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A K LEO T H E

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 to SUNDAY APRIL 21, 2013 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 77

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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MIZUSAWA WINS Page 2 I was in shock, just in shock by the vote difference.

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-ASUH President Richard Mizusawa

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News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

News K A LEO

Incumbents win big, NLS rivals shutout Al ex Bit t er Associate News Editor

ASUH President Richard Mizusawa and his slate of incumbent executive offi cers claimed victory Wednesday in the student government’s spring general election, leaving the main opposition group without any seats in the senate or its executive council. The results of the election, released at approximately 8 a.m. by ASUH offi ce staff, showed Mizusawa handily winning a second term as president with 63 percent of the vote. His nearest challenger, New Leadership Slate candidate Ian Ross, trailed far behind with 31 percent, while former ASUH Sen. Ryan Mandado took 6 percent. “I was in shock, just in shock by the vote difference,” Mizusawa said of his 32 percent victor y over Ross. “I think we both campaigned as hard as we could, and we were definitely out there.” The landslide spread to incumbents in other executive races, with current Vice President Francesca Koethe beating NLS candidate Carter Koch 64 percent to 36 percent, and Secretary Emily Murai claiming 70 percent to NLS nominee Megan Wharton’s 30 percent. Voters also opted for current ASUH senators in the race for four open Senator-at-Large positions, reelecting incumbent SAL Christopher Escalante and fi lling the remaining seats with College of Engineering Sen. Cassandra Belisario and College of Arts & Sciences Sens. Kelly Zakimi and Kendyl Oshiro. In the races for college-specifi c senate seats, where the NLS fi elded no candidates, over a dozen incumbent senators won reelection, while a menagerie of unaffi liated candidates won their fi rst terms in the chamber.

D I S S E C T I N G D E F E AT A fter the unofficial results were released, the two unsuccessful presidential candidates, while disappointed with the returns, congratulated Mizusawa for his win. NL S candidate Ian Ross told Ka Leo that he contacted Mizusawa shortly after the results were released to congratulate his opponent, and he and Mizusawa still have a cordial relationship.

“We were actually still looking at possibly getting coffee and chatting about the results sometime,” Ross said. “He was definitely respectful in victory.” Mandado shared Ross’ sentiment, saying that R ichard “did a really amazing job with his campaign.” Ross indicated that, while he was disappointed with the results of the election, he was satisfied with the voter turnout in this year’s contests. A total of 1,391 students cast their ballots for ASUH’s executive positions during the 11-day voting period, a figure nearly three times greater than the turnout for the 2012 election but in line with Ross’ prediction. “I’d figured it would be over 10 percent of the potential voting body voting,” Ross explained. The candidate noted that he was particularly proud of how his team had established good and effective working relationships

I think this year was different because we actually had competition who was getting out there, who was spreading the word about their campaign. - ASUH President Richard Mizusawa during the course of the campaign. “I think the level of just raw commitment, raw passion for wanting to do something big, do something that changes things, was the main strength,” Ross said. Although Ross acknowledged that the NLS utilized help from volunteers during the campaign, he said that he would have liked to organize these workers more during the race. “I feel being able to best coordinate with all of them was something that I think could have been potentially improved upon,” he said. For the Mandado campaign, the challenges were even greater. Mandado, who is spending this semester interning in Washington, D.C., had to campaign for president from thousands of miles away. In the end, he relied on much of the same base that elected him as a senator. “Campaigning from across the nation was difficult, but I am glad that I did get votes

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from people who supported what I stood for and believed that I could be the next president for ASUH,” he said in an email interview.

