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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20 to TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2012 VOLUME 107 ISSUE 5

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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Against the flow: Cayetano talks transit, UH DAVIN AOYAGI Editor in Chief

mer governor Benjamin Cayetano Former gathers media attention as the sole candidate d to rail, but his alternatives to the rail opposed project and his views on the university’s role for lu County are less known. Honolulu ving retired from the state’s highest ofHaving fice in 2002, Cayetano sat down with Ka Leo for nute interview on rail, rail alternatives a 60-minute and the university.

needs. He pointed out that by 2030, Honolulu’s population will have increased by an additional 100,000 people, and that rail would not achieve its intended purpose. “I would tell a UH student to go on-

R A L LY I N G AGA I N S T R A I L

Cayetano, yetano, who announced his candidacy yor on Jan. 19, was motivated by his for mayor tion to rail. opposition ne reason why I came out of retirement “One is that I didn’t like what I saw happening in the ayetano said. “I thought the spending city,” Cayetano was veryy reckless, and I really feel that the rail system is something we can’t afford.” e rail project is expected to stretch from The West O‘ahu ‘ahu to Ala Moana Center. If ted, it will cost the City completed, ounty of Honoand County .2 billion, aclulu $5.2 g to the ofcording ebsite for ficial website olulu Rail the Honolulu Transit Project. yetano, Cayetano, r, stated however, that the cost will ser to be closer on. $7 billion. He said that rail fails to adodress Honolulu’ss f ut ure trans on portation

line [and] Google this stuff ... [They’ll] fi nd it won’t reduce traffic congestion ... The city had to admit this as well,” Cayetano said. Cayetano also criticized rail due to the locations it will service. “The fi rst thing that all students know is that it will probably never go s to Mānoa. The reason is that the Mānoa spur would cost about $1.8 billion in addition to what’s already on the table.” grow Cayetano dismissed the potential job growth projections due to the rail project, stating tthat, “The city says 10,000 jobs a year. What does the University of Hawai‘i economics departm department say? 2,000 [jobs] for the entire project.”

Cayetano referred to a 2003 Envir Environmental Impact Statement as a basis for his alternative transit plan. According to Cayetano, the EIS stated that an expanded bus rapid transit (BRT) sys system was better than rail for three main reaso reasons: “First, it was less costly. [Second] ... the ridership riders was forecasted to be a little higher than ra rail ... t Third, it’s much more flexible so, they try routes, it doesn’t work out, and you can change. O Once you build rail, that’s it, you’re stuck with it it.” See Cayetano, page 2

WWW.KALEO.ORG

IF YOU GIVE A KID A BOOK... Children’s lit starts Thursday

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OPINIONS

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HIGHER HIGH G ER S STANDARDS? TANDARDS? S? Campus members weigh in on Cayetano comments

COMICS

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BEAT THE HEAT

Read some cool comics

This article is part of a three-part series covering the candidates for mayor of Honolulu County. Ka Leo interviewed mayoral candidate Ben Cayetano on June 8, 2012. To watch the interview, go to kaleo.org

SPORTS

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FAMILY MAN

Softball coach talks responsibilities, legacy

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R A I L A LT E R N AT I V E S

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 20 2012

News@kaleo.org | Emi Aiko Editor | Kim Clark Associate

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ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal Marketing Director Reece Farinas Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Kara McManus, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

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Cayetano served two terms as Hawai‘i’s governor from 1994-2002. Cayetano acknowledged that he was unsure of the number of buses that would be added under the BRT system to the 530 buses currently in operation, but said that there may be a reallocation of those existing buses via establishing a dedicated bus lane in the existing infrastructure. In response to whether a dedicated bus lane pulled from an existing lane would increase traffic, Cayetano said, “You got these two systems. You know from the studies – two studies – that they achieve about the same kind of ridership. You know that this one may take an existing lane, you grant that. ... But take a look at what the rail does: ... it’s much more expensive [and] it really changes the profi le of the city.” Cayetano was unable to provide any current figures about the cost of the bus rapid transit project. “We haven’t calculated that right now. But … let’s even that up with a 20 percent increase; [it’s] still far less than rail,” Cayetano said.

