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SUMMER 2018


JUNK DRAWER is a prompt-based art and literary magazine that aims to both

showcase what artists can produce when baited and to praise the tangential nature of creativity. We are so inspired by the contributors’ interpretations of these prompts and hope that their work encourages readers to create something of their own. Feel very free to check the prompts at the end of each issue and send your arts our way.

Thanks for giving a shit!

Yours,

No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without permission from artist. For more information, contact junkdrawermagazine@gmail.com Cover art by Ali Berry


CONTRIBUTORS ALI BERRY Maker and Painter

A M Y MCL A I N grew up in the Middle of Nowhere Up North Mid-West. Moved to the Good Land as soon as she could “for college” so she could forever be in debt and never use her degree. But it’s all part of the process. She met some of the best people she has ever known in that city. Since blowing her life up, Amy has been in LA for almost 3 years. Working for a living but more importantly, playing and crying and laughing at life and making art. She draws her inspiration from her trials, her pain and her brain, with the love and constant support of the people she loves dearly. CASEY O’BRIEN writes, mostly about water and mirrors and smoochin’. She is currently out on loan to South Carolina where she’s letting the red dye grow out of her hair, trying not to get hit by cars, and wondering what the pull-quotes of her life will be when it’s all said and done. http://brocasarea.webflow.io/


CONTRIBUTORS DAN BOVILLE Multimedia artist, Travel thirster, Jeopardy! enthusiast http://danboville.wixsite.com/beta

KELLY MICHAEL ANDERSON filmmaker // photographer currently working in documentary filmmaking, coffee, concert photography, music video, ... @kellymichaelanderson

N E L L I E VA N C E artist/designer + hopeful crybaby nellievance.com

S AVA N N A H C A M P L I N is currently professionally unemployed and spends her ample amount of free time read-walking, cross word puzzling, and beating her friends at Settlers of Catan. She enjoys snacking and talking about feelings with anyone who is remotely willing. Candy, friendship, and community are her life force and she writes in order to foster connections and process her feelings.


WRINGING OUT


WRINGING OUT

1

NELLIE VANCE


KNOW I N G N OW didn’t know tragedy proper only that it was why I’d keep the tag on my Princess Di Beanie Baby and wait to sell it online, unloved, for fifty bucks to a romantic overseas. why I’d get sent home from school after the collapse of towers I’d never heard of full of people I’d never heard of. had the wrong idea about princesses. knowing now, they live and die just once but can be borrowed back broadcasted for the global anonymous the rubber necks. the wrong idea about wars. knowing now, they are only finite for the men counting their winnings from the luxury boxes …

WRINGING OUT

2

CASEY O’BRIEN


tragedy proper isn’t as violent or crazed as I imagined it would be as a child when, in anticipation, I tripped every breaker so loss would never sneak up on me. cased the deep-dark caverns and cathedrals so I knew how to navigate my way out, bats and all. twenty years older now, pen to page, the wringing out of a mophead. obsessively pushing dirt from one side of the kitchen to the other, making believe I’m doing something about my grief. what kind of trophy do you get for not making a scene, for calmly, quietly surviving your real life and will someone buy it on eBay years later for more than it’s worth?

WRINGING OUT

3

CASEY O’BRIEN


WRINGING OUT

4

KELLY MICHAEL ANDERSON


WRINGING OUT

5

AMY M C LAIN


O N L ET T I N G G O A recent development: my nephew has brief anxiety attacks every time he has to say goodbye to any of his family members. He tells us, “my body isn’t ready to say goodbye to you.” It doesn’t matter how many hugs and kisses you give him, when you make your final exit he screams, “ONE MORE HUG” and runs to the window to bang on it until you hop into your car and drive off. As an adult in his life, I have to not cry when he does this. I have to remind him to take deep breaths, that all the people who leave will come back, that he is OK. Part of me feels like this is a lie, because not all people come back, but if we allowed ourselves to think about that whenever we said goodbye, we would be in a constant state of debilitating fear and sadness. So, I tell him to breathe, but I know exactly how he is feeling. Some part of you doesn’t want to breathe or to calm down. Not because the pain and panic feels good, but because letting go of the pain feels like a strange betrayal. If we let go of this pain and fear, are we not also giving up a little part of our love for that person? Are we dishonoring them by recovering and going about our day? Will we be able to forgive ourselves for forgetting about them for a moment? Of course, when I put it that way it gives a sense of brave martyrdom. I have this false belief that being miserable is a good way to remember and honor the people I am missing. The reality is, the pain gives us a false sense of control. We think that if we hold onto it we can prevent the escape of something that, in reality, is already gone. When we are finally able to accept the situation and move on from it, what we are really doing is relinquishing the idea that we have the ability to control the course of the day. By accepting the reality, we let go of the idea that holding on to the pain and continuing to focus all of our energy on missing them will protect them or bring them back to us.

