EVOLUTION OF FINALS PRIYA R ASHID Special Issues Editor Finals week is the time of year when there is no makeup and your clothes don’t matter. Pull on some yoga pants, start brewing the coffee and microwaving your cup of noodles (close Netflix) and procrastinate on the studying you have to do by reading this piece on final exams. Here is the anticipated time line of this month.

TWO WEEKS LEFT

1. You realize finals are two weeks away. 2. You acknowledge that you may have skipped, slept through or Facebooked during one too many lectures. 3. You promise you won’t miss any classes for the rest of the semester... unless it is to study for other classes. 4. Ask yourself, “Can I really get everything done?” Grab coffee. 5. Become overly confident. Allow yourself to watch one more episode of Supernatural. Pick up and leisurely read Ka Leo. 6. Glance at a syllabus. Cue panic. 7. Determine to start studying. 8. But when you get home you are so tired from being so determined that you take a nap. 9. But sleep would waste too much time so you watch another episode of Supernatural. 10. And another. 11. Realizing how difficult this week is going to be, you just finish the whole season. You deserve this.

ONE WEEK LEFT

12. Now there is only one week.

13. You know nothing. 14. Panic sets in. 15. Depression. “What have I done?” 16. Fearful. 17. Angry. You consider joining a biker gang. 18. Mentally unstable.

THREE NIGHTS BEFORE

19. Finally begin to study. Hallelujah. 20. Start dating a coffee cup. 21. The sleep and healthy eating habits begin to disintegrate. 22. You begin to feel like a superhero without sleep ... a delusional, yoga pants wearing superhero of Sinclair Library 23. Everything anyone says becomes funny. 24. You have no idea what you are actually studying at this point. 25. Everyone and every sound becomes annoying. 26. The coffee isn’t strong enough. Stop at the liquor store. Cue crying. 27. Complain on Facebook. 28. You become a despondent zombie. 29. Somehow you are motivated again.

DAY BEFORE

30. You finally start cramming the day before. 31. At this point you’re out of confidence and legitimately don’t care anymore. 32. So you take 20 15-minute power naps

EXAM DAY

33. You go to class to take the exam hoping the odds will be ever in your favor. 34. You see the test. 35. You’re shocked, dismayed, hurt. Feel slightly violated. 36. Wish you had studied harder, longer and had different genetic material. 37. But after two hours, you turn in the test. 38. A big part of you feels doubtful, confused and considers therapy. 39. But the bigger part of you is about to dance out of that exam room because you ultimately realized you did it. 40. Until next semester.


Page 5 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Scheduling for success NOELLE FUJII News Editor

TAKE YOUR FIRST STEP

TO SUCCESS! YOU’LL QUICKLY LEARN THAT WE HIRED YOU TO EVENTUALLY RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS. AND YOU’LL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH PEOPLE AS MOTIVATED AND DRIVEN AS YOU. YOU’LL BRING YOUR DEGREE TO THE TABLE, AND WE’LL HELP YOU MAKE CRUCIAL BUSINESS DECISIONS IN NO TIME. YOU’LL LEARN HOW TO RUN A MILLION-DOLLAR BUSINESS, MAXIMIZE PROFITS AND MOTIVATE A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS, WHILE HAVING FUN ALONG THE WAY.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICANTS FOR:

MANAGEMENT

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ENTERPRISECAREERS

KENNETH RODRIGUEZ-CLISHAM KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

classes to relax and eat. You’ll be happy that you had the time to eat, or you’ll be sitting in class wishing you did. A big question on many students’ minds is whether to start off the day with a super early class or to start the day late and end with a late-night lab. If you work in the early mornings or in the late afternoons these might be your only options. Starting a class at 7:30 a.m. every day can be tiring, but it can also be worth it when you’re done with your day by 12 p.m. and can go straight to work without having to worry about making it back in time for another class later in the day. Ending the day with a late-night lab can be the kicker that makes you glad you took it because you were able to work all morning and afternoon, or it can be one of the worst mistakes you’ve made because by that point, you’re exhausted. Be sure to weigh the pros and cons of these types of classes to make sure your schedule fits your lifestyle. Lastly, remember to always have a backup plan. There may not be enough sections of each of the classes that you need, or those sections may not be at the right times for your personal schedule. Find at least two classes that can fit the requirement that you need at two different times that can work with your schedule. This way you’ll still be able to take a class that you need when you need it.

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Planning for next semester can be stressful. Class times, getting the classes you need and finding time for meals and work can be hectic in the short period that we have to register. But, planning ahead and thinking scenarios through can be a lifesaver in having an enjoyable semester. First, make sure you know what classes you need for the next semester. Have you finished all of your general education requirements? Do you need to finish some graduation requirements? Don’t overlook any of the required classes you need to graduate, or you might end up regretting it later when you have to stay another semester just to take one more class. Start off planning your schedule by prioritizing and finding one class at one time that you like. Then plan around it. Decide on the time that you will set aside for school, work

and play. If you work in the mornings, plan your classes to be all in the afternoons, evenings and nights. If you work at night, plan your classes to be in the early mornings and afternoons. Be sure to set aside time to get to class. It can be stressful when you’re always running to make it to class on time. It’ll catch up to you as well. A good rule of thumb to determine how long each break between each class should be is to look at how far your classes are on campus. If you’re taking a class from 7:30- 8:20 a.m. at the Kamakakūokalani Building for Hawaiian Studies and then have another at 8:30 a.m. in Webster Hall, that’s probably not a good idea nor is that enough time for you to get to class, running or not. If you have two classes across campus, set at least 15-20 minutes between your classes so you’ll have enough time to get a snack or go to the bathroom along the way. If you have classes around lunch or dinner time, make sure you have at least an hour between

WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V.


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

How to pull an all-nighter NATEONE/FLICKR

KEN REYES Senior Staff Writer

When procrastination kicks in and the mountain of schoolwork starts building up during finals week, some students have no other choice but to sacrifice sleep for the sake of an exam or a deadline. However, pulling an all-nighter is not as easy as it seems. Staying awake is one thing and also much easier to accomplish, but maintaining focus is an entirely different process. Keep in mind that sleep deprivation is unhealthy and can reap several consequences, such as impaired judgment, memory loss and an increase in obesity and heart disease. However, the necessity to stay awake may come up, especially during fi nals week when it can become a must instead of an option for students.

Here are some tips on how to pull a successful all-nighter:

1. If you know you are going to pull an allnighter on a certain day, make sure you get more than enough rest the day before. Also, if it is possible, take a one- to two-

hour nap before the evening begins, as this would likely break the body’s circadian rhythm, or biological clock, temporarily and allow you to stay up longer than usual. 2. Manage your time wisely. Create a schedule of what needs to be done at each hour of the night, and allot a few breaks in between to avoid monotony and burnouts. Make sure you have all the materials you need to study for that exam or complete the project. The last thing you want to be is unprepared for the night and waste time trying to gather what you need instead of doing what needs to be done. 3. Caffeine is an easy solution to stay awake, whether it be in the form of coffee, soda or energy drinks. However, be careful about your intake, as the buzz could only be as temporary as the life span of a mayfly. Also, beware of a stealthy thief called the post-buzz crash, which may hastily rob you of your resolve to stay awake. To combat this, drink twice as much cold water as you would drink your caffeinated beverage, as this will keep you hydrated.