ASSESSING SUCCESS Although his margin of victory was more decisive than he expected, Mizusawa believes his largely incumbent slate succeeded for a few key reasons, the first being the presence of a serious challenger in the race. “I think this year was different because we actually had competition who was getting out there, who was spreading the word about their campaign,” Mizusawa said, re ferring to Ross and the NL S. As a result of that competition, Mizusawa said that his slate had to redouble their campaigning efforts. Overall, he said facing two competitors made this the “most rigorous” campaign so far in his career. Another part of the Mizusawa-Koethe ticket’s success, the president argued, was the wide variety of majors represented among the candidates for the various offices. “I’m one of the only people on my team from communications, Francesca is from zoology, Emily is from history and American Studies, [and] Jeremy is of course [Travel Industry Management],” Mizusawa elaborated. “We did reach out to different majors [and] different populations.” Looking forward to his second term, Mizusawa identified several priority issues – such as working with UH Mānoa administrators to increase class availability and improving campus security – that were centerpieces of his campaign platform. He also expressed interest in improving student life on campus, including increasing student activity on campus after hours, which is an essential part of the college experience at many mainland institutions. “I want to help promote that, because even though I don’t dorm, I want to be here even at night because I want to have that college experience,” Mizusawa explained.

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EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Marc Arakaki Managing Editor Paige Takeya Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Joseph Han Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino Assc Design Editor Emily Boyd News Editor Caitlin Kelly Assc News Editor Alex Bitter Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Assc Features Editor Nicolyn Charlot Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Assc Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Special Issues Editor Ariel Ramos Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck Assc Web Editor Kafa Dawson

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Rebekah Carroll, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications


Page 3 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

News Why Should I Hire You?

Forum seeks to increase Hawaiian education

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The future of Hawaiian culture and language education is a popular topic of discussion, and panelists at the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa want to take it a step further. A forum was held on April 17 during which panelists discussed the ways that the mainstream education system should be changed to enhance Hawaiian culture and language-based education. Participants included Keoni Bunag, who works at Kamehameha Schools in extension education; Kalehua Krug, vice-chair of ‘Aha Kauleo; and Noelani GoodyearKa‘opua, associate professor of political science and author of the book “The Seeds We Planted.” Ikaika Hussey, editor and publisher of “Hawai‘i Independent,” moderated the event.

B E C OM I N G B I - L I T E R AT E Bunag, who is also a proponent of Hawaiian language education, believes targeting the concept of being bi-literate will begin to shape how children are thinking in the state. Bunag said monolingualism within the educational system now defines the state’s educational success.

“As [our Hawaiian immersion children] go home, they’re being judged by people who are not of that caliber,” Bunag said. Bunag said that current education paths and developments are beginning to close off divergent thinking. “If you start with Hawaiian as a medium and introduce a dual language program, you will actually provide your child a different language, a different perspective on education, thus a different perspective on the world so when you think of collaboration, that binary vision that each child has will be providing the tools necessary to insert themselves in a global society,” Bunag said.

R E F R A M I N G AT T I T U D E S Goodyear-Ka‘opua believes that the notion that Hawaiian education is only for Hawaiians needs to be reframed. “In order for us to have change in the system as a whole, it has to be for everyone – so for all people, not just kanaka, have to see the value in Hawaiian knowledge,” Goodyear-Ka‘opua said. According to the panelists, sovereignty in education is going to need to happen to transform public and private institutions

such as the Department of Education and Kamehameha Schools. Bunag said sovereignty in education refers to the way decisions are made in immersion schools. Decision-making power should be given to the experts who are in the immersion program, but the higher education system doesn’t currently acknowledge that these experts are in the program. “The education sovereignty I’m talking about is actually the self-determining process of those teachers and those administrators and those parents and those within the immersion program and the immersion system to make decisions for themselves because they are the experts,” Bunag said. “They are the only ones who can provide the information necessary for decision.” K rug believes Hawaiianfocus charter schools are a vital vehicle through which they can pursue that educational sovereignty. He said it’s problematic that they reside in a state-set system and thinks they should have discussions about having their own school district for Hawaiian charter schools, focus groups and immersion schools so they can redefine educational successes in Hawai‘i.


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Features

Campus events COMPILED BY NICOLYN C HARLOT Associate Features Editor

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This spring’s installment of “Footholds” will feature the work of several graduating seniors. There will be a wide variety of dances in the production, including one that uses modern dance and electronic dance music, and another that incorporates poetry into the piece. The show will feature nine performances that display both contemporary and classical work.

