Draw the line final process manual

Page 1

PROCESS MANUAL


TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION

4

MARKETING

16

Creative Brief 5

Print Media 17

Case Studies 6

Digital Media 24

Research 8

Promotional Items 25

CAMPAIGN IDENTITY 10

CONCLUSION

Inspiration 11

Design Anaylsis 27

26

Graphic Exploration 12 Final Logo 13 Business System 14

3


INTRODUCTION


CREATIVE BRIEF Needs

Background

There is not enough education about what is considered to be sexual harassment. This leads to victims being unsure if they can claim sexual harassment and perpetrators being unaware of the seriousness of their actions. Many people entering the workforce are young, impressionable, and at risk of being taken advantage of. Victims do not know if they should speak up or how to report the issue. Employees, especially victims, need to have more power against sexual harassment through easily accessible resources and clear education. In addition, companies need to implement stricter sexual harassment policies, because the lack of enforcement of these policies allows for sexual harassment to continue with little punishment.

Sexual harassment training is being implemented in more workplaces today. However, the training is poorly designed with little interactivity and engagement. Workers view the mandatory training as a hassle, which inhibits their learning on the subject. In addition, employees might not take it seriously if the graphics are too casual. Although harassment is more commonly spoken about today, there is still a lack of resources and education on the topic. Statistics show that harassment continues to happen and the number of reported harassment does not include all instances of harassment. Many people do not report it or know what they can do to handle it. Many young adults are unsure of what qualifies as harassment or who to talk to regarding such incidents.

Project Objective The campaign will educate new and current workers about the issues of sexual harassment so they can identify when it is happening, assess the situation, and act accordingly. Workers should be unafraid to act against sexual harassment. The campaign will provide the resources to effectively report and punish these incidents. By providing better sexual harassment training for companies and raising awareness of the issue, these cases will no longer be hidden or left unresolved.

In many institutions, sexual harassment cases are left unresolved or the harasser is protected from consequences. This makes the issue a taboo subject and allows for future sexual harassment to occur. It breeds improper firing of employees and injustice in the workplace. Victims have very little power to stop the harassment or get justice. Furthermore, while sexual harassment is illegal, federal law only covers employees if the workplace has more than 15 employees. The company size and location, such as the state, can change procedures of dealing with sexual harassment.

Message

Project Strategy

Draw the line on sexual harassment.

The campaign will focus on bringing resources and education on sexual harassment to students in high school and college. Sexual harassment kits will be given to organizations that provide employment, internships, and job readiness training. This education kit will include character cards, posters, brochures, pens, notebooks and t-shirts to be given to the public and participants of the workshops. For example, this kit will be provided to the Internship and Career Center (ICC) at UC Davis. Organizations that provide resources on employment attract students who are looking to work, and these are the people who will benefit the most from the campaign’s resources. The campaign will have also have a website that consolidates all of our resource materials digitally. Our strategy is to give students, as the next generation of workers, the tools to fight against sexual harassment in the workplace.

Audience The targeted audience will be American males and females between the ages 15 and 30 who have less knowledge about workplace dynamic and how to handle harassment situations. More specifically, the campaign will be helping students in high school and college who will be the incoming workforce. The campaign will be at the national level, referring to federal law for companies with more than 15 employees, but will make changes according to differences in state law or when the company has less than 15 employees.

INTRODUCTION

5


CASE STUDIES Know Where The Line Is Background This is a campaign in Australia that focuses on sexual harassment in the workplace. They push the idea of knowing where the line is between acceptable behavior and sexual harassment. They promote three main ideas, see, talk, support, as being the ways people should go about dealing with this issue. This website provided lots of materials to the user. This included lots of information on the topic to educate. There were also resources for victims to get support as well as for employees and employers to prevent and stop sexual harassment. They also included documents for users to print their own materials, such as stickers and posters, to put up in their own workplace. Analysis The simplicity of the design elements are strong. The colored lines stand in contrast to the black background and the infographics are interesting and informative. The amount of information they had was really good. They were thorough in covering both the victim as well as prevention. In addition, the materials were provided straight to the users through this website.