4. Snacking will likely keep you going through the night as well. But just like caffeine, be cautious about what you munch on as you cram your brain or type your fi ngers off. Foods such as sandwiches, cereal and fresh fruit are packed with proteins, complex carbohydrates and sugars that will fuel your body more than junk food and candy. 5. Stay away from the couch or bed, if possible. Better yet, keep vigil in places other than your home, such as at a coffee shop or in a library. While it may not ward off sleepiness entirely, at least there is no pillow around where you can lay your head. Being outside also forces you to pay attention to your surroundings. 6. Break a sweat and avoid being lethargic. Do jumping jacks, pushups or jog around the area to give you that burst of alertness. It will raise your heart rate and help keep you alert and stimulated. Follow up with a glass of cold water. 7. Be around people, especially your friends. They will motivate you to stay awake (and vice versa). Share a laugh, talk

story and snack with them in between studying. It will not only make the night bearable but enjoyable as well. The temptation to fall asleep will be there, but that’s when your friends can slap you awake and push you to keep going. Make sure to return the favor if you catch them snoozing.

7. Create an environment that stimulates and gives you a sense of uncomfortability, such as keeping the lights on, playing loud, upbeat music (through your earphones if in public) or watching some television in the background.

8. Know your limits. If you absolutely cannot combat the drowsiness, set a strong, annoying alarm signal to go off after half an hour and take that nap. But once you are done with all your tasks, do not waste any more time. Catch some sleep. Any sleep, even an hour or two, is better than no sleep at all, especially if an exam or a presentation follows on that day. While these tips can get you through a night without sleep, it will not guarantee an A for that exam or project. Staying awake is half of the battle. But after getting through the all-nighter, reaping the reward of satisfaction and sleep will be well worth it.


Page 7 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Group collaboration: avoid the nightmare ELLISE K AKAZU Contributing Writer

Your professor announces that a group project. You can either panic and start pulling your hair out or keep calm and take on the challenge with a positive mindset. We have all had good and bad group experiences. Take a minute to think about your experiences and note what made them total nightmares. Was it the group members’ attitudes? Was it the lack of organization? To try and avoid those sticky situations next semster, here are a few tips that may help alleviate the stress and pain that come with group collaborations.

BREAK THE ICE Start with introducing yourself in a polite fashion and other group members will likely do the same. Get to know your group and establish a level of respect. ORGANIZE AND ESTABLISH ROLES

Have deadlines within the group. Set Once the group has an understanding of the assignment, take a note of what up a date for the group to look over the each member is best at. Make a list of work that is done and use that time to make any changes. roles and tasks that need to be done. Try and let members BE PREPARED FOR choose what assignment MISTAKES they would like to take Even if you do all the on so that each perright things, there is son can have a sense BREAK THE ICE always a chance for of power. ORGANIZE AND ESTABLISH ROLES error. No one is perfect, and therefore STAY CONNECTED STAY CONNECTED it is important to Get everyone’s CREATE DEADLINES manage negativity contact informaBE PREPARED FOR MISTAKES and responsibilities tion and decide ACCEPT NEW IDEAS professionally. Acwhich means of cording to an online communication, such article on Forbes, “the as email, phone, Skype ability to manage disor text, is best. Follow up agreements without letting with each other. Make sure them rise to personal conflict is you communicate frequently, even if it is a simple question like asking another hallmark of successful teams identified by Bennett and Gadlin. And how someone’s research is going. while no one wants to think about it in CREATE DEADLINES

the exciting early days of a project, joint ventures do often fail — so it’s important for prospective team members to write and sign what Gadlin calls a ‘prenuptial agreement,’ spelling out how responsibilities are to be allocated.”

ACCEPT NEW IDEAS Group projects can have their ups and downs, but they are things that most people will have to deal with. Our world is becoming more interconnected with the help of technology, and it is impossible to avoid working with other people. We need to adapt to a new way of learning, living and working. There are multitudes of cultures, ethnicities, religions and backgrounds, so having a straightforward, negative attitude will not take you far in life. Embrace others and learn to accept the idea of working with people. In the words of Henry Ford, “Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”

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Page 9 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Take-out: time for food Location: Sustainability Court- Da Spot Location: 2469 South King yard Hours: Mon-Sun, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Street Hours: Mon, 9 a.m.–9:30 p.m.; Staying healthy is imporTue-Sun, 10:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m. tant, but with finals, cooking may not be top priority. These Teddy’s Bigger Burger take-out places for you are OFF CAMPUS Vegetarians and people need- Location: 2424 S. Beretania St. close to UH Mānoa and will ing gluten-free items can pick up Phone: 949-0050 keep you full for finals. a plate of curry at Da Spot. Salads, Hours: Mon, 9 a.m., Tue-Sun, cheap fruit and plates of vegetari- 10:30 a.m.–9 p.m. an curry, lamb and Middle Eastern FOOD TRUCKS Manoa Marketplace Most food trucks on cam- dishes are specialties. For a burger and French Location: 2851 E. Mānoa R pus will supply lunch before exams. Blue Truck Teppanyaki, Le fries or even a salad, call in Phone: 988-0520 Crêpe Café, Hank’s Haute Dogs to Teddy’s Bigger Burger. Get Hours: Mon-Sun, 6a.m.-11p.m. and Simply Ono have cheap a milkshake to help keep you lunches on-campus to pick up. up studying. Ten dollars for an Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf Visit Blue Truck Teppanyaki for original burger, French fries Address: 2754 Woodlawn Drive, steak, garlic shrimp, and Porta- and a drink is worth your time. Unit 7-106 Safeway, Longs’ and Star- Hours: Mon-Sun, 5:30 a.m.-9 bella mushroom (depending on season). Try veggie or regular bucks can provide hot meals, p.m. hot dogs at Hank’s before a poke or coffee, but stop by night of studying or take one the other restaurants if youʻre Island Manapua Factory of your last Hawaiian meals at looking for something more. Location: 2752 Woodlawn Drive Simply Ono before going back Mānoa Marketplace is half an Hours: Mon-Sat, 8 a.m.–8 p.m.; home. Grabbing a breakfast hour walk from Campus Center Sun, 8 a.m.–7 p.m. or dessert from Le Crêpe Café or a minute from Lowry Avenue is comfort food after an exam. (the last stop on the Rainbow Kozo Sushi Govinda’s is vegetarian and Shuttle; Monday–Friday, last Location: 2334 S. King Street route at 6 p.m). Hours: Mon-Sun, 9:30 a.m.-7 works with gluten-free needs. The Coffee Bean and Tea p.m. Leaf has take-out meals such as Blue Truck Location: 1810-1820 University pasta salad, bagels or burritos for breakfast, chicken wraps for HEALTH FOODS Avenue Down to Earth and Kokua Hours: Mon-Sun, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.. lunch and lemon bars for dessert. Expect their coffee to be Market in Mōʻiliʻili are the best of high quality. stops for vegetarian, vegan Hank’s Haute Dogs At Island Manapua Factory and gluten free food. Take a Location: POST parking lot Hours: Tuesday and Friday, 10 you can buy manapua for you plate of your favorite food-laand your friends and eat your sagna, curry and chili at Down a.m-2 p.m. dinner at your dorm while work- to Earth are all vegetarian. ing on a study guide. Not only Kokua Market is the only coLe Crêpe Café can you read while holding a ops in Hawaiʻi-don’t miss out. Location: 2515 Dole Street Hours: Mon-Fri, 7:45 a.m.-5:30 manapua, getting take-out dim sum dinner for almost $1.50 per Down to Earth p.m. dish is a deal. Location: 2525 South King St If you and your roomate need Hours: Mon-Sun, 7:30 a.m.–10 Simply Ono Location: Krauss Hall turn- food that can be saved for a long p.m. night, sushi platters from Kozo around Hours: Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.–1:45 Sushi, self-labeled the “best Kokua Market take-out sushi in town,” provide Location: 2463 South King p.m. 45 pieces of sushi for $30, the Street perfect number to split. Hours: Mon-Sun, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Govinda’s Vegetarian Buffet

