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A K LEO T H E

FRIDAY, MARCH 9 to SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012 VOLUME 106 ISSUE 80

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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A HISTORY LESSON IN STYLE A NTON GLAMB Staff Writer

This weeke weekend, Apparel Dep arel Product Prod and Mersign an chandising is c and ch cleaning out clean its closets and inviting you to raid Historic Costhe UH Histor Collection. From tume Collectio intricate embroidery emb to ’90s neon, the vintage pieces go g as far back as 1900. 1900 “The “Th whole purpose of the collection is for students to t study and do research r and learn lear from these clothes,” said clothe Carol D’Angel D’Angelo, who is in charge of the sale. But as more clothes are added, the collection recollec

quires more space. “The clososets are so crowded that we feel like we’re tearing things gs if we take them in and out,” t,” said D’Angelo. Unique items up for or sale include a purplee snakeskin pimp coatt and an entire collection ion of furs. D’A ngelo says the collection was taken out ut because of complaints from om People for the Ethical Treatment eatmentt of A nimals. Many items that willl be be sold d are duplicates of styles in n the col-lection. Dresses, gowns, jackets and accessories were donated for the education of upcoming coming designers, and all proceeds eds will be used to aid the program. The price tags (which range from $2-$100) also include the year the items were made, so browsing the racks will double as a shopping opporpportunity and a fashion history lesson. n.

Vintage Sale Cost: $2-$100, cash or check only When: Sunday, March 11; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Where: Miller Hall 207 (Enter via Varney Circle) Contact: 808-956-2234 PHOTOS BY ANTON GLAMB / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

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Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

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The Board of Publications office is located on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall.

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Will Caron Managing Editor Jaimie Kim Chief Copy Editor Karleanne Matthews Assc Chief Copy Editor Candace Chang Design Editor Beth Shiner Assc Design Editor Justin Nicholas News Editor Kelsey Amos Assc News Editor Emi Aiko Features Editor Maria Kanai Assc Features Editor Alvin Park Opinions Editor Boaz Rosen Assc Opinions Editor Justin Francisco Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Broadcast News Editor Naomi Lugo Web Editor Jefferson Speer Special Issues Editor Sherley Wetherhold Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Ryan Tolman, chair; Ming Yang, vice chair; or Susan Lin, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

Graduate student employees of the University of Hawai‘i will have to wait another year before their pleas for collective bargaining rights can be heard again before House committees. Members of the UH Mānoa Graduate Student Organization expressed hope that next year’s efforts may be more successful. “The support voiced for the bill by students, government, faculty, … LGBT labor organizations, and the House labor and education committees was very encouraging and bodes well for the bill’s future passage,” said Amy Donahue,

COMPILED BY K YLE ENG Staff Writer

TAG G E D Numerous graffiti reports have been made at a variety of places in the past weeks. Feb. 19: Geophysics building at about 11:30 p.m. Feb. 19 and 21: Athletics Complex in the evening and early morning respectively. Feb. 21: Lower campus portables at about 2 p.m. Feb. 22: Hawai‘i Hall at about 8 a.m.; Cancer research facility during off hours. Feb. 23: Webster during off hours; Biomedical Sciences at 12:45 p.m. Feb. 26: Kennedy Theatre at about 1:30 a.m.

Ph.D. and former GSO Advocacy Committee chair. House Bill 2859, which would have removed legal impediments to collective bargaining, passed both the House Committee on Labor and Public Employment and the House Committee on Higher Education before stalling in the Finance Committee on March 2. Graduate student employees are currently barred from forming a bargaining unit. While the faculty union has negotiated salary increases, graduate students haven’t received a raise since 2004.

Associate News Editor Emi Aiko contributed to this article.

T E R RO R I N H E M E N WAY A report was fi led of terroristic threatening in Hemenway Hall on March 2 at 11:15 a.m.

