KADK - School of Design

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The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation School of Design





Index 04

Foreword by Rector Lene Dammand Lund

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About KADK

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Partnerships

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Degree projects: Institute of Architecture and Design

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Architectual Lighting Design

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Spatial Design, Perception and Detail

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Furniture Design

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Textile Design

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Interview with Anders Byriel - CEO Kvadrat A/S

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Interview with Laerke Bagger - KADK Graduate, Institute of Architecture and Design

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Degree projects: Institute of Visual Design

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Game Art, Design and Development

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Type Design and Wayfinding

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Production Design

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Visual Culture and Identity

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Interview with Erik Legernes - Senior Creative Director, LEGO

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Interview with Sine Jensen - KADK Graduate, Institute of Visual Design

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Degree projects: Institute of Product Design

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Ceramic Design

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Fashion Design

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Codesign

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Industrial Design

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Interview with Inesa Malafej - KADK Graduate, Institute of Product Design

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Interview with Niels Bastrup - Creative Director, Royal Copenhagen


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FOREWORD

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BY RECTOR LENE DAMMAND LUND


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140 years of design engaging us all It is a great pleasure to see that the world around us judges KADK’s schools so highly in international polls and rankings. It bestows on us a sense of duty and only inspires us to do even better in our teaching, in our research and in our many collaborative projects dealing with real-world problems with companies, users, public stakeholders and decision makers, both at home and abroad. We believe that our graduates’ specific understanding of practice, art and science forms the basis for creating better services, better products, better output and more interesting forms of collaboration and interaction. In short, we equip our graduates to create better designs and better conditions for people to live in.

When faced with having to define what KADK – The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design is, we are also faced with 140 years of history. The School of Design has undergone massive changes throughout its 140 years of existence. This has made us one of Scandinavia’s major design schools. We are robust and sustainable. We also listen to, and interact with the world around us. Today we encompass three platforms of design in three institutes: Visual Design: from printing to interactive design; Product Design: from 3D to fashion; and Architecture and Design: from construction textiles to furniture and modern lighting design. It is not our intention here to tell the story of the last 140 years, but rather to describe what goes on here and now on the School of Design’s three platforms at. How better to show the scope of what we are capable of than to hear what our recent graduates have to say?

The capacity of designers to create new futures is not a simple task. It can be complex to understand and relate to. After all, if as a company you mostly see the need for a new prototype, a new digital gizmo, poster or method of production, how are you supposed to deploy designers’ radically different way of thinking? We hope that our method, which is rooted in KADK’s special DNA, consisting of three types of knowledge (practice, art and science), not only creates here-and-now solutions, but also helps create solutions, which relate to users, environment, resources and the future. The main contribution of design is to invest people with a central role. For both public stakeholders and private companies, this means that designers must start with the world of their clients and create insight into the value they can create for them. Even companies, which are traditionally highly technological (software companies, advanced manufacturing companies and financial institutions), have finally admitted that the needs of users must take precedence over technology. Throughout the world, people are aware of the 140-year history of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design because of its iconic alumni: Hans Wegner, Poul Kjærholm, Børge Mogensen etc. However, the School of Design also deserves to be known for having made a qualitative mark on the concept of welfare with a vast spectrum of design achievements. On top of that, today we see a growing interest from new sectors in involving designers. Private and public sector organisations are increasingly aware that design is an essential driving force for innovation. In terms of study and research projects, the School of Design collaborates just as much with new sectors (the Danish tax authority, the waste and health sectors etc.) as it does with the fashion industry, manufacturing companies and new software companies. We need design and designers to transform visions, abstract strategies and ideas into practice – and we need designers to create solutions, which create meaning for people and influence the way we act and interact in the future. KADK is a compilation of degree case stories, seen from our point of view, a casebook with a selection of comments from recent design graduates, which we hope may inspire the world around us. Enjoy, share - and please welcome our new designers into your company or organisation. They represent a source of much sought-after expertise and may change your, and everyone’s world. Lene Dammand Lund Rector KADK


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ABOUT KADK

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THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS, SCHOOL OF DESIGN

About KADK

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design is a leading global school of design and a talent hub, in which Danish design traditions are developed and disseminated with focus on high professionalism and sustainability. Every year we educate a wide range of design graduates and produce new knowledge for the international community in the fields of visual communication, games, production design, furniture, space, textiles, fashion and ceramic design, and glass and industrial design. Our graduates develop knowledge and methods of working with artistic experimentation and research-related development, and make a contribution to society through collaborations with the world of business. We participate actively in the world around us. We wish to play a leading role and to contribute to the development of Denmark as a design society, in which design skills are widely deployed in both the public and private sectors. We also wish to make a contribution to the world around us with commitment, critical thinking, analysis and the design of both products and services.

Design to lead the way The ambition of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design is to develop its leading position in the fields of design education, research and artistic practice through a dynamic, integrated education and research environment, centred around “state-of-the-art” workshops, leading professional design environments, internationally oriented research groups and close relationships with the profession. Graduates from the School of Design are characterised by their unique combination of academic, artistic and practical approaches to design and process facilitation. Skills are taught through problem-oriented projects and a wide variety of design methods. In the coming years, the School of Design wishes to enhance the artistic and design-related foundation of the education it provides. This will be implemented by more focused courses of study, which unleash the students’ creativity and artistic sensibility, while enhancing graduates’ interdisciplinary skills.


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ABOUT KADK

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THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS, SCHOOL OF DESIGN

KADK: Leading Academy in the fields of architecture, design and conservation Founded in 1754, KADK - The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts is home to three of the leading schools of architecture, design and conservation. The academy includes world-class study and research environments engaged in Bachelor, Master’s and Ph.D. programmes, taught in Danish and English. KADK is an educational institution under the aegis of The Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science, and handles education and research within the subject fields of the three schools. We live and breathe architecture, design and conservation around the clock. Our main campus is located in the lively capital of Denmark, Copenhagen – known as the bridge between Scandinavia and continental Europe.

Our DNA

Facts

KADK unites three fields of knowledge: academic research, artistic development and professional practice – three different approaches to discovery, invention and creation. These three fields are closely interlinked in the educational programmes, enabling us to develop graduates and knowledge, which match the needs of the corporate world, while promoting world-class research, ground-breaking artistic design and new experimental understanding. This gives KADK a unique position among educational and research institutions both in Denmark and abroad.

KADK has more than 1,800 students and the equivalent of 350 full-time employees, who create learning, research, artistic development and dynamic study environments on KADK’s three campus sites: Holmen and Esplanaden in Central Copenhagen and at the Arts and Crafts Department on the island of Bornhom.

At KADK the three approaches are underpinned by a unique learning environment, in which studio-based project work, theoretical teaching, workshops and laboratories are all vital basic elements. All help to shape the architects, designers and conservators of tomorrow.

Total number of students at KADK: Bachelor: 990 Master: 870 Ph.D.: 60 Staff: 380 International students every year: 488

Design students: Bachelor: 415 Master: 285

History The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation was founded in 2011 on the basis of a merger between the Academy’s School of Architecture (1754), the Danish Design School (1875) and the Academy’s School of Conservation (1973). The purpose of the merger, was to enhance cooperation between the different disciplines, and to integrate expertise from related academic fields. www.kadk.dk


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Science

THE KADK DNA Art

Profession

Academic research, artistic development, practice-based teaching


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PARTNERSHIPS

Partnerships Our students and researchers want to put their efforts into problems that matter. At the School of Design we work with real-world problems, constraints and commitments in close contact with relevant national and international organizations, business enterprises and client groups. A number of companies serve as strategic business partners, who make their resources available for a period of time and participate as active partners in teaching, research and development projects. A few of the organizations that have partnered with us include:


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Industry partnerships:

Microsoft, NIKE, NASA, H&M, LEGO, Bang & Olufsen, Henning Larsens Architects, MOMA, Kvadrat, Reseau Femmes Artisanes in Morocco, Palestine and Tunisia, DR: the Danish Broadcast Corporation, Rosenthal, Danida - Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, Socialsquare, KL7, Lightyears, The Royal Opera, Movia, Post Denmark, Lysiplex, Narayana Press, Copenhagen Phil, Design Museum Denmark, Vilsbøl de Arce, Swedish Archipelago, Fritz Hansen, The City of Copenhagen, Wonderful Copenhagen, SKAT - the Danish Customs and Tax Administration, The City of Copenhagen, Bertelsen & Scheving Architects, INDEX: Design to Improve Life, Micro Challenge: KEA and DTU, Innonet Lifestyle, Geopark Odsherred, European Ceramic Context, Fuori Salone in Ventura Lambrate, Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair, London Design Festival, Danish Fashion Institute, Danish Design Centre, Sydney Opera House and many many more.

Academic partnerships:

Copenhagen Business School, DADIU- National Academy of Digital Interactive Entertainment, DTU, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde University, d.school Institute of Design, Rhode Island School of Design, Novia University of Applied Sciences (Turku), Conservatory of Modern Music and the School of Theatre design, Textile Futures Research Centre London; Textielmuseum Tilburg, Adelaide, South Australian School of Art, Swinburne University of Technology, University of Applied Arts Vienna, Ontario College of Art and Design, Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design Prague, Estonian Academy of Arts, Aalto University, L’Ecole de Design Nante Atlantique, Paris Institute of Art and Design, ENSAD, ENSAAMA, ESAG, ESAD, Parsons, Universität der Künste Berlin, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften. Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Iceland Academy of the Arts, Ahmedabad The National Institute of Design – India, National College of Art and Design Dublin, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Osaka Seikei University – Kyoto, Gerrit Rietveld, Arnhem Academy of Art and Design, Design Academy Eindhoven, Royal Academy of Art Haag, Willem de Kooning Academy, AKI Academy of Visual art & Design, Kunsthøgskolen Oslo, Arkitektskolen Oslo, Kunstog Designhøgskolen Bergen, Akademia Sztuk Pieknych w Krakowie, Vysoká skola výtvarných umení v Bratislave, University of Ljubljana Universitat de Vic – BAU, Art Universitet Autonoma de Barcelona, HDK Göteborg, Konstfack Stockholm, Umeå University, Högskolan i Borås, Lund Tekniske Universitet, University of Kalmar, Hochschule für Gestaltung+Kunst Zürich, Lausanne ECÀL, Edinburgh College of Art, The Glasgow School of Art, London College of Communication Ravensbourne, Rhode Island School of Design, University of Michigan and many many more.