KIRSTIE CAMPBELL Associate Chief Copy Editor

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Remember pizza when ordering food for you and your roommates. Whether getting Domino’s pizza combinations (such as buffalo chicken or Pacific Veggie) or trying Boston Pizza and Pizza Hut pizza, you will be full during your early morning of studying. Domino’s Address: 2424 S. Beretania St. Hours: Sun-Thu, 10 a.m.-1 a.m.; Fri-Sat, 10 a.m.-2 a.m. Online order: dominos.com Pizza Hut Address: 2320 S. King Street Hours: Sun-Thu, 10 a.m.–11 p.m.; Fri-Sat, 10 a.m.–12 a.m. Online order: pizzahut.com

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Page 10 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Foods for thought, foods to avoid NOELLE FUJII News Editor With finals approaching, you’ll need all the study time you can get. You’ll also need to be prepared for this study time. You’ll need your books, flashcards, computer, pen, pencil and food. Here are some tips on what foods are better for you to eat during your study time and what foods you should avoid. The brain requires a lot of energy, as well as a constant source of it. According to an article in the Star Advertiser by Alan Titchenal and Joannie Dobbs, Ph.D.s, from UH Mānoa’s Food Science and Human Nutrition department, the brain likes sugar. They said consuming carbohydrates and protein are important for brain function. “Based on research conducted on brain nutrition and mental performance, the most important food components for brain function are carbohydrate and protein,” Titchenal and Dobbs said in the article. “Ideally, the carbohydrate is one with a low glycemic index, meaning that it results in a more gradual rise and fall in blood glucose levels.”

A good source of protein can come from eggs and meats such as chicken and beef. Scramble some eggs in your kitchen or grill some chicken for an easy source of protein and a convenient snack. Whole-grain cereal with milk and fruit, yogurt with fruit and miso soup with rice are also good snack choices. According to Titchenal and Dobbs, the meal should not be too large as “a heavy meal can cause tiredness because extra blood flows to the intestines to aid in digestion and absorption of nutrients.” They also said that blood glucose typically drops two hours after a meal, unless you’re diabetic. “A light snack such as fruit or yogurt might give blood glucose the slight rise needed to maintain optimal brain function,” Titchenal and Dobbs said. Avoid sweets and sugary foods. According to the Purdue University Student Health Center’s bulletin, “If you crave sweets, consider a high protein snack instead.” Choose a protein bar with 15 grams of protein instead of a candy bar. Be sure to read the nutrition label carefully.

Study Foods According to BBC Good Food, these foods are particularly important for brain function. • Whole grains: pasta, cereals, wheat bran and granary bread • Oily fish: salmon, trout, mackerel, herring, sardines and kippers • Blueberries • Tomatoes • Pumpkin seeds • Broccoli • Nuts ALL PHOTOS BY ANTOINETTE RANIT / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Page 11 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

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Interested in getting involved in a fun, on-campus position? Why did you join Campus Center Board (CCB)? I joined CCB because I wanted to get out of my comfort zone within my own little group of friends and actually make something out of my college experience. Driven by some sort of previously inert ambition, I began joining clubs, being active and searching through numerous RIOs and CSOs, and finally, I ended up here, a member of the University of Hawaii at Manoa Campus Center Board! How do YOU benefit from being on CCB? Being involved with CCB certainly has its perks. Something that definitely stands out and that I like the most is the fact that we’re active not only within our own legislative processes, but we actually have the opportunity to get out there to the student body and physically serve them in person, whether it be on our own initiative as a CCB group or as one of the initiatives of the programming arms that make up the entire identity of the Campus Center Board Ohana. Should other students get involved with CCB? Why? Most definitely. The way I see it, CCB is one of those outlets where we can have the power to change or to create something that everyone wants to see get done. Ultimately, the members of the board and their unique personalities affect the overall quality and quantity of the events that happen at the Campus Center throughout the year, and with each new member that we get, the stronger these events become. I mean, if that’s not enough to convince you to join, there’s a lovely stipend that comes with being a part of this organization!

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Page 13 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Stay fit while staying in the dorms KELLY SLOAN Staff Writer

Looking for a workout routine that doesn’t include leaving your dorm room? It may be difficult for college students to find the time to head down to the campus gym for a simple workout due to busy schedules or overcrowding at the gym. There are many workouts that college students can do in the comfort of their dorm rooms while still getting the results they want. There are some important factors to consider before working out: Be sure to hydrate and eat a well-balanced meal prior to working out so your body will have energy to burn. Here in Hawai‘i, the heat can lead to dehydration and fatigue when working out moderately or strenuously throughout the day, so drink plenty of fluid.

Cardio exercise burns calories. It can also strengthen your heart and lungs and help relieve stress. Aim for 20 minutes of cardio a day for three days a week; this includes movement of both the arms and legs to get the blood pumping. 1. Jumping jacks. 2. March or jog in place. 3. Walk up and down the stairs in your dorm building. 4. Dance. 5. Kickboxing moves with punches. Strength training helps build muscle. Maintaining muscle can be difficult, so aim to do any of these exercises twice a week. 1. Squat Jumps: Stand with your feet hip-width apart. Lower yourself until your heels start to lift off the floor; keep your back straight and head straight ahead. Once your body is lowered, jump up quickly, fully extending your legs

and land softly on your feet. Tighten your core and keep your back straight through this process. Start with small jumps for 10 reps. 2. Walking Lunges: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart. Straighten the back and tighten the abs as you step forward with your right foot, lowering yourself until the knee is at a 45-degree angle. At the same time bend the left leg until your left knee almost touches the floor. Step forward for each lunge, alternating legs. Repeat 15 reps on each leg. 3. Planks: Planks are a great way to strengthen your core and work your abdominal muscles. To do a plank, go into push-up position, lower yourself onto your elbows and hold your body in that position. Try to lower your butt so your back is aligned and your butt is not lifted too high. Try three one-minute sets to start out.