UNIONS AND THE UNIVERSITY Cayetano felt that the Travel Industry Management department on campus exemplified the university’s role as an economic generator. “The TIM school is a good example [of how the university supports Honolulu]. We’re a tourism-industry-based

economy, and the University provides that sort of research and training.” His suggested improvements for the university include raising admission requirements for students. He explained, “Mānoa is a research university. I went to UCLA, and in California, you can’t get into the UC system unless you’re in the top 12 percent. ... I think UH Mānoa, which is a research university, should adjust its standards and guys like me who nearly flunked out of high school … [should look to] the community colleges and West O‘ahu. ... The University of Hawai‘i [at Mānoa] will flourish if the students who are freshmen don’t have issues with remedial writing and all that, because a lot of the professors complain about that.” Cayetano also advised that faculty members should not be allowed to both be a part of a union and hold tenure. “Either the faculty should have tenure or have the union, not this double protection, because then you can’t get out the professors who are not quite up to par – and I’m sure that you folks run into some of them,” said Cayetano.

SPORTS

EDITOR

M ARC A R AK AKI

CONTRIBUTED TO THIS REPORT.

For campus perspectives on Cayetano’s suggestion of raising admission requirements, go to page 4


Features@kaleo.org | Alvin Park Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 20 2012

Features

Children’s Literature Hawai‘i conference Event will have something for both adults and youth.

Ka Leo is looking for highly motivated students interested in gaining real world experience.

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JUNE COMBO SPECIAL

COURTESY OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE HAWAI‘I

FULL LEGS & UNDERARMS

Children’s literature illustrator James Rumford (left) and author Pam Munoz Ryan (right) will be guest speakers at the conference.

The Sixteenth Biennial Conference on Literature and Hawai‘i’s Children

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Dates: June 21 at Cathedral Church of St. Andrew’s Tenney Theatre from 7 p.m.-9 p.m.; June 22-23 at Ching Conference Center at Chaminade University from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: Free Contact: www.childrensliteraturehawaii.org

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“ There will be three different types of panels at the conference: ‘Interpreting Children’s Literature,’ ‘Creating Children’s Literature’ and ‘Using Children’s Literature,” Wolf said. “So conference-goers can choose which one interests them the most.” Wolf, who is a doctoral candidate on creative writing, will also be

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S H A R I N G WO R D S

hosting a panel based on the future of children’s books and how the next generation may access them in the future. “My panel is about digitalizing children’s literature,” she said. “It will focus on how it will be affected and how it will be used in the classrooms and libraries.” The conference will also host two special guest speakers: author Pam Munoz Ryan and illustrator James Rumford. Ryan and Rumford will be joining other English professors, teachers, artists and librarians participating in the panels and keynote addresses. “My father was a children’s librarian, so I was always interested in children’s literature,” Wolf said. “It’s something I enjoy studying. It’s also important for different literary organizations on campus to support each other.”

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This week, the non-profit group Children’s Literature Hawai‘i will be presenting the Sixteenth Biennial Conference on Literature and Hawai‘i’s Children, which will explore the creativity and interpretation of literature geared towards our keiki. The free event, in partnership with the UH Mānoa English department, will span three days, from June 21-23, and is open to members of the public who are interested in discussing, using or creating children’s literature. “This is a conference that’s been going on since the early- to mid-80’s, but the biennial conference focuses on anyone who is interested in children’s literature,” said Rachel Wolf, conference director for the event

and editor in chief of Hawai‘i Review, Ka Leo’s sister publication. “It has events for both adults and children.” The event will kick off on Thursday with a performance from the Honolulu Theatre for Youth at the Cathedral Church of St. Andrew’s Tenney Theatre. The event will then continue at Chaminade University on Friday and Saturday for a series of instructional panels and keynote addresses.

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Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 20 2012

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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DOWN 1 Cowardly Lion portrayer 2 Golfer Aoki

3 Life partner? 4 Arrange in columns 5 OPEC is one 6 Climate Reality Project chairman 7 Cavs, on scoreboards 8 Roofer’s supply 9 Sets up, as software 10 One hearing a confession 11 Everypooch 12 Curvy music figure 13 Lord’s laborer 18 Words on a yogurt container 19 On the up and up 23 Train between ropes 24 First Nations members 25 Cygnets’ parents 26 Kitchen counter? 27 Alt. 28 Former Quebec premier Lévesque 29 “La Vie en Rose” chanteuse 30 Sparkling libation of Italy 34 Tart, juicy apples 35 Fabergé collectibles 36 Hanging organizers 38 “P.S. I Love You,” to “Love Me Do” 39 Trapshooting 41 Add to the payroll 42 Place to be 43 Rather recent 46 Propped up by pillows, perhaps 47 Writer Grey 48 Fed. inspection org. 50 Mother of Zeus 51 100 C-notes 52 Bologna bone 54 Sign of summer 55 Shaq’s alma mater