https://knowtheline.humanrights.gov.au/

6

INTRODUCTION


It’s On Us Background A sexual assault campaign launched by the United States government in 2014. It promotes bystander intervention for students by providing tips on how to intervene and what to look out for. It is an internet campaign with an interactive website and PSA videos. The campaign is also on other social media platforms such as twitter and facebook. The website includes these tips and asks the student to “take the pledge” against sexual assault. The campaign utilized the influence of celebrities and they became the sole element in the videos. Celebrities wore “It’s On Us” apparel and spoke about stopping sexual assault. Analysis It is a smart tactic to use internet medias and celebrities because these are two things youth spend a lot of time on and get influenced by. However, some criticisms about the campaign were about the overall message: bystander intervention. Some were unhappy that it put the responsibility on the bystander or victim and not on the perpetrator. In addition, the campaign failed to acknowledge the major facts of how many people were affected by sexual assault and who exactly were affected. Sexual assault is an issue linked to gender, race, sexuality, and more.

http://itsonus.org/ http://feministing.com/2014/09/22/its-on-us-to-go-beyond-its-on-us/

INTRODUCTION

7


RESEARCH U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that administers and enforces laws on discrimination in the workplace. They were formed in 1965 after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was enacted. The EEOC are responsible for handling discrimination cases in the workplace through investigating the issue and following through with its outcome. In addition, they do general research into the current status of discrimination in the workplace and work to create better policies and procedures to stop and prevent it.

The current EEOC logo

In terms of sexual harassment, it is listed under sex-based discrimination. The EEOC defines sexual harassment and has published reports on dealing with this issue. The EEOC is a resource to turn to when you cannot settle the complaint within the company. It serves as an outside, unbiased party that does not tolerate any sort of harassment. However, while the EEOC is a federal resource for employers, employees, and victims of harassment, data has shown that many sexual harassment cases do not have positive outcomes. There is still poor enforcement of sexual harassment policies in the workplace and while the law states that retaliation against a person for filing a complaint of discrimination, such as firing or demotion, it happens still too often. The data EEOC collects is useful to understanding the seriousness of sexual harassment in the workplace, but it takes a bit of digging to find all of it. In addition, their methods of preventing and stopping sexual harassment is not very active and does not empower victims.

Harassment & Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program (HDAPP) Brochures provided by HDAPP when we visited their office

The HDAPP is a UC Davis program that deals with all campus harassment and discrimination issues. They provide harassment training to UC Davis departments to educate and prevent harassment in the workplace. In addition, they are a non-confidential resource for victims of harassment. This means that if a harassment case is reported, they are obligated to follow through with the investigation and settle the issue. They do provide a phone service if UC Davis community members want to talk to someone about harassment and discrimination but do not need or want to report anything. We visited the HDAPP office, which is located in TB 169, to learn morea about the program. We were able to get multiple brochures that discussed harassment, including sexual harassment. Through this, we found out there were many resources on campus, confidential and non-confidential, that students and employees could turn to if they needed support with a harassment issue. It was surprising that we had never heard of many of these resources before, and we were disatisfied with the lack of publicity these programs received. Many of us work at UC Davis and have taken mandatory harassment training through a web quiz, but did not remember hearing about these programs. We saw there was a problem in how students have access to these resources.

8

INTRODUCTION


Survey We conducted a small survey among mostly college students ages 18-30. Out of 52 participants, 20 were male and 28 were female (4 declined to state their gender or chose “other”). 44.2% of participants said their workplace(s) never provided sexual harassment training, and 19.2% said some, but not all of their workplaces provided it. While more than half of the participants reported never being sexually harassed or witnessing sexual harassment, 26.9% were unsure if they have experienced or witnessed it. We noticed most described sexual harassment as a physical act or of a sexual nature. responses from survey participants

“A delivery man called me ‘sweetheart’ and ‘doll’ while getting a package signed. I didn’t report it for a while because I wasn’t sure if it was just mildly offensive or harassment so it wasn’t resolved.” “I find that younger individuals and those with less understanding of sexual harassment tend to have a weaker response to sexual harassment, which makes them easy victims of future harassment.”