4. Body Weight Squats: To do a squat, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your toes facing forward. Hold your arms out in front of you to help you balance. As you begin to squat, make sure youʻre looking straight ahead, your back is straight and your heels are firmly on the ground with knees bent right over your heels. Try to get lower each time you squat, until your knees are at a 90-degree angle. Add 5 lb. weights to this workout to strengthen the arms. 5. Push-ups: Get into a push-up position (either on your knees or on the balls of your feet). Lower yourself by bending your elbows then slowly push back up and repeat 10 to 15 times. MIKE SCHMID/FLICKR

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Page 14 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Page 15

Fall 2013 Ka Leo News NOELLE FUJII News Editor

A lot can happen in the three-and-a-half months that make up a semester. Here are some of the biggest things that happened this fall.

Adapting to decline in funds

Greenwood’s leave of absence University of Hawaiʻi President MRC Greenwood took a one-year unpaid leave of absence on Sept. 1 as Interim President David Lassner assumed the position. The Board of Regents approved Greenwood’s leave at their July 18 meeting, along with a part-time position on UH’s medical research faculty, where she is expected to aid in the creation of a center to study diabetes and obesity at the school. In an email announcing her resignation, Greenwood said she looks forward to having time to spending time with her family, “to write, teach and do some policy work.”

State lawmakers lowered university funds by cutting $7 million from the state legislature and $2.5 million from the governor’s office, which took effect July 1. “The University of Hawai‘i, like the rest of the state, has suffered deep budget cuts since the recession hit Hawai‘i and the nation,” Interim President David Lassner said. The decline in funds from the state legislature has remained consistent in past years, with declines in state general funds from 8.7 percent in 2009 to 6.7 percent in 2013. In 2011, the Board of Regents approved a five-year tuition increase schedule that generates about $10 million in additional income for the university’s budget according to Senate Ways and Means Chair David Ige in a Hawai‘i News Now report.

$1 million allocated for UH classroom improvements

No butts about it: smoking prohibited on campus in 2014 Smoking will not be allowed on campus after a policy prohibiting the use of all tobacco products and electronic cigarettes on campus is implemented on Jan. 1, 2014 by campus administration. In February 2012, the Associated Students of the University of Hawaiʻi passed a resolution in support of banning tobacco products on campus. UH Mānoa joins 422 colleges and universities in the United States that are 100 percent tobacco free, according to the American Lung Association website. According to an article published in Tobacco Control, cigarette smoking is linked to cancer, respiratory disease, coronary health disease and stroke.

Board of Regents approve supplemental budget for FY 2015

Enrollment decreases for UH system Enrollment at the University of Hawaiʻi system has decreased by 2.2 percent, following five years of recordbreaking enrollments. According to Jodi Leong, director of communications for external affairs and university relations, the decrease in enrollment was not a surprise. “As the economy began to improve we expected enrollments to begin to drop,” Leong said. According to the United States Census Bureau, enrollment in fall 2012 decreased by half a million students in colleges across the nation compared to that of fall 2011.

The campus will allocate $1 million a year for continual classroom upgrades, with a second batch of classrooms to be renovated this summer. According to interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Physical, Environmental and Long Range Planning Stephen Meder, this money will come from Capital Renewal and Deferred Maintenance, which is money allocated from the state legislature to the University of Hawai‘i system. Five classrooms in the Business Administration building will be renovated in the summer with the money allocated for classroom improvements. The UH system’s deferred maintenance backlog has reached $487 million, according to the BOR Committee on Planning and Facilities and Committee on Budget and Finance meeting on Oct. 4. During this past summer, the Facilities Management Office renovated approximately 23 classrooms across campus.

Students protest against developments on Mauna Kea and for free speech

About 80 people gathered on Oct. 15 in front of HauMĀNA’s mural by the Art Building to protest their right for free speech to express their political and cultural values. “Weʻre here to take a stand and say that the university cannot be a place of Hawaiian education and Hawaiian learning, while also participating in the desecration of Mauna a Wākea,” Haley Kailiʻehu, a Ph.D. student at UH Mānoa, said. According to the UH Institute for Astronomy website, Mauna Kea hosts the world’s largest astronomical observatory, with telescopes operated by astronomers from 11 countries. The university leases the land within a 2.5-mile radius of the site of the UH 2.2-meter telescope, which is essentially all the land above 3,700 meters elevation except for the portions that lie within the Mauna Kea Ice Natural Area Reserve. Board of Publications chairwoman Rebekah Carroll said the construction barriers around the new Campus Center, where the mural was painted, are owned by the Campus Center Board and, to her understanding, are not a venue for free speech.

The Board of Regents approved the university’s fiscal year 2015 supplemental budget, including a proposal to cut funding for the Daniel K. Inouye Center. The university budget will now go on to the state Department of Budget and Finance, which is the governor’s budget agency. The board approved an amended request for $5 million in state general obligation bonds for construction of the Daniel K. Inouye Center on the Mānoa campus. The construction for the center will not begin in July 2014 as planned. The university’s deferred maintenance backlog has reached $487 million. The budget calls for $14 million in general funds, which was cut from the base budget in FY 2012. If the funds are received, the university can take the $14 million in tuition revenues it had been using so it can pay the debt service on $212 million in revenue bonds. “That $14 million is enough to eliminate the deferred maintenance backlog for all of our campuses except Mānoa,” Interim President David Lassner said.

A step toward a sustainable UH

Students, faculty and community members introduced a sustainability policy to the Board of Regents on Oct. 18 to promote sustainable practices in different university functions. The proposed policy calls for the recognition that the knowledge base in sustainable island systems resides in the indigenous people and residents of Hawaiʻi and for commitment to consult with local cultural practitioners and sustainability experts on best practices in sustainable resource allocation and use. “If the university is not sustainable, the system may not be sustained long enough for future generations to come here and learn,” said Gabriel Sachter-Smith, a graduate student studying Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences.

University of Hawaiʻi campuses receive $83.9 million

New chief of Campus Security plans to raise safety standards As newly appointed chief of Campus Security and Emergency Management, Charles Noffsinger plans to improve the overall standard of safety on campus by incorporating community policing, engaging in open dialogue and improving policy development. Noffsinger assumed the role on Sept. 30, 2013, after a threemonth national search conducted by Campus Services management and the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Administration, Finance and Operations. He said his interest focuses on the perception of safety. He said if people don’t feel safe and if they don’t believe it’s a safe community, then that’s a starting point for him.

The University of Hawaiʻi system received $83.9 million for capital improvement projects on Nov. 21. According to Gov. Neil Abercrombie, the projects address the needed maintenance and repair work while creating jobs. Fifty million dollars will go to System Capital Renewal and Deferred Maintenance at UH Mānoa, UH Hilo, UH West Oʻahu and UH Community Colleges, along with other projects. Twenty-eight million dollars will go to Systemwide Health, Safety and Code Requirements at UH Mānoa, UH Hilo and UH Community Colleges.

See more at kaleo.org


Page 14 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Page 15

Fall 2013 Ka Leo News NOELLE FUJII News Editor

A lot can happen in the three-and-a-half months that make up a semester. Here are some of the biggest things that happened this fall.

