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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5 to THURSDAY, OCT. 6, 2011 VOLUME 106 ISSUE 31

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

UH professor, UH alumna discuss food security and APEC

NEWS

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APEC GEAR

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Honolulu Police Department equips itself for protests

FEATURES

6

FASHION FORWARD CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Nandita Sharma (left) and Shelley Muneoka (right) spoke to 50 people before a backdrop of an APEC protest mural that previously hung over the art building. K ELSEY A MOS News Editor

Revolution Books hosted a talk on food security as part of an ongoing series of talks on APECrelated issues last Sunday. Nandita Sharma, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa associate professor of ethnic studies and sociology and Shelley Muneoka of K AHEA: The Hawaiian-Environmental Alliance, a UH grad, spoke to an audience of about 50 people on the dangers they perceive in proposed APEC policies. For example, opponents believe the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, which would reduce trade tariffs, could lead to a food-production system dominated by large corporations. Sharma traced these issues back to the birth of capitalism in the English countryside 500 years ago, when English peasants

were increasingly shut out of the land they depended on for survival, forcing them to buy food they would have otherwise produced themselves. Sharma argued that this situation is not unlike our own. “Control food means control people,” said Sharma. “Once our ability to eat is in the marketplace, the more likely it is that capitalism will go unchallenged.” Sharma claimed that independent farmers around the world are protesting APEC policies that they fear will ruin their livelihood. “47 farmers a day are committing suicide in India for fear of losing land and livelihood because of APEC policies,” said Sharma. “Large agribusinesses are going to have, increasingly, a monopoly on the world food supply,” she said. This is because “Those who use the most short-term methods for increasing productiv-

ity ... only those kinds of agricultural producers will survive in an APEC free-trade zone.” She said that having large, profit- and productivity-driven agribusinesses in charge will lead to unhealthy food, environmental degradation and a loss of biodiversity. Muneoka brought the discussion back to Hawai‘i, speaking about the plantation-system sugar and pineapple industries, which have given way to other forms of agriculture. Hawai‘i’s top three agricultural industries today are genetically modified organisms, nurseries of nonedible plants and pineapple (primarily for export), none of which produce food for the local population to eat. According to Muneoka, it’s “a story of externalizing costs,” in which outside businesses grow their crops in Hawai‘i, but Hawai‘i carries the

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environmental costs. “The descendants of those systems [sugar and pineapple] became and are still becoming subdivisions, which no longer produce food,” said Muneoka. She pointed out that even as those lands become unproductive in terms of food production, they house people who still need to be fed. Shipping in food allows for an infl ation of the number of people who can live in the islands. “We’re absolutely dependent; if anything happened to the import, we’d be in a seriously messed up situation,” said Muneoka. Muneoka was also concerned about the turn to industrial fi sh farming, a practice in which cages of money-making carnivorous fi sh like ‘ahi are kept in the ocean and fed on soy pellets. According See Speakers, page 4

Report

Alumna starting a new local business

OPINIONS

WORLD TRADE WOES WTO policies take issue with U.S. law

SPORTS

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor

News

UH Museum Consortium display

Where can you fi nd something that was killed, preserved and then put on display for everyone to see? Hamilton Library. More specifi cally, the bridge between the two wings of the library, until Dec. 16. The University of Hawai‘i Museum Consortium is working with the UH Mānoa Library System to feature displays from various members of the consortium. The Museum Consortium “consists of units within the UH System which house living and non-living collections or are engaged in exhibition programs,” as stated by the Museum Consortium. The collections displayed come from the Ethnomusicology Instrument and Museum Archives, Waikīkī Aquarium, Fish Museum, UH Art Gallery, Harold L. Lyon Arboretum, UHM

MATT SYLVA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

This display by the UH Insect Museum, located in Gilmore Hall, showcases close to 240,000 specimens, many over 50 years old.

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Hamilton Library Special Research Collections, University of Hawai‘i Insect Museum, Joseph F. Rock Herbarium and the Historic Costume Collection. The area has been turned into a tour ground that is open to everyone during the library’s operating hours. The tour includes a touch screen with information about the exhibits, paper information, wall-sized posters, several videos looping on a single monitor and a cell phone tour to supplement the individual displays.