WRINGING OUT

6

SAVANNAH CAMPLIN


The world will, in fact, keep on spinning whether or not we are thinking about and pining for the people we love. No matter how tightly we curl ourselves around the pain and around their absence, we will have no power over what happens to them or if the decisions they make will bring them back to us. We only have control over ourselves and our reactions to things. Nothing else. We want to take on more responsibility than is reasonable or realistic. What a terrifying and lovely realization that we can not shape the future merely with our thoughts. What a relief that the fates and futures of everyone we love do not rest on our shoulders. When we wring out our anxiety, we find that what is really there is the pure and simple fear that we do not have any control. We don’t. Except for over how we react to that powerlessness. As a kid it was saying goodbye to my parents, but as an adult this sort of anxiety presents itselves during breakups. I think that if I hold onto the pain and the loss of the person, that if they change their mind or feel differently, I will still be there, waiting for them. Letting go of the pain means that if they do change their mind or feel differently, I will no longer care. And although that seems ideal, in the midst of the hurt, I am terrified of the not caring. I do believe the feelings kids experience are exactly the same as the ones adults experience, just triggered by different events. Perhaps as we get older our pain tolerance gets higher and we get better at navigating the emotional terrain. I try to help give my nephew tools to deal with his anxiety in the hopes that as he gets older he will have the resources to maneuver heartbreak, pain, and fear a little more smoothly than I have. In the meantime, I will always come back and show up for him, as long as it is in my power to do so.

WRINGING OUT

7

SAVANNAH CAMPLIN


A TRUE I


INSIDER

A TRUE INSIDER


M Y POT EN T I AL ’S POT EN T I AL I grew it in my gut it kicked around with the butterflies knowing what it was like to be in my belly a true insider I spread my legs and cut it loose named it, microchipped it fed it free-range meats gave it my eyes for eyes my insatiable sweet teeth my affinity for the idea of the sea I met with other mothers to watch my baby compete with theirs I monitored TV time clipped its soft claws trained it in bipedalism first foot, next foot first, next first, next

A TRUE INSIDER

8

CASEY O’BRIEN


but, the young thing inhaled poisoned air and drank metallic water heard me murmur words of war in the end, it beat me bloody with hands wrinkled and folded and colored so similarly to my own I grew tired, and, shaded with an absolute bruise I fell asleep for years forgot to raise it any further now I hear it’s in a prison somewhere just off the interstate but I’m too ashamed to visit and still so tired

A TRUE INSIDER

9

CASEY O’BRIEN


A TRUE INSIDER

10

KELLY MICHAEL ANDERSON


A TRUE INSIDER

11

AMY M C LAIN


A S U N N Y DAY T H OU G H T : we’re our own sacred spaces and I am grateful for all the times I’ve been allowed inside to see what’s behind the gate

A TRUE INSIDER

12

SAVANNAH CAMPLIN


A TRUE INSIDER

13

ALI BERRY


T H E X - R AY U N D E R S THE X


S TA N D S M E B E T T E R X - R AY U N D E R S TA N D S M E B E T T E R


THE X-RAY UNDERSTANDS ME BETTER

14

KELLY MICHAEL ANDERSON


THE X-RAY UNDERSTANDS ME BETTER

15

AMY M C LAIN


THE X-RAY UNDERSTANDS ME BETTER

16

NELLIE VANCE


Better than doctors with sterilizing optimism Better than the misshapen cells of my mind, jailed The X-ray understands me better than you ever cared to ask Better than my first dog’s last retreat Better than my cold yet palpitating heart The X-ray understands me better than my blood Better than the cartilage could support Better than the malignant dread of mortality The X-ray knows me better when I’m sick Better than my porcelain happiness Better than my sedative esthesia The X-ray knows nothing of what my ailed mind’s convinced

THE X-RAY UNDERSTANDS ME BETTER

17

DAN BOVILLE


THE X-RAY UNDERSTANDS ME BETTER

18

ALI BERRY


V I S I O N & V I S I O NS You were wrong about me, but to be fair I was wrong about me, too The X-ray understands me better than my reflection’s been shooting for all these dirty-mirrored years My knees hinge my elbows hinge better and my soul is my body de-boned having nothing to do with me

THE X-RAY UNDERSTANDS ME BETTER

19

CASEY O’BRIEN


SU BM I S S I O NS F O R FA L L 2 0 1 8 DEADLINE AUGUST 1 JUNKDRAW ERMAGAZI NE@GMAIL.COM

The Fingers of Everything Taught to Haunt Imagined it Smaller

Profile for Junk Drawer Magazine

Junk Drawer Summer 2018 Issue  

Summer 2018 Issue of Junk Drawer Magazine, a prompt-based literary and art magazine.

Junk Drawer Summer 2018 Issue  

Summer 2018 Issue of Junk Drawer Magazine, a prompt-based literary and art magazine.

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