SUPER-M’S MONTE CARLO NIGHT When: Wednesday, April 24; Students and parents are invited to learn 6 p.m.-8 p.m. more about how mathematics can be fun and practical. The goal is to address proficiency in Where: Campus Center Ballroom Cost: Free math in the state by teaching math in a way that will help students understand its use in their ev- Contact: Mike Andonian, 808-956eryday lives. The event will also help students 4669, superm.hawaii@gmail.com explore false beliefs about gambling.

EARTH DAY @ UHM When: Monday, April 22; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.. Where: Legacy Pathway Cost: Free Contact: ichange@hawaii. edu, facebook.com/evsuhm

This event, sponsored by The Environmental Center, aims to give the university community knowledge about sustainability and climate change. Research from multiple departments will be showcased with the intention to educate and influence lifestyle choices. The event hopes to show students that small changes in behavior can have a big effect on the environment. Extracurricular student efforts that promote sustainability will be coordinated.

‘THE HOBBIT’ MOVIE NIGHT The last free movie night of the semester will feature “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.” This fantasy movie, based on the book by J.R.R. Tolkien, tells the story of Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), who goes on an epic adventure with a group of dwarves to reclaim the Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor. Subway sandwiches, popcorn, cotton candy, drinks and cookies will be available before each show for 25 cents.

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Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Features

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

FASHION FRIDAYS

Karissa Montania Staff Writer

Fashion how-to:

Instagram-style photos DO AN D DO - N OT- P OS T RU LE S

From clothes collages and outfit of the day pictures, many use Instagram to express their style identities. However, similar to food pornography, there are things to avoid and guidelines to keep in mind when posting your fashionable best. Follow these dos and don’ts to show your fashionable side the right way.

PU T A F I LT E R ON I T Certain Instagram fi lters can bring out the best in certain types of clothing. Use these recommendations for the fi nal touch on your fashion photos.

D O L AY I T O U T N E AT LY When taking photos of clothes that you have recently bought or want to show off, lay them out fl at – as it would look when you’re wearing it – and spread them out so they don’t look messy or chaotic. Have the tops that you bought together overlapping each other and arrange it by color. Do the same for shorts and accessories, and place them below and over the tops respectively.

D O N ʼ T F O RG E T T H E BAC KG RO U N D

N A S H V I L L E , VA L E N C I A

The clothes may be the center of your photo, but you don’t want the background to be boring. For pictures of just clothes, add your shopping bags behind them for easy store identification or add decorations such as lights. If you’re taking an outfit of the day picture, mix it up by going outside – scenery behind you will look nicer and more thoughtout than an indoor picture with a messy room.

E A R LY B I R D

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Whether you’re taking an outfit of the day photo in the mirror or having a friend take one of you, remember that angles can affect how both you and your outfit look. Having your phone camera below you makes you appear tall, while having it above you makes you look smaller. Having someone take the photo for you means that you can show off your outfit from different angles as well, such as from the back if your top has an interesting design. Take photos of your outfits from the neck down to bring focus to a particular piece.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL PUZON

D O N ʼ T G O OV E R B OA R D W I T H C O L L AG E S If you splurge and want to show off all the items you bought, create a collage – limit it to three or four items. If you add any more, the pictures become too small to showcase your new purchases. Collages draw more attention with a focal point rather than having multiple pictures of the same size. Give the biggest picture slot to your favorite purchase, while accessories should take smaller slots. PHOTOS BY CAITLIN KURODA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


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Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features

Nicole Kim

Nicole Kim rehearsed with the UH Wind Ensemble under the Director of Bands Dr. Jeffrey Boeckman.

has keys to success

NIK SEU KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JACKIE PERREIR A Senior Staff Writer Senior piano performance major Nicole Kim shows that you don’t need to be a graduate student to perform at their level – she is the winner of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Music Concerto Competition and the only undergraduate soloist in the upcoming Wind Ensemble Concert alongside seasoned performers Todd Yukumoto and Megumi Kurachi. To qualify as a concert soloist, Kim competed against six other musicians. “My private piano instructor told me, ‘Why don’t you just try it?’” said Kim, who was originally unsure of whether she would be prepared to compete. “Playing with the orchestra, that’s one of my dreams. It’s really hard to play with the orchestra if you’re not a professional. … So that’s why I tried it. I worked at it. I practiced for only like six weeks to play the whole [piece], and I didn’t know if I could get it. … I was totally surprised that the conductor told me I got in.” “[Kim is a] very, very talented pianist,” said conductor and director of bands Jeffrey Boeckman. “So for her to get a chance to play with our ensemble and for our ensemble to get the opportunity to play with her, and get to know her talents, is a rare opportunity for all of us.”