M AT T SYLVA Staff Writer

Dollar T acos and $8 King Burritos with UH ID

Oct 31, 2011


News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

News

HPD armed for APEC TAYLOR MORRIS Staff Writer

The Honolulu Police Department is armed with over $700,000 worth of “nonlethal” and “less lethal” ammunition in preparation for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. In the past two years, HPD has purchased ammunition and weaponry including Taser stun guns, tear-gas machines, fog and smoke machines, bean-bag launchers, pepper spray and other less harmful ammunition, according to the ACLU of Hawai‘i. Not all of this has been purchased specifically for APEC. Regarding questions about HPD’s activity in Leaders’ Week, Captain Andrew Lum of HPD released a statement by email. “The HPD respects the right to legally demonstrate, and we make no distinction as to the purpose, message or intent of any group exercising this right. While we expect protests to be peaceful, the department must be prepared for all situations. As a law enforcement agency, it is our responsibility to ensure that everyone’s safety and rights are protected. This applies to protesters and members of the public alike.” The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa expects no changes in regards to police presence or tactics during APEC. Rather, Denise Konan, the senior associate to the president on APEC 2011, believes that most protest activity during the APEC meetings will surround the meeting venues. She stated in an email, “To date, we have not been invited to host any formal APEC activities at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus. APEC Leaders’ week is happening during our academic school year. Since classes are in session, it doesn’t seem to be the best venue for international activi-

ties. We are not anticipating Mānoa to be the site of protests. Most of the official APEC events are happening in Waikīkī, the convention center and Ko ‘Olina, and these locations are more likely to be the subject of international visibility.” Konan, also the chair of the economics department and an economics professor, believes that APEC will bring a positive presence to UH Mānoa. Konan said, “Several UHM programs are planning functions and activities to highlight APEC. I’m anticipating that our role in APEC will be enlightening and also reflective of the intellectual diversity of our campus community.” Although the university will not be greatly impacted during APEC, students still care about what is going on. Colby Hansen, a business major, said, “I have mixed opinions. There’s going to be a lot of security and people protesting that could turn violent, and it’s good to be prepared. At the same time, that’s a lot of money [spent on ammunition]. It’s funny because APEC is business-oriented, and is it necessary to spend that much money when it could go to other things that APEC promotes? It’s good that they are investing in nonlethal ammunition, but I think that they can budget the money better and have it go toward more important things.” APEC has not been held in the United States since 1993. Other meetings have already taken place this year in Washington D.C.; Big Sky, Mont.; and San Francisco, Calif. It was announced that Hawai‘i would be the location of the 2011 APEC meetings last year in a statement that read, “The president looks forward to welcoming his fellow APEC economy leaders to the state where he was born and to showcasing Hawai‘i’s rich cultural heritage and hospitality.”


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor

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In late September, thanks to the U.S. Department of Education’s GEAR UP program, the University of Hawai‘i System received $3.4 million for scholarships and student services for underprivileged students. GEAR UP, which stands for “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs,” provides grants to state organizations, schools and partnerships that help disadvantaged students obtain a higher education. As stated on its official website, GEAR UP “aims to prepare students for academic success, facilitate transitions from K-12 to higher education, and increase access to information and financial aid.” The state of Hawai‘i’s GEAR UP program, a consortium of universities, community colleges, high schools and other partnerships, uses the funds they receive from the U.S. DOE to help support individuals who would otherwise not be able to afford or attend college. GEAR UP provides college counseling, intervention and economic aid to many students

beginning as early as 7th grade. These students receive support and education that prepares them for college-level work. “We start working with students from middle school to high school so we can provide them with academic support and financial education,” said Angela Jackson, the director of GEAR UP Hawai‘i. She has worked with the program for five years. According to the U.S. DOE, the more involved a student is with his or her education, the more likely he or she is to enroll and stay enrolled in college. And with the average college graduate making about twice as much as a nongraduate, the state has made it a high priority to educate students on how to improve their future quality of living. Through a combination of state grants and partnership grants, Hawai‘i is trying to improve the condition of many of its schools, which often perform far below state standards. The money going to programs like GEAR UP Hawai‘i will help replenish funding for scholarships, academic advising and other services. By assisting disadvantaged students early in life, the GEAR UP Hawai‘i program aims to make education more equitable in Hawai‘i.

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Speakers claim APEC threatens Hawai‘i from front page

to Muneoka, this could lead to the spread of disease in both farmed and wild fi sh populations. The common thread she sees between fish farming and land farming in Hawai‘i is “people who are looking at Hawai‘i and ... using us as a testing ground.” She also claimed that because Hawai‘i is “perceived as a part of America,” it is sheltered from the worst of agricultural abuses. She said she felt bad that Hawai‘i would be complicit in abuses in other parts of the world that may result from policies enacted through APEC. During the Q&A section of the program, the discussion turned philosophical as local playwright Alani Apio asked if protesters and critics of APEC have cultivated too much of an “us versus them” attitude. He suggested that perhaps critics do not recognize that corporations are made out of people, all of whom share a natural tendency toward greed with the rest of humanity. Sharma responded that she does see her opponents as individuals, but she isn’t sure that greed is a necessary part of the human condition. “They need to stop,” she said.


