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A K LEO T H E

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 to SUNDAY, FEB. 26, 2012 VOLUME 106 ISSUE 74

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WEEKEND EVENTS – “Souled Out” – Hawai‘i Chocolate Festival – Hard Rock Rising 2012: the Global Battle of the Bands DUSTIN M IYAK AWA Contributing Writer DUSTIN MIYAKAWA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

From high atop key traffic lights and street signs, three faces survey thousands of University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa commuters. These ceramic masks are an art project called MiGrate, created by English and art major Michael Moore. The three faces are part of a larger series of identical ceramic masks installed at major intersections throughout Mānoa and Makiki.

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

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Editor in Chief Will Caron Managing Editor Jaimie Kim Chief Copy Editor Karleanne Matthews Assc Chief Copy Editor Candace Chang Design Editor Beth Shiner Assc Design Editor Justin Nicholas News Editor Kelsey Amos Assc News Editor Emi Aiko Features Editor Maria Kanai Assc Features Editor Alvin Park Opinions Editor Boaz Rosen Assc Opinions Editor Justin Francisco Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Broadcast News Editor Naomi Lugo Web Editor Jefferson Speer Special Issues Editor Sherley Wetherhold Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. Š2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Ryan Tolman, chair; Ming Yang, vice chair; or Susan Lin, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

Power outage holds up homework SHERLEY WETHERHOLD Special Issues Editor A power outage caused by a run-off-road collision on University Avenue (between Maile Way and Ka‘ala Street) left some 1,000 Hawaiian Electric customers without power and snuffed the trafďŹ c signal at East MÄ noa Road Monday night. Jen, a graduate student at UH MÄ noa who asked not to be identiďŹ ed, saw what looked and sounded like ďŹ reworks from her window in lower MÄ noa at 11 p.m. She said she was startled to see showers of light coming from a utility pole. Luckily, Jen had ďŹ nished her homework ahead of time. But other University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa students in the surrounding area scrambled to ďŹ nd Internet access to ďŹ nish last-minute assignments; some driving to friends’ houses, while others headed to Kissaten, a 24-hour coffee shop. Sarah Ching, who was biking home from a late-night run to the Safeway in MÄ noa Marketplace, suddenly found herself

in complete darkness on O‘ahu Avenue. “It was really creepy. My bike light is usually fine, I’d never biked when the streetlights weren’t on. I could barely see 2 feet in front of me. ‌ All the cars had their high-beams on, and it was even harder to see,â€? she said. Others reported a “burning rubberâ€? smell. W hile UH students tried to finish assignments, students and faculty at Mid-Pacific Institute, University Avenue Baptist Preschool, St. Francis School and MÄ noa Valley Church Pre school woke up to another day off after the long weekend due to the outage. Some 250 homes in the area were still without electricity in the morning. Power was fully restored to the area by Tuesday evening. Police say there were two people in the car at the time of the crash; one was in serious condition and was brought to the Queen’s Medical Center, while the other did not suffer any major injuries. It is suspected that alcohol was involved.

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Page 3 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

News WHY SHOULD I HIRE YOU?

COMPILED BY K YLE ENG Staff Writer

F E B . 18 -2 0 H O U S I N G RU L E S There were four separate violations of the student housing code reported this week. The first took place on Feb. 18 at Hale Aloha ‘Ilima at 5:45 p.m. The next event took place the same day at 8 p.m. at Hale Aloha Mokihana. The next incident took place on Feb. 19, also at Mokihana, around 5:30 p.m. The final incident took place at Hale Aloha ‘Ilima around midnight on Feb. 20.

F E B . 17 B OM B T H R E AT At about 3 p.m., Ka Leo received a bomb threat via telephone. The staff member who took the call said that a man called the news desk and, speaking in a calm voice, stated that a bomb was going to detonate in 18 seconds. “What motivates people to do that is extraordinarily difficult to fi nd out,” said Captain Donald Dawson of Campus Security.

F E B . 16 D O U B L E VA N DA L I S M A N D T H E F T A theft and a vandalism listed on the same case occurred on Dole Street in the late evening to early morning period.