44.2% 26.9%

have NOT received sexual harassment training in the workplace

are UNSURE if they have witnessed or been a victim of sexual harassment

“Most things that could be listed as sexual harassment were known to all workers as jokes.” Looking at our result, it was enlightening to see the variety of responses. Some people were indifferent if they had never experiences sexual harassment or if they had never had a job. Others took the survey seriously, especially if they had experienced sexual harassment before. Unfortunately, there were some participants who joked about the matter. One participant had claimed that sexual harassment was the only “action” they ever get. It was both sad and useful to hear that many students did not know what sexual harassment was or had never been trained. It showed that our campaign is needed.

INTRODUCTION

9


CAMPAIGN IDENTITY


INSPIRATION

CAMPAIGN IDENTITY

11


GRAPHIC EXPLORATION We started our logo exploration with ties and expanded our ideas from there. We got rid of the tie idea because it made the logo too corporate and the graphic image can be confused as bowling pins as well. We played around with the words “keep it professional” and then changed it to “draw the line”. We decided that “Draw the Line” had the most impact for our campaign, so we made several alternations with the text until it was to our liking.

12

CAMPAIGN IDENTITY


FINAL LOGO Our final logo consists of the phrase “Draw the Line”. The word “the” is rotated 90 degrees to create a more graphic look to tie the words together. There are two versions of the logo, one for a light background and another for a dark background. Our campaign will be using the typefaces from the Franklin Gothic font family and have 5 colors. The blues and grey are our main colors while the golden yellow is used as an accent color.

Light Background

Typography

Dark Background - Variant

Color Palette

Franklin Gothic Book a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

#009897

Franklin Gothic Medium a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Franklin Gothic Medium Condensed

82 20 43 1

C M Y K

62 0 31 0

R 0 G 152 B 152

C M Y K

0 0 0 80

R 88 G 89 B 91

C M Y K

5 41 93 0

R 238 G 161 B 48

#58595B

R 84 G 195 B 189

#56C3BD

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Franklin Gothic Demi Condensed

C M Y K

#EDA131

C M Y K

95 74 49 48

R 14 G 48 B 68

#0D3044

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z A B C D E F G H I J K L M O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

CAMPAIGN IDENTITY

13


BUSINESS SYSTEM Initial Sketches We wanted our business system to be simple and straightfoward. The logo will be on each piece of the business system so our audience can identify us quickly. Several of the sketches include the logo and an orgranized layout design that will not come off as something too coporate.

14

CAMPAIGN IDENTITY


Final Our final business system include the logo on every piece. The designs are straightforward, making it easy towards the eyes. The business cards are customized so each member have their own color and telephone extension. The inside of the envelope is colored to give it a little surprise when the receiver opens it.

Maxine Lui

Robert Won

1.800.THE.LINE ext. 319 mlui@drawtheline.org

1.800.THE.LINE ext. 317 rwon@drawtheline.org

391 Sutter St. Suite 410 San Francisco, CA 94108 www.drawtheline.org

391 Sutter St. Suite 410 San Francisco, CA 94108 www.drawtheline.org

391 Sutter St. Suite 410 San Francisco, CA 94108 1.800.THE.LINE www.drawtheline.org

Internship and Career Center 1 Shields Ave Davis, CA 95616 1.530.752.2855

March 15, 2017

Angela Won

Judy Zhen

1.800.THE.LINE ext. 315 awon@drawtheline.org

1.800.THE.LINE ext. 316 jzhen@drawtheline.org

Dear Advising Manager, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In eget urna id lectus tempus pellentesque id nec ex. Nunc pulvinar porttitor commodo. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Quisque ut euismod lectus. Aliquam erat volutpat. Aliquam vehicula auctor dictum. Sed vulputate mollis lacinia. Aenean ac turpis id nisl dignissim elementum. Morbi sit amet nisl nulla. Curabitur sed semper massa, vel aliquam justo. Vestibulum nec malesuada ante. Vestibulum pharetra consectetur eleifend. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Mauris sollicitudin massa imperdiet lectus scelerisque consequat. Quisque et molestie lorem.

