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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 to THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012 VOLUME 106 ISSUE 79

Hear

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.facebook/HawaiiNationalGuard.com

www.kaleo.org

College experience extends beyond the classroom. Here are some events – all taking place tomorrow – for a fun Thursday night out on campus.

GROOVE IN THE GARDEN

Groove in the Garden, a monthly event, is organized by KTUH and Ka Leo to expose the public to different aspects of music, media industry, production, management and promotions. “Groove in the Garden can provide ambiance for people hanging out at the Ba-Le courtyard,” said KTUH promotions director Michelle Umipeg. “Some students might be too young to go to a club, prefer to be in a casual setting on campus, or may not be able to afford cover charges or cab fares. It’s an alternative social setting that we can offer on campus.” The all-ages event will feature DJ Jamison, DJ Kyd and Rocki Sasaki from KTUH. Ka Leo will be streaming live video footage of the entire event on the Ka Leo website. When: 5-8 p.m. Where: Ba-Le Courtyard

Thursday night madness JAYSON NAKASHIMA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Taste

FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Menu: TASTE OF MĀNOA

The seventh year of the biannual food fair will showcase the culinary skills of the UH Mānoa Sodexo chefs. Five chefs will prepare a dish of their choice for faculty, students and the public to be purchased for $1 per plate. “It is designed for college students,” said Grant Ponciano, a student member of the Campus Center Board of Activities Council. “Students are generally running on a budget, so who wouldn’t want to buy food for $1? “This is one of our most popular events,” said Ponciano. “It surprises me every time that no matter how much this event is publicized, many people show up. It’s a tradition.” When: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Where: Campus Center

TASTE OF MĀNOA

See

Need Money for College?

Vegetarian (Chef Philip Shon): Apple-cinnamon swirl grilled cheese with walnuts and Wisconson cheddar Seafood (Shon): Grilled miso-marinated salmon on spicy tuna and avocado maki sushi with furikake Beef (Chef Wesley Ching): Asian long rice beef salad Chicken (Chef Mark Ching): Furikake chicken bites with ume aioli and garlic fried rice Pork (Chef Carl Peterson): Roast pork tenderloin with a lilikoi, rum, maple glaze on sweet-potato hash, watercress slaw Dessert (Chef Brian Takatsuka): Decadent chocolate mousse in a champagne glass

72-HOUR FILM CHALLENGE PREMIERE

In collaboration with the Campus Center Board of Activities, UH Productions designed a three-day film challenge that began last Friday. The competition will conclude tomorrow, when the final products (short films produced within the 72hour limit) will premiere and winners will be announced for a possible $500 prize. Students were invited to participate in the challenge regardless of fi lm experience. They were given a prop, a line of dialogue and a character and asked to incorporate the elements into an original fi lm. “The goal is to inspire creativity in students of UH Mānoa,“ said Josh Huaracha, director of UHP, “to give them the opportunity to experience making a fi lm.” $5 vouchers for Ba-Le will be given to those who attended the kickoff night on Friday. When: 6 -9 p.m. (doors open at 5) Where: Campus Center Ballroom

1295 S. Beretania St. Honolulu, HI 96814 (808) 626-5202

UH SPECIAL Free Fries & Drink with burger purchase with coupon or UH ID.

COMPILED

ISABELLA H ASTINGS Staff Writer

BY

Report

SHINICHI TOYAMA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

WEDNESDAY N: W: S: E:

8 -15+ f t. 5 - 9 f t. 0 - 3 f t. 7-12+ f t.

THURSDAY N: W: S: E:

5-10+ f t. 3-7+ f t. 0 - 3 f t. 5-9 f t.


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

News K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Religious abductions ignored

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

$1 tacos w/ UH ID Cannot be combined with any other coupon/offer

WARNING: TACOS ARE ADDICTING!!!

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org ADVERTISING The Board of Publications office is located on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall.

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RELAY FOR LIFE April 14th, 2012

Help fight cancer just by enjoying a great meal!!! California Pizza Kitchen Ala Moana Shopping Center 1450 Ala Moana Blvd.