KADK INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN 18

Architectual Lighting Design

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Lotte Clementsen Hansen & Zina Laura Bosse

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Oda Blomnes & Anette Andenæs Bull

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Rasmus Rune Eggers

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Spatial Design, Perception and Detail

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Benjamin Isak Schlifer Monrad

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Fie Reffelt & Nan Sofie Brøgger

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Furniture Design

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Aske Foersom, Adam Mathias Hermansen & Morten Husum Nielsen

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Ellinor Ericsson

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Eva Fly & Suguru Kobayashi

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Textile Design

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Lea Katrine Kargaard

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Laerke Bagger

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Miranda Tengs Brun


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KADK

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INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

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BY MATHILDE AGGEBO

“We are in between two subjects and two schools – architecture and design. We enhance the academic specialisations and make the two degree programmes meet in a cross-disciplinary teaching environment” – Head of Institute, Mathilde Aggebo


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Institute of Architecture and Design At the Institute of Architecture and Design we work at the intersection of architecture and design, educating both architects and designers in an interdisciplinary environment. Bringing together the two, closely related disciplines creates a synergy between the whole and the detail. This applies, for example, to architecture, interiors, lighting, textiles and furniture. We work on quality and detailing in construction, focusing holistically on the relationship between a building’s function and its internal and external design. We also educate furniture, textile and lighting design specialists with a materialoriented approach to the design process: in the Institute’s specialist workshops and in close cooperation with selected companies. We educate architects and designers with great insight into the needs of society and the encounter with the user. The Institute focuses particularly on the challenges posed by the welfare society: in the health, education and hospital sectors etc.

The Institute of Architecture and Design is an interdisciplinary educational environment, providing education of the highest level to architects and designers in the areas of architecture, spatial design, furniture, lighting and textile design on the basis of research, artistic development activities, practice and strategic business partnerships. We are an agenda-setting educational and research environment, working at the intersection between architecture and design. We educate designers and architects, who, as specialists in their professional fields, can participate in interdisciplinary, national and international collaborations. Our architects and designers are entrepreneurial and have great insight into the needs of society and the encounter with the user. They help set new agendas within the Institute’s specialist areas. Our approach to the design process is rooted in knowledge of materials and working in the institutes specialist workshops, as well as close collaboration with selected businesses. At the same time we have a strong focus on new technology and IT. There is a major social need to educate architects and designers, who can help to work on entities, developing and qualifying our experience of urban and landscape spaces, buildings, rooms, interiors, furniture, lighting and textiles. Society needs specialized architects and designers, who can dedicate themselves to a particular professional area, and who can work across the area between architecture and design, developing and shaping public spaces, workplaces, schools, hospitals, public institutions and private residences etc. for the future.


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KADK

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INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

Our programmes: A large number of the programmes at Institute of Architecture and Design are aimed at design students, or joint School of Architecture / School of Design programmes:


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Bachelor Furniture Design

- is based on Scandinavian tradition and rooted in the interaction between people, furniture and space, placing emphasis on the craft-related and industrial production of furniture, so that the manufacture of furniture is reflected clearly and legibly right down to the smallest detail.

Spatial Design

- The task of spatial design is to plan and configure space, spatial sequences and spatial components for entities, which convey artistic quality and utility value. We work on different scales and on different issues within architectural contexts: for example, the home, the workplace, social and cultural institutions, urban and existing public spaces, and exhibition and experiential spaces.

Textile Design

- The bachelor programme focuses on professional design issues, which are associated in practice with the specific areas of textile: clothing, interiors and architectural contexts. The focal point is: Human Being-Culture-Form-Function-Material-Technology.

Master Architectural Lighting Design

On the basis of sustainability, the objective of Architectural Lighting Design is to contribute to, and enhance the aesthetic quality of our surroundings, and promote our well-being, health and ability to work. The Master’s programme is an artistic education based on mankind, architecture and lighting technology in a Nordic perspective.

Furniture Design

The Furniture programme combines two disciplines and cultures, providing research-based teaching of the subject in a joint degree, which is offered to students with both design and architectural backgrounds. The programme investigates furniture’s relation to the outside world, not only from the point of view of professional architectural practice, in which furniture is involved in complex spatial relationships, but also from the point of view of furniture as an individual object in an artistically directed approach to the subject’s conditions of production.

Spatial Design, Perception and Detail

This program is open for students with bachelor degrees in architectual, interior and furniture design, and is focused on the perception, product and fittings of architectual spaces. Studies will provide the students with skills necessary for mastering the art of designing and contructing interior and exterior spaces in detail. The program stands on two pillars. On one hand, understanding the many contexts of design, including the end-user’s perception of space. On the other hand, the professional knowledge of how to work consciously with light and sound, materials and color, proportion and represntation will be trained and critically examined.

Textile Design

The focus area of textile design includes professional design issues and assignments, in which colour, tactility, construction and pattern formation are a vital part of the form-generating element. The curriculum of the Master’s degree programme in Textile Design ranges from conceptual entities with an extended grasp of material to the concrete design of textiles for clothing, interiors and architectural contexts.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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ARCHITECTUAL LIGHTING DESIGN

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LOTTE C. HANSEN & ZINA L. BOSSE

Lotte Clementsen Hansen & Zina Laura Bosse

Lotte Clementsen Hansen Architectural Lighting Design 1987 / Denmark Graduation 2016 stud5151@edu.kadk.dk

Zina Laura Bosse Architectural Lighting Design 1988 / Germany Graduation 2016 zbos@kadk.dk


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is an honest construction with the light in focus. It carries lightsources in different ways and offers more lightsituations in one fitting. The wings have led strips and channel plast which orchestrates light against the center and reflect outwards. The center cone has a led lightbulb and a screen of translucent paper witch orchestrates light down. Constructive Light is designed for the canteen of the Danish Film Academy, which is a dynamic space for lunchtime, group work and movie premiers. Constructive Light adapt to the dynamics in the canteen space. The wings and the center can be lit together or separately and create three different lightsituations.

Combining cables and lightsources

Lighting the center only, you get a warm color and a functional light for working in the evening. Lighting the arms only, you will get a colder and calmer light decorating the room. The arms accompany the daylight and adds an atmospheric element without giving to much light. By lighting both parts, Constructive Light offers function and decoration at the same time. Constructive Light explores the possibilities with led and builds with light in a new way, from a traditional perspective of orchestrating light.

Testing light canalization


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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ARCHITECTUAL LIGHTING DESIGN

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ODA BLOMNES & ANETTE ANDENÆS BULL

Oda Blomnes Architectural Lighting Design 1990 / Norway Graduation 2016 odablomnes@gmail.com

Anette Andenæs Bull Architectural Lighting Design 1990 / Norway Graduation 2016 anette_bull@msn.com

Oda Blomnes & Anette Andenæs Bull


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diffusing filter. A neutral white tone is chosen to accompany the matte white colour of the shade. This will optimize the reflection of the light without interfering the eye. The white color emphasizes lightness and gives the shade a floating expression, in contrast to the tight black lines of the construction.

is inspired by an elegantly widebrimmed hat, and is designed as a fusion between architecture and fashion. The strict graphical expression meet the soft features of fabric, in a composition adjusted to a space. The shade consists of a perforated metal sheet that allows the light to reflect and transmit, as the light source is hidden in the lower part of the construction. Adjustable joints gives the viewer an opportunity to vary the brightness and the direction of the light. A counterweight will ensure the balance of the construction. The light source in it selves consists of LED-technology, supplied with a


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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ARCHITECTUAL LIGHTING DESIGN

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RASMUS RUNE EGGERS

Rasmus Rune Eggers

Rasmus Rune Eggers Architectural Lighting Design 1991 / Denmark Graduation 2016 stud5189@edu.kadk.dk


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is a luminaire consisting of a vertical set of luminous frames in black painted wood with diffuse overlapping surfaces. These horizontal surfaces are placed in notches in the wood frame. Gravity is the only thing keeping them in place. The diffuse surfaces are balancing on the elliptical frames, which are balancing on a wooden rod held up by wires. The balancing luminous frames are filled with LED strips on the inside, so the light emanates from the individual frames. The frame made light float through the diffuse plastic material and the overlaps. The light is hereby shaded in patterns on the wall or surfaces near the luminaire.

The light floats through overlapping surfaces

The luminaire model seen from the inside


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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SPATIAL DESIGN, PERCEPTION AND DETAIL

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BENJAMIN ISAK SCHLIFER MONRAD

Benjamin Isak Schlifer Monrad

Benjamin Isak Schlifer Monrad Spatial Design, Perception and Detail 1984 / Denmark Graduation 2015 bm@allatseacph.com


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Holmen Art House Project This combined exhibition and restoration project was inspired by a collection of art houses on the island of Naoshima and by the Japanese philosophy of Wabi Sabi meaning “blooming through time”. I wanted to create an exhibition house for The Royal Cast Collection in one of the listed Cannon Boat Houses on the old marine station Holmen, Copenhagen.

The boathouses have fallen into disrepair and the rising tides flood the parts of the buildings closest to the waters edge. I chose to add a levelled concrete deck to the existing building. Furthermore in-situ concrete walls inspired by Ando Tadao were placed to generate a flow through the building and create intimate spaces for select pieces. I used Øland sandstone for inlays in the concrete deck and oxidized cor-

ton steel for a collecting pool for the rising tide. Both sandstone and steel are perishable and the water rising into the building from the harbour will leave its mark on the materials and change them through time. I have chosen to exhibit my 1:50 model from the project. It is displayed without outer walls thus to draw attention to the existing beam construction and the concrete, sandstone and steel additions.