A TA L E N T F ROM C H I L D H O O D Kim, originally from Korea and then a resident of Canada from the age of 10, started off her musical career the way most children do with instruments: messing around on the piano keys until she realized she liked it. She enrolled in piano classes, where one of her teachers urged her to continue studying piano because she had a talent that most others didn’t.

She played steadily until middle school, when she took a two-year hiatus from the instrument. “It was really hard to concentrate on studying,” Kim said. “And also you have to practice for so many hours – it was kind of hard. So that’s why I stopped.” Her break came to an end when she felt a sense of urgency to play again, a commitment she’s felt ever since. “I really missed it,” she said. “I felt like I actually want to play, and I feel more like I need to do this for my entire life, not only in college. This is the thing I feel happy about – this is something that I really need to do.”

F ROM S E AT T O S O L O I S T Now, Kim feels even more prompted to do well at the concert. “I’m the only undergrad right now, so it feels like there’s a little more pressure on

me,” she said. “It’s really an honor though.” She will be performing “Paganini Variations” by Polish composer Witold Lutoslawski. “It’s one of my favorites,” she said. “There’s a lot of things going on in this music, and it’s new and there’s a lot of technical stuff, so I need to practice a lot.” This is K im’s first time performing with an orchestra, a sharp contrast from playing alone. “It’s a pretty wonderful chance for her to perform as a soloist,” Boeckman said. “She’s never been in anything like this. … It’s a different performing environment, where she has to listen to all of us and respond to what I’m doing up here and have a conversation back and forth between the piano and the players.” “This concert is not only me,” Kim said. “Even though I’m the soloist, I still have to

work with the orchestra. For the orchestra, there’s not even like one instrument. There’s tons of people playing together, and I’m just only one who plays with them, so I have to work well with them.” “Also, I’m really happy that they’re actually playing with me for this concert. So hopefully I can work well with them on the actual concert day.”

UH Bands Aloha Concerts When: Sunday, April 21, 4 p.m. (UH Symphony Band and Concert Band), 7 p.m. (UH Wind Ensemble) Address: President William McKinley High School Auditorium, 1039 S King St. Cost: $10 general admission, $6 students and seniors (65+), UH faculty and staff Contact: uhbands.org


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Features

GET YOUR

HACK ON

Software industry professionals will judge hackathon. THINKSTOCK

CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor

Get ready programmers, designers and developers: The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is set to get hacked from Monday, May 13 to Wednesday, May 15 for Get Your Hack On, a three-day hackathon in which teams of participants must de velop a software application in a little more than 50 hours. David Wilkie, a senior majoring in information computer sciences, wished to “develop the innovative culture among the students of the University of Hawai‘i system,” which led him to get involved in the organization of the hackathon. Wilkie is familiar with competitions like these, as he participated in last year’s Startup Weekend at UH Mānoa. Co-founder James Wang

is a co-founder of HI Capacity, a community of people hoping to turn doers into dreamers and projects into reality. This marathon competition is similar to Startup Weekend Honolulu, which took place this past weekend, and City Camp, the first hackathon held by the city and county that had teams build applications centered on city data. However, Wilkie cited two major differences: First, Get Your Hack On is only open to students in the UH system; second, teams don’t need to have a value proposition to enter, and there is no theme driving the software development. “You just have to make something cool,” Wilkie said. “We expect everyone to build something that they can be really proud of or to fail gloriously and learn something useful through the process.”