Adapting to decline in funds

Greenwood’s leave of absence University of Hawaiʻi President MRC Greenwood took a one-year unpaid leave of absence on Sept. 1 as Interim President David Lassner assumed the position. The Board of Regents approved Greenwood’s leave at their July 18 meeting, along with a part-time position on UH’s medical research faculty, where she is expected to aid in the creation of a center to study diabetes and obesity at the school. In an email announcing her resignation, Greenwood said she looks forward to having time to spending time with her family, “to write, teach and do some policy work.”

State lawmakers lowered university funds by cutting $7 million from the state legislature and $2.5 million from the governor’s office, which took effect July 1. “The University of Hawai‘i, like the rest of the state, has suffered deep budget cuts since the recession hit Hawai‘i and the nation,” Interim President David Lassner said. The decline in funds from the state legislature has remained consistent in past years, with declines in state general funds from 8.7 percent in 2009 to 6.7 percent in 2013. In 2011, the Board of Regents approved a five-year tuition increase schedule that generates about $10 million in additional income for the university’s budget according to Senate Ways and Means Chair David Ige in a Hawai‘i News Now report.

$1 million allocated for UH classroom improvements

No butts about it: smoking prohibited on campus in 2014 Smoking will not be allowed on campus after a policy prohibiting the use of all tobacco products and electronic cigarettes on campus is implemented on Jan. 1, 2014 by campus administration. In February 2012, the Associated Students of the University of Hawaiʻi passed a resolution in support of banning tobacco products on campus. UH Mānoa joins 422 colleges and universities in the United States that are 100 percent tobacco free, according to the American Lung Association website. According to an article published in Tobacco Control, cigarette smoking is linked to cancer, respiratory disease, coronary health disease and stroke.

Board of Regents approve supplemental budget for FY 2015

Enrollment decreases for UH system Enrollment at the University of Hawaiʻi system has decreased by 2.2 percent, following five years of recordbreaking enrollments. According to Jodi Leong, director of communications for external affairs and university relations, the decrease in enrollment was not a surprise. “As the economy began to improve we expected enrollments to begin to drop,” Leong said. According to the United States Census Bureau, enrollment in fall 2012 decreased by half a million students in colleges across the nation compared to that of fall 2011.

The campus will allocate $1 million a year for continual classroom upgrades, with a second batch of classrooms to be renovated this summer. According to interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Physical, Environmental and Long Range Planning Stephen Meder, this money will come from Capital Renewal and Deferred Maintenance, which is money allocated from the state legislature to the University of Hawai‘i system. Five classrooms in the Business Administration building will be renovated in the summer with the money allocated for classroom improvements. The UH system’s deferred maintenance backlog has reached $487 million, according to the BOR Committee on Planning and Facilities and Committee on Budget and Finance meeting on Oct. 4. During this past summer, the Facilities Management Office renovated approximately 23 classrooms across campus.

Students protest against developments on Mauna Kea and for free speech

About 80 people gathered on Oct. 15 in front of HauMĀNA’s mural by the Art Building to protest their right for free speech to express their political and cultural values. “Weʻre here to take a stand and say that the university cannot be a place of Hawaiian education and Hawaiian learning, while also participating in the desecration of Mauna a Wākea,” Haley Kailiʻehu, a Ph.D. student at UH Mānoa, said. According to the UH Institute for Astronomy website, Mauna Kea hosts the world’s largest astronomical observatory, with telescopes operated by astronomers from 11 countries. The university leases the land within a 2.5-mile radius of the site of the UH 2.2-meter telescope, which is essentially all the land above 3,700 meters elevation except for the portions that lie within the Mauna Kea Ice Natural Area Reserve. Board of Publications chairwoman Rebekah Carroll said the construction barriers around the new Campus Center, where the mural was painted, are owned by the Campus Center Board and, to her understanding, are not a venue for free speech.

The Board of Regents approved the university’s fiscal year 2015 supplemental budget, including a proposal to cut funding for the Daniel K. Inouye Center. The university budget will now go on to the state Department of Budget and Finance, which is the governor’s budget agency. The board approved an amended request for $5 million in state general obligation bonds for construction of the Daniel K. Inouye Center on the Mānoa campus. The construction for the center will not begin in July 2014 as planned. The university’s deferred maintenance backlog has reached $487 million. The budget calls for $14 million in general funds, which was cut from the base budget in FY 2012. If the funds are received, the university can take the $14 million in tuition revenues it had been using so it can pay the debt service on $212 million in revenue bonds. “That $14 million is enough to eliminate the deferred maintenance backlog for all of our campuses except Mānoa,” Interim President David Lassner said.

A step toward a sustainable UH

Students, faculty and community members introduced a sustainability policy to the Board of Regents on Oct. 18 to promote sustainable practices in different university functions. The proposed policy calls for the recognition that the knowledge base in sustainable island systems resides in the indigenous people and residents of Hawaiʻi and for commitment to consult with local cultural practitioners and sustainability experts on best practices in sustainable resource allocation and use. “If the university is not sustainable, the system may not be sustained long enough for future generations to come here and learn,” said Gabriel Sachter-Smith, a graduate student studying Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences.

University of Hawaiʻi campuses receive $83.9 million

New chief of Campus Security plans to raise safety standards As newly appointed chief of Campus Security and Emergency Management, Charles Noffsinger plans to improve the overall standard of safety on campus by incorporating community policing, engaging in open dialogue and improving policy development. Noffsinger assumed the role on Sept. 30, 2013, after a threemonth national search conducted by Campus Services management and the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Administration, Finance and Operations. He said his interest focuses on the perception of safety. He said if people don’t feel safe and if they don’t believe it’s a safe community, then that’s a starting point for him.

The University of Hawaiʻi system received $83.9 million for capital improvement projects on Nov. 21. According to Gov. Neil Abercrombie, the projects address the needed maintenance and repair work while creating jobs. Fifty million dollars will go to System Capital Renewal and Deferred Maintenance at UH Mānoa, UH Hilo, UH West Oʻahu and UH Community Colleges, along with other projects. Twenty-eight million dollars will go to Systemwide Health, Safety and Code Requirements at UH Mānoa, UH Hilo and UH Community Colleges.

See more at kaleo.org


Page 16 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

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Page 17 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

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Page 18 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