Sketching a version of the floor plan

Model making

View from rear end towards entrance showing the length of the room


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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SPATIAL DESIGN, PERCEPTION AND DETAIL

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FIE REFFELT & NAN SOPHIE BRØGGER

Fie Reffelt Spatial Design, Perception and Detail 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2013 rbstudio.dk

Nan Sophie Brøgger Spatial Design, Perception and Detail 1983 / Denmark Graduation 2013 rbstudio.dk

Visualization of Space in motion

Visualization of Motion in space

Fie Reffelt & Nan Sophie Brøgger


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Space in motion / Motion in space Mankind has always sought out adventures and experiences, because of an inherent need to be challenged, affected and perhaps changed. This project sets out to induce these feelings and reactions through spatial experiments. The idea was to create spatial experiences in different vibrant and engaging constellations that would question our perception and understanding of a space when interacting with them. We analyzed various spaces and came to a general conclusion that all spaces that surround us – more or less – are static. That applies for both the way they are build and how they are used. To affect and question space we set out to create the opposite and make space dynamic and interactive!

Visualization of the two spatial concepts

This is a sneak peak of the project. Showing mainly the two final experiences. Space in motion is the concept of a space where the space itself is in active motion. The motion creates indirect interaction with the people interacting with it because of its independent actions. The other, Motion in space, only comes alive through the actions of the people in the space. People directly have to interact with the space and they immediately see their influence as well as reason for interacting with the room. Fraction of 1:1 experience of Space in motion

Fraction of 1:1 experience of Motion in space


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DEGREE PROJECTS

Aske Foersom Furniture Design 1989 / Denmark Graduation 2017 asfoe.com

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FURNITURE DESIGN

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ASKE FOERSOM, MORTEN HUSUM NIELSEN & ADAM MATHIAS HERMANSEN

Morten Husum Nielsen Furniture Design 1990 / Denmark Graduation 2016 mortenhusum.com

Adam Mathias Hermansen Furniture Design 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2017 adammth@gmail.com

Aske Foersom, Morten Husum Nielsen & Adam Mathias Hermansen


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Kosmos The idea for the LED based lamp Kosmos arose from a mutual fascination of old iconic schoolmodels of the solar system that in an almost humorous way can reduce the universe to a fully understandable microcosm. A simple way to communicate the planets position around the sun, the light, but at the same time remind us of the dark side of these spheres.

The simplicity of the lamp construction parts. The lamp is divided into as few items as possible: Light source, screen, reflector, stand, foot


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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FURNITURE DESIGN

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ELLINOR ERICSSON

Ellinor Ericsson

Ellinor Ericsson Furniture Design 1987 / Sweden Graduation 2014 ellinorericsson.wordpress.com


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In our Nature Furniture is a part of our way of living and shows our behaviour, we furnish our lives with them and live in between them. “But what is our natural behaviour?� In a digital world where contrasts speak up between the industry and craft, the urban city and the country, I wanted to experiment with the haptic experience to be in a furniture and an environment. A textile environment, as in nature where it is not predetermined how to act or sit. An environment, which changes, grows and adapts to you depending on your actions. In Our Nature is inspired by the free way we act in nature and the changed way we began to act with furniture as the technology became mobile. Today we take our laptop from our office space and work from home in our bed or lying on our couch. The space between private life and work has been erased and as we are both working from the office chair and the bed we need a new way of using furniture. I have created a furniture space were you can interact with different textile structures and objects to create different settings for your everyday life and activities. The different textiles stimulate your senses, through the structure, material and the heavy weight.

The method for the project was to use craft techniques in contrast to the technology, in order to achieve a more authentic furniture environment made by hand and in relation to the human. The process of experimenting with materials and techniques created the furniture collection In Our Nature


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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FURNITURE DESIGN

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EVA FLY & SUGURU KOBAYASHI

Eva Fly & Suguru Kobayashi

Eva Fly Furniture Design 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2016 evafly.dk Suguru Kobayashi Furniture Design 1990 / Japan Graduation 2016 stud5673@edu.kadk.dk


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1:5 scale models from the an early stage of the designproces

Needle Chair The design of this chair is morphing textile and sticks by using their contrasting characteristics in the meeting between them. Using the stick as needle sewing through the fabric, the stiffness of the stick and the formability of the textile is emphasized, while fixing the textile to the chair. The textile makes a soft and flexible backrest and gets a curved structure that provides the chair with a tactile quality. The shape of the construction is inspired by danish classics such as the showy chieftain chair and the modesty of the FDB collection. It’s a simple chair telling a poetic story about the meeting between the two materials. The textile part of the chair is removable, so it can be washed or changed – so don’t worry about spilling your hot chocolate or getting a new favorite color.

Trying out details in 1:1 for the mock-up


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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TEXTILE DESIGN |

LEA KATRINE KARGAARD

Lea Katrine Kargaard

Lea Kargaard Textile Design 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2017 leakargaard@gmail.com


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RUGS - A Tactile Interpretation The task for this project was to do a fictive collaboration with a focus on creating new textile solutions from a strategic design perspective. I chose to work with luxury fashion brand CÊline and after a deeper analysis of the company, I decided to extend their design portfolio with a home collection. I focused on creating a series of hand-tufted rugs produced as a limited edition line. I wanted to combine classic, luxurious elegance with some surprise elements to make the designs stand out. I experimented with the height of the pile, the combination of colors and different materials. This technique created a subtle, yet strong expression; the closer you look at the rugs, the more hidden details you will find. I chose a very tight and geometric composition, in order to not lose focus from the complexity in the surfaces and color combinations. The final product is a series of hand-tufted samples of three rugs that express my interpretation of CÊline’s design aesthetic as a collaborative design project.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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TEXTILE DESIGN |

LAERKE BAGGER

Laerke Bagger Laerke Bagger Textile Design 1985 / Denmark Graduation 2015 laerkebagger.com

All’s Well That Ends Well - White Gorilla fur


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Beaded Armour is an exclusive hand knitted collection of one-off jumpers intended for evening wear. The initial inspiration came from traditional Greenlandic beading techniques combined with the overall aesthetics and tactility of medieval armour. My objective was to create a luxurious jumper with a simple silhouette but a very evocative expression that would make women feel both comfortable and sexy. All´s Well That Ends Well is a collection of hand knitted jumpers and furs intended for keeping warm in a stylish and playful way. I am interested in various aspects of zero waste fashion, so I saved and collected old unusable yarn ends and created my own multi-colour and multi-material skeins from them. My objective was to create a design that merged functionality, upcycling, and fun.

Beaded Armour - Starry night jumper

Beaded Armour - Tutti frutti jumper

I am showcasing a selection of styles from two fashion knitwear collections. Both collections are thematically inspired by ‘randomness’ and ‘repetition,’ and the way these two topics at once complement and contradict one another.

All´s Well That Ends Well - loop stitch in upcycled yarn

Swatches using various beading techniques

Beaded Armour - close up of the tutti frutti jumper


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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TEXTILE DESIGN | MIRANDA TENGS BRUN

Miranda Tengs Brun Textile Design 1988 / Norway Graduation 2015 cargocollective.com/mirandabrun

Red smoke: Digital print on silk

Miranda Tengs Brun

Organic stripes: Digital print on silk


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Destruction is creation This textile pattern project is inspired by natural processes: forces that are destructive and fierce, but that also express beauty and rejuvenation. While the volcano, emerging from dormancy with explosive force, kills everything in its path, this destructive inferno also makes way for the creation of new areas of land; it tells a story of the constant movement and ongoing lifecycle of the earth’s crust. The development of the textile patterns utilized both digital and analogue techniques to achieve an element of movement and transformation. Mirroring the uncontrollable and mystical nature of destruction, experimentation dictated process, and method was controlled by coincidence. The final textile patterns were created using analogue techniques and are digitally printed on silk. The patterns are intended for both combined and individual use.

Black Smoke: Digital print on silk

Pattern developments from Sketchbook


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INTERVIEW

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ANDERS BYRIEL


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“Both historically and today, KADK graduates are at the centre of the development of Danish design…”

Kvadrat – Creativity Pure and Simple KADK in the eyes of Anders Byriel, CEO at Kvadrat A/S

What characterises a KADK graduate? “There are few sources of pure and simple creativity, and in Scandinavia, a KADK graduate is one of them.” What does close collaboration with KADK mean for Kvadrat? “The school is one of Kvadrat’s two main pipelines, so KADK is incredibly important when it comes to supplying our creative engine room with talent.” What influence do KADK graduates have on the development of Danish Design? “Both historically and today, KADK graduates are at the centre of the development of Danish design…the school has the same status in Scandinavia as the Royal College of Art has in London.”


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INTERVIEW

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LAERKE BAGGER

Interview with Laerke Bagger Textile Design

How do you balance being a student at KADK and working commercially outside of school? I am a student in the programme of textile design at KADK, and I work as a fashion knitwear designer. During my time at KADK I have been prioritising projects that will meet the demands of specific consumers and satisfy a real life demand

or need. I want my school projects to become “real” projects to be bought and sold. I’m showcasing a selection of styles from two one-off fashion knitwear collections. The two collections were made to order and are intended for retail in a high-end fashion boutique in Copenhagen by the end of summer 2015.


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“As a young designer, it is important to get your work out there”

Inspiration and process, what choices have you made in terms of aesthetics and collaboration with the production company whom you are working for? I have worked both conceptually and commercially. I find that both genres contain interesting aspects in terms of how you develop and target your design or product. The creative freedom of conceptual design helps you to determine your own personal style and identity as a designer, and the constraints and limitations of commercial design provide the opportunity to work with a target-based design that sometimes requires you to compromise on your own personal aesthetics. In my opinion, both genres are essential to becoming a good designer. To me, the most important thing, when working with a company, is knowledge. As a designer, you rely on your ability to adapt to different aesthetics and ways of working creatively. Whenever I am involved in collaborations and freelance work, my most important tool is research about the company’s aesthetics, methods, and products. It’s essential for me to know who the client is, so that I can target my designs in a way that extends, improves, and contributes to the general vision of the company. What is the most important thing you’ve taken with you from your time as a student at KADK? The most important thing that my time at KADK has taught me, is how valuable process and method are to good design. KADK focuses on training students in various ways to generate and visualise new ideas -creating a space for young designers to explore their own methods of creativity. In that sense we become more individualistic and accurate in our work.