F E B . 15 A N D 18 D RU N K E N WA L K Two reports of intoxicated individuals were filed this week, one on Feb. 15 at 1:24 a.m. at Hale Wainani, and the other at Hale A loha L ehua on Feb. 18 at 2:14 a.m.

F E B . 14 -19 A M E R I C A N G R A F F I T I Several incidents of graffiti were reported this week. The fi rst was at Kuykendall Hall during the offhours between Feb. 14 and 15. Another report came from Campus Center on Feb. 18 around 1:30 p.m. A third report came from the geophysics building on Feb. 19 at an indeterminate time.

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A fter consulting an adviser, the staffer called Campus Se curity half an hour later. W hen CS arrived on scene, the area was cordoned off and the entire building, including Mānoa Garden and Ba-L e, was evacuated. “Bomb threats are usually made just to disrupt things, but we can’t take that chance with people’s lives,” said Dawson. He explained that CS’s policy is to react to all bomb threats as if they were real. HPD was contacted and they searched the building, giving an all clear by about 5 p.m. and letting people return to work. No one was hurt and no bomb was found. Dawson said that a few years ago there were four to five bomb threats a week on campus, especially during midterms and finals. “I don’t know why it stopped,” he said. This threat did not seem to be aimed at disrupting classes, ANYSSA KARNKAENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I and also was not related to the bomb threats that happened last semester during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation meetings.

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Mask tasks from front page MiGrate began as a class project for Moore, who started making masks last spring. It took him about four hours to make the first mask. The rest took him months, but by the time he was finished, he had 10 masks that he placed in different locations. Now, six have disappeared. “ The idea that someone took the masks sparked all kinds of questions about the installation and inspired an extrapolation of my original concept,â€? said Moore. As an English major, formulating a narrative appealed to him. “I started thinking about where did it go, how would I find out where it went?â€? He formulated a story about 10 brothers who are looking for their missing brother, and attached instructions to the back of the masks for people to re-hang them, take photos and post on Facebook. “My hope is for a little conversation,â€? Moore said, “to get people talking about art.â€? As whimsical as they seem, the sculptures comment on issues central to contemporary art, such as challenging viewers to question the way they interact with art and mixing sculpture with alternative media. “It’s nondestructive, just clamps on metal,â€? said Moore. “But there is still the element of grafďŹ ti art. However, people can interact, either in a vandalist way themselves or as participants.â€? The remaining MiGrate members continue to generate buzz online through the Facebook page. Friends and viewers have already begun posting photos and comments. “It’s like ceramic grafďŹ ti,â€? said business student Jessie Hironaga, who worked in the ceramics studio as MiGrate developed, “but instead of vandalizing the space, this enhances it.â€? The installation reveals how objects are accompanied by a contextual frame, which provides semantic information regarding their function and setting. MiGrate challenges the way people experience objects, and offers an interactive alternative to viewing art.

ACEBO

OK

e: Mi First Nam e: Grate Last Nam rip on e comic st Look fo3r th p ag e 1 PHOTO COURTESY OF DUSTIN MIYAKAWA


Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

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‘Le Samouraï’ still worth the watch BACHMAN QUACH Staff Writer Film noir is a genre often imitated, yet rarely perfected. With classic tales of the criminal underworld, moody contrasts of dark and light, and timelessly cool style, it’s easy to understand why the genre is so popular. Though originally an American concept, it has since been embraced by fi lmmakers everywhere, and one prime example is the French classic “Le Samouraï.” Released in 1967, this neo-noir fi lm follows the character Jef Costello, a killer for hire who operates with a zen-like calm and a near obsessive-compulsive dedication to his routines. The story revolves around the fallout of his latest hit, as he enters a game of cat and mouse with police hot on his trail. Every scene is propelled to the next with tension as Costello evades his pursuers – cop and criminal alike. Director Jean-Pierre Melville, widely regarded as one of the founding members of the French New Wave movement, displays confidence in deftly synthesizing a

variety of international sensibilities. From the opening “quote” from the book of Bushido to the curious spelling and references in the name Jef Costello, the movie can easily be seen as a love letter to the many influences in Melville’s life. With the help of cinematographer Henri Decaë, he captures the streets of Paris in cloudy tones of blue and gray, giving the film an air of cold detachment that matches the demeanor of his protagonist. Alain Delon gives an amazing performance as Costello, portraying him as nearsilent, preferring to let his steely gaze do the talking. Constantly planning with meticulous precision, his piercing blue eyes scan the landscape, breaking through the fog of his desaturated surroundings as he uncovers solutions. Costello, with his taciturn code of conduct and classic fashion of trenchcoats and fedoras, is very much a man out of time – a last “samurai” of sorts in the Paris crime world. Numerous filmmakers, such as Quentin Tarantino and John Woo, have praised Melville as a great influence for their directing styles. Melville himself can be seen as a pro-