A N YO N E C A N H AC K There are t wo assumptions that many people have about hacking: that it ’s about breaking into computer systems to steal data and that only the brainiest people are capable of it. Neither is true. Hacking, in a technical sense, simply refers to skillfully writing or refining computer programs, or as Wilkie put it, “programming effectively.” The popular culture definition of hacking began to catch on in the 1980s, and its negative connotations are still perpetuated today. “A couple decades ago, there were a series of high-profile computer security breaches which popularized the term, and it got popularized with that criminal connotation,” Wilkie said. “But in fact, that’s valid, but it’s only one sense of the word. And so

when you hear people talk about … hacking, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re doing something illegal.” Wilkie also addressed the assumptions that people have about the level of technical skill necessary to hack or compete in a hackathon. While ICS, management information systems and engineering majors are expected to participate, Wilkie welcomes students in graphic design, the Academy of Creative Media and any others who are interested in new media, web and global technologies and innovations. Twice -weekly workshops will lead up to the competition and will range from technical tutorials to sessions with guest speakers from startup business or the tech field. These workshops will essentially prepare students for the hackathon

while also teaching them to start up and develop a business as well as themselves on a personal and professional level. “We think it’s about how much time you put into it,” Wilkie said, emphasizing that even a student unfamiliar with the world of computing could have success at the hackathon. “Anyone can learn this.”

HACKATHON When: Monday, May 13, 10 a.m.-Wednesday May 15, 9 p.m. Where: POST 318 Cost: Free Contact: David Wilkie, 808-979-1982, davey@ktuh. org, hackuh.slickage.com


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Opinions FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

Autism, dyslexia and textual problems Sarah Nishioka Opinions Editor April is Autism Awareness Month in the United States, a designation that calls for public education about and for autism and the autism community. One in 88 children in America can be placed on the Autism Spectrum, a term used to describe a range of disorders that are different in severity for each individual. For those who are unfamiliar with developmental disabilities, autism affects a person’s ability to interact with others, sometimes manifesting in emotional outbursts, reserved behavior or strict attachments to routines. Autism is an “invisible” disability that does not manifest itself in physical ways, like bodily frailties or sickness but rather in behavioral and relational ways. Even less visible are intellectual disabilities like dyslexia, a disorder that affects a person’s ability to read.

COPING MECHANISMS According to the Mayo Clinic, “dyslexia occurs in children with normal vision and intelligence.” It has no clear causes or known cures, but this lifelong condition is characterized by difficulty in reading and writing that is so subtle as many as 14.5 to 43.5 million Americans might have it and not know it. People with dyslexia process words differently than most and are often described as having brains that are “wired” differently. Switching or misrecognizing letters like p and d is a common problem. If left undiagnosed, dyslexia can be the cause of many other invisible problems such as low self-esteem because of poor performance at school or work. Otherwise healthy children may become anxious, aggressive or antisocial as a result of their inability to understand written information and keep up with their peers in class. Most people with dyslexia struggle to find their own coping mechanisms: They learn to read phonetically (by sounding words out) instead of recognizing whole words, look for distractionfree environments so they can focus better and simply force themselves to work and practice much harder than people without dyslexia.

S E E I N G P RO B L E M S

Notice that the font of this section is radically different from the rest of this article. It is written in Open Dyslexic, one of many free fonts available on the Internet that was designed specifically for people with dyslexia. Like all mediums, not every person with dyslexia likes Open Dyslexic or similar fonts, but take a look at the following sentences: “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”

In dyslexia-conscious fonts, the weights and shapes of each letter are different so that they are unique and easily recognizable, making p and d look less similar. The way we speak, act and even the types of fonts we pick can have an effect on others, but our attitudes have the most impact. I am not writing this in an attempt to take atom Autism tention away from h (Dyslexia y Awareness Month h is not unAwareness Month til October), butt rather to at there are remind us all that many types of disabilities mmon than that are more common we think. We cannot ase are “bad” sume that people ey y act difor “weird” if they ot meet our ferently or do not y may y just j standards: They be reading the world differo. ently than we do. c is availOpen Dyslexic exic.org. able at opendyslexic.org.