FIRE IN THE HOLE Kennedy Theatre reported a fire on the Feb. 29 at 2:30 p.m. There were no reports of injury or damage.

B E YO N D A N N OY I N G Two counts of harassment were reported last week. The first was at Campus Center on Feb. 23 at about 3 p.m. The second took place at Campus Security headquarters on Feb. 24 at about 4:20 p.m.

YO U N G A N D R E C K L E S S

A report of reckless endangerment was made at Hale Wainani on Feb. 22 at around 6 p.m.


Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

Features

Weekend events

COMPILED BY M AILE THOMAS Staff Writer

N E X T C OA S T: L I V E H I P - H O P S H OWC A S E

YA L E G L E E C L U B P E R F O R M A N C E

Hailing from the West Coast, rapper and producer Blu will be making a special appearance at Nextdoor this weekend for his Hawai‘i fans.

The Yale Glee Club will make its Honolulu debut tonight at St. Andrew’s Cathedral. The show will feature arrangements of traditional college songs, folk songs and works by composers Josquin des Prez, Frank Martin, Joseph Gregorio and more.

Nextcoast: Live Hip-Hop Showcase Cost: $15 When: Saturday, March 10; 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Where: Nextdoor, 43 N. Hotel St. Contact: 808-852-2243, www.nextdoorhnl.com

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Cost: Calabash donation When: Today, March 9; 7:30 p.m. Where: St. Andrew’s Cathedral, 229 Queen Emma Square Contact: 203-432-4136, www.yalegleeclub.org

‘Boy’ EMILY BOYD/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I ANTON GLAMB / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JAVA AND JAZZ CONCERT JAM World-famous saxophonist Miwill be playing with chael Paulo w local musicians. musician

P I A N I S T J O N AT H A N KO R T H Assistant professor of piano Jonathan Korth will be performing a solo recital including music by Debussy, Liszt, Mendelssohn and Ives.

Jonathan Korth Cost: $15 Sunday, March 11; When: Su 6-9 p.m. Jazz Minds jazz club, Where: Jaz Kapi‘olani Blvd. 1661 Kapi‘o Contact: 9951-696-0184 www.apaulomusic.com w ww w.apaul

Cost: $12 general admission ($8 students, seniors, UH faculty/staff with ID) When: Saturday, March 10; 7:30-9:30 p.m. Where: Orvis Auditorium, 2411 Dole St. Contact: 808-956-8742, uhmmusic@hawaii.edu

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Cost: $10 general admission, $8 for museum members When: Sunday, March 11; 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Where: Doris Duke Theatre, 900 S. Beretania St. Contact: 808-532-8768,, aalgar@honolulu academy.org

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Features

Q&A with Karen Kim Second violinist, the Parker Quartet

COURTESY OF PARKER QUARTET

(L-R) Karen Kim, Kee-Hyun Kim, Jessica Bodner and Daniel Chong make up the Parker Quartet. SILA M ANAHANE Contributing Writer The young members of the Grammy Award-winning Parker Quartet have been known to play energy-infused chamber music in unusual venues like clubs and bars. Karen Kim, second violinist, sat down with Ka Leo to share her thoughts on classical music for a new generation.

Q

What are your thoughts about the stigma that classical music is just for older people?

A

I think there are a few misconceptions behind [the fact] that people believe it’s boring or it’s music to listen to when you’re relaxing. … Classical music is beyond any of that.

Q A

What does classical music mean to you, then?

For me, just a way to really express myself in a way that I can’t with words.

Q

How would you address a young generation to provide an alternative view of classical music?

A

It’s very important with classical music to really expose yourself to the many different sides to it. Going to see concerts live is a really important part of getting to know classical music. There is an incredible energy that you’ll get from the music that you could possibly miss if … you’re playing it in the background.

Q

What is your motivation that brought you to classical music?