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LE SAMOURAÏ

“Le Samouraï” is credited as a major influence on many other films, including John Woo’s “The Killer” and Jim Jarmusch’s “Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai.” totype of Tarantino without the self-awareness, taking his love of American style like rock music and Ray-Bans, and combining it with a willful disregard for cinematic conventions to create a style all his own. It is easy to see why the DVD is available

through the Criterion Collection. I highly recommend any fan of avant-garde cinema and all students of filmmaking seek out “Le Samouraï” as a prime study in the art of film noir.


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Weekend Venue

WEEKEND EV E NT S COMPILED B Y M AILE THOMAS Contributing Writer

SHAWNTRELLE SOOKLA / KA

HARD RO CK RISING 2012: THE GLO BAL BAT TLE O F THE BAN DS Support local bands as they compete in the Global Battle of the Bands to win the chance of a lifetime: performing at Hard Rock Calling in L ondon’s Hyde Park. This will be the second qualif ying battle round. Cost: Free admission When: Saturday, Feb. 25; 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Where: Hard Rock Cafe Honolulu, 280 Beachwalk Ave. Contact: www.hardrock.com/honolulu

LEO O HAWAI‘I

With midterms coming up, many students could benefit from an evening of smooth jazz to ease those nerves. “Souled Out” will feature music by Alicia Keys, Aaliyah, Stevie Wonder, Sting and many others performed by Got Soul, a band of jazz musicians. This event takes place only on the fourth Saturday of each month, so don’t miss out. Cost: $5 When: Saturday, Feb. 25; 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Where: The Dragon Upstairs, 1038 Nu‘uanu Ave. Contact: www.thedragonupstairs.com

T” “S O U L E D O U

SHANNON REE SE / KA LEO O HAW

AI‘I

PHOTOS BY RIE MI

YOSHI / KA LEO O HA

WAI‘I

Valentine’s Day may be over, but Eat the Street is back this weekend with a tasty theme: chocolate. All of the participating food vendors will creatively incorporate chocolate into their menus. There will also be entertainment by the Shogunai DJ Crew.

Attention chocoholics: This month has officially been declared as “Hawaiian- Grown Cacao Month.” The Hawai‘i Chocolate Festival will take place this weekend as it promotes Hawai‘i’s developing chocolate industr y. Head to the Shops at Dole Canner y to taste exquisite, locally grown chocolate from the state’s top chocolatiers. Cost: $20 (online); $25 (door) When: Saturday, Feb. 25; 12-5 p.m. Where: Dole Cannery Shops, 650 Iwilei Road Contact: www.hawaiichocolatefestival.com

E ET: E AT TH E STR C H O C O L ATE

Cost: Bring money for food (cash only); $2 for parking When: Friday, Feb. 24; 4-9 p.m. Where: 805 Ala Moana Blvd. Contact: www.streetgrindz.com/eatthestreet

HAW AI ‘I CH O CO LATE FE ST IVAL

DIN NER, CLASSICAL IN DIAN DAN CE AN D A MOVIE The Still and Moving Center will be putting on a dinner, dance and movie night with an Indian theme this Sunday. If you plan on participating in the dinner, show up at 5 p.m. and bring any vegetarian ingredients that you wish to throw into the soup, labeled “Stone Soup” because of the popular fable in which a soup is magically conjured up from the sparsest of ingredients. The popular Indian movie “Lagaan” will be shown and a Bharata Natyam dance number will be performed during the intermission. Cost: $5 When: Sunday, Feb. 26; 5 p.m. (to start dinner), 5:30 p.m. (fi lm starts) Where: Still and Moving Center, 1024 Queen St. Contact: 808-397-7678 or stillandmovingcenter.com

CORRECTION A Feb. 15 article about DJ Krush should have reported that Sky Hi Productions has no upcoming events scheduled.