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Features@kaleo.org | Alvin Park Editor |Maria Kanai Associate

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A fashion pop-up shop at the Campus Center Ballroom made junior Alyssa Jitchaku late to class. “I think her clothes are so adorable,â€? said Jitchaku, while browsing through Dara Fujio’s selections, which were on sale at Campus Center last month. Fujio is a 24-year-old University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa graduate with a degree in apparel product design and merchandising and a minor in business. After graduating from college in 2010, Fujio began establishing her own fashion business called Mikinola in January 2011. “I started Mikinola when I did a school project for UH and we needed to do something about branding and we had to choose a name,â€? Fujio said. “That’s when I thought of my two dogs, Miki and Nola, because it kind of just stuck with everyone.â€? Being a UH graduate allowed Fujio to hold the shopping event for her fashion line, which was a sale consisting of the remainder of her clothing inventory. The majority of Mikinola products at the event were discounted by 50 percent or more, which enabled her to sell most of her products.

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See Mikinola, next page

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Features@kaleo.org | Alvin Park Editor |Maria Kanai Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Features

Mikinola: tech-smart promotion from previous page

S O C I A L M E D I A M A R K E T I N G I’m just doing it a different way Even in this economic downturn, Fujio has found sav v y ways using social media to market her products to keep Mikinola on the radar. “Since Facebook is such a great marketing tool, I ďŹ gured why not just start taking cool pictures styling girls and see if I could start an online store with that,â€? Fujio said. “Most of my clients I have gotten through Facebook.â€? Using Facebook has enabled Fujio to beneďŹ t from Hawai‘i’s small community by using wordof-mouth advertising to spread the word about Mikinola. “We do pop-up shops everywhere, so it’s just friend-to-friend telling everyone, and that’s how the word’s been spreading,â€? Fujio said. But she also receives help from her friends and family. “I have my parents, who help me a lot, but I’ve just been recycling my money from the ďŹ rst time I’ve bought inventory to selling that inventory and saving the proďŹ t I make from that. So it’s been doing really well,â€? she said. With Fujio’s connections through Facebook and her friends, she has been selling almost all her clothes – which she purchases from her buying trips at the Fashion Market in Los Angeles – at shopping events around the island, which has helped her fund subsequent buying trips. The Fashion Market is a large convention that occurs ďŹ ve seasons a year. Buyers and owners of boutiques attend to purchase inventory for their stores. In this economic downturn, although many businesses have been filing for bankruptcy and people have been losing their jobs, Fujio remains persistent in establishing Mikinola, which she hopes will become a f lourishing business. “There’s never really a perfect time to start a business.

because I’m doing it without an overhead cost,� she said.

E X PA N D I N G B U S I N E S S Fujio, with the help of a friend, hopes to expand Mikinola beyond Hawai‘i to international marketplaces, such as Japan. Her goal is to establish numerous boutiques and to make a difference in the fashion world. “If your heart is set in doing something, know what you’re doing first, but don’t think too much about doing it,â€? Fujio said. “Just go for it, since there is never a perfect time in starting your own business.â€? Fujio learned how to run a business through her fashion and business education, and was able to build a clientele from her sales careers at several bout iques around the island. Fujio had not expected that styling and shopping for clients in the past would be so beneďŹ cial in est a bl i s h i n g her own business. Jitchaku, who is a fan of Mikinola apparel, was shocked that Fujio was the owner of Mikinola at

such a young age, which has allowed Fujio to become an inspiration to current students looking to start their own businesses. “I can only hope to be that successful at that age,� Jitchaku said.

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Dara Fujio, a 24-year-old APDM graduate from UH MÄ noa, hopes to establish her fashion line Mikinola through friends, family and social media. KARTRINA OH KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Features@kaleo.org | Alvin Park Editor |Maria Kanai Associate

Features

Prosecutor profile: Keith Kaneshiro speaks on MÄ noa, mainland law school and local crime

Kaneshiro was born and raised in Kalihi, and graduated from Farrington High School. He then attended Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., for two years, but transferred to the University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa as a political science major. Before graduating in 1971, Kaneshiro became involved on campus, though he lived at home and commuted. As a part of a committee, he

REECE FARINAS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

City prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro has spent more than 30 years working at various levels of the criminal justice system. See UH alumnus, next page

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Keith Kaneshiro believes â&#x20AC;&#x153;one crime is one too many.â&#x20AC;? For Honoluluâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prosecuting attorney, this conviction pervades his efforts to reduce crime and increase the quality of life in Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, to me, is the ofďŹ ce that can really effect change,â&#x20AC;? said Kaneshiro.

brought prominent speakers such as Jesse Jackson, William Rehnquist, Leon Panetta, Peter Fonda and Betty Friedan to campus. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see current UH students have a similarly rich oncampus experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, students are concerned about going to classes â&#x20AC;Ś and a lot of them have part-time jobs, so they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stay on campus a lot. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have as much student activities.â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro worked for six years with the Campus Center Board, particularly on the Campus Center renovation project. He said the purpose of the project was â&#x20AC;&#x153;to keep the students back focused on the campus. ... We wanted to give them a reason to stay on campus and enjoy the campus life.â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro also spoke on the importance of making decisions that beneďŹ t the student population.