A

I started playing music at a very, very young age, when I was 4 years old. … When I was that young, I just felt like playing the violin was fun. It was kind of the spark in me. And as I’ve gotten older, I think I still have that feeling, but I also feel like being a classical musician, I am working on something that is important to me and that is important for other people to hear.

Q

Are there any live music performances of any genre that you won’t forget?

A

Maybe four or five years ago, I heard Radiohead play live, and that was pretty amazing.

Q

What advice can you give for students at UH who want to pursue a career in music?

A

I think if you pursue a career in music, the most important thing is always to be passionate about what you’re doing. A lot of times when you’re working for a goal, you can lose sight of the very first thing that made us want to achieve that goal. If you always have that drive and conviction that you have something important to say, you can make it, no matter what. It’s really important to meet other musicians, work with great teachers and try to have as many connections as you can in the classical music world, so that you have a broad picture of the world.

The Parker Quartet Cost: $20 for students, $45 general admission, $40 for museum members When: Today, March 9; 7:30 p.m. Where: Doris Duke Theatre (Honolulu Academy of Arts), 900 S. Beretania St. Contact: 808-532-8700


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

Comics


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

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DOWN 1 Chesapeake Bay haul 2 Shop alternative 3 One of the Greek Furies 4 Conditional words 5 Defense mechanisms 6 He ruled jointly with Ivan V for nearly 14 years 7 "Don't leave home without it" co. 8 Sunscreen element 9 Vacation for the self-employed? 10 Secretary of state after Albright 11 Good street for playing 12 Inspired poetry 13 Body pic 21 Teacher's grad deg. 22 17-Across's state 26 Roughly 27 Distraught state 29 Duff Beer server 30 Concert venue 31 Not gross 35 Diana's escort __ al-Fayed 36 National rival 37 No longer together 38 Bind 39 "Mr. Chicago" journalist Kupcinet 41 Israeli parliament 42 Storybook heavy 43 Stock clerk's charge 44 Dench of "Iris" 46 Leader with a shoestring budget? 47 Cold remedy in LiquiCaps 48 "Mayor" memoirist 49 Connect 53 Arab League member 55 "__' Eyes": Eagles hit 56 Actor Rob 57 Blacken 58 Journal ending 59 Sister or mother

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Spring Break! And have a chance to be centerfold. Send your summary to springbreak@kaleo.org along with a 300 dpi picture of yourself doing the activity. 300-400 words of why you think your activity is best! Winners will be chosen based on summary.

We’re Doing it Again! Be apart of Ka Leoʟs Swimsuit Issue Looking for Men, Women, Boys and Girls Reply to SpringBreak@kaleo.org with a 300dpi picture headshot. 1st people to enter are chosen to be a part of our 2012 spring break photo shoot.


Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

Decoding body language W JUSTIN F R ANCISCO Associate Opinions Editor

While this column has talked about the necessity of communication before, there has been no mention of the most proactive form: body language. Studies report that body language and paralinguistic cues account for anywhere from 60 percent to an astounding 93 percent (proposed by author James Borg) of communication. In hopes of deciphering these lost messages, look for:

HIP AND SHOULDER ALIGNMENT Ever approached a person waiting to buy a drink at a bar or club? Typically, the person leans his or her body into the counter, toward the objective: a drink. Similarly, when you initiate conversation, notice whether people turn only their heads to acknowledge you, or their entire bodies – more importantly, their hips.