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KIRSTIE CAMPBELL Associate Chief Copy Editor Having a healthy finals week is just as important as your major classes. Ka Leo’s tips will help you keep your sanity during finals. SCHEDULE Creating a schedule via Excel or Google Drive takes about 20 minutes, but will save you both guilt and procrastination. Estimate study time for each class, space out time for breaks between and add hours for events. Decide when to study, sleep and have free time. Feeling less guilty for goofing around during your planned study break and studying efficiently is better than trying to power straight through your studying. SLEEP Eight hours of sleep might seem like too much, but remember that optimal sleep means optimal functionality. Decide on your limits and stick to them, whether they be six hours of sleep or eight. Your top priorities should include bedtime. Caffeine works, but ending finals well-rested and cheerful will get you in Christmas shopping mode. Plus, early bedtimes help to keep you less distracted. Decide how productive you will be late at night before the test versus the morning of the test, and if you studied during the afternoon and struggle at night, morning might be better. STRESS Stress is always painful, but staying alone will make it worse. If study groups distract you, find time

to chat with a roommate or Skype a friend or family member. Budgeting friend time gives you incentive. If you really need Netflix breaks or Internet surf time, make sure your schedule covers them. However, if you don’t trust yourself on the Internet, then keep your computer off until it’s needed – print out your notes at the school library, then work at a desk. Rest when you study. Take a walk. Sitting down in the library while you attempt to study may work for a time. However, you will need a break to stay calm. SCHOOL Now is the time to text a friend for help if your professor is not around, the Emporium is unavailable or the tutors are missing. In five minutes friends can give help on errors you took two hours on. This is a desperation move; email your professor unless it’s the night before. If you are behind, write down your classes and what you need in them, both your passing grade and the material you need to learn. Compare the material on the final to what you already know, and estimate the time it will take you to learn. Prioritize by writing down the most crucial information to summarize material for your final: important formulas for science, literary themes, vocabulary, etc. FOOD PLAN Junk food intake this week should be low. Eating snacks on hand will be convenient, but buying food earlier with less snack food will keep you happy during the long hours at night. When studying late

at night, you’re more likely to eat what’s on hand regardless of nutrition, so make sure you have plenty of healthy food, such as granola bars (in moderation), sandwiches and veggies. Use a rice cooker or boil hot water while you study. In your schedule, your top priorities are mealtimes and sleep. Although skipping a meal to study may seem easy, you will regret it during your test. If time is nonexistent, eat with one hand while you study. Grab food from the cafeteria and save it for a meal after your exam. Drink orange juice for health, and go easy on the energy drinks. Beverages like juice help your immunity, especially with the Vitamin C you will need to study. Drink only as much coffee as you normally do; becoming hyper after attempting more than you can handle is not good for your test.

STUDY AREA Budget 10 minutes every day to clean up your study area. Losing your notes under scrap paper will stress you out. Even if you like a comforting mess, exam time is efficiency time: Losing textbooks and notes will not help. Keep a study guide for each class on hand, and print out exam schedules, final project requirements and exam breakdowns so you don’t realize your last project is due in a few hours. Keep healthy during exam week, and remember that you are more important than your schoolwork. Stay healthy, and your schoolwork will naturally follow.


Page 19 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

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Page 20 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Why GPA no longer matters

SKAKERMAN/FLICKR

DOORAE SHIN Opinions Editor Too many times, students compare grade point averages and worry about this number as a major indicator of college and post-graduation success. More and more, evidence is coming out that GPA may not be as significant as we thought. Though it does hold merit in some situations, GPA is becoming less of a factor in overall success of students and graduates. BROKEN EDUCATION SYSTEM It’s important to first recognize that GPA is merely a symptom of an education system that is increasingly criticized for stifling creativity. Ken Robinson explained this thoroughly in his popular TED talks, where he compared the current structure to the fast food

system, as education becomes more and more standardized. Just like what fast food does to our body, the way schools now function impoverishes the spirit and energy of the youth. Robinson further stated that the mechanization of education starts early as schools often operate like a factory with bells to tell us when to go from one class to another and with the calculated separation of age groups in what seems like a production line of well-behaved, conformed students simply accumulating information. GPA is an indicator of how well a particular student has become accustomed to this system. In a New York Times interview with Google’s Senior Vice President of People Operations Laszlo Bock, Bock affi rmed, “Academic environments are artifi cial environments. People who

succeed there are fi nely trained; they’re conditioned to succeed in that environment.”

BENEFITS OF A HIGH GPA From many perspectives, GPA still carries high importance. Most scholarships heavily weigh GPA in choosing awardees, and many even require a minimum GPA to apply at all. This is also true when receiving additional fi nancial assistance from most institutions of higher education and when earning grant funds for research programs. In a practical sense, GPA can certainly be beneficial to subsidize education and research, but when it comes to overall success, the true value of GPA is less convincing. The Houston Chronicles reported that “Google doesn’t even ask for GPA or test scores from candidates anymore ... because

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Page 21 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

they don’t correlate at all with success at the company.”

A NEW APPROACH TO SUCCESS Jeff Acido, Student Regent of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, admitted, “I stopped checking my GPA once I realized that I wasn’t learning anything when the motivation was to get an ‘A.’ I realized that GPA is not a reflection of how much we have learned. We could have a high GPA with no skills or knowledge required: It only means that we did all the things to get an ‘A’ or get the grade.” Acido believes that “generally, we have a low GPA when we are not interested in the subject matter. I have a higher grade in subjects that I feel passionate about.” With a broken education

system full of standardization, it’s imperative to consider alternative indicators of success, intelligence and competence. “We cannot make the equivocation of wisdom/ knowledge with the grade we have,” Acido said. “How many times have we gotten an ‘A’ on a test and completely forget what we just learned? Too often. Education ought to teach us how to transgress our boundaries epistemologically and ontologically.” The quantification of success is perhaps the greatest inhibitor of true learning and growth within an individual. Many with high GPAs are certainly intelligent, hardworking and creative, but a high GPA in itself should not be the sole indicator for those characteristics within an individual.

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Page 22 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

DOORAE SHIN Opinions Editor

The gap year: the highly desirable year to travel to exotic places, explore your passions and experience what the world has to offer. The growing trend to take a year off before graduate school or before starting a career leaves many students unsure of potential advantages and disadvantages of this bridge year.

WHY DO PEOPLE TAKE TIME OFF? Many students want to go straight to law school or medical school or immediately pursue a master’s degree after they finish their undergraduate studies. Though this may make sense for some, those who take gap years consistently claim that it is a profound, life-changing experience. The concept of the gap year started in the United Kingdom five decades ago. The purpose behind this time off was for

students to travel and volunteer abroad or even to spend time working in various fields for real world experience. Many cultures view this year as a crucial part of personal and professional growth to prepare and feel comfortable with future pursuits. With most students graduating with the burden of loans, a gap year also helps to alleviate some of those financial hardships by allowing students to begin paying it off; this gives new graduates a sense of responsibility and accomplishment, and it relieves some of the anxiety about mounting financial obligation. A FRESH EDUCATION As we go through the routine of school since preschool or kindergarten, we often miss out on opportunities for experiental learning. Though school teaches a variety of key subjects, there is often a lack of hands-on, real world experiences and valuable self development.

Idealist affirms the advantages of a bridge-year for recent graduates, stating that, “Learning in the classroom is more meaningful when you have had real-world experience to relate to.” Not only is a gap year beneficial for those going back to school, but the variety of possible experiences you can have in your time off gives you a leg up when applying for a job as you can contribute more personal insight in your interviews and strengthen your application and resume entirely. CONFIDENCE IS KEY It also never hurts to be more mature and confident before going back to school or starting a career. Times Higher Education reports that students who take a gap year “are more self-confident ... and (tend) to be more enthusiastic and focused when they return.” A good way to put your decision into perspective is to ask if you would

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The gap year: It could change your life

accept your own application to your dream graduate program or if you would hire yourself for your ideal job. Employers and admissions officers tend to look for confidence, independence and experience; a gap year offers all of the above and gives one the ability to feel firm in the path he or she chooses. If you were to interview yourself, how impressed would you be with your ability to articulate your hopes, passions, experiences and merits? Even beyond the much needed recharge period for your mind and body, taking that year for yourself fosters spontaneity and provides time to catch up on the bucket list that you’ve placed on the back burner while you were in college. Gap years provide an opportunity to intentionally think deeper about future endeavors through rewarding and intense experiences or a reflective and relaxing time off.