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Features@kaleo.org | Alvin Park Editor |Maria Kanai Associate

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Features

UH alumnus now prosecuting attorney L E GA L B E G I N N I N G S As prosecuting attorney, Kaneshiro oversees 90-100 deputy prosecutors who handle everything from property crimes to sexual assault cases. But his legal career began long before he took on his current position. After graduating from UH, Kaneshiro was accepted into the ďŹ rst class of William S. Richardson School of Law. But he instead decided to attend California Western School of Law in San Diego to broaden his understanding of the law. As UHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s law school was just

have to have the treatment aspect and the education,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be prosecuting everybody and putting everybody in prison. We need to treat them ... or youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have this revolving door.â&#x20AC;? In addition to rehabilitating drug users, Kaneshiro is making efforts to prevent addiction. From Oct. 27-28, his ofďŹ ce will host an international drug trafďŹ cking conference attended by prosecutors from eight nations, district attorneys from eight U.S. states and local law enforcement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason why weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing this is we need to go to the source of the drugs,â&#x20AC;? said Kaneshiro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a local problem, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a national problem â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a global problem.â&#x20AC;? When asked what areas of crime heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most proud about fo-

...we need to go to the source of the drugs. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a local problem, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a national problem â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a global problem. starting out, he knew there would be what he termed â&#x20AC;&#x153;growing pains.â&#x20AC;? But he feels his choice to go to the mainland has beneďŹ tted his local service by exposing him to experiences he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have gotten on the island. He speciďŹ cally mentioned racial tensions, which are more pronounced on the mainland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over here, you just see it on TV,â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro said. Kaneshiro was ďŹ rst elected prosecuting attorney in 1989. He stepped down in 1996, but was re-elected in 2010 with nearly 10 percent more of the vote than his nearest competitor.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Kaneshiro has tackled several high-proďŹ le issues as prosecuting attorney. He is perhaps best known for combating the crystal meth problem in Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. But Kaneshiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach requires more than simply prosecuting offenders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enforcement is one aspect, but you

cusing on, Kaneshiro spoke about domestic violence, among others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the time I was [ďŹ rst] elected prosecutor, domestic violence was viewed as a private affair between the spouses. We started focusing on having more programs for domestic violence, focusing on prosecuting cases.â&#x20AC;? Now, the office is involved in developing a family justice center, which will include a longterm domestic violence shelter providing vocational training to help victims become independent of their abusers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to take [victims] out of the cycle of violence,â&#x20AC;? said Kaneshiro. To lessen the strain the criminal justice system often places on victims, Kaneshiro also promotes a system known as vertical prosecution for sexual assault cases. This means that the same prosecutors handle a case from start to finish, instead of new attorneys stepping

We are the bo bop! p! What is the Bop?

from previous page

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The administration, sometimes theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for the administration, not what is good for students,â&#x20AC;? said Kaneshiro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we need to do whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for students.â&#x20AC;?