Support the Relay For Life of UH Manoa on Wednesday, March 14th 2012 (All Day)

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Editor in Chief Will Caron Managing Editor Jaimie Kim Chief Copy Editor Karleanne Matthews Assc Chief Copy Editor Candace Chang Design Editor Beth Shiner Assc Design Editor Justin Nicholas News Editor Kelsey Amos Assc News Editor Emi Aiko Features Editor Maria Kanai Assc Features Editor Alvin Park Opinions Editor Boaz Rosen Assc Opinions Editor Justin Francisco Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Broadcast News Editor Naomi Lugo Web Editor Jefferson Speer Special Issues Editor Sherley Wetherhold Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Ryan Tolman, chair; Ming Yang, vice chair; or Susan Lin, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

TAYLOR MORRIS Staff Writer According to student groups, over 4,000 adults in Japan have been victims of kidnapping and torture in the name of religious de-conversion for decades, and these crimes continue today without reform. “ The police, the courts, the media, they all just say the same thing. They say they don’t have enough proof. But we have all the proof,” remarked Takaaki Ito, a member of the Hawai‘i Collegiate Association for the Research of Principles. Tonight, Hawai‘i CARP is sponsoring an event called “Japan’s Hidden Shame.” Its purpose is to raise public and political awareness about these abductions, promote media exposure and put political pressure on Japan’s government. The event will include testimony by and photos of a victim of forced de-conversion, Toro Gato, who was tortured for 12 years. Luke Higuchi, a victim and president of Survivors Against Forced Exit, will also speak. According to Ito, Japan’s traditional religious beliefs are rooted deeply in Buddhism and Shinto, and over the past 40 years, families have taken extreme measures to de -convert or “de -program” members of minority groups such as the

Unification Church and the Je hovah’s Witnesses. Families are often assisted by hired de-programmers, who include exit counselors, Protestant pastors and former members of marginalized religions. There are even businesses that offer de-programming services for a price. In order to regain freedom, some victims fake de-conversion, some are successfully de-converted and some escape. While in confinement, victims have reported being beaten, starved and raped. Several of these crimes have been reported by victims after regaining their freedom, but very few cases have been won. “The media has painted a bad image of these churches, and they are marginalized religions; therefore, the police are afraid to do anything,” said Ito. Ito also noted, “If it’s a family thing, they [the police and media] step out. … It’s not a bad thing, they are just abusing it. Family is very important … in Japan, individual rights are not very respected, and it’s a problem.”

Japan’s Hidden Shame When: Today, March 7; 4-5 p.m. Where: Campus Center Snacks and drinks will be provided.


News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

News

Roadside regulation

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Bill 59 attempts to revise limits on food trucks

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SEAN NAKAMURA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Honolulu City Council member Romy Cachola speaks during the second meeting regarding Bill 59 at Honolulu Hale (City Hall) on Thursday, March 1. SEAN NAK AMUR A Contributing Writer

Without successful legislation, food trucks such as the Blue Truck Teppanyaki often parked in front of Atherton YMCA and the popular monthly event Eat The Street could be jeopardized. A bill that would extend the legal business hours for food trucks from 15 minutes to two-three hours advanced last Thursday at the City Council of Honolulu in a show of support for small businesses. “I think the intent of the bill is a good one,” Councilwoman Tulsi Gabbard said. Gabbard introduced the bill several months ago to change the time limit regulated by a 1978 ordinance that requires vendors to move at least 300 feet after being at one location for 15 minutes. Violators can face a charge of up to 30 days in jail and up to a $1,000 fi ne. The 1978 ordinance – which was originally intended to clear Waikīkī of street vendors – had not