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

www.childrensliteraturehawaii.org

ACROSS 1 Jaunty tune 5 Desert bloomers 10 They may be on KP 14 Land east of the Urals 15 Detective Pinkerton 16 Vex 17 White Castle offering 20 Wide cigar 21 Drive on a course 22 Look like a wolf 23 Yields to gravity 24 Gadget for sharing a TV signal 29 The U.K.’s Labour, for one 31 “Leaves of Grass” poet Whitman 32 __ de la Cité 33 “That makes sense” 34 Becomes frayed, say 36 Feds fighting counterfeiting 37 Broke a fast 38 Talk with one’s hands 39 It doesn’t hold water 40 Angler’s weight 44 Mid-month time 45 Not e’en once 46 Blue shades 49 Affirm under oath 53 Types of them can be found at the ends of 17-, 24- and 40-Across 56 Opposite of ecto57 Monterrey jack? 58 Salad dressing “Born in a great steak house.” 59 Professor’s boss 60 Confederacy 61 Starch from a palm

Where Pictures Speak and Stories Paint

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

the 16th biennial conference on literature and hawai`i’s children

K A LEO

June 21, 2012 tenney theatre June 22-23, 2012 chaminade university

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featuring ~ Pam Munoz Ryan and James Rumford Sponsored by Children’s Literature Hawai`i, Hawai`i Council for the Humanities, Chaminade University and the University of Hawai`i at Manoa

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 20 2012

Comics


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, June 20 2012

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(L-R) The Coolen family: Demi, 18, Bob, Nanci, and Bo, 16.

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O N T H E D I A MO N D Coolen coached the Rainbow Wahine softball team this season to a 44-9 overall record and a Western Athletic Conference regular season title. The ‘Bows are now busy with the start of Hawai‘i’s softball camp season, which started last Wednesday and will continue until Aug. 11. “The camp is basically for my assistants [Dee Wisneski and Kaulana Williams],” Coolen said. “They’re the ones that organize it. I show up, I talk to the parents, I observe my players – my former players and my assistants. It gives them a leadership role. It’s not really something that I need to be proactive [for], because all year long I’m the one that’s setting the tone for nine months.”

Stadium was constructed prior to the 1998 season. UH has just approved $2.4 million dollars for the redesign of a new softball stadium. “I was also told that I would never see it in my lifetime,” Coolen said. “It’s kind of frustrating that I will be involved in the design of it, but I won’t see the fruition of that design. It’s great that they afforded [$2.4 million] for a new design to make it state-of-the-art so we can compete with a BCS [Baseball Championship Series] program.” Coolen fi nished his 21st season as head coach and 23rd season in the program. He is the winningest coach in program history and the only coach to take the team to the NCAA Tournament. Across the street of the softball stadium stands the Les Murakami Stadium. The stadium was built in 1984 as the Rainbow Stadium and was renamed in 2001 to honor the man who was responsible for its inception. “It won’t be named after me,” Coolen laughed. “I’m a visitor to this island and I was told that early and often when I came here. It would be a great legacy for me to be the winningest coach. I don’t need a stadium to be named after me.”

ʻB O B C O O L E N S TA D I U Mʼ? The softball team has played its games on campus since 1985. The 1,200-seat Rainbow Wahine Softball

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Rainbow Wahine softball coach Bob Coolen has two full-time jobs: one as a coach and the other as a father. “I try to make as many of their events as possible,” Coolen said of his two children, Demi, 18 and Bo, 16. “I’ve been to a lot of their different sports that they handled throughout their career.” Demi Coolen, a 2012 graduate of Punahou, participated in three high school sports – one of them being softball. “[High school] softball, since it’s similar to our season, that was kind of tricky,” Coolen said. “I’d always have to run over on lift days, and I did see her play.” Bo Coolen, a junior at Punahou, plays baseball. “Baseball is a little more extensive in regards to practice. So he’ll [Bo] come down to the cages and I’ll throw him batting practice. I try to wear both hats – softball and baseball,” said Coolen. Coolen’s wife, Nanci, a physical education instructor at Punahou, is also instrumental in their children’s success. “I give a lot of credit to my wife,” Coolen said. “She’s a taxi for them – always there for them. She teaches during the day and her evenings were always available for them.”

Coolen’s players also see a side of him outside of softball. “He definitely comes off as a great dad,” junior outfielder Brynne Buchanan said. “We all have a great relationship. He’s very welcoming to girls, especially those who are not from the islands – always opening up his home for Thanksgiving. He really looks out for us, and I think he does a great job with his kids too.”

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Read an extended version of this article at http://www.kaleo.org


June 26 2012