391 Sutter St. Suite 410 San Francisco, CA 94108 www.drawtheline.org

391 Sutter St. Suite 410 San Francisco, CA 94108 www.drawtheline.org

Vivamus tempor augue dolor, in vestibulum tortor fermentum ut. Sed mi tortor, egestas a rhoncus in, condimentum ac metus. Suspendisse a vestibulum sem. Vestibulum condimentum laoreet augue sed tempus. Nulla lacinia, enim id pulvinar placerat, erat diam lobortis ante, sed pulvinar nibh elit id ipsum. Sed iaculis, nisl nec bibendum ullamcorper, mauris nulla sodales sem, sed mattis libero erat nec eros. Donec non vehicula elit. Mauris id eros in neque tristique imperdiet. Nam sed diam eu nisl semper venenatis eu in diam. Nunc ornare magna quis purus tempor molestie. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Pellentesque metus ligula, tempus ac malesuada eget, dignissim ac orci. Curabitur a nulla in nulla efficitur fringilla ac ac ligula. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Sed leo ipsum, ultricies id vehicula sed, suscipit et odio. Mauris ultrices, tortor sed rhoncus laoreet, lacus dolor rhoncus sapien, varius varius neque odio at libero. Aenean ut turpis tincidunt, pulvinar tortor eget, lobortis lectus. Ut ullamcorper finibus libero, sed vehicula magna malesuada quis. Cras elementum erat ligula, non venenatis nisi fermentum nec. Sed ullamcorper, elit in vestibulum lobortis, eros felis rhoncus purus, et vulputate est magna non felis. Thank you,

Maxine Lui Robert Won

Angela Won

Judy Zhen

Draw the Line Co-founders

CAMPAIGN IDENTITY

15


MARKETING


PRINT MEDIA Posters For our campaign, we created a small variety of posters that would be posted in different places around campus and various transportation platforms and stops. Since our main demographic are young teens and adults, they tend to use public transportation and will likely see these posters. We formatted our posters with a similar grid, but using different colors from our color palette so they would look cohesive yet communicate a clear message about sexual harassment. Each poster features a different fact about sexual harassment that most people might not know to educate them and motivate them to look further into sexual harassment using either our hotline or website.

75% of people who experience sexual harassment do not report it.

Did you know 1 in 3 women get harassed in the workplace?

There is a clear link between sexual harassment and sexual assault.

Draw the line.

Draw the line.

Draw the line.

HARASSMENT 1-800-THE-LINE www.drawtheline.org

HARASSMENT 1-800-THE-LINE www.drawtheline.org

HARASSMENT 1-800-THE-LINE www.drawtheline.org

MARKETING

17


Editorials

NOT IN MY OFFICE By Maxine Lui, Angela Won, Robert Won, Judy Zhen

There are two types of sexual harassment in the workplace: quid pro quo and hostile work environment. Quid pro quo, which means “this for that” in Latin, is a coercive situation usually in which an employee feels forced to provide sexual favors. Often, a superior employee brings this on by threatening to fire, demote, or create improper treatment. Hostile work environment is when an employee feels uncomfortable in the workplace because of intimidating, offensive, or hostile actions. These actions can be made by employees, clients, or anyone a person interacts with in their workplace. Offensive slurs, mockery, and offensive objects are examples of ways a hostile work environment can be created. These two types are distinct, but can occur together in a situation.2

For our Draw the Line editorials, we based our editorials on Time magazine because they tend to feature a variety of articles and many of these topics are serious incidents, which ties into the serious and professionalism of our message campaign. Each spread was based on different articles within an issue of Time magazine, so each editorial has a different layout. Quotes from our copy and graphics made from the statistics of our survey and research were used to break up the text and lessen the heaviness of the text.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace company with more than 15 employees, they are protected under federal law and should not experience retaliation from a company for involvement in a sexual harassment case.