enewa newal process. Director So whether this is part of a the largest role in that proces cess studies stud udies Meda Chesney continuing i i takeover k b by the h system, for students, they need to b Heerr contract was up for s well, if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cohereent he Board of Regents level, p p g where they want the universit rs hiss is a response to t that th t versity it are, th the more problems bl there th â&#x20AC;&#x153;St â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stability bilit iis somethin ng Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ss a natural time for her are of us ... really welcome, so oI ut, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;should I stay or not?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? we went back to having a chancel- than a little sad that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ann it is ann organization known as the t board of publications. pu cation cations however, speculate lor,â&#x20AC;? Cooney continued. her departure, because it m lp overs overseeWaters, student associate publicationsvice suc such as: wâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ss decision was a pre- We help Lynne have to go through another e a ovee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She p probably y lost p president of external affairs and univer- trative change,â&#x20AC;? said Lind.. T H E V O I C E ncee of [U UH H Sy Syysst ste te sit ela si elatio ations, tions, ns co ount un e ered these hes h es e ese e claims, cla lai aaiims mss, ms, H Hi Hinshawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in announcem me .] Greeenwood en nwood s sa lor llo or Hinshaw aaw w did did n di not d detailed t iill d the work she hass do geen nts. Sh She hee p prrob ob baablyy as bably as - actually ac ual act ually ua lyy hav ha have ve a co ont nttraact. She had an apntr p- ing in ng he ng h her er ttime im ime me at MĹ&#x201C;noa, in me we w erenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going i g to o renew poi pointment intment from from the Board of Regents. WAS WASC W WA C reaccreditation, th he t but I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t t, can t prove that that. You will note it was for a period of ďŹ ve ďŹ tion of residence halls, the ec um me this iis a way for f her h years. It was Chancellor Ch ll Hinshawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hi h â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ti tion off new buildings, b ildi inccre Benefits: Benefits ow w out gracefully,â&#x20AC;? said decision to announce e herThe departure at ďŹ nancial aid, the advancem me We Execuare recruiting re ruiting as leaders, leaders dministrators Facculty Senate this time board and with enough n Grow time to en- administrators, Hawai inuis,Ĺ&#x201C;planners, kea School off H communicators publishers, meet more people of t tivvee Committee chairto best transition o possible for theanddKnowledge, the opening members t sure helptheoversee ob b Cooney. incoming chancellor.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? understand how chartered ter for Microbial Oceanogra g hartered publications publicatio dWhen we want â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something either s and asked if the t student renewalorganiz pro- ons other advancements. organizations function errssonal on her levelstu or ents cess a factor h decision, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sad to hear that sh heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s communityHinserv service sstudents ntswas like yyou!in her meetthing between her shaw instead cited sstrategic reasons for a number of reasons,â&#x20AC;? saaid A stipend! the system,â&#x20AC;? he specu- for leaving the university next year. thought it was wonderful th that lated â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many upcoming projects will take university president and a ch c

in for each phase. This policy was abandoned after Kaneshiro left office in 1996, but he is now working to re-implement it.

E X PA N D I N G RESPONSIBILITY Kaneshiro has also focused his office on previously underprosecuted crimes. For the ďŹ rst time, the prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce now prosecutes animalcruelty cases. One puppy mill, which was mistreating about 150 dogs, has already been shut down. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been done in the past, and now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing something about it,â&#x20AC;? said Kaneshiro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at doing a lot more.â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro said that if the prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce handles crime on a case-to-case basis, it will never catch up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce, prior to me coming here, was just processing cases. It was not really proactively addressing the crime problem,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I wanted to do is â&#x20AC;Ś make an impact on the crime problem.â&#x20AC;?

K A LEO

KA LEO O HAWA Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC; I A NNOUNCES AN ADVANCE SCREENING 8LYVWHE]3GXSFIVXLÂ&#x2C6;TQ Ward 16 Theatres

FOCUSING ON THE FUTURE Kaneshiro also offered some advice for UH students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would encourage them to go into law,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; They can make effective changes in our community, in our society.â&#x20AC;? The prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office provides internship opportunities for UH students, and Kaneshiro spoke highly of previous internsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always have a soft spot for the UH law students,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The interns] are looking at this office as a place that can make this community a better place.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a lawyer, I think they can make an impact on the quality of life that we can have and they can be an advocate and help people.â&#x20AC;? For Kaneshiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s views on Campus Security and elder abuse and more on drug abuse and domestic violence, visit kaleo.org.

No purchase necessary. Present your valid UH ID at the BOP Business Office after 1:00 pm Thursday, October 6th to get your complimentary pass!

OPENS IN THEATRES October 7th First come, first served. A valid UHM student ID is required--valid for FALL 2011; NO EXCEPTIONS on day of giveaway. No phone calls. One pass per person. Supplies are limited. One pass admits two.


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Opinions@kaleo.org | Taylor Gardner Editor | Boaz Rosen Associate

Opinions

WTF WTO: the World Trade Organization’s silent victims TAYLOR GARDNER Opinions Editor

Unbeknownst to many, the World Trade Organization has increasingly attacked U.S. consumer and environmental policies. In the past month, the WTO has ruled that both dolphin-safe tuna labels and the U.S. Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act are, in fact, in violation of the organization’s rules. If the U.S. refuses to abandon or revise these policies, it could face trade sanctions from the WTO. For those of you that may be unfamiliar with dolphin-safe tuna labels, these are found on tuna products that were caught through fishing methods known to reduce dolphin bycatch. The dolphin-safe tuna labeling campaign has been largely successful in the U.S., with consumers preferring tuna caught using these methods. However, the WTO has declared that the labels violate the WTO’s Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade, calling it an “unnecessary obstacle to