MANOA E XPERIENCE Saturday, February 25, 2012 9am-12pm • McCarthy Mall


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• First come, First served. Sign up at tent is required. PROSPECTIVE FRESHMEN STUDENT SESSION

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Audience: (High school students, middle school students welcomed)

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Time: 9:30 am Duration: 30 minutes Location: Bilger Hall 150 (Lecture Hall)

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Time: 9:30 am Duration: 60 minutes Location: Bilger Hall 152 (Lecture Hall)

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Session 1:

Hear from an admissions representative and academic advisors about the transfer process and steps to take regarding advising.

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Hear from an admissions representative and learn more about requirements, the application process, and how to ll out the Self-Reported Application.

TIPS & TRICKS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS INFORMATIONAL SESSION

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BUILDING

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 OVER 120 DIFFERENT PROGRAMS REPRESENTED PARADISE

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MUNDSON HALL

Visit the COLLEGE OF TROPICAL AGRICULTURE & HUMAN RESOURCES tent & check out their aquaponics, snail, and snake displays, Beagle Brigade, and learn how to dye cloth. Visit the LANGUAGE, LINGUISTICS & LITERATURES tents to  nd out about the 25 different languages taught on campus. Sample campus food by visiting the SODEXO tent (cash only). Learn how you can STUDY ABROAD or go on STUDENT EXCHANGE. Watch the annual PHYSICS Olympics at Watanabe Hall.

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Learn more about jobs students can get in school and after graduation from the M NOA CAREER CENTER.

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Take a tour of the brand new UH Translational Health Science Simulation Center at the SCHOOL OF NURSING

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Find out more about evening, summer and weekend classes from the OUTREACH COLLEGE.

HALL

View art drawings, performances & visual displays at the COLLEGE OF ARTS & HUMANITIES tent. Watch cultural performances at the SCHOOL OF PACIFIC & ASIAN STUDIES. Learn why science is so cool at the NATURAL SCIENCES tent.

ILGER

HALL KENNEDY THEATRE

Get your blood pressure taken and learn about the different career and HEALTH PROFESSIONS paths you can study at their tent. …& much, much more! Visit every tent on McCarthy mall to get the total M noa Experience!


Manoa Experience Tents (Alphabetical order) [Department(Tent #)]

Academy for Creative Media (22) Admissions (2) Air Force ROTC (40) Animal Sciences (43) Apparel Product Design & Merchandising (43) Arabic (25) Architecture (37) Army ROTC (41) Art (22) Asian Studies (21) Athletics (12) Beagle Brigade (43) Biology (44) Botany (44) Bookstore (42) Bridge to Hope (30) Business (38) Cambodian (25) Campus Security (42) Campus Tours (33) Center for Chinese Studies (21) Center for Japanese Studies (21) Center for Korean Studies (21) Center for Okinawan Studies (21) Center for Pacific Island Studies (21) Center for Philippine Studies (21) Center for Southeast Asian Studies (21) Chemistry (44) Childrenʼs Center (30) Chinese Language (23) Classics (28) College of Art & Humanities (22) College of Natural Sciences (44) College Opportunities Program (30) College of Social Sciences (20) College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (43) CTAHR Academic & Student Affairs (43) Communications (20) Communicology (22) Counseling & Student Development Center (6) Dental Hygiene (46) Economics (20) College of Education (45) College of Engineering (31) Filipino Language & Culture (24) Financial Aid Services (3) Financial Literacy Program (4) First Aid (15) First Year Programs (7)