How are you cooperating with production companies in connection with your study? During my time at KADK I have been focused on developing relationships with various brands, production companies and people from both the Danish and international fashion industry. It’s very important to be connected with other professionals, and a good network is the alpha and omega for new designers today. A lot of what I do involves fixed-term projects and I rely heavily on my network to provide me with new opportunities and work. As a young designer, it is important to get your work out there. Social media enables you to display your work in a quick and easy way that engages your followers and creates relations between potential collaborators, clients, or buyers. I use Instagram as a professional platform for showcasing my process and work, and I have greatly benefited from it. Other important associates for me are stylists, bloggers, magazines, and shop owners. The key is to constantly expand your network and to treat all new acquaintances as a potential associate. Even when I’m not working, I’m always working. What types of partnerships / assignments can we expect to see from you in the future? I work on many projects simultaneously and, besides finishing my M.A. in fashion knitwear this spring, I’m also in the process of starting up my own knitwear brand, Laerke Bagger, as well as a fashion knitwear brand called Shit to Knit that is focusing on up-cycling and turning waste materials into high-end, hand knitted jumpers. In addition to this, I also do freelance consultancy work for Nike Running for their Flyknit shoes, as well as private commissions of my own designs. Previous work and collaborations include an internship at the London-based knitwear company Sibling and freelance work for the Danish menswear brand, Soulland.



KADK INSTITUTE OF VISUAL DESIGN 50

Game Art, Design and Development

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Emil Juul Clevin

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Jeppe Kåre Sørensen

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Michael Bech Hussein

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Type Design and Wayfinding

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Linda Egeriis Hørsted Poulsen

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Camilla Stig

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Production Design

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Anne Oddershede

62

Josephine Farsø

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Sarah Gad Wøldike Sørensen

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Visual Culture and Identity

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Morten Steinbach

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Sine Jensen

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Tea Palmelund


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KADK |

INSTUTUTE OF VISUAL DESIGN |

BY TINE KJØLSEN

“We contribute solutions, which society and the cultural scene may not yet be aware they need. This could be new fonts for road signs that make it easier for people to find their way. It could be learning apps for the primary and lower secondary school. It could be computer games that will one day become a part of a new canon of Danish art and culture.” - Head of Institute, Tine Kjølsen


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Institute of Visual Design The Institute of Visual Design provides the setting for teaching, research and artistic development in all forms of visual design. We study visual identity, universes for television and film, and the development of games and digital products. The Institute examines notions of identity, experiences and interaction. We develop computer games, analyse fonts/types and design new ones. We work on interactive screens for concerts, street signs and games, and applications for the next smart phone. In other words, we work with visual communication for every aspect of daily life.

We offer four graduate programes, one of which is also open to students of architecture, and two undergraduate programmes, together with cross-curricular elements, including KADK’s PhD school. The Institute of Visual Design provides the setting for one of Europe’s leading educational, research and development environments in the fields of visual communication and cross-media design. We regard the wide scope of the Institute as a major strength in terms of tackling the challenges posed by the society that surrounds us. The Institute challenges the way we think about visual communication and the way we experience design. Visual media is constantly changing, so development processes, user interfaces and content must keep pace. Teaching, research and practice are closely linked, and studies aim to train designers, who can enrich society, professions and industries. Graduates combine technical, artistic and academic skills, including critical thinking, in holistic solutions, which strive to set new standards. The Institute wishes to attract the best students, teachers, practitioners and researchers and, through an inspiring and highly professional educational environment, to develop knowledge and skills. This is done in collaboration with national and international partners from the areas of research, business and artistic practice.


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KADK |

INSTUTUTE OF VISUAL DESIGN


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Our programmes: Bachelor Game and Production Design

The work and teaching focus on designing computer games and digital interaction, and on production design for film, tv and animation. We teach design for visual media, whether for computer games and their interactional dimension, or for films and TV series.

Visual Communication

Visual Communication focuses on studies in the fields of graphic design, identity and illustration, qualifying the student to work independently on complex design solutions at a high level.

Master Game Art, Design and Development

In the programme, students will develop skills in concept development, gameplay design, level design, visual design and user interface design. We prepare students to work in the game industry or to start their own game company.

Production Design

We concentrate on methods, tools and theories, principally associated with the design of living images, which possess a dramatic, narrative content. That means that the basis of the programme is the teaching of, and work with production design for narrative visual media, such as live-action films, animation, TV series, studio production and cross-media.

Type Design and Wayfinding

In addition to wayfinding and type design, the programme focuses on visual identity, exhibition design and information graphics. Design of typefaces, symbols, pictograms etc., and wayfinding projects in complex construction and urban planning contexts.

Visual Culture and Identity

We work with visual narratives, methods and strategies. We invite graduate students: to be creative and productive; to work critically; to research independently, individually and in collaboration; to experiment with various forms of media; and to reflect on the remarkable developmental trends in society and the profession.


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

GAME ART, DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT |

EMIL JUUL CLEVIN

Emil Juul Clevin

Emil Juul Clevin Game Art, Design and Development 1989 / Denmark Graduation 2016 ejclevin@gmail.com


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is a single player, level based, flock runner game set in ancient Greece. You take on the role as the god of sheep herding and it is your job to steer the sheep through the ancient Greek landscape. Save the sheep from the evil sheepstealing cyclops and collect their wool to buy mighty godpowers. The goal within each level is to get as many of your sheep to the end of the level as possible, and to get as many flowers as possible on the way to maximize the amount of wool you are rewarded with. The game is free-to-play and available for iOS and Android. The game is a DADIU 2014 student project. The production team was formed by 17 students coming from art schools and universities in all of Denmark. My role in the production: I worked as Art Director and was in charge of the overall visual appearance of the game. It was my responsibility to make sure the game was visually communicating as intended and consistent in its art style. Swipe to steer your flock in a certain direction in the form of wind. Escape the sheepstealing cyclops. Use the lightningbolt godpower on obstacles to clear the way


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

GAME ART, DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT |

JEPPE KÅRE SØRENSEN

Jeppe Kåre Sørensen Jeppe Kåre Sørensen Game Art, Design and Development 1984 / Denmark Graduation 2014 flaboere@gmail.com

A poster for the game, showing parts of a story-telling intro video for the game


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is a game project about the native american, Hotah, trying to save the Tree of Life from dying. Hotat wears a medallion allowing him to transform into wolf, eagle and fish, inheriting each animals special power. My role in the project was Art Direction of the game, both designing the games visuals and leading a team of artists making the game’s 3D assets.The game’s visual style is strongly inspired by cave paintings, because of their raw, simple looks and the almost mystical storytelling power conveyed. I attempted to adapt the crooked, uneven drawing style to the 3-dimensional game world in both picture and movement. The game is a mythical telling, perhaps passed on mouth to mouth, and the visuals are supposed to support this feeling. At the same time, I wanted to depicture the native americans strong connection to nature, by having realistic looking surfaces to the games elements, with warm, brown colors. It’s resulted in a direct yet detailed world of “stylized realism” with enough depth to let the eye wonder for a bit more than just a glance.

The very early parts of the game, where the player learns how to shoot Hotahs bow. Hotah only ever uses his bow to manipulate the environment, never to injure

Further into the game, the player must use his bow to shoot vines, making a log fall into the water, and allowing passage

Final concept art, depicting the rocky mountain parts of the game


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

GAME ART, DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT |

MICHAEL BECH HUSSEIN

Michael Bech Hussein Game Art, Design and Development 1987 / Denmark Graduation 2014 didunculus@gmail.com

Michael Bech Hussein


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Screenshot of a level

Punish Panda In 2013, I attended DADIU as an art director on the tablet game Punish Panda during my MA. As part of a relatively small team, I had to work hands on with all visual aspects of the game. In addition to the concept art, I sculpted the panda character, and drew all in-game illustrations, most textures, as well as GUI icons. The game is a sort of reversed Lemmings, where the player has to kill all evil pandas on each level. Punish Panda won the showcase award at Spilprisen 2014. Early concept sketch


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

TYPE DESIGN AND WAYFINDING |

LINDA EGERIIS HØRSTED POULSEN

Linda Egeriis Hørsted Poulsen Type Design and Wayfinding 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2016 stud5137@edu.kadk.dk

Linda Egeriis Hørsted Poulsen


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“The green is from the many copper roofs in Copenhagen”

is a map created out of the idea that the mind creates its own mental map when moving around a city. According to the book “The image of the city” (1960) by urban planner Kevin Lynch, the mind navigates via paths, districts, nodes, landmarks and edges. I used this hypothesis in the Copenhagen map, by highlighting these elements, to make the map correspond more to how we experience the world in real life. The back of the map has nine detailed drawings of selected districts that stands out from the rest of the city. I drew these maps with inspiration from amusement park maps, which basically means a map entirely made from landmarks. The result is a map that lacks in accuracy but instead tells about the atmosphere of the place. The visual identity of the map is inspired by maps from the 19th century and older. I’ve taken inspiration from the many different hatches used in classical maps and reinterpreted them into a modern context. Another example is the landmarks, which I’ve tried to draw in the same level of detail as in copperplate maps. The map is in black, greytones, a very subtle cream and a copper green pantone color. The copper green is from the many copper roofs in Copenhagen. The cream color is used to slightly hint certain areas. I’m using pantone colors, as they seem to “pop” out of the paper, almost as if it had a lacquer coating. My color inspiration comes from the dutch architect and graphic designer Joost Grootens, who use the subtle cream color together with a bright color in the Metropolitann World Atlas. At last the map is folded and tucked into book with a fabric back and a cover with a collection of selected landmarks.