Page 23 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Ace that interview: your job depends on it PRIYA R ASHID Special Issues Editor You have invested thousands of dollars for education. Now itʻs time to move out of the dorms, learn to balance a budget and get a real job. Ka Leo brings you some tips to ace that interview.

2. Ask appropriate questions. Ask about the goals and atmosphere at work. This shows the employer that you are interested and forward thinking. It shows that you have put thought into the position. It is also your time to interview them. Try to find out if the place suits you. Will you be miserable and immediately searching for another job if you take the position? Try to see if your talents and skills will be utilized. Look for opportunities for advancement or training programs.

3. Don’t bring up money on the first interview. Don’t bring up anything too personal: Now is not the time to discuss your relationships or your partying. 4. Dress professionally. Shower. Be neat and groom yourself. You don’t want to wear an Aloha shirt if the company has a strict suit and tie policy, and vice versa can be equally harmful. Look at number one: research. In confusing or ambiguous settings it is better to ask before the interview when

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confirming what is appropriate to wear. Better to be safe than unemployed. 5. Be nice to everyone. You never know who is watching or who has a say in hiring. From the secretary to the janitor, be polite and respectful. 6. Arrive a few minutes early. Grab coffee nearby or sit and read outside about half an hour before the interview. If you have a weekday morning interview in Honolulu, prepare yourself. You know the traffic is going to be hectic. 7. Maintain appropriate eye contact. Interest and directness show that you are honest and sincere. If multiple people are interviewing you, show equal interest and respect. Remember firm but not violent handshakes. Be cognizant of your body language. Don’t hunch or swagger. Walk confidently and try to avoid crossing your arms or legs. 8. Don’t drink — whether the night before an interview, sharing a meal or attending an event with a potential employer. It may not impair your judgment, but you don’t know what the employer’s position and biases may be. You want to be as

SAN JOSE MERCERY NEWS / MCT

1. Research. Take a few moments to research the company you’re applying at. Decide whether the climate and purpose of the company fit your personality and goals. You want to impress on the interviewer that you have invested time and effort into this company and that you are the right person for their team. A quick Google check can tell you their growth records, their aims for the future and give you hints on what to wear and company policies they adhere to.

clean as possible. Many employers say that they would immediately want to be friends with their interviewee, but would not hire him or her for a position. 9. Be confident and present the best side of yourself. Be attentive to your own strengths and weakness and work to showcase them. If you tend to get fidgety, skip the morning coffee. If you are not a morning person, pick up an espresso. Many times you only get one chance to impress a potential employer, so keep the interview positive but memorable. Be prepared to answer common questions and curve balls. Practice your interview. Sometimes having a friend quiz you can help you catch mistakes you didn’t know you were making. 10. Don’t forget the details. Bring extra copies of your CV, a notepad and a pen. Follow up with a polite thank you note. It reminds the interviewer of you and leaves him or her with a positive impression.

President’s Message

Aloha students,

Can you believe it is already finals week? Time has flew by faster than ever, and there is so much to be proud about in terms of all the hard work and dedication our fellow students have put into their education this semester. From undergraduates doing graduate-level work within the Honors Program to student leaders soaring through RIOs on campus to all the students who have came out to support our student athletes this semester, I can say I am proud and honored to serve as president of a student body that has so much spirit, commitment, and pride in the work they all do and in being a student right here at our University. I would like to recognize all the seniors who will be graduating this Fall on Saturday at the Stan Sheriff Center. All of their hard work has finally paid off, and the real world is fortunate to have its newest additions of individuals who will excel in their diverse and respective fields beyond new heights. On behalf of the undergraduate student body, congratulations and best of luck on all of your future endeavors. As we reflect on the Fall semester, there are many events and accomplishments to be proud of. Your student government was able to allocate funds to a diverse amount of programs, services, and organizations while actively engaging in conversations regarding important issues the Senate has taken up. We have supported programs on our campus such as First Year Programs, Student Success Center, New Student Orientation, and RIOs through our RIO Funding. We have also looked into major issues, including parking and sustainability through our most recent student forum in collaboration with GSO and the Chancellor’s Office. Even with all of this and more in mind, there is still more work to do with the Spring bringing even more excitement, productivity, and change for the better for the student body. I wish you all a Happy Holiday season and I commit the Senate’s continuous efforts in 2014 to represent you. Sincerely, Richard Mizusawa President, ASUH 101st Senate


Page 24 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Going for the gold

SHANE GRACE / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore Armund Gismervik and the UH swimmimg and diving teams will return to Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Center on Jan. 4 to face Wisconsin . HAYLEY MUSASHI Staff Writer

it is interesting to get to know people from different cultures.”

Whether the uniform consists of a helmet, knee pads or a swim cap, donning the University of Hawai‘i emblem is an opportunity to represent both the school and state. And for one member of the University of Hawai‘i diving team, this responsibility has been showcased on the biggest stage in athletics — the Olympic Games. Hailing from all across the globe, the Hawai‘i swimming and diving teams are some of the most culturally and globally diverse squads in the country. And while the teams boast several athletes with international experience, one diver has taken his career to new heights — sophomore Amund Gismervik. “It’s nice being a multicultural team,“ Gismervik said. “It’s nice to have people in the same situation as yourself around you. And

LONDON CALLING Gismervik, a native of Stavanger, Norway, qualified for his first Olympic Games last summer and made the trip to London in anticipation of competing against the world’s best. “When I knew that I was going to the Olympics, it was kind of surrealistic,” Gismervik said. “As more time passed, it sank in more and more.” Gismervik placed 24th overall in the qualifying rounds of the men’s 10-meter platform competition, an event in which the gold medal was awarded to American diver David Boudia. Though it was an honor and created a multitude of memories, the Rainbow Warrior diver was most excited to relax after the competition and let the significance of the Games resonate with him.

“My favorite moment in the Olympics must have been when it was done actually,” Gismervik said. “Because it was actually kind of a relief.” PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT With a decade of diving under his belt, Gismervik’s success on the international level comes without a surprise as he has also picked up a 10th place finish in the 2011 World Championships in the 1-meter. He is also a 10-time Norwegian senior national champion, a sixtime Norwegian junior national champion and four-time Nordic champion. UNCHARTED WATERS Although he redshirted his freshman season at Hawai‘i, Gismervik has proved that he is able to compete at UH. After sitting out his first year, the Rainbow Warrior returned to competition at the Texas Diving Invitational in late November in stellar form.

Gismervik won the men’s 10-meter platform dive setting a UH school record in the process. The victory for Gismervik capped off a successful weekend for the Norwegian newcomer. After failing to advance in the 1-meter prelims earlier in the competition, Gismervik moved on to the 3-meter dive where he earned a bronze medal and his place upon the podium. The sophomore scored 444.75, a staggering 26.35 points better than second place Will Chandler of Texas. The diving team returns to action after the break hosting a trio of competitions in the first two weeks of the New Year where it will first take on Wisconsin. But Gismervik also has his sights set on representing Norway as well as the islands. “This season I’m looking forward to traveling with the UH team and going to some meets with the national team like the European Championships and World Cup,” Gismervik said.