Subtle actions (as shown above) can also be considered as sexual harassment

Newly elected President Donald Trump is no stranger to controversy. While campaigning, a tape surfaced of him discussing an incident where he had allegedly sexually assaulted a woman with continued unwanted sexual advances. Since then, he has been associated with his quote, “grab ‘em by the pussy.” Despite the concrete evidence of his misconduct, his campaign for presidency was unaffected, and he was ultimately elected President of the United States. His comments were dismissed as “locker room banter.” Placing politics aside, Trump’s admission to sexual harassment is an issue that should not be taken lightly. This is a prime example of the climate surrounding how sexual harassment is treated in America. As one of the most powerful political figures in the world, Trump has not been held accountable for his poor behavior. If the President’s actions go unpunished, what does this mean for sexual harassment cases around the country? Unfortunately, President Trump is not the exception in the workplace. Every year, harassers continue to go unpunished or even unreported because of the lack of support for victims.

6

TIME February 22, 2017

Victims still struggle to obtainjustice, and these cases are often “swept under the rug.” Why does it happen? How can we change the mentality concerning sexual harassment in the workplace? This issue is not simple so let us break it down for you...

Am I a victim? A harasser? A bystander? Sexual harassment is hard to define. It encompasses a wide range of explicit and subtle actions. Many times, people do not understand if they are victims or if sexual harassment has occurred.

Understanding this definition is helpful for identifying and stopping sexual harassment. While most people have a vague idea of what it is, they are unaware of how broad this issue is. This leads to people not reporting sexual harassment because they are unsure if the situation is indeed harassment. Other times, victims do not report it because they feel that it is not worth it. Some victims opt to endure the situation, avoid the harasser, or downplay the seriousness of the harassment. Some victims do not want to report sexual harassment because many cases go unresolved or end in favor of the harasser. While retaliation from a company, such as firing the individuals involved in a harassment case, is illegal, many companies continue to get away with it because company sexual harassment policies are not enforced or strictly defined. Even with the federal laws and company policies in place, victims have to jump through hoops to get their claims heard. Understanding exactly what they are dealing with is just the first step.

To get down to the bottom of this, we conducted our own survey to get firsthand information on people’s experience with sexual harassment. More specifically, we wanted to see just how many people have gotten training on sexual harassment and how many of these people have been sexually harassed. The main demographic for our survey was between the ages 18 to 30 years old. As the incoming workforce, this group is new to working and does not yet understand the nuance of sexual harassment in the workplace. They are impressionable and can be easily taken advantage of. Noticing this, we decided to ask this demographic – consisting mainly of college students and recent graduates – about their knowledge on the topic. The survey asked the participants if they have had sexual harassment training at their workplaces and if they have had experience with harassment at their workplace.

NOT IN MY OFFICE

After sending out the survey, we began to realize how many people around us were sexually harassed, witnessed instances of harassment or were unsure of whether or not they were sexually harassed in the workplace. Out of 52 respondents, 46 were between the ages of 18 to 30 years old. From these 52 participants, 24.8% stated that they had been or witnessed sexual harassment, while 26.9% were unsure if they had been or witnessed sexual harassment. This sends a clear message that people are not properly educated about sexual harassment in the workplace or how to handle these situations.

by Maxine Lui, Angela Won, Robert Won and Judy Zhen

[

Our results state that 36.5% responded positively towards receiving sexual harassment training. However, an alarming amount of our participants had not received any sexual harassment training with a whopping 44.2%. While 19.2% of our respondents had received some sexual harassment training, not at all their places of employment had provided it. Out of those who have received training, many have stated that while it does bring some awareness, it was ineffective because it was repetitive, easily ignored and forgettable.

What is your experience with sexual harassment in the workplace?

11.5% 13.5%

have been sexually harassed have witnessed sexual harassment

26.9%

are UNSURE if they have experience

57.7%

have NO experience

36.5% Yes

Have your workplaces provided sexual harassment training?

Subtle actions (as shown ere)can also be considered sexual harassment.