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

TYPE DESIGN AND WAYFINDING |

CAMILLA STIG

Camilla Stig Camilla Stig Type Design and Wayfinding 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2016 stud4353@edu.kadk.dk

The project is solely based on a particular hand painted sign that spelled the word “Fish� all in capital, 3D letters.

negative spaces between the strokes, and imagined the letters as living figures dancing around on the paper.

The curves, the musicality and the dramatic shapes between the thin and thick strokes became a big inspiration when trying to draw a new alphabet. I quickly noticed and nourished the

I started my proces by hand drawing each letter in order to give the curves a dramatic character, a character that would be impossible to achieve based solely on digital medias.

The curves and the contrasts are meant to be elegant, feminine and musical


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Creating parts of an alphabet, solely based on four capital letters, became a musical challenge


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

PRODUCTION DESIGN |

ANNE ODDERSHEDE

Anne Oddershede

Anne Oddershede Production Design 1984 / Denmark Graduation 2014 anneoddershede.dk

A Spatial Interpretation of a Radio Drama. The design concept shows a spatial interpretation of the Danish radio drama “Moriendo” from 1988.

The purpose of the project is to design an installation that encapsulates the narration and as a space provides a link between the sound and the listener.


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The installation is based on the events that are unfolded in the play and hence it is related to the narration, characters, movement etc. A small audience is placed in the world of the protagonist, while the story is being played in different located sound sources. The shifting location of the sound sources leads the listener through the installation. A main focus has been to create a space that supports the possibility of leading the listener through the narration while setting a certain mood for the listener’s experience, but in a way that still provides space for the listener’s own imagination. For this reason the shape of the installation is shown as spatial abstractions based on the central themes of the play. Through the installation the project aims to establish a link between an imaginary and a physical space, where the spatial design helps to involve the audience in the radio drama in a new way.

Details of elements that are part of the installation, here among the main construction where the audience is placed. Additionally you will see a character design that is to be displayed as visuals An example of the lighting design and the preparation of the installation’s main construction


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

PRODUCTION DESIGN |

JOSEPHINE FARSØ

Josephine Farsø Production Design 1987 / Denmark Graduation 2014 josephinef.com

Josephine Farsø


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“Is it possible to survive in a perverse and mendacious world without taking part in it’s crimes?�

4 Veninder The dead body of a teenage girl is found in a forest lake. 4 Veninder is a noir-inspired youth crime TV series. It is about four 17 year old girls who are about to find themselves as young women in their encounters with men, love and the adult world. A murder is committed in the small town the girls live in and one of the girls ends up being killed.


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

PRODUCTION DESIGN |

SARAH GAD WØLDIKE SØRENSEN

Sarah Gad Wøldike Sørensen Production Design 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2014 sarahgad.com

Sarah Gad Wøldike Sørensen


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Sound Scape - A concert experience of Classic Music In a attempt to renew the concert format for the classical concert, the idea is that changing the format will bring the participant closer to the content. A concept inspired by classical music’s historical development and musical moods, through work with screenprint, projection and spatial design.

The elements of the visual universe is developed through analogue processes to make a connection to the analogue nature of the live performance of a classical concert.


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

VISUAL CULTURE AND IDENTITY |

MORTEN STEINBACH

Morten Steinbach

Morten Steinbach Visual Culture and Identity 1975 / Denmark Graduation 2014 steinbachgrafik.dk

Colors. Strong colors make it clear to recognize the value of the banknotes


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New Danish Banknotes Graphic design of new Danish currency. Aesthetically inspired by secure printing methods, these banknote designs are characterised by layers that tell multiple stories. Background and reason for the design I’ve designed a series of banknotes that look forward and outward. The theme is the innovative Dane today. The initial idea was to reinvent “Plovmanden” (“The Plowman”), which was on the Danish 500-kroner note in the early 1900’s. Plovmanden was not a famous Dane, but a symbol of the working Dane. The current series of banknotes called The Bridge Series feature bridges from around Denmark, but do not portray any people. The Danish banknotes between The Plowman and The Bridge Series, have featured famous people on one side and the Danish landscape, animals or symbols on the other side. This bank note series connects the two sides in one story for each note. Stories from everyday life in Denmark. I wanted to make the motives more present and to stir a curiosity for Denmark anno 2014, by placing people in the centre. Not famous Danes, but Danes as you may see them in everyday life. Graphic principles Size: The banknote size increases one cm in length with each higher value note, which helps blind people recognize and differentiate be- tween the notes.

Colors. Strong colors make it clear to recognize the value of the banknotes

Size increases one cm in length to help blind people to differentiate between the notes

Shapes: Five different geometric shapes, printed with tactile mate- rial, make it easy to feel or see the difference. The most simple of the five shapes (circle) is printed on the lowest value, the most complex (hexagon) on the highest. Folding: The underlying banknote grid is split into four vertical areas and two horisontal. When folded, it’s still easy to see the value of the banknote. Tactility. A closer look at the geometric shape from the 200-banknote, shows the holographic foil, pressed on to give tactility and security for standard copying


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

VISUAL CULTURE AND IDENTITY |

SINE JENSEN

Shirt and flower lettering from Soulland’s SS15 collection ‘Deco’ Jacket and frieze illustration from Soulland’s AWz15 collection ‘Exotic/Erotic’

Sine Jensen Visual Culture and Identity 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2013 sinejensen.dk

Sine Jensen


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Flower lettering from Soulland’s SS15 collection ‘Deco’

Since graduating in 2013 I have worked as a freelance illustrator in various fields of the profession. As I see it, illustrations can be used in a wide range of different contexts and forms and can be applied to anything from books to clothes. Since I only work with one style of drawing, I strive to make my collaborations as versatile as possible in order to work with different materials and expressions. This exhibiton shows examples of my work with the Danish menswear label Soulland for the SS15 and AW15 collections. In both cases I have made detailed pencil drawings that have been digitally printed on textile.


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DEGREE PROJECTS |

VISUAL CULTURE AND IDENTITY |

TEA PALMELUND

Tea Palmelund (IFOTBS) is a promotion video for an imaginary drone camouflage. The purpose of the film is to reflect on and illustrate a recent change in the digital environment. From being an utopian open source network the internet has become clearly militarized, surveilled and monopolized. The change of the blue sky functions as both a metaphor and an existing condition that illuminates the architecture of the internet today. A Pakistani boy who survived a drone attack testified before congress in Washington DC and explained: “I no longer love blue skies. In fact I now prefer grey skies because drones do not fly when the skies are grey� The drone becomes a terrifying manifestation of both the militarization and surveillance of civil people. When its in the air it moves both in a physical dimension and in the dimension of the datacloud. It navigates through digital stored data and satellite images but simultaneously it is circulating above a small town in Pakistan. The drone sort of destroys the boundaries between digital and physical reality. In the eyes of the pakistani boy the sky is no more romantic blue but turning dark.

In the beginning of the project I created a series of collages to visualize my storyboard and ideas for the film. This specific example is illustrating a textile that will cover you from the infrared satellite camera

Tea Palmelund Visual Culture and Identity 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2015 teapalmelund@gmail.com


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The film consists of both self-made and found footage. This is a screenshot from the green screen shooting

This image is a screenshot from one of the sequences that I didn’t use in the final film. It shows a person in thermal colors trying to cover the ground with a camouflage blanket

Screenshot from IFOTBS


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INTERVIEW

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ERIK LEGERNES

LEGO - Global building blocks with digital genes

KADK in the eyes of Erik Legernes, Senior Creative Director, LEGO

What do you expect from a KADK graduate? “At LEGO we expect both internship students and new design graduates to have something unique. Their design and creative skills should be broad and well developed. They should be able to come up with new ideas, and their concepts should be strong. Designers should be able to put themselves in the consumer’s shoes. For us, a consumer might be 7 years old. So they need to understand how to experience things as a child, not just as a designer.” “We strongly believe that students should be excellent communicators. They should be skilled at conveying visual ideas using sketches and drawings. Both graduates and intern students are always part of LEGO’s global development team on equal terms with the rest of the team. So they should be team players, who can work together in multidisciplinary teams in all phases of development, where individual ideas are part of a collaborative process and evaluated on a level playing field in product development.” “And they should also be ‘doers’. That means that they should be able to produce models and prototypes in our model workshop. They should be able to think with their hands in materials and use a 3-D model to communicate what they are thinking. The ability to think and communicate in 3D is an extremely important attribute. “

What does collaboration with KADK mean for LEGO? And why do you choose this collaboration? “We are delighted with our global internship programme, in which we work closely with KADK and students from design schools around the world. “ “The advantage for us is that we have the opportunity to gain insight into the students’ skills and what each of them are good at. At LEGO we make serious use of the internship programme as a platform for recruitment. Conversely, the students gain insight into LEGO’s many departments and can look at future job opportunities and career paths. In several cases, students have subsequently been given jobs in departments at LEGO other than those, in which they originally started their internships.” “The students contribute with an immediacy and usually work without any ‘negative professional baggage’. They don’t say, ‘We’ve already tried that.’ They ask different and immediate questions and this helps shed new light on projects, which are already in progress.” What influence do KADK graduates have on the development of Danish Design? “Anyone who starts in LEGO has a chance to make an impact on product development from day one. We believe that we put Danish design on the world map – with high-quality toys and great products, both digitally and physically. In the future we want to see more physical-digital products. In this respect, KADK students have an advantage because they have a natural digital gene.”