international trade.” Spearheading this movement was Mexico, who believed the policy created an unfair advantage for those who receive a dolphin-safe label. Mexico has failed to meet the standards to receive the label, as their tuna corporations often use unsatisfactory fishing methods, and has sought to relax dolphin-safe tuna standards in the past. The U.S. Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act was also found to be in violation of the same agreement. In an effort to reduce teenage smoking, the FSPTCA banned candy and clove cigarettes in 2009. Extensive research has shown that teenagers more commonly use these, which are often marketed as “starter cigarettes.” Pushing this particular agenda was Indonesia, where clove cigarettes are a substantial export. These are two blaring examples of the W TO placing corporate interests ahead of public interest. Are corporate profits more important than the positive effects derived from these con-

sumer and environmental policies? Apparently, to the W TO, profits are more significant than saving dolphins and preventing teenagers from developing an unhealthy addiction. Viewing these progressive policies (which have been popular with the public) as “barriers to trade” is the WTO’s fi rst mistake. While reducing barriers to trade can achieve economic growth, mislabeling these policies “barriers” will cost society more than it could hope to gain. Consumers (and of course dolphins) lose with the elimination of dolphin-safe tuna labels, as consumer preferences have shown that it is clearly an important issue to many. In the tobacco case, public health will ultimately suffer the greatest loss. Further addiction could place an additional monetary strain on the health care system. Neither of these policies is considered to be particu-

larly stringent market regulation. Both are fairly soft regulatory approaches, which have typically been safe from WTO attacks. Neither policy seeks to discriminate against foreign trade, nor do they seek to promote domestic producers. Therefore, neither should even be open to attack from a trade organization; they are domestic poli -

PHOTO BY NATHALIA CARVALHO/FLICKR, ILLUSTRATION BY NIK SEU/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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cies. Instead, the WTO has chosen to assert its infl uence over American policy decisions, while placing corporate profits ahead of the interests of the people.

i


Opinions@kaleo.org | Taylor Gardner Editor | Boaz Rosen Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Opinions K A LEO T H E

I would consider it his loss, not yours. Obviously, this guy was not ready for any kind of commitment and got cold feet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moving too fastâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just be friendsâ&#x20AC;? are lame excuses â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an easy way out to avoid hurting someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feelings. It seems like he was trying to be nice, but really just ended up confusing you. I would move on and not waste your time on someone who clearly cannot even ďŹ gure out his own feelings. It sounds like the spark went out a long time ago. The next time he suggests you hang out or have dinner, tell him thanks but no thanks and leave it at that. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to follow through anymore, as it sounds like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already had enough. You should let him do the work. Any guy that is not pursuing you or making you a priority is a waste of your time; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fall into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;friendsâ&#x20AC;? trap.

ASK

Liz &Sam Question I was seeing this guy at the beginning of the year, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve slowly transitioned to just being friends because he felt we were moving too fast. Later, he started suggesting we have dinner or hang out, but he never makes plans. Does he expect me to follow through, or should I let him do the work? Have a question? Submit yours to advice@kaleo.org

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To be honest, he probably isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that into you; at least romantically. But he seems to want to pursue a friendship with you, so if you truly care about him as a person and friend, you should consider taking the relationship that far â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no further. Only truly seek a friendship with him if you seriously think you can remove your romantic feelings for him, because if not, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll end up hurt and down one friend. Express how you feel and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m positive you both will come to an agreement on where you both stand. Be honest with him â&#x20AC;&#x201C; what do you have to lose? If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t clear the air on the entire situation and ďŹ gure out what relationship you truly want, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll only continue being confused. Just know that everything happens for a reason. In the end, he may turn out to be your best friend, but until then remember not to make someone a priority if he only makes you an option. Just keep it cool and if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re available when he does call to hang out (and he will), then go ahead with a fresh start and a positive outlook that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gained a friend. y yo o

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i at MÄ noa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org ADVERTISING The Board of Publications office is located on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall. Ka Leo O Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i at MÄ noa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. Š2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Ryan Tolman, chair; Ming Yang, vice chair; or Susan Lin, treasurer) via bop@hawaii. edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.


Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Opinions@kaleo.org | Taylor Gardner Editor | Boaz Rosen Associate

Opinions

Fantasy football: are you in? TREVOR Z AKOV Staff Writer

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The 2011 NFL Regular Season is running on all cylinders, and once again, all seems to be right with the world for countless sports aficionados. The 2011 season nearly did not happen given the league lockout, which stretched over five months in back-and-forth deliberations. Had there been no season, things could have gotten ugly. Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, boldly forecasted a dramatic increase in street violence and crime across America if our nation’s beloved game were to be taken away from all the loyal fans. With the season guaranteed now, no one knows if Ray Lewis’ prediction would have come true or not. But there are numerous facts that need to be addressed concerning a football fan’s lifestyle during the football season. If you are in a relationship with someone or know someone who is a sincere, passionate football fan, there is a very large possibility that you have already witnessed many of the symptoms that affl ict fans. Numerous fans are dedicated to fantasy football. A pastime that can border on addiction, it affl icts countless American men and a smaller – but still signifi cant – percent of American women. Recently, Yahoo Sports mentioned that women manage 12 percent of fantasy football accounts. Eerily similar to the Black Plague’s arrival to Europe in the Middle Ages, fantasy football appears out of nowhere in late August each year, then mysteriously disappears around New Year’s. Each year, men and women participate in fantasy football in order to further embrace the game on an even more intimate level (if that is even possible). The logic purported is that football fans now have reasons to watch all football games and are able to root for many more star players, even if they don’t

play for the fan’s favorite team. The result is that many Americans become overly consumed in the intricacies of the football season and linger in the doldrums of fantasy football management. Listed below are many of the telltale signs that can clearly confirm that your friend (or friends) is firmly under the spell of fantasy football. If at some time in the past few weeks there was a large gathering at a friend’s place where boisterous hollering was accompanied by a large diagram of football player’s names, your friend is a fantasy football addict. What’s more, these fans are even further invested in this hobby than most. Another sign: if your friend rarely checks his or her phone but now suddenly begins to religiously check the stats, then you are dealing with a fantasy football zombie, a lost soul – at least until mid-December. The most common symptom of a fantasy football junkie is frequent outbursts of random football statistics between friends. For example, “Dude, did you see Peyton Hillis run for 130 and two TDs, bro? Oh man, I smoked you this weekend.” All of these overly territorial, bragging jabs at fantasy league rivals are attempts to demarcate their fantasy dominance. If you fi nd yourself on the outside looking in because nearly all your acquaintances seem fully committed to fantasy football, you are left with few options. The fi rst is to wholeheartedly embrace fantasy football and the many strings attached. If this seems too drastic a change in lifestyle, simply acknowledge that you’ll now be forced to independently develop your own hobby on Sundays. Fantasy football is now a fully integrated complement to NFL football. It would be wise for those unfamiliar with fantasy football to at least attempt to become more familiar, because the hobby will only continue to grow in infl uence.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 13 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Comics


Page 14 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

2 9 6 Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solution.

ACROSS 1 The duck in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peter and the Wolfâ&#x20AC;? 5 Hail 10 1996 title role for Gwyneth 14 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Project Runwayâ&#x20AC;? host Heidi 15 Ardent lover 16 Business jet company founder 17 Honk ... honk ... honk ... 20 Conifer with springy wood 21 Help in a bad way 22 Jargon 23 City on the Shatt al-Arab waterway 25 Cheeky pet? 27 Woof ... woof ... woof ... 30 Youngest â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pride and Prejudiceâ&#x20AC;? Bennet sister 31 Love, in MĂĄlaga 32 In the center of 36 Bonehead 37 Pong maker 38 Britâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s floor covering 39 Men 40 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will be,â&#x20AC;? in a Day song 41 Prefix meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;hundredâ&#x20AC;? 42 Drip ... drip ... drip ... 44 Mime who created Bip the Clown 48 Fragrant compound 49 Gesundheit evoker 50 Walrusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weapon 52 Filmmakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deg. 54 What youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get as a result of 17-, 27- or 42-Across? Not! 58 Normandy river 59 Kentucky pioneer 60 Like lawn spots in need of reseeding 61 Some wallet bills 62 Social customs 63 Jeanne and Geneviève: Abbr.

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor| Joe Ferrer Associate

Page 15 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Sports

UH tennis to start season with Rainbow Wahine Invitational JOEY R AMIREZ Staff Writer

The University of Hawai‘i’s women’s tennis team begins its 2011-12 campaign at home this week with the Rainbow Wahine Invitational. The other teams competing are all fellow schools from O‘ahu: Chaminade, Hawai‘i Pacifi c, and BYU-Hawai‘i. “[The tournament] can really show how tennis is improving here in Hawai‘i,” UH assistant coach Bridgette Thompson commented. “From our team to BYU-Hawai‘i, Chaminade, HPU – everyone is really improving.” Hawai‘i will play the other teams in a round-robin format, with the tournament beginning at 3 p.m. on Thursday, 2:30 p.m. on

Friday and 10 a.m. on Saturday. Chaminade is coming off of a 7-10 season, including two losses each to fellow Pacific West Conference members Hawai‘i Pacifi c and BYUH. The Silverswords did not

riors are coming off of an impressive year that ended with a loss to the fourth-ranked Division II team, Armstrong Atlantic. Despite its regular-season matchup with UH being canceled,