affected food trucks until approximately two months ago, when some vendors were charged by police. Gabbard, along with council members Breene Harimoto, Stanley Chang, Tom Berg, Romy Cachola, Nestor Garcia and Ikaika Anderson, was present at the hearing. The first speaker at the meeting was Honolulu Police Department Major Sean Naito. Naito said HPD does not support or oppose the bill. His main concern is how HPD would enforce the bill if it passed. Cachola suggested that instead of a two- or three-hour time limit, time zones could be implemented for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Buffer zones were also brought up in the meeting, regarding regulating the distance of a vendor from a brick-andmortar establishment such as a restaurant. The proposed ranges vary between 100 and 500 feet. Also present was Wayne Yoshioka, director of the Department of Transportation Services, who was involved in discussions regarding

designated vendor zones, parking limits and the possibility of requiring another license for vendors to do business. Roger Morey, executive director of the Hawai‘i Restaurant Association, testified in support of the bill, and said that the HR A recognizes food trucks as legitimate restaurants. Tiki Truck owner Abe Jazmin and Aloha Ice Cream Tricycle owner Kathy Sills were two out of a handful of people who were charged by HPD. “There is a sense of urgency with this bill passing, as there are food truck owners in court testifying,” Gabbard said. She also said the judge hopes to see the outcome of the bill before making a decision on any outstanding charges. The third meeting will take place March 21 at Honolulu Hale (3rd floor), starting at 10 a.m. It will be open to the public.

GROOVE IN THE GARDEN March 8 5-10pm th

BA-LE COURTYARD

91.3 NORTHSHORE ∙ 89.9 WINDWARD

WWW.KALEO.ORG ∙ WWW.KTUH.ORG • WWW.UHPRO.ORG WWWKAL ORG


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Features

Collidiscope 2012: where arts collide MAC KAUL / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

WHY SHOULD I HIRE YOU? Ka Leo is looking for a web editor to produce online content and keep the website up to date with most relevant information. This is a great opportunity to gain real world working experience and build your resume.

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107• (808)-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

A LEX ANDER C HAR Staff Writer This week, Ka Pilina Interactive Arts Society is sponsoring Collidiscope 2012, Hawai‘i’s version of the Burning Man festival, on the North Shore. Although the event will be on a smaller scale compared to mainland versions, it will provide an opportunity for artists and people with similar interests to gather and showcase talent and originality.

W H AT I S I T ?

CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHAT TO DO O ON O YOUR OU BREAK?

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A lthough Burning Man primarily features music, poetr y or dance, it is entirely up to the participants to contribute to the event. A ll exhibitions, artwork and creative content is made and enjoyed by attendees. The only scheduled event is the burning of an effigy to mark the end of the festivities (which gives the festival its name).

Heels for him

SPRING BREAK ISSUE HITS THE STREETS

transactions must be done through a system of barter or donation. All other aspects, like political backgrounds, are meant to be ignored to make way for the art.

H OW T O B E A B U R N E R

B U R N I N G I N H AWA Iʻ I

Event attendees create a fullyCollidiscope will feature the functional small city for the dura- burning of three effigies, and the tion of the festival. But once the largest crowd is expected to apevent is over, participants must pear on Saturday. Newcomers are leave no trace of having gathered. always welcome to join. “It’s a sharA ll who enter are expected ing community, so something you to bring what they need to sur- need, someone will give you. … vive and be able to clean up their The expectation is that someone own trash as they leave. else will help you out later on,” De Artists are encouraged to leave Partee said. “It’s basically aloha.” behind mainstream culture to express as Collidiscope 2012 pure an art form When: Wednesday, March 7 at 8 a.m. to Saturday, as possible. No March 10 at noon currency is alWhere: Gunstock Ranch, 56-250 Kamehameha Hwy. lowed except in Cost: $60 ($80 at the gate), free for children 13 and under extreme circumContact: 808-594-7138, www.kapilina.org stances, and all

CAITLIN S TAGG Contributing Writer If you see a group of guys walking down McCarthy Mall in high heels, know it’s for a good cause. Walk a Mile in Her Shoes is a national men’s march to stop rape, sexual as-

sault and violence. The event began in 2001, and it has now turned into a large nonprofit organization. Enjoy free food, T-shirts, music and speeches. If you’re a woman, you can cheer the men on and show your support. Event organizers will be providing male-sized high heels.

