Draw the line final campaign proposal

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PROPOSAL


Maxine Lui | Angela Won | Robert Won | Judy Zhen DES 154 | Gale Okumura | Winter 2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

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Mission Objective Background Research

6 7 8

PROPOSAL

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Audience Strategy Graphic Identity Education Kits

12 13 14 18

MARKETING

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Print Media Digital Media Promotional Items

22 23 24

CONCLUSION

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Campaign Summary Sources

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INTRODUCTION 5


MISSION OBJECTIVE The campaign will educate new and current workers about sexual harassment in the workplace so they can identify when it is happening, assess the situation, and act accordingly. Workers should be unafraid to act against sexual harassment because they will be provided with the tools to effectively report and punish these incidents. By providing better sexual harassment training for workers and raising awareness of the issue, these cases will no longer be hidden or left unresolved.

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BACKGROUND Today, sexual harassment training is being implemented in many workplaces. However, workers view the mandatory training as a hassle or do not take it seriously, which inhibits their learning on the subject. Some workplaces still do not provide training for their employees. Although sexual harassment is more commonly spoken about today, there is a lack of resources and education on the topic. Victims are unsure if they can claim sexual harassment, and perpetrators are unaware of the seriousness of their actions. Statistics show that harassment continues to happen. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reported 12,860 sex-based harassment allegations in the 2016 fiscal year. This number of reported harassment cases does not even include all instances. Many workers do not report it or know what they can do to handle it. In many institutions, sexual harassment cases are left unresolved or the harasser is protected from consequences. This allows for future sexual harassment to occur. It breeds improper firing of employees and discrimination in the workplace. Victims have very little power to stop the harassment or get justice. Furthermore, while sexual harassment is illegal, federal law only covers employees if the workplace has more than 15 employees. The company size and location, such as the state, can change procedures of dealing with sexual harassment.

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RESEARCH DEFINITION Sexual harassment is unlawful discrimination based on sex. It is repeated and unwanted offensive conduct that targets someone because of their sex. It includes, but is not limited to, unwanted sexual remarks or advances, as well as hostile verbal or physical behavior. In the workplace the harasser can be anyone that the victim interacts with including supervisors, co-workers, and clients.

SURVEY We conducted a small survey among mostly college students ages 18-30. Out of 52 participants, 20 were male and 28 were female (4 declined to state their gender or chose “other�). 44.2% of participants said their workplace(s) never provided sexual harassment training, and 19.2% said some, but not all of their workplaces provided it. While more than half of the participants reported never being sexually harassed or witnessing sexual harassment, 26.9% were unsure if they have experienced or witnessed it. We noticed most described sexual harassment as a physical act or of a sexual nature.

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responses from survey participants

“A delivery man called me ‘sweetheart’ and ‘doll’ while getting a package signed. I didn’t report it for a while because I wasn’t sure if it was just mildly offensive or harassment so it wasn’t resolved.” “I find that younger individuals and those with less understanding of sexual harassment tend to have a weaker response to sexual harassment, which makes them easy victims of future harassment.” “Most things that could be listed as sexual harassment were known to all workers as jokes.”

44.2% 26.9%

have NOT received sexual harassment training in the workplace

are UNSURE if they have witnessed or been a victim of sexual harassment

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PROPOSAL 11


AUDIENCE The target audience includes American males and females between the ages 15 and 30 who have less knowledge about workplace dynamic and how to handle harassment situations. More specifically, the campaign will be helping high school and college students who will be the incoming workforce. The campaign will be at the national level, referring to federal law for companies with more than 15 employees, but will make changes according to differences in state law or when the company has less than 15 employees.

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STRATEGY The campaign will focus on bringing resources and education on sexual harassment to students in high school and college. Sexual harassment education kits will be given to organizations that provide employment, internships, and job readiness training. Organizations that provide resources on employment at schools or for students attract students who are looking to work, and these are the people who will benefit the most from the campaign’s resources. Our strategy is to give students, as the next generation of workers, the tools to fight against sexual harassment in the workplace.