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76

INTERVIEW

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SINE JENSEN

”It is very satisfying to make illustrations for clothes because of the very tactile expression they achieve” Interview with Sine Jensen Visual Culture and Identity

What was the description of your assignment? I was hired by the Copenhagen-based menswear label Soulland to do some of the prints for the SS15 and AW15 collections ‘Deco’ and ‘Exotic/Erotic’. Inspiration and process. What choices have you made in terms of aesthetics and collaboration with the production company whom you are working for? I have been very lucky with regard to my collaboration with Soulland. Silas Adler, the designer and founder of the company, originally contacted me because he was inspired by my work and wanted to use that exact expression on some of his clothes. Since this has been the foundation of our collaboration, I have never had to compromise at all in terms of aesthetics, because of the great understanding we have of each other’s work. I am, however, not very fond of colours, but Silas insisted we made a coloured version of the flower lettering, forcing me to work with watercolours, which to my surprise turned out to be quite satisfying.

How did you collaborate with production companies in connection with your study? As a student I tried to work with people, mostly musicians, who had an actual project that needed to be made. In this way I worked with a client that wouldn’t always just go along with my ideas, and the output would be an actual album cover that had to be sent to the printers. This way I learned how to make files ready for print and how to deal with clients, which I think is important as a variation to the fictive element of most school assignments. How did you contact/connect with the company? The last two years of my studies I joined a shared office space run by one of the guys from my course. He was part of a two-man company doing graphic design and art direction for various companies, primarily in the fields of fashion and art. One of their clients was Soulland, and Silas happened to see my drawings lying around the office, when he came in for meetings.

What is the most important thing you’ve taken with you from your time as a student at KADK?

What types of partnerships / assignments can we expect to see you in in the future?

A great network of people working in all branches of the creative field. The most important thing you can do as a student is to show interest in the work of your fellow students, no matter what field of study they are in. Since graduating I have found that the most interesting collaborations and sources of inspiration come from people working in fields other than my own.

I hope to be able to keep working with Soulland in the future, since I am always happy with the outcome. It is very satisfying to make illustrations for clothes because of the very tactile expression they achieve. I also love drawing for magazines and books, but inevitably the expression turns out more static. I have worked a little with a small publisher and right now I am working towards doing more illustrations for book covers as well as doing my own drawings for an exhibition.


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KADK INSTITUTE OF PRODUCT DESIGN 82

Ceramic Design

82

Inesa Malafej

84

Katrine Lønstad

86

Petra Dalström

88

Mette Marie Lyng

90

Fashion Design

90

Mathilde Krab Nymann

92

Tilde Bay Kristoffersen

94

Marie Brandt Overbye

96

Tobias Birk Nielsen

98 98

Codesign Liv Maria Henning & Fanni Baudo

100

Barbara Hilduberg, Gaia Colantonio, Kristina Törnblom, Zoè Bonnardot, Isabel Aagaard & Toke Frello

102

Rie Maktabi, Toke Frello & Rasmus Michaëlis

104

Industrial Design

104

Christoffer Kronholm & Christopher Pilgrim

106

Johanna Gieseler

108

Thomas Funder-Nielsen


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KADK

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INSTITUTE OF PRODUCT DESIGN

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BY HEAD OF INSTITUTE TROELS DEGN JOHANSSON

“We make products that interpret tradition and bring us to a new place. Products and solutions for everyday life that grabs your attention, making you think: I hadn’t thought of this; I didn’t realise this was something I could do!” - Head of institute, Troels Degn Johansson


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Institute of Product Design The Institute of Product Design at the KADK School of Design provides the framework for a series of very different scholarly and artistic environments: industrial design, fashion and clothing design, ceramic design, codesign, and crafts (glass and ceramics). Our institute has a very comprehensive approach to design - we believe that design should touch the heart and encourage people to touch and act as a person, a user, a customer, a citizen, and as an artist. We believe that design is about inviting people into a discussion about what the future could look like and be like, and about how to deal with major societal issues such as the problem of waste and resources, future welfare, transportation, a decent life for the elderly and young people etc. We teach students to become good designers with a sense of function as well as experience, and pleasure as well as ethics. We also teach them how to work as designers with both professionals and laymen. Design should be seductive and invite us to live a better and more meaningful life. But design should also pose questions, help us to make sense of the world, and help to create a better world.

The Institute of Product Design is home to a number of very different professional design environments, all of which possess a certain affinity in the area of product design. These include: codesign, industrial design, ceramic design, fashion and clothing design and crafts (glass and ceramics). The Institute aims to contribute to the continued development of the modern concept of design, but with respect for the artistic heritage of Danish design. Over the years, the School of Design’s programme in Industrial Design has developed a special focus on the relationship between problem, methodology, and design: for example, in the fields of robotics, transport, the hospital sector etc. This academic environment has also been a driving force in the development of standards for problem-based learning in design education. The internationally leading research environment in Codesign focuses particularly on the development of problem and vision, where it is fruitful to involve a wide range of stakeholders. The codesign research group has worked on major societal issues, such as the question of waste and the future demands placed on municipal services. The functionality of products has been the basis for this industrial design, but today the issue of functionality has expanded significantly to include communicative, emotional and identity-related aspects. The School of Design’s fashion research has focused particularly on the artistic and cultural values of design, as they emerge in interaction between designers, manufacturers, and markets and on cultural fates in specific local contexts such as art objects, luxury goods, trend phenomena and welfare benefits. The department’s craft environment is located with excellent workshop facilities on the island of Bornholm in the middle of the Baltic Sea. Here, students from all over the world learn local craft traditions with a special focus on glass and ceramics. The creation of value, both cultural and market value, is a central theme in the Institute’s area of work via curator and exhibition practice: for example, in the clothing environment’s exhibition and event activities, codesign’s experimental exhibitions, the ceramic environment’s exhibition initiative, Copenhagen Ceramics and, above all, the craft studies’ glass and ceramic biennales on Bornholm, which have now evolved into an international institution. Specifically in the clothing, ceramics and glass environments, the Institute is also a setting for experimental and material-oriented research in design. The ceramic environment has been a pioneer in terms of redefining the workshop as an experimental research and development environment. We call it the SuperFormLab. The Institute of Product Design collaborates extensively with leading international and Danish design companies, as well as internationally leading design schools and universities. Recent and current industry partners include Microsoft, Kähler, Copenhagen Municipality, Copenhagen Fur, Rosenthal, Wonderful Copenhagen, Royal Copenhagen, to name but a few.


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KADK

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INSTITUTE OF PRODUCT DESIGN


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Our programmes: Bachelor Crafts - Glass and Ceramics

The programme, based on the island of Bornholm, is characterised by its intensive approach to materials in the way, in which students design artefacts. The programme is rooted in the Danish design tradition, in which focus on craft and a material-based way of thinking and experimentation have always represented a large part of the artistic basis for the design of artefacts in glass and ceramics.

Fashion Design

The programme provides a basic academic and artistic foundation aimed at professional practice. The focal point of clothing design is the “Fashion Form Lab”. It is here that students develop the fundamental, professional, craft-related and technological competencies in tandem with analytical, methodological and artistic skills.

Industrial Design and Ceramic Form

The programme is based on cooperation between Industrial Design and Ceramic Design. We work with 3 dimentional form and plasticity. We combine the industrial focus on process, context, form and function, with experimental and material based approach from Ceramic Design.

Master Ceramic Design

Specialisation in the use of silica based materials such as clay, concrete, plaster and glass as ceramic materials in various professional contexts. The overall objective is to prepare students for careers as ceramic designers through independent specialisation in relation to research, artistic research practice and in relevant practical and professional contexts.

Codesign

Codesign and coproduction is rapidly spreading in the fields of product design, communications design and environmental design etc. Traditional design fields have to be re-thought and new venues for the designer are opening up, as designers have to engage in open collaborations with a network of nondesigners. We call this design profile “codesign”.

Fashion Design

This programme is rooted in a specific Danish design approach, but with a distinct international outlook. The objective is to educate fashion designers for the future with respect for the past. Studio and research based, the aim is to combine strong material and conceptual skills with an artistic and sustainable approach to create original, innovative design products for the global market.

Industrial Design

The school’s programme in industrial design focuses particularly on the relationship between problem-solving, form and design in the context of modern Scandinavian design traditions. The programme is thematically structured with an emphasis on the applicable contexts of solutions. Thus, design projects are mainly regarded on the basis of their technological, utilitarian, aesthetic and cultural conditions – and our work is targeted at both research and the corporate world.


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CERAMIC DESIGN |

INESA MALAFEJ

Inesa Malafej

Photos by Arunas Sukarevicius

Inesa Malafej Ceramic Design 1988 / Lithuania Graduation 2015 ectect.lt


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Format Unsealed - Pattern for Rosenthal Studio Line The intention of the pattern was to reveal the porcelain instead of hiding it. By disclosing just a part of the object, the materiality steps forward. The object looses its original appearance and the main attention is drawn to the details and the quality of the porcelain itself. The pattern is made by repeating simple shapes such as triangles or dots into solid fabric-like stratum. These shapes create layers that are applied on each other and are disclosed by removing parts of them. Every object adopts its own clothing, revealing part of its body - white porcelain. The project started in collaboration with Rosenthal and Kunstakademiets Designskole, which was part of the Made in Europe project. Made in Europe is the title of a collaborative project between KADK and German porcelain- and glass industries in an attempt to challenge the future of tableware and table culture. Format tableware set shape by Christoph de laW Fontaine.

Process-12 Graphics


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CERAMIC DESIGN |

KATRINE LØNSTAD

Kathrine Lønstad

On the Edge The main inspiration for the lamp On The Edge came after observing different private homes anno 2013. One of the common denominator for the spaces observed reflected on a more multifunctional usage of the rooms. The outcome of the research resulted in the product On The Edge which is an interpretation of this actual tendency. On The Edge is a lamp that can be placed either on a table or on the floor. The direction of the light can vary depending on which side the lamp rests on. On The Edge can light up a corner creating a cosy atmosphere in a room. On The Edge is made of casted ceramic and rubber. The mat and smooth surface of the lamp invites the user to sense the objects, both visually and tactile. By handling the lamp you can change the sculptural look of it. The character changes from being grounded to the surface, too a more uplifting expression.