Walk A Mile In Her Shoes

3/.19.12

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107. Honolulu, HI 96822 • 808-956-7043 • www.kaleo.org

“[It’s] a creative platform for people to explore their inner creativity or be entertained by others,” said local firedancer and Burning Man enthusiast Moe De Partee.

When: Today, March 7; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Where: Hawai‘i Hall lawn (Varney Circle side) BETH SHINER / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Cost: Free Contact: 808-956-8059, www.facebook.com/pauviolence


Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Features

Campus catwalk CALLING ALL SENIORS

Name: Bo Tanaka Class Standing: Junior Age: 21 Major: Art and APDM, minor in women’s studies

A NTON GLAMB Staff Writer

What’s your favorite place to shop? Bebe, Brandy Melville, nastygal.com, and my mom’s closet of old clothes.

List what you’re wearing, where you got it, and how much you paid for it: Mesh cut-out little black dress from Bebe, $100 Vintage silk sheer floral wrap cardigan from my mother’s closet, $0 Black Toms, $40 Black and white backpack from Campus Center, $25 Crutches and cast, ER Diamond earrings from Tiffany’s, $5,000 (gift) Three-diamond necklace from Tiffany’s, $600

How long does it take you to get ready? 20-30 minutes depending on how I look when I wake up.

What happened to your leg? I broke my fibula on my 21st birthday wearing some killer Michael Kors heels.

How would you describe your style? My style is classy, fun and experimental. I like to try out new looks. Most of my friends say I am always either dressed to kill or majorly dressed down. There is never an inbetween with me; there’s either comfort or fashion, rarely both.

IT'S OFFICIALLY GRAD SEASON! Find out about Caps & Gowns, Announcements, and Class Rings Stop by the

Manoa Bookstore re e s and Herff Jones les les informational tables at Campus Center er er TODAY - Wed, March 7 Tue, March 13 or Wed, March 14 10am - 2pm

-

Manoa Bookstore REGULAR HOURS M-F 8am - 4:30pm Sa 9am - 12:30pm ANTON GLAMB / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen

Opinions

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 

   

                                                                                                                                                                       

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Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Opinions

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Opinions

Political correctness reaching insanity TREVOR Z AKOV Staff Writer

For those readers too busy to keep up with sports, it’s time to be brought up to speed. Jeremy Lin of the New York Knicks is a hot topic, causing much ballyhoo when it comes to writing about minorities. Lin has become a very sensitive topic in the world of media. Indeed, there have been several well wdocumented instances where people acted foolishly in their comments concerning Lin. Some journalists have been fired, suspended or disciplined by their employers due to the journalistic minefield known as political correctness. But one specific sub-plot of the Lin saga proves just how counterproductive political correctness has rendered both business and society.

A Ben & Jerr y’s shop in New England debuted a special f lavor titled ‘ Taste the Lin-Sanity” in celebration of Lin. The ingre dients in this vanilla-based frozen yogurt consisted of lychee f lavor, honey and bits of fortune cookie. The limited-production item achieved great success, completely selling out. The goal was to create a fl avor that celebrated an Asian-American athlete. Nonetheless, there was backlash; people demanded political correctness. Their argument was that the ingredients play on Asian stereotypes. The store offered an apology to all and then substituted fortune cookies with waffl e cookies. But note that Ben & Jerr y’s did not remove lychee from the ingredients. Lychee is a fruit

JIM MCISAAC / MCT

native to China and Southeast Asia. W hy did the store focus solely on fortune cookies? L ooking at all the possible ingredients, fortune cookies are actually a quite fitting ingredient to represent Lin. Fortune cookies were first created in California over 150 years ago; they are not from China. Similarly, Lin was born in the Bay A rea, he is truly Asian-A merican. Perhaps if this historical connection between Lin and fortune cookies were better understood, it might take on a positive connotation, sort of like “Cheeseheads” and the Green Bay Packers. The Asian-American Journalists Association has taken the initiative to educate the public about good journalism protocol specifi cally when covering Jeremy Lin.