[The tournament] can really show how tennis is improving here in Hawai‘i. fare well at last year’s invitational, compiling a 1-5 record in doubles matches and going 2-6 in singles. The Rainbow Wahine’s other two opponents look to be much more of a challenge. Hawai‘i Pacifi c fi nished last season ranked No. 5 in the fi nal NCA A Division II poll with a record of 19-6. The Lady Sea War-

HPU did give the ‘Bows a run for their money last year by compiling a 9-7 singles record at last season’s invitational. But it could not match that success for its doubles pairs, as it only went 3-6. Joining the Rainbow Wahine Invitational this year is BY UH. The Seasiders will supply some competition this year, after fin-

ishing as the No. 3 team in last year’s final D -II rankings with a record of 27-1. BY UH completed a perfect regular season in 2010 -11 before being knocked out of the National Tournament by No. 2 Lynn University. As for UH, the ’Bows are returning from an 8 -13 2010 -11 campaign. The bright side for the Rainbow Wahine includes their first team A ll-WAC se lection Katarina Poljakova, who represented the school in the ITA R iviera Women’s A llA merican Championships. A lso looking strong for the ‘Bows is Barbara Pinterova, who was se lected as second team A ll-WAC. “It’s always nice to win,” Poljakova said. “We can only improve with this tournament, and

we’re excited to play.” Do not expect the ‘Bows to underestimate their opponents. The Rainbow Wahine are fully aware of how dangerous D-II opponents can be – especially those ranked in the top five, who would relish the opportunity to take out the island favorite.

UPCOMING RAINBOW WAHINE TENNIS MATCHES Oct. 20-24: ITA Regionals, San Diego Nov. 10-12: Rainbow Wahine Fall Classic, Big Island Nov. 22: vs. Stanford, Big Island


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joe Ferrer Associate

Page 16 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Oct. 5 2011

Sports

Wahine soccer gears up for WAC road trip JEREMY NIT TA Staff Writer

After a diffi cult start to the season, the Rainbow Wahine soccer team is beginning to gain some momentum. Having built confi dence with a victory in the alumnae match, the Rainbows defeated both Utah State and Nevada in impressive wins. “I think we came out ready to play, and I think we created a lot of pressure on Nevada and really controlled the tempo of the game,” said head coach Michele Nagamine. “I was very happy about that, and I think we had a really good game. Our team is really enjoying our win.”

BAC K T O T H E ROA D

The Rainbow Wahine (3-8) will now go on the road for their first Western Athletic Conference road trip of the season. The ‘Bows will face Idaho on Friday, Sept. 7, then play a nonconference game against Seattle on Sunday, Sept. 9. While the team has yet to earn a victory away from home. Nagamine is hopeful that the team will be able to carry over its momentum as it progresses through its final season in the WAC. “I think we’re more confident now than we were when we went on our fi rst two road trips,” said Nagamine. “I think it’s going very different, because we have a couple of wins under our belt.” However, Nagamine is wary of the team becoming overly confident due to its recent success. “We’re not looking too far down the road. We just want to make sure that we stay consistent and keep doing the things we’ve been doing. Hopefully, we can have three good games in a row, maybe four. “We’re not going to take anyone lightly. Whether it’s conference play or nonconference, we really

ERIC ALCANTARA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior midfielder Amber Fuller takes a shot on goal during the alumnae game, the match that started Hawai‘i’s current winning streak. want to win. The girls have gotten a bit of a taste for winning, and that it feels much better than losing.”

L I F E O N T H E ROA D While away from the comforts of their home state, Nagamine makes sure the Rainbow Wahine keep a businesslike mentality while on road trips. On game days, the team eats breakfast together, and then does a few hours of study hall.

Nagamine expressed a strong commitment to the team keeping up on homework. “We’ll usually have two or three study halls a day,” said Nagamine. “We make sure that the girls have all their homework assignments in advance, and that the teachers are all on board with what’s going on. We also try to make sure that the girls have someone back home taking notes for them, so they won’t miss any-

thing when they get back.” After study hall, the ‘Bows eat team lunch, where they have their traditional pregame meal. Then, the team heads to the field to begin warmups and prepare for the game. After the game is fi nished, Nagamine said that the team heads back to the hotel, where the girls can get something to eat and drink. Then, it’s back to study hall and bed. “It’s not too glamorous at all,”

said Nagamine. “Basically, each road trip is made up of soccer and studying. We are student athletes on a road trip for soccer, so there’s a lot of studying for the girls.” On occasion, the team can watch movies in their rooms, but Nagamine said that that the team never goes out partying or shopping. “I think overall, it’s pretty boring,” said Nagamine with a laugh. “But it’s better than them getting into trouble.”


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