Food (36) Food Science & Human Nutrition (43) French (28) GEAR-UP Manoa (27) Geography (20) Geology (32) Geophysics (32) German (28) Global Environmental Sciences (32) Graduate Professional Access (30) Hawaiʻi P-20 Partnerships for EducationStep-Up Scholars (9) School of Hawaiian Knowledge (Language & Studies) (18) Health Careers Opportunities Program (HCOP) (30) Health Professions (46) Health Promotion Program (15) Hindi/Urdu Langauge (25) History (22) Honors Program (8) Information Booths (1, 35, 47) Ilokano Language & Culture (24) Indonesian Language (25) Information and Computer Sciences (44) Invasive Species (43) Japanese Language (23) Journalism (20) Ka Leo Newspaper (17) KOKUA Program (30) Korean Language (23) Kuaʼana (30) Learning Assistance Center (14) Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgender, Intersex Office (LGBTI) (30) Linguistics (26) Manoa Career Center (5) Manoa Educational Talent Search (METS) (30) Maori Language (25) Marine Biology (44) Marine Option Program (44) Mathematics (44) Medical Technology (46) Meterology (32) Molecular Biosciences & Bioengineering (43) Multicultural Student Services (30) Music (22) Muslims in Asia and the Pacific Studies (21) Na Pua Noʼeau (30) National Student Exchange (11)

Natural Resources and Environmental Management (43) School of Nursing (46) School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology (32) Oceanography (32) Office of Public Health Studies (46) Online Learning Academy (13) Osher Re-Entry Scholarships (30) Outreach College (19) Parent & Family Relations (34) Peace Studies (20) Philosophy (22) Plant & Environmental Protection Services (43) Political Science (22) Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program (30) Pre-Health Advising Program (46) Pre-Law Advising Program (16) Psychology (20) Residence Hall Tours (34) Rest Area (29) Samoan Language & Culture (25) Sanskrit Language (25) School of Pacific & Asian Studies (21) Second Language Studies (27) Senior Citizen Visitor Program (30) Social Work (46) Sociology (20) SODEXO (Food) (36) Spanish Language (28) Speech (see communicology) (20) Student Employment (See Manoa Career Center) (5) Student Group Check-In (48) Student Housing (34) Study Abroad Center (10) Tahitian Language (25) Thai Language (25) Theatre and Dance (22) Tongan (25) Travel Industry Management (39) Tropical Plant & Soil Sciences (43) University Health Services (15) Vietnamese Language (25) William S. Richardson School of Law (16) Womenʼs Center (30) Womenʼs Studies (20) Zoology (44)


Page 11 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

: : y y n e n e a a n n m m m m n n o o o o i i l R l R l i i t t t m t i m i 0 0 M $$2200 M

Opinions

e e h tth

EDWARD H ICKMAN Staff Writer If having the right look decided campaigns, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney would have probably won the GOP candidacy weeks ago. Standing at a slim 6 foot 2, he towers over fellow candidate Newt Gingrich (who comes in at a portly 5 foot 10). Now you may laugh at such a seemingly pointless comparison – until I point out that in the 21 presidential elections from 1904 to 1984, the taller candidate won 80 percent of the time.

SKIN DEEP So what does that mean by extrapolation? It means the A merican voting base tends

to be shallow. Apparently, we don’t care if your policies are backward and don’t make sense as long as you’ve got a veneer that matches up with our pre conceived notions about what a leader looks like. Looks, of course, are only skin deep, so what makes Mitt Romney the protean fi gure? He’s come storming out of Massachusetts (a liberal stomping ground) in the hopes of leading a party that has become synonymous with the word “conservative” (albeit not traditionally or fiscally conservative). The very fact that he can be a frontrunner for the GOP candidacy after being the key fi gure in enacting a universal health care system that ensures nearly all Massachusetts residents receive

nce coverage (which would insurance normally make any GOP member point and scream “socialism!” “socialism!”)) suggests that Romney the political fi gure is occupying a space of profound contradiction.

MO N E Y M A N What about Romney the man? For starters, he stands above the other candidates not only in physical height, but in wealth. Exactly how tall of a bank account are we talking about here? Well, if you combined the wealth of the past eight presidents, you’d still fall short. There’s been a lot of talk about the 1 percent. Ol’ Romney, with a net worth of $190 -250 million, falls in at about the .006 percent mark. Even among the top 1 per-

cent, he stands out – doubly so as a political candidate. To put it bluntly, the candi candidate with the most money usually wins. In the past six presidential elections, the only candidate who managed to win with a smaller coffer was Bill Clinton, but we don’t call him Slick Willy for nothing. In the House, the candidate who raises the most money wins a whopping 93 percent of the time, and in the Senate it’s even worse, at 94 percent. As the old saying goes, “money talks, bulls--- walks.” If the tallest candidate with the most money stands the best chance of winning, surely Romney is the odds-on favorite to win the GOP candidacy. He’s certainly the guy I’d put my money on, even if I think he