One of its suggestions was to focus on only discussing the sport of basketball, resisting the “temptation to refer to an ‘Asian who knows how to drive.’” But it seems that the A A JA has gone overboard; it is taking advantage of this unique opportunity to use the organization’s title and political platform to stamp out all Asian stereotypes. Most of the concerns listed about Lin coverage seem next to impossible to associate with the game of basketball. The Lin phenomenon has resulted in some poor judgment calls by many individuals. Nonetheless, the overreaction by some in the world of political correctness is now clearly bordering on what can only be called Lin-Sanity.

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Comics


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday,March 7 2012

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

ACROSS 1 Long-necked waders 7 Sgt. Friday's employer 11 Blow away 14 __ pork: Chinese dish with pancakes 15 Fairy tale villain 16 Betty Crocker product 17 Click-and-drag tool 19 Impersonal pronoun 20 Barnyard brayer 21 Half an Orkan goodbye 22 Enjoyed, as a lollipop 24 Filming locations 26 More out of practice 28 Reunion attendee, briefly 30 Libyan or Liberian, e.g. 34 Tequila plant 37 Kimono sash 38 Hefty volume 39 Learner's permit prerequisite, often 43 Guitarist Hendrix 44 Reveal, in verse 45 Thick, like fog 46 Step on the gas 48 Jack of late-night TV 50 Legislative period 52 Mex. ladies 56 Samples a bit of 59 Univ. military org. 61 Dada co-founder Jean 62 Actress Gardner 63 Memorable surprise attack site 66 Deafening noise 67 Sprinter's path 68 "Seinfeld" woman 69 Fruit drink ending 70 Egg foo __ 71 Name associated with the start of 17-, 39- or 63-Across

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

DOWN 1 Actresses Watson and Thompson 2 Fairy tale Mother 3 Shake awake 4 Superman's monogram 5 Afterwards 6 Forester automaker 7 Legs-intertwined meditative position 8 Player's rep. 9 Very productive 10 Naysayer 11 Helter-skelter 12 RosĂŠ or Cabernet 13 Crossed (out) 18 U.S. motto word 23 Animals, casually 25 Most well-informed 27 Dana's "forbidden fragrance" 29 Grant wartime foe 31 Nickel or dime 32 "Famous" cookie guy 33 Hawaiian goose 34 Descriptive wds. 35 Golf club part 36 "Je t'__": French "I love you" 37 Shelley work 40 Philosopher Jean-Jacques 41 "House" actor Omar 42 Oral health org. 47 With intense feeling 48 Motel amenity 49 "O Canada," e.g. 51 Discount rack abbr. 53 Former Israeli leader Yitzhak 54 "The San Francisco Treat" suffix 55 Shopper's indulgence 56 "I did it!" 57 Raring to go 58 Of sound mind 60 Colombian city 64 __ Arbor, Michigan 65 Took flight

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor| Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 7 2012

Sports COURTESY OF THE ALIVIADO FAMILY

The heart of a champion living in the moment and having fun,” Aliviado said. “Playing against those big boys, you just got to play big and play hard.” Aliviado’s home run also had larger implications. It gave the Rainbows [9-4] the go-ahead run that eventually sealed their victory

Once a Little Leaguer

M ARC A R AK AKI Sports Editor

Freshman Kaeo Aliviado stands 5 foot 6, but packs a punch at the plate. The Rainbows’ starting left fielder, a 2011 graduate of Saint Louis School in Honolulu, belted his fi rst home run of his short collegiate career last Friday. And the pitcher was a foot taller. “It just felt amazing – just

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and put Hawai‘i up 2-0 in its series against Wichita State. The Rainbows carried through their momentum, winning the series 3-1 over the Shockers. “It was huge,” head coach Mike Trapasso said. “Whenever you can get a base hit that wins the game for you, it’s big. But when you do it in such dramatic fashion, when it’s a home run that ends up standing up and being the gamewinning hit, that’s huge. “And then when you combine that with a great team like Wichita State [and] a freshman

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doing this so early in the season, it makes for a great story.” Aliviado has also fulfi lled everyone’s expectations with his defense in left field. “It’s outstanding,” Trapasso said on Aliviado’s defense. “When we have him and [junior] Breland [Almadova] and [senior Zack] Swasey in the outfield together, it’s three centerfielders. And so those guys can really cover ground. That’s our most important thing that we want to focus on: being a good defense club.”