Kathrine Lønstad Ceramic Design 1985 / Norway Graduation 2013 noidoi.no


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“The mat and smooth surface of the lamp invites the user to sense the objects, both visually and tactile�


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CERAMIC DESIGN |

PETRA DALSTRร M

Petra Dalstrรถm

Petra Dalstrรถm Ceramic Design 1987 / Sweden Graduation 2015 pedalstrom@gmail.com


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Serving Ceremony The coffee will travel from the upper jug, down through the slide, and right into your cup and saucer. Sugar is added by turning the propeller on the right side, and the milk gets mixed in by the smaller jug, all regulated by the string mechanism. Our culture is always changing, and so are our everyday objects. But the almost ceremonial way of gathering for a small break is something very human that always remains. This rather inconvenient way of consuming coffee is a play with our constructed ritual, and besides, it is a much more enjoyable way of drinking coffee! The machine can be seen in movement on; www.vimeo.com/tantlava/ceremony

The process was characterized by trying to understand the mechanisms in play, and using them as a part of the aesthetics. From which angle, in which movement, and from which height can the liquid be poured, without spilling coffee all over the white tablecloth?


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CERAMIC DESIGN |

METTE MARIE LYNG

Mette Marie Lyng Ceramic Design 1987 / Denmark Graduation 2014 memamemamema.tumblr.com

Mette Marie Lyng


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In my graduation project, I wanted to create something where the design reflected my relationship to the material (plaster, ceramics and glass). These materials can be so lively, unpredictable and sometimes unmanageable. It’s a symbiotic relationship where both parties are mutually dependent and the balance always is bordering right on imbalance. I wanted to capture a state I’m in with the material, because even if it is difficult and teasing, this is where I will be challenged and get exciting results. This is where I am really passionate about the material and the process! The wooden part reflects me holding a lump of porcelain/glass that melts out of my hands. It’s a partial uncontrolled action, creating a form that satisfies me more than if there is complete control.


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FASHION DESIGN | MATHILDE KRAB NYMANN

Mathilde Krab Nymann Fashion Design 1989 / Denmark Graduation 2014 mathildekrab@live.dk

Main focus within the project was to explore how to produce a feminine aspects in menswear through textile techniques such as decorative tufted borders and applications. The work present modern interpretations of details found in ancient Russian costumes, which today would be considered feminine elements. In my form and pattern studies, I chose to take the starting point in Karl Blossfeldts photographs of flowers, where petals were translated into textile pleating and the flower stalks as hairy tufted borders.

Mathilde Krab Nymann


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“Menswear with an interesting feminine touch” Genus My final project, Genus, is based on how gender typically manifests itself. It demonstrates how men are able to express themselves nuanced by moving between and across the two concepts of masculinity and femininity. In particular, my focus has been to strike a delicate balance that makes it possible to produce menswear with an interesting feminine touch. The project is characterized by a great interest in the development of textiles, inspired by flowers photographed by Karl Blossfeldt, as well as Mark Rothko’s colour compositions, which have helped to create the overall composition of the collection. My work reflects a shift from working with womenswear towards working with menswear. I consider the new direction, as a dynamic and playful journey with a feminine perspective up against a traditional practice in men’s clothing, in which there is an opportunity to push the boundaries.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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FASHION DESIGN | TILDE BAY KRISTOFFERSEN

Tilde Bay Kristoffersen

Tilde Bay Kristoffersen Fashion Design 1982 / Denmark Graduation 2013 tildebay.com

evolves around the gap between functional fashion-design and more expressive and decorative garments that relate to showpieces. I have chosen to name this series of garments “body compositions,” rather than use the term “collection.” I have merged shapes made of fabric-sketches and selected material such as fur, skin, and print, using photoshop. In this way, I have managed to create compositions that


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relate to the body from an approach as a bricoleur – from French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss notion of the term. The mood emanating from words such as ‘melancholy,’ ‘darkness,’ ‘violent nature,’ poetic,’ ‘feminine’ and ‘magic.’ Composing the Between, should be seen as a narrative, as a physical outcome after 3o years of collected both physical and mental impressions. “Everything that

is absorbed and registered in your mind adds to the collection of ideas stored in the memory: a sort of library that you can consult whenever a problem arises. So, essentially the more you have seen, experienced and absorbed, the more points of reference you will have to help you decide which direction to take: your frame of reference expands.” (Hertzberger, H., Lessons for Students of Architecture in Lawson, B., p.113)

Hertzberger does not distinguish between the conscious or unconscious memory. Our consciousness consists sense impressions that are more or less processed. These are all a part of the creation of a “sense-nerve” through which we experience the world. In that sense Composing the between aren´t one-sided but a physical outcome of a collection of pictures, experiences and emotions through the past 30 years.

Photos by Kajsa Gullberg


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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FASHION DESIGN |

MARIE BRANDT OVERBYE

Marie Brandt Overbye Marie Brandt Overbye Fashion Design 1987 / Denmark Graduation 2014 mariebrandtoverbye.com

Striped textured transparent outfit. My focus in this outfit was the movement, and the outfit’s relation to the body, that effect the look of the white shades of the fabrics

Embroidered top with crystal/prism like embroideries and high waist pleated pants


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Example of an experiment with sequins and textile structure, with focus on light reflection and prism-足like effects

Top with distorted deconstructed compositions and low waist open pants, with focus on movement and change in expression, when the wearer moves

My focus in this project was to combine simple sculptural shapes in the garments, with textures and detailed embellishments. My thoughts about creating fashion, is to tell a story or create a mood, that in some way moves the beholder, and to awaken the garments from surfaces of fabric, to alive body-足related shapes. As well one of the most important things for me is the craftsmanship in doing embroideries and working with the choice of textiles, and how to combine different textures. In this collection, I wanted to work with a focus on the effect of light/ shadow in different surfaces, and as well with the transformation of the clothes shapes as the wearer move. The turning point for the construction of the garments was to make it able to change, by adding unpredictable, deconstructed elements. These elements are made with the aim to give the collection a transformable and sensual mood. To enhance the focus on light reflections, surfaces and movement, the collection is made in white shades, because white is the surface that gives the most optimal basis to reflect light.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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FASHION DESIGN | TOBIAS BIRK NIELSEN

Tobias Birk Nielsen Fashion Design 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2016 tobiasbirknielsen.com

Tobias Birk Nielsen


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The Journey is an eight-day non-linear travel in time. The thoughts and fundament of the project is to visualize an identity created as a hybrid between contemporary Arabic culture and it’s rich past. The malleable language for this purpose is found in the mid-eastern Islamic architecture portrayed by the German dr. Andreas Volwahsen, with an overall collection aim to be seen as modest homage, to a long time personal muse – the enchanting Arabic culture.

“I was silent, but my desire was painted on my face”

Photos by Charlotte Ea / Modelling by Noah Syrkis


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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CODESIGN | LIV MARIA HENNING & FANNI BAUDO

Liv Maria Henning & Fanni Baudo

Fossils of the Present Moment

Liv Maria Henning Codesign 1985 / Denmark Graduation 2012 livmariahenning.dk

Fanni Baudo Codesign 1984 / Denmark Graduation 2012 fannibaudo.com


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Supertid Supertid is a design research project that confronts the contemporary notion of time – in a time when one is always striving to be super effective, often with the loss of contemplation and deviations. The title Supertid is a Danish expression, which means super time and refers to the competition of being the fastest. But the title also refers to the Latin origin of the word super - meaning above. How can we explore and contemplate time from above, from new perspectives? The nature of time is abstract and difficult to grasp, and the instruments used to measure it, like a clock counting seconds, are even more so distancing time from an intuitive and personal comprehension. Through interviews with 5 people (aged from 43 to 83), revolving around their decisions of living with time in unusual ways, the project has resulted in a number of objects and experiences, collected in the publication titled Supertid. Making time more experientially accessible by exploring what time could look, feel and smell like in visual and tactile experiments, Supertid investigates and describes aspects of time in an immediate and sensitive manner, to create a new reflective environment for rediscovering time and imagining alternatives.

Milk, two weeks

Cucumber, three months


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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CODESIGN | BARBARA HILDUBERG, GAUA COLANTONIO, KRISTINA TÖRNBLOM, ZOÈ BONNARDOT, ISABEL AAGAARD & TOKE FRELLO

Barbara Hilduberg, Gaia Colantonio, Kristina Törnblom, Zoè Bonnardot, Isabel Aagaard & Toke Frello

Barbara Hilduberg 1986 / Faroe Islands bahil@edu.kadk.dk Gaia Colantonio 1991 / Italy gaia.colantonio@gmail.com Kristina Törnblom 1975 / Sweden kristinatornblom.com Zoè Bonnardot 1991 / France zobo1569@edu.kadk.dk Isabel Aagaard 1990 / Denmark isabelaagaard.dk Toke Frello 1988 / Denmark tokefrello.dk Codesign Graduation 2016


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Democratic Design Experiments - The book The cultural centers and libraries of 4 Copenhagen neighborhoods invite the codesign program to facilitate democratic design experiments that bring citizens and neighborhood institutions closer together. Democratic Design Experiments are gatherings where citizens explore, rehearse and prototype answers to common challenges. This can be the revitalization of a local square, the set up of a new platform for organizing cultural events, a re-design of the library to make it a learning space for school kids or the formation of a network of volunteers that will work with health and quality of life in the neighborhood. Codesigners still have an important role to play in staging such design experiments with citizens and public institutions.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

Rie Maktabi Codesign 1987 / Denmark Graduation 2016 riemaktabi.com

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CODESIGN | RIE MAKATABI, TOKE FRELLO & RASMUS MICHAテ記IS

Toke Frello Codesign 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2016 tokefrello.dk

Rasmus Michaテォlis Codesign 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2015 rasmusmichaelis.dk