Page 25 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013


Page 26 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

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Page 27 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

No break for UH winter sports

Jace Olsen. Isaac Fotu. JEREMY NITTA Associate Sports Editor School may be winding to a close, but for University of Hawai‘i athletics, things are just beginning to heat up. Take a look at the upcoming slate of games during winter break.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Rainbow Wahine basketball team will not play at home again until Jan. 8, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be intriguing games before then. Fresh off a win over Pacific, the ‘Bows will head on the road to take on USC (Dec. 21) and Grand Canyon (Dec. 23). Hawai‘i will then return home to open Big West Conference play with matchups against reigning conference champion Cal Poly (Jan. 8) and Cal State Northridge (Jan. 12).

Key Matchup: Cal Poly The game against the Mus-

Shawna-Lei Kuehu. tangs (5-4) marks Hawai‘i’s first game of 2014, as well as its conference opener. The ‘Bows (6-4) will be looking to start the year off right. The game also holds value in its potential impact down the stretch. Cal Poly and Hawai‘i were picked to finish first and second in the Big West in preseason polls. Also intriguing is the potential matchup of low-post stars between reigning BWC Player of the Year Molly Schlemer of Cal Poly and Hawai‘i’s Kamilah Jackson, a first-team selection.

MEN’S BASKETBALL Unlike the women, the Rainbow Warrior basketball team will be playing most of its winter break games in the confines of Stan Sheriff Center. The ‘Bows will be hosting the Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic, which runs Dec. 2225. Hawai‘i’s schedule is still to be determined, outside of its opening round matchup with Boise

State. The tournament is played with a winners and losers bracket, so Hawai‘i’s next opponent will be based on the outcome of the first round. Following the tournament, Hawai‘i will host Norfolk State (Dec. 30) in its final game of 2013. The ‘Bows will then face Omaha (Jan. 3) before heading out on the road to begin Big West Conference play against Cal Poly (Jan. 9) and Cal State Northridge (Jan. 11). Key Matchup: Boise State Besides the fact that Hawai‘i must defeat the Broncos to advance in the winners bracket of the Diamond Head Classic, the overall quality of this game promises to be high. The Broncos boast an 8-2 record, with their only losses coming to No. 11 Kentucky and undefeated St. Maryʻs. Additionally, Boise State comes in averaging 86.4 points per game, 12th best in the country. Hawai‘i (7-2) has also gotten off to a

strong start, averaging 86.4 just as many points per contest. MEN’S VOLLEYBALL The Rainbow Warrior volleyball team will get its season underway in January, with a pair of exhibition matches against Thompson Rivers, a team from British Columbia, Canada, on Jan. 2 and 4. Following those matches, the ‘Bows will host the Outrigger Hotel Invitational, which boasts a strong field this year. The 13th ranked Rainbow Warriors will open against No. 12 Ohio State on Jan. 9. Hawai‘i will then take on ninth ranked Penn State (Jan. 10) and second ranked UCLA (Jan. 11). Key Matchup: UCLA While a matchup with the second best team in the country may seem daunting, it’s worth remembering that Hawai‘i won the season series against the Bruins last year, with each of Hawai‘i’s two wins coming

ALL PHOTOS BY ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

in five-set matches with Hawai‘i rallying back to win. Additionally, the ‘Bows and Bruins have a longstanding rivalry dating back to the early ’90s when the two teams routinely battled each other in the NCAA tournament.

ALSO PLAYING: The men and women’s tennis teams will be in action during winter break. The Rainbow Warriors will be participating in the USTA Wild Card Challenger, which will be held at Central Oahu Regional Park. The event will last from Jan. 10-12. The Rainbow Wahine will resume play right before school begins when they host Baylor on Jan. 11. Also, the men and women’s swimming and diving teams will have matches during the vacation. Both teams will face Wisconsin on Jan. 4 before hosting the Hawai‘i Diving Invitational from Jan. 8-9. The two teams will then face Minnesota on Jan. 11.


Page 28 | Ka Leo | Monday, Dec. 16 2013

Rozitis rises above on court, in class JOEY RAMIREZ Sports Editor

At seven feet tall and 240 pounds, Davis Rozitis surprises his peers when they find out he’s often the smartest person in the room. But Rozitis, a center on the Rainbow Warrior basketball team, proved his intellect when he was named one of nine selections to last year’s Big West Academic AllConference team. “Girls especially stereotype me for being the dumb athlete,” Rozitis said. “But my ‘stat sheet’ speaks for itself: I speak five languages, graduated in four years with a B.A., grad school now. It’s just a process. You have to prove to people you’re not one of those people.” Rozitis redshirted after transferring from USC to Hawai‘i in 2010. In his first year of eligibility, the Cesis, Latvia, native earned All-Western Athletic Conference academic honors on his way to a bachelor’s degree in political science with a minor in peace and conflict studies. But that doesn’t stop people from assuming his brainpower is limited to putting an orange ball in a hoop.

“There’s no smoke without fire. In some ways, it is true,” Rozitis said. “It’s not that they’re dumb jocks. It’s that athletes are sometimes lazy, and they don’t take care of their academics. For the most part, it’s true. But you can’t just stereotype all of the athletes.” Now going for his master’s in advanced conflict negotiation, Rozitis maintains that more athletes should be as successful in the classroom as he is. “It’s easy: Just follow the syllabus cause that’s gonna get you everywhere,” Rozitis said. “Just do your assignments on time and go to every class.” Rozitis, who plans on eventually going into international relations, credits the same drive that pushes him in basketball for his academic success. “I just like to compete with myself,” Rozitis said. “Same in the weight room: I don’t look at what other guys on the team (are lifting). I’m just trying to beat myself – whatever I did the previous time.” Despite goals that include working for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Latvia and maybe even becoming an ambassador, Rozitis wants to

Center Davis Rozitis leads the Rainbow Warriors with 14 blocks this season. JESSICA HOMRICH KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

keep playing basketball for as long as possible. Professional leagues could be approaching him soon if he continues his current level of play. Rozitis has been an offensive force, making 17 of his 23 shots this season for a team-best field goal percentage of 73.9 percent. Though he hasn’t taken enough attempts to qualify,

that mark would be the highest in the country. On the other end of the court, Rozitis, who was named the team’s Best Defensive Player at last season’s awards banquet, has served as the leader in the Rainbow Warriors’ point-zone and full court press defenses due to his towering frame and mobility.

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“That’s his role. He’s our sparkplug,” head coach Gib Arnold said. “He gets us going defensively, especially, and he does great things. … He’s a big part of what we do, and I feel really comfortable having him in there. We had him in there at the end of games, and he made some defensive plays. I was proud of him.”

RAINBOW WARRIOR DEC 23 BASKETBALL**

RAINBOW WARRIOR DEC 25 BASKETBALL**

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RAINBOW WARRIOR JAN 2 BASKETBALL

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2013 finals and grad