BREEDING SUCCESS Aliviado’s early success is helping the Rainbows leap into the national spotlight. But perhaps Hawai‘i (and the rest of the country) knows him best for being a part of Waipi‘o’s 2005 Little League World Series world championship team. “It helped me a lot, seeing different talent around the world [and] playing in front of big crowds,” Aliviado said. “You don’t really feel it until you get about to this age [college]. And

you just look back on it, and it was a great ride.” For the Aliviado family, seeing Kaeo carry the success from his preteen years to college has been a pleasant journey. “He worked hard for it since he was 4 years old,” father Layton Aliviado said. “I

Now an idol feel proud and happy that he worked hard and he can play back home, so he can play in front of his family.” Kaeo Aliviado achieved success throughout high school, leading the Saint Louis Crusaders to back-to-back Interscholastic League of Honolulu titles 2010-2011. He was a two-time first-team All-State performer and batted .500 with 21 runs and 15 RBIs in his senior season. Now, as a Rainbow, his mentality has stayed the same. “I’m just ready to contribute to the team with everything we need

MARC ARAKAKI / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

to do to get the job done and get the ‘W’s on the board,” Aliviado said. Growing up, Aliviado watched Hawai‘i baseball players from the stands. Now Hawai‘i’s keiki are watching him. “It feels great,” Aliviado said. “Coming back here, there’s a lot of history behind the Les Murakami [Stadium]. Coming here is just [making me] speechless, and I’m really happy to be here and be a Rainbow.”

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Junior pitcher Kaia Parnaby (pictured) teamed up with senior pitcher Stephanie Ricketts to go 17-0 for the Rainbow Wahine. K EVIN FOX Staff Writer “It’s our best-ever start. [17-0] is just a great way to start the season,� said junior pitcher Kaia Parnaby. The wins keep mounting for the No. 22 Rainbow Wahine softball team (17- 0), which extended its winning streak after sweeping the Bank of Hawai‘i Invitational at home last weekend. The Rainbow Wahine looked unstoppable, with their 1-0 marquee win coming during Sunday night’s championship game against the No. 20 Florida State Seminoles. Although the ’Bows defeated the Seminoles earlier in the tournament 2-1, Florida State proved to be Hawai‘i’s strongest competition. “They took it to us,� said Parnaby. “They hit well, and they played good defense. They just brought it to us.� Parnaby pitched a 5 - 0 shutout against UC Santa Barbara on Saturday, the same day senior pitcher Stephanie Ricketts broke a UH record by earning her 83rd career win, surpassing Kelly Gentle’s former record of 82.

Ricketts led Hawai‘i last weekend with a 1.40 ERA, going 3-0 with 27 strikeouts. Her performance earned Ricketts the tournament’s Most Valuable Pitcher award and this week’s Western Athletic Conference Pitcher of the Week award.

UP NEXT

The Radford Highlanders, who lost 5-1 at the hands of Hawai‘i on Sunday, will remain in town for this weekend’s Pepsi Malihini Kipa Aloha Tournament. The ’Bows will also host Marist, Robert Morris and Southern Illinois. The tournament will run from Thursday through Sunday. Hawai‘i will play Radford (6 p.m.) on Thursday, Marist (6 p.m.) and Robert Morris (8 p.m.) on Friday, and SIU (4 p.m.) on Saturday. Sunday’s schedule will feature a round-robin format to determine the tournament champion. The ’Bows feel the pressure is all on them to compete at the highest level. “Nothing but ourselves,� replied Iwata when asked what the team’s main focus is. “We have to keep working hard. Nothing is going to stop that.�


Volume 106 Issue 79