Rule of thumb: Interest follows the hips. sponsive to touch. She concludes that if you If an individual in a circle of friends makes smoke, you’ll take more drags; if you drink, an intentional effort to face his or her body you’ll take more sips. toward you, it’s a sign of interest. Likewise, a seated person SMILING AND who’s interested will maneuE Y E CO N TAC T ver or shift in your direction. Are you conscious of People have the innate capacbody language? ity to discern the authenticity of PREENING AND smiles. When paired with allurGo to ing eye contact, a genuine smile G RO OM I N G kaleo.org/opinions is the simplest way to communiNotice people constantly to vote cate interest. grooming their hair, touching When we are attracted to sometheir lips or subtly fidgeting one, our eyes widen, our eyewith their clothing. Preening brows rise and our pupils dilate. translates to “I want to look Do you see yourself as more T his biological f unct ion good for you.” of a tortoise or a hare? occurs inst ant aneously and Author Tracey Cox 75% Tortoise of ten involunt ar ily. W hen claims this is a combination 25% Hare t alk ing, t ake not ice i f a perof nervous excitement, preenson is const antly glancing at ing and autoerotic touching. Cox states that when people are revved with your lips; i f your par tner is, he or she attraction, their skin, particularly their lips is inter nally gauging the likelihood of and mouth, becomes more sensitive and re- k issing you.

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Opinions P ROX I M I T Y AND POSITION If a person positions him or herself apart from the rest of a group, that person wants to be noticed as an individual and potential partner. Gauge the situation by leaning in closer, if only because “it is too loud in this bar to hear you.” Also, notice how often he or she touches you – even acts as subtle as touching your arm. Respond with flirtatious touches of your own, like grazing the person’s lower back as you move about. Finally, mirroring is a common communicator of interest. If someone mimics your positioning and/or body language, it is an indicator of rapport.

IN THE END Too many people are concerned about what to say and how to say it. When you’re at a loss of words, get close and try exchanging lingering glances, amiable smiles and fleeting touches. There will be no need for words, since your lips will be occupied.

Join a Campus Center Board Committee!!!! Campus Relations Committee! The Campus Relations Committee is responsible for all marketing of the Campus Center including but not limited to advertising, public relations, and promotions. The committee is also responsible for ensuring the production of a Campus Center inclusive marketing plan. Establishing and maintaining public relations with Campus Center constituents such as Charted Student Organizations, Registered Independent Organizations, other departments, newspapers and other oth media. Pick up an application at Campus Center Ticket & Info or apply online or at http://hawaii.edu/ccb/join.htm


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 8 | Ka Leo | Friday, March 9 2012

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JEREMY NIT TA Staff Writer The Mountain PaciďŹ c Sports Federation is known as one of the toughest water polo conferences in the country. Six of eight MPSF teams are ranked No. 1-6 in the nation. The University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo team (5 -7, 0 -2 MPSF) is ranked 14th, but head coach Maureen Cole appreciates the high level of competition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you play against the best, you reach your potential a lot faster than if you were playing a weaker team,â&#x20AC;? said Cole. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m deďŹ nitely an advocate of playing against the best teams possible, and the MPSF offers that.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It lifts your game up by playing stronger teams,â&#x20AC;? said sophomore

utility player Emily Scott. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re such a new team, a lot of teams underestimate us. ... Although they are strong teams, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know anything about us. This conference deďŹ nitely has a lot of strong teams, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a strong team too.â&#x20AC;? This weekend, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i will host MPSF foe No. 2 Stanford (131, 1-0 MPSF) on Saturday at 6 p.m. at the Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex. Admission is free. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a young team, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t underestimate ourselves. So we go into every game thinking we can win,â&#x20AC;? said Scott. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to go in and always give a 110 percent, because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all we can really do in the end. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only the beginning of the season, so we have a lot of work to do.â&#x20AC;?

Cole feels the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential is high, despite its youth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We go in treating every team with respect,â&#x20AC;? said Cole. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know every game is going to be a battle. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t focus on the score at all, or the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at the end of the game. What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re focused on is improving all of the little things that add up to a win or loss. â&#x20AC;Ś We ďŹ gure that if we work on all the little things and improve our fundamentals, the winning will take care of itself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Success for us this year is really just trying to reach our potential as a team, and be the best that we can be come April. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re growing all year long, and we want to be the best. And that success is determined by doing the best we can â&#x20AC;&#x201C; every single day.â&#x20AC;?


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