TIM TIME A few weeks ago, a good friend asked me to hook him up with a female friend of mine. I got them talking, and it seems like they hit it off. Lately though, my buddy hasn’t been actively pursuing her, but I know he’s still interested. The problem is that now I find myself interested in the same girl, and I’ve already started to pursue her without him knowing. Am I a bad friend? What should I do? -A torn friend Well, the short answer is that you’re a terrible friend. There’s a lot going on here, though, so let’s take a closer look. First things first: Are you seriously interested in this girl, or do you just want to be inside her? It’s perfectly normal to feel sexually attracted to a female friend, but if that’s all it is, you need to suck it up and be content with your current relationship. Just because you can pursue her doesn’t mean you should. On the other hand, if you are interested in actually dating this girl, then it’s a little different. You have two options. You can talk to your buddy; ask him what’s going on and if is he still seriously interested in this girl. If he’s not, then you’re all clear. If he is, though, you should let him know that he’s not the only one, and he needs to move forward or get out of the way. That’s the option where you still keep being friends. The other one is to continue pursuing this girl regardless of what your

buddy thinks. This is going to cause some grief, and it’s entirely likely that you’ll wreck your friendship. It’s also possible that you’ll ruin your friendship with the girl if she isn’t on board. Which brings me to the girl; you’re not the only terrible friend here. There’s a pretty slim chance she doesn’t know what’s going on, since you said that you’ve already started to pursue her. What I would like it know is why didn’t she just shut you down once you started laying down game? In the best-case scenario, she doesn’t realize that you’re serious, and then she’s off the hook. Otherwise, I’d call her a tease and tell her to grow up a little. If she hasn’t told you to lay off, she’s obviously enjoying the attention. While it’s not wrong to enjoy a little positive attention from the opposite sex (who doesn’t?), it is wrong to string guys along like dogs sniffi ng after a little bacon. It’s time for her to go or get off the pot, just like you. Bottom line: This isn’t the end of the world. Keep in mind that your friends are like your family, the only difference is you got to pick them this time around. Do you really want to wreck two friendships this way? I’ll leave you with a little tidbit I got from a salty old sailor: “Get over it, son. There are plenty of fi sh in the sea, so let’s go fi nd you one that looks just like her.”

Tim Metra Associate Opinions Editor


Page 11 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 13 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

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Page 14 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

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GET IT ile ACROSS 1 Their first parts are geog. indicators 5 Her last film was “TwoFaced Woman” 10 Newspaper page 14 Injure, in a way 15 __ dome 16 Denpasar’s island 17 __ mentality 18 *Celebrating the big five-oh, say 20 __-Locka, Florida 21 Sum, sometimes 22 Country across the sea from Eritrea 23 *Small museum piece 27 Oil-rich African country 29 City on the Rhone 30 “__ Theme”: “Doctor Zhivago” song 32 Tram contents 33 Hog : sow :: rabbit : __ 35 Freak (out) 36 Court cry 37 What the answers to starred clues end in, in more ways than one 40 Pigeon-loving Muppet 42 Fjord cousin 43 __ Victor 44 Bargainer with GM 45 LeVar’s “Roots” role 47 Bender 51 Icky coating 53 *Dancer with many fans 55 Its young are called crias 57 Rock’s __ Lobos 58 Touch clumsily 59 *Profit factors 62 Siouan tribe 63 __ d’amore 64 Terse observation 65 W.S. winner in four of the last five years 66 Flex 67 Leafy recess

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Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor| Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 15 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Sports

Optimism holds the ‘Bows through trials

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Junior left fielder Adam Hurley is one of two Rainbows to have hit a home run this season. ELIAQUIM R EYES Staff Writer A fter enjoying two series victories before the road trip to California, the Rainbow base ball team (8 -24, 3 - 6 Big West) labored through loss after loss, emerging with one victory out of seven games it played in the past two weeks. Despite its struggles, the team remains confident in its abilities, as the ‘Bows prepare to face Cal State Northridge (19-17, 5-4 BWC) this week. The ‘Bows scored 15 runs compared to their opponents’ combined 39 runs against them during the seven-game trip. “I felt like we were separating, like we weren’t playing together as we should have,” junior fi rst baseman Marc Flores said. Regardless of the strenuous two weeks the team went through in California, the team battled through the struggle. “ The one thing that we did do was that I felt like we still battled,” sophomore catcher Trevor Podratz said. “We didn’t have any game that we just rolled over and gave up. We battled good, given the circumstances.” Three players, in particular,

stepped up and led the team in the past two series. Junior shortstop Austin Wobrock came through in the last two weeks, hitting .333 while scoring three runs for the ‘Bows. Senior third baseman Pi‘ikea Kitamura also contributed by posting a .307 batting average and collecting six RBIs.