WILL CARON/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

doesn’t stand a chance of going toe -to-toe with Obama come general election time. But the real question we should all be asking ourselves in light of this information is this: Are we OK with money being a deciding factor in most campaigns? The Occupy Wall Street movement certainly isn’t OK with that, which is why “getting money out of politics” is often cited as one of its chief concerns. It will take a dramatic shift for that to happen. But if it means we can start choosing our political candidates on the merit of their platforms and put a stop to the corruption caused by the constant need for candidates to fundraise, we should be prepared to go as far as it takes.


Page 12 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Opinions

Mapping the infamous ‘friend zone’ JUSTIN F R ANCISCO Associate Opinions Editor

W H AT I T I S A place one fi nds him or herself when intimately attracted to a friend who sees the relationship as merely platonic.

W H E N YO U K N OW Friend: “I can talk to you ou’ u’re re e about anything; you’re rl” rl l” such a nice guy/girl” Lover: “Our talks are so open; I feel like you actually listen” Friend: “You’re like a brother/sis-ter to me” e eLover: “I feel like I rreou” ally connect with you” Friend: “I don’t want to jeopardize our friendship” Lover: “I don’t want to get hurt”

H OW YO U G O T T H E R E You’re too passive Waiting around for his/her calls and moves undermines your confidence – and ultimately, your sex appeal. You never initiate contact If you aren’t fl irting, you are communicating that either you lack confi dence, or he/she isn’t attractive enough to incite desire. You’re not his/her ‘type’ Yes, you may be cute, but you’re not hot. Unfortun na t ely there is really nately, not no t nothing you can do about this, so llearn to work other aspects. You took too long He/she fears jeopardizing a genuiine friendship.

WHY IT HAPPENS Caution C Caut Ca aut utio io n ion It’s safer to admit you as a friend rather than a lover, and he/she can enjoy some of the benefits without the risks.

Supply and demand d odi dity y iinnnThe value of a commodity ilab il abil il-il creases when the availabiloess oe ity of that object goes down. If you aren’t al-ways available, romantically or platonically, you are more desirable. Poor communication n a id d to o ccomom ommOften, people are afraid e ell in i ngs gss b eemunicate their true fe feelings because of the fear of being rejected or creating awkwardness. Damaged goods Some wounds take time to heal. Don’t think a new relationship is the bandage; hurt people need you to console him/her as a friend, not a lover.

THE DILEMMA Most guys are shy. When we finally do become familiar enough to feel comfortable, we are even more reluctant to make moves because we are worried about jeopardizing a friendship that might suffer the

in this world as sweet as the fi rst encounter between friends. For things to avoid when attempting to escape the friend zone, visit kaleo.org/opinions.

ag g on o n ie iess off an a n attempted atte at t mp p ted te e d aand agonies fail ill e ed dm an n eu e u ve ver e r. r. failed maneuver.

THE SOLUTION If you’re meeting a new person, make a move early. When the foundation of your friendship isn’t set, you can bring your intentions into the development of the friendship. If you’re already friends, gradually make your intentions known. As soon as there is subdenc de nce ea s t a nt i a l evidence tion nphysical relationork, k, ship might work, make a move. e It will b be re e worth it; there gs gs are few things

POLL

Is the friend zone based on physical attractiveness?

Go to

kaleo.org/opinions

to vote

Last week’s results On dates, should the man be expected to pay?

38% Yes 62% No ILLUSTRATIONS BY WILL CARON/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 13 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

Comics

MiGrate

Michael Moore


Page 14 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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Field Research Assistant positions are short term and temporary with the UH School of Public Health Studies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Underage Alcohol Prevention Project. Job entails participation in surveys/field activities and collecting research data throughout the island of Oahu. Must be able to follow a strict protocol and confidentiality policy. Attention to detail is a MUST! Will need to fill out data collection forms accurately and legibly as well as perform other duties as assigned. All positions require a valid State issued I.D and/ or current drivers license. Access to reliable transportation and availability during evenings and Saturdays a must. Positions require a clean drivers abstract. Must be able to pass a postoffer criminal background check.