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GRAPHIC IDENTITY LOGO Light Background

Dark Background - Variant

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DESIGN INTENT Our logo is a type treatment to emphasize the weight in the three words “Draw the Line”. As a horizontal logo, our logotype becomes a line itself. The colors we chose are bright, but neutral in tone. Teal is the color of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. While sexual assault and sexual harassment are not the same, these two issues can cross over. The teal in our logo acknowledges the color’s symbolism for sexual assault prevention and works to do the same for sexual harassment.

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TYPOGRAPHY

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Franklin Gothic Book

Franklin Gothic Medium

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Franklin Gothic Medium Condensed

Franklin Gothic Demi Condensed

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


COLOR PALETTE C M Y K

C M Y K

82 20 43 1

R 0 G 152 B 152 #009897

C M Y K

62 0 31 0

R 84 G 195 B 189 #56C3BD

C M Y K

95 74 49 48

R 14 G 48 B 68 #0D3044

C M Y K

0 0 0 80

R 88 G 89 B 91 #58595B

5 41 93 0

R 238 G 161 B 48 #EDA131

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EDUCATION KITS This education kit will include character cards, about 4�x6� in size. Each card will describe an employee and their situation dealing with sexual harassment in their workplace. It will provide steps to take to deal with the situation and other resources that a victim of sexual harassment might need. The kit will also include posters and brochures to bring awareness to the public. They can be placed in HR departments or in organizations that provide resources on employment attract students who are looking to work. Lastly, the kit will include promotional items such as pens, notebooks and t-shirts to be given to the participants of the workshops. This will continue to remind students of what they have learned about sexual harassment and advertise to others.

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THE FIRST EDUCATION KIT The first education kits that are sent out will include a specific amount of educational and promotional items. This is to give the organizations a sense of what will be provided. The organizations will be able to order a more specific kit after the the first kit. Extra brochures that include the character cards will be included as resources for others who want to be informed but are unable to attend workshops.

ITEM

QUANTITY

Posters

6 (2 of each design)

Brochures

150

Character Cards Set

150

Notebooks

100

Pens

100

T-shirts

100

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MARKETING 21


MARKETING APPLICATIONS PRINT MEDIA

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DIGITAL MEDIA

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PROMOTIONAL ITEMS

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BUDGET ITEM

QUANTITY

UNIT COST

TOTAL COST

Posters 11” x 17” 100 lb. glossy paper

2,000

$0.35

$700

Bus Stop Advertisements 45” x 65” Every 4 weeks

100

$320.00

$3,200.00

Subway Advertisements 45” x 65” Every 4 weeks

20

$400.00

$8,000.00

T-shirts XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL

5,000

$2.76

$13,800.00

Notebooks 5” x 7”

5,000

$1.79

$8,950.00

Pens Blue and White

5,000

$0.19

$950.00

Website Hosting page per year Domain name per year

100 gb

$72.00 $10.00

$82.00

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CONCLUSION 27


CAMPAIGN SUMMARY Many people entering the workforce are young, impressionable, and at risk of being taken advantage of. Employees, especially victims, need to have more power against sexual harassment through easily accessible resources and clear education. Workers need to keep the company in check and make sure it follows its sexual harassment policies. Our education kits and advertisement materials will go straight to the students, the next generation of workers, so they can create better workplace environments.

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SOURCES “Frequently Asked Questions.” Frequently Asked Questions | National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, n.d. Web. Feb. 2017. “Sexual Harassment.” U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. N.p., n.d. Feb. 2017. “What Do I Need to Know about...WORKPLACE HARASSMENT.” U.S. Department of Labor. N.p., n.d. Feb. 2017 Feldblum, Chai, and Victoria A. Lipnic. EEOC Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace. Rep. N.p., June 2016. Web. Feb. 2017. Rettner, Rachael. “6 Ways Sexual Harassment Damages Women’s Health.” LiveScience. Purch, 09 Nov. 2011. Web. Feb. 2017.

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DRAW THE LINE ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT.


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