P R E PA R I N G F O R C A L S TAT E NORTHRIDGE In preparing for the threegame series against the Matadors, the Rainbows continued their optimism and determination to come out victorious this week as they play at home. “It ’s a big part of baseball, being comfortable where you are,” Podratz said. “Not saying we’re incredibly uncomfortable where we were, but it definitely helps and we’re definitely excited to be back.” They also made it a point to keep the past losses behind and strive ahead. “We’re gonna come in here, and we’re gonna work hard for this upcoming series against Northridge,” Flores said. “[The last two series] are in the past and we can’t get them back, so we’re gonna keep striving from here and try to win out.”

Some of the players also said that team meetings held them together during the rough patch they faced. “ We all got together and talked about what was going on and the things we needed to fix, and we needed to stop pouting and being angr y and just go out there and play ball and have fun,” Flores said. It was the meeting that gave them a renewed spirit and talking amongst one another brought them back to what was important to them. “It just gave us reassurance again about how we’re a family and how we love each other,” Wobrock said. “Maybe some of us, we veered away from it. But when you have a meeting of just the players to talk to each other and tell us what’s going on, we brought that family back.”

UPCOMING GAMES Hawai‘i vs Cal State Northridge Friday, 6:35 p.m. Saturday, 6:35 p.m. Sunday, 1:05 p.m. All games will be held at Les Murakami Stadium


Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 16 | Ka Leo | Friday, April 19 2013

Sports

Playoff time for the Warriors Maddie Sapigao Senior Staff Writer After barely squeezing into the postseason, the University of Hawai‘i men’s volleyball team (1116, 10-14 Mountain Pacific Sports Federation) will have its work cut out for it as it prepares to face off with the nation’s top squad. The Warriors travel to Provo, Utah, to take on No. 1 BYU (22-4, 21-3 MPSF) in the opening round of the MPSF Tournament. BYU has won 14 of its past 15 matches, which includes seven victories against teams currently ranked in the NCA A top 10. The Warriors returned home with two wins against UC San Diego, giving them the opportunity to make an appearance in the tournament.

Sophomore opposite Brook Sedore had a career-high weekend with 50 kills, despite his team missing two of its star players, JP Marks (eligibility issues) and Sinisa Zarkovic (ankle injury). He was chosen as the MPSF Player of the Week for his performance. “Going in not having two of our starting outside hitters, we knew a lot of the guys had to step up and had to be a team effort if we had to get the win,” senior libero Matthew Cheape said. Sedore leads UH in both kills (334) and serving aces (41). Hawai‘i’s offense has been rounded out by middle blockers Taylor Averill and Davis Holt. “On the other side, we just realized that we had to free it up and have fun and play,” Sedore said. “When we have been suc-

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Senior libero Matthew Cheape is third on the team with 1.27 digs per set. VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

cessful, that’s how we’ve played. So we couldn’t come into the game all tense.” The Cougars’ dominance was on full display as they ended their regular season with a sweep against No. 6 Stanford. All-American junior outside hitter Taylor Sanders and senior setter Ryan Boyce, who was named “Best Setter” at Global Challenge, lead the way for BY U. The Cougars currently lead

the nation with a .326 hitting percentage and 2.94 blocks per game. Sanders, who recorded 384 kills during the regular season, will look to lead his team to a perfect 3- 0 yearly mark against UH this season. The teams faced off twice to open the season, and BY U came away with two victories in seven sets. “We just have to play our game,” junior setter Max Wechsung said. “We know we can beat

anyone. We have taken down great teams this season...They [BYU] better be ready for us cause they have everything to lose, and we have everything to gain.”

UPCOMING GAMES Hawai‘i at BYU Saturday, 3 p.m. HT

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