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor| Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 15 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

Sports

Taking a breather from back page

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAIâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I

Freshman Taylor Averill fought his way into the starting lineup midseason, while senior middle blocker Jarrod Lofy started every match this season. Breaking from Mountain Pacific Sports Federation conference play will also help the Warriors regroup after losing two straight matches to then No. 1 UCL A . â&#x20AC;&#x153;For us, with a young team, we need to compete,â&#x20AC;? Wade said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing a fair amount of things well pretty regularly, and we just got to sustain it. We got one guy playing good or two guys playing good; we need three or four guys playing good. We can play good for most of the game; we need to play good for the entire game. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bye week for us, and we need to keep playing.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a matter of refining,â&#x20AC;? senior middle blocker Jarrod L of y said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; We just need to refine a few small things â&#x20AC;&#x201C; be able to hit out of system, be able to put away balls when we need them.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be able to challenge ourselves against what should be an excellent and good CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAIâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I team. Just because it â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not MPSF doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean Freshman outside hitter Stanley Hinkle appeared in his first match two weeks ago it â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not high-quality volleyball. That â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly the and is averaging 1.33 kills per set, hitting .333. type of thing we need.â&#x20AC;? Although Donovan, Wade and the department hope to pick up two wins over Nittaidai, these matches also have larger implications. UH vs. Nittaidai â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, hopefully we can get some good recruits,â&#x20AC;? Friday, 7 p.m., Stan Sheriff Center Donovan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the other thing there is we can Toyota Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i will award $300 in gas gift cards at intermission build brand awareness and name awareness out in Sunday, 5 p.m., Stan Sheriff Center those countries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we can start building a fan followFirst Insurance of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i will distribute 500 reusable tote bags ing. And as the television rights start expanding a and award up to $400 in gas gift cards little wider, at least into Asia, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll already have a All UH MÄ noa students get in free with a validated ID. set group of people that are already pulling for us because they can identify with us.â&#x20AC;? AFTER TODAY, SURRENDER IS NOT AN OPTION.

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 16 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 24 2012

Sports

Bridging the gap M ARC A R AK AKI Sports Editor The University of Hawai‘i Athletics Department ’s vision stretches nearly 4,000 miles be yond Hawai‘i’s shores. “We’re doing all that we can to reach out to Asia,” athletics director Jim Donovan said. “I think that ’s, strategically, one of our long-term goals – is to build better relationships with Japan and potentially China and Australia, the Asia-Pacific region.” And progress is being made. “I did go over to a couple of seminars with [former football] coach [Greg] McMackin to meet some coaches in Japan coaching A merican football,” Donovan said. “A nd we do have a company that ’s been able to get some of our women’s volleyball games, men’s basketball

games and football games on a cable net work in Tokyo on a delayed basis. “I would say that we’re up to around 40 or 50 broadcasts within the last three years. That ’s about half a million to 600,000 households. We’re talking about playing a football game in Japan in the future, and [men’s basketball coach] Gib [A rnold] just finished the circuit with China and Japan.” The Rainbow Warrior basketball team played five games in Asia this past summer, but this Friday and Sunday, the No. 13 Warrior volleyball team (6 -9) is set to host Nittaidai from Japan in two exhibition matches. “We want to do our part too and help get exposure,” head coach Charlie Wade said. “That’s part of it with Jim Donovan and kind of the big picture of [getting] more exposure into the Pacifi c Rim.” See Taking, page 15

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Warrior volleyball team plays Nittaidai tonight (7 p.m.) and Sunday (5 p.m.)

Welcome Back Students! Aloha UH Manoa Community! We, CCB, strive to improve student life on campus and create an awesome college experience. Through activities put on by our Recreation Board and Activities Council, we aim to create a unique experience. We love to hear feedback from the whole UH Community. Aloha, Michael Magaoay CCB President Looking to get involved? The Campus Center Board, your student union is accepting applications to be a part of our day to day operations.

Feb 24-26, 2012  
Feb 24-26, 2012  

Volume 106 Issue 74

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