Rie Maktabi, Toke Frello & Rasmus Michaテォlis


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The Measurement Box – A landscape of investigation How can a library support the citizens in creating urban life on a new, centrally located city square? And what happens when the library moves outside? In collaboration with the library on Rentemestervej, teachers and students from three local public and private schools in the Nordvest neighbourhood, we have created outdoor landscapes of investigations consisting of boxes with tools, materials and tasks. These boxes can be loaned out to classes and be put to use on the newly renovated square in front of the library. The boxes transform the square and the library into a space in which the students can practice their various skills in everyday surroundings.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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INDUSTIAL DESIGN | CHRISTOFFER KRONHOLM & CHRISTOPHER PILGRIM

Christoffer Kronholm Industrial Design 1988 / Denmark Graduation 2015 kronholm-design.com

Christopher Pilgrim Industrial Design 1986 / Denmark Graduation 2015 industrialproductdesign.dk

Christoffer Kronholm & Christopher Pilgrim


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The Exo Chair In the search to improve the activity level of wheelchair users all over the world. This was done by making the wheelchair frame a lot more versatile, instead of only being a transportation device. With the custom designed locking system, the chair became able of transforming into other functionalities, such as a Sitski. The Sitski module was chosen due to a collaboration with a Danish Sitski OL athlete Ulrik Nyvold. Together the designers and the OL athlete fine-tuned the design to suit a wide range of users. In the future, more modules will be designed, and added to the Exo Chair product range. Both designers are determined to make an impact with the design, not only focusing on sport, but also hunting, fishing and wakeboarding but also for gardening, and other hobbies/sports that require a more customised wheelchair setup.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

Johanna Gieseler Industrial Design 1991 / Germany Graduation 2016 johannagieseler.com

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INDUSTIAL DESIGN | JOHANNA GIESELER

Johanna Gieseler 3D printed prototype for the biking prostheses

GRIEF - Printed prostheses The project GREIF consists of three concepts for rapid manufactured hand prostheses for children with amniotic band syndrome. The affected children are able to deal with most everyday tasks. Existing prostheses are highly expensive and often include poor aesthetics and functionality. For these reasons, prostheses are often rejected. However, prostheses are required for certain activities.

Prototypes for the biking prostheses at three different states of the design process


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Laser cut prototype for drawing prostheses and concept for the visual appearance of the biking prostheses

The first concept is a mere aesthetic prostheses for girls between 11 and 14 years. In that certain age girls often wear prostheses as dysfunctional, visual replacement. The prostheses developed in this concept does not try to replace a human hand, but presents its own new beauty and therefore works as an accessory. The second concept consists of a drawing prostheses that allows to use tools such as pencils or cutlery in an easy and adaptable way. The third prostheses is made for biking and grips to the bike steering with a simple, reliable mechanism. Rapid manufactured prostheses, which includes 3D printed, moulded and laser cut prostheses, do not yet exist on the market in this form since they include recent production methods. However, these methods involve huge advantages. The produced devices are individually adaptable as well as functionally and aesthetically pleasant.


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DEGREE PROJECTS

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INDUSTIAL DESIGN | THOMAS FUNDER-NIELSEN

Thomas Funder-Nielsen Industrial Design 1991 / Denmark Graduation 2018 thomasfunder.com

Thomas Funder-Nielsen


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Sustainable Faucet With inspiration from the workflow in industrial kitchens, this faucet is created to raise the awareness about wasting water. The growing urbanization makes it more difficult to deliver clean groundwater. This is the reason, why I wanted to create a more sustainable faucet, which could save water and minimize stress in the kitchen. At the end of the faucet a digital display is placed. This makes it easy to use and convenient when adjusting the temperature and the amount of water. When the

user has selected the desired settings by turning the adjusting wheel, the water begins to run with a single push at the end of the faucet. It stops automatically when it reaches the pre-set amount of water, so the user does not need to worry about turning off the faucet. The faucet is made of plastic, because of a less complicated production and a much more affordable price compared to the current material: brass. Brass emits lead, so by taking the health aspects in consideration, plastic would be a better solution and this is why this material was preferred.


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INTERVIEW

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INESA MALAFEI

Interview with degree student Inesa Malafej Ceramic Design

What was the description of your assignment? As a result of close collaboration with the company Rosenthal, the assignment contained discussions about luxury within our team and a practical task, in which we had to create graphic proposals for a tableware set. Our discussions where targeted at young people and their consumer habits.

Inspiration and process, what choices have you made in terms of aesthetics and cooperation with the production company, for whom you are working? The collaboration between Rosenthal and The Royal Danish Academy was an exciting experience. Before visiting Rosenthal, I knew that Rosenthal produces high quality porcelain, that it has a remarkable history and that their products are


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“I have learned to arrive at the best artistic quality that could be translated into the future product”

created by the most famous and talented designers from all over the world. Nevertheless, my impression of this company has changed significantly after visiting it. The passion to create something more than just a piece of porcelain was so powerful here, that the museum, factories and other facilities of the company are still filled by this wonderful atmosphere. Highly original at that time, the pieces won the brand respect as a brand that creates value through rethinking and reconsidering the situation of the particular time. Today these pieces are respected as objects that have a great aesthetic appearance and also as examples of brilliant design. To appreciate the significance of each piece, it was important for me to reduce the noise of the overwhelming quantity of products. My intention with the Rosenthal collaboration project was to make a pattern that reveals the porcelain instead of hiding it. By disclosing just a part of the object, the materiality is highlighted. The object looses its original appearance and the main attention goes to the details and the quality of the porcelain itself. Pattern is made by repeating simple shapes such as triangles or dots into a solid, fabric-like stratum. These shapes create layers that are applied on top of each other and are revealed by removing parts of them. Every object adopts its own clothing, revealing part of its body – white porcelain. What is the most important thing you gained from your time as a student at KADK? I was admitted to the Design Academy as a furniture designer. During my studies I had an opportunity to transfer to ceramic and product design. I was involved in very different projects, which could broaden my profile. I have learned to be confident in working outside the comfort zone of my expertise, to produce quality results.

How do you cooperate with production companies in connection with your study? During my studies in Copenhagen and Vilnius together with my partner Arunas Sukarevicius, I also ran a design studio etcetc.lt. During this period of my life I had an opportunity to work on commercial design projects, as well as developing my personal design skills in an academic environment. An academic environment always requires innovative solutions. At the same time, companies are looking for commercial products that will be easily perceived by their clients. Having a mindset between innovative and commercial, I have learned to arrive at the best artistic quality that could be translated into the future product. How did you make contact/connect with the company? “Made in Europe” was a school project curated by Martin Kaldahl and Hrafnkell Birgisson. It is the title of a collaborative project between KADK and the German porcelain and glass industries, in an attempt to challenge the future of tableware and table culture. After the contact between the school and Rosentahl was established, we had an opportunity to present our pattern designs for tableware sets. The Rosenthal team was interested in the pattern I had made and I was offered the opportunity to do an internship at their Creative Centre department. It allowed me to work hand in hand with the team and have the product as a result. What types of partnerships / assignments can we expect to see from you in the future? I am continuing my collaboration with Rosenthal in projects for upcoming collections. At the same time, I am working on my independent design projects and looking for opportunities to produce them with companies in Denmark and abroad.


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INTERVIEW

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NIELS BASTRUP


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Royal Copenhagen – Collaboration by necessity

KADK in the eyes of Niels Bastrup Creative Director, Royal Copenhagen

What do you expect from a KADK graduate? “We’re looking for people, who have understood how to utilise the skills and scope of their education. Candidates, who have pushed themselves to the limit and challenged both themselves and the education. Students should have an understanding of the professional world, into which they are entering after they graduate. They should have a toolbox of skills, which are so good that they can fare in the world of industry.” “You must be rooted in your craft and your history in order to look ahead, if you wish to be considered by Royal Copenhagen. And that is not something you simply get from studying. We expect design graduates to be creative and to have resilient, committed ideas.” What demands does today’s global market make on designers? “More and more demands are made on designers today. The design world is under constant pressure, and this makes great demands on new graduates. On top of their professionalism, there is so much diversity in terms of the tools a designer is expected to master. It is like a kaleidoscope of challenges. So a designer must have resilient, committed ideas. They should be able to chart a course through the incredibly diverse reality, in which all kinds of communication are important. As a designer, you should be able to defend your product through all its phases: not only in terms of the technical and design communication of the idea and its development, but also in terms of the marketing and sales process.”

What does close collaboration with KADK mean for Royal Copenhagen? “At Royal Copenhagen we are very aware of our cultural heritage and our craftsmanship. We have always worked with the best designers and craftsmen, and will continue to do so. In our work with our permanent team of designers, the content of a design brief always looks back at the history of the company in order to look forward. New products should recognisably reflect Royal Copenhagen 100% and at the same time be 100% innovative. In the light of the history of our artistic industry, we have an obligation to create long-lasting products, which stick to all parameters - far into the future. “ “It is not only from the marketing point of view that Royal Copenhagen has cultivated collaboration with KADK’s designers and craftsmen over the past 10 or 20 years. It has been a necessity. This collaboration with designers and craftsmen represents the backbone of our 240-year history.” “You must be rooted in your craft and your history in order to look ahead.”




Title

KADK

SCHOOL OF DESIGN

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation School of Design

Published by The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts,
 Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation www.kadk.dk We would like to extend our heartfelt gratitude for your support Ministry of Higher Education and Science - RKU 15. Juni Fonden Kvadrat A/S Editing Kristian Rise - Head of Communication Tine Kjølsen - Head of School of Design Susanne Jøker Johnsen - Project Manager Copyright KADK, the designers, the photographers and the authors Translation www.culturebites.dk Curators Martin Kaldahl Grethe Weber Andreas Emenius Graphic Design www.kasperfriis.com & www.mariatran.dk Typography Houschka Pro GT Sectra Book Print Prinfo Holbæk Printet on Cover: Munken Polar 240 gram Content: Munken Polar 130 gram Cover images Marie Brandt Overbye Liv Maria Henning & Fanni Baudo Eva Fly & Suguru Kobayashi Ellinor Ericsson Mathilde Krab Nymann ISBN: 978-87-7830-368-4



978-87-7830-368-4


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