]

Newly elected President Donald Trump is no stranger to controversy. While campaigning, a tape surfaced of him discussing an incident where he had allegedly sexually assaulted a woman with continued unwanted sexual advances. Since then, he has been associated with his quote, “grab ‘em by the pussy.” Despite the concrete evidence of his misconduct, his campaign for presidency was unaffected, and he was ultimately elected President of the United States. His comments were dismissed as “locker room banter.” Placing politics aside, Trump’s admission to sexual harassment is an issue that should not be taken lightly. This is a prime example of the climate surrounding how sexual harassment is treated in America. As one of the most powerful political figures in the world, Trump has not been held accountable for his poor behavior. If the President’s actions go unpunished, what does this mean for sexual harassment cases around the country? Unfortunately, President Trump is not the exception in the workplace. Every year, harassers continue to go unpunished or even unreported because of the lack of support for victims. Victims still struggle to obtain justice, and these cases are often “swept under the rug.” Why does it happen? How can we change the mentality concerning sexual harassment in the workplace? This issue is not simple so let us break it down for you...

44.2% No

Let’s start with the basics. Sexual harassment is not merely sexism and does not need to be of a sexual nature. It is discrimination based on sex through unwanted conduct or attention.1 A person is targeted because he/she is male or female. Sexual harassment is not always an unwanted sexual advancement, but depends on the situation and the individuals involved. An important thing to note is that it is always unwanted. Sexual harassment is illegal in the U.S., because it deals with a protected characteristic. For individuals in a

Am I a victim? A harasser? A bystander?

Learning the numbers

19.2% Some, but not all

Visual aids for the survey percentages for sexual harassment experience and training recieved

20

TIME February 22, 2017

Sexual harassment is hard to define. It encompasses a wide range of explicit and subtle actions. Many times, people do not understand if they are victims or if sexual harassment has occurred. Let’s start with the basics. Sexual harassment is not merely sexism and does not need to be of a sexual nature. It is discrimination based on sex through unwanted conduct or attention.1 A person is targeted because he/she is male or female. Sexual harassment is not always an unwanted sexual advancement, but depends on the situation and the individuals involved. An important thing to note is that it is always unwanted. Sexual harassment is illegal in the U.S., because it deals with a protected characteristic. For individuals in a company with more than 15 employees, they are protected under federal law and should not experience retaliation from a company for involvement in a sexual harassment case. There are two types of sexual harassment in the workplace: quid pro quo and hostile work environment. Quid pro quo, which means “this for that” in Latin, is a coercive situation usually in which an employee feels forced to provide sexual favors. Often, a superior employee brings this on by threatening to fire, demote, or create improper treatment. Hostile work environment is when an employee feels uncomfortable in the workplace because of intimidating, offensive, or hostile actions. These actions can be made by employees, clients, or anyone a person interacts with in their workplace. Offensive slurs, mockery, and offensive objects are examples of ways a hostile work environment can be created. These two types are distinct, but can occur together in a situation.2 Understanding this definition is helpful for identifying and stopping sexual harassment. While most people have a vague idea of what it is, they are unaware of how broad this issue is. This leads to people not reporting sexual harassment because they are unsure if the situation is indeed harassment. Other times, victims do not report it because they feel that it is not worth it. Some victims opt to endure the situation, avoid the harasser, or downplay the seriousness of the harassment. Some victims do not want to report sexual harassment because many cases go unresolved or end in

Another image of possible subtle sexual harassment favor of the harasser. While retaliation from a company, such as firing the individuals involved in a harassment case, is illegal, many companies continue to get away with it because company sexual harassment policies are not enforced or strictly defined. Even with the federal laws and company policies in place, victims have to jump through hoops to get their claims heard. Understanding exactly what they are dealing with is just the first step. Learning The Numbers To get down to the bottom of this, we conducted our own survey to get firsthand information on people’s experience with sexual harassment. More specifically, we wanted to see just how many people have gotten training on sexual harassment and how many of these people have been sexually harassed. The main demographic for our survey was between the ages 18 to 30 years old. As the incoming workforce, this group is new to working and does not yet understand the nuance of sexual

What is your experience with sexual harassment in the workplace?

11.5% 13.5%

harassment in the workplace. They are impressionable and can be easily taken advantage of. Noticing this, we decided to ask this demographic – consisting mainly of college students and recent graduates – about their knowledge on the topic. The survey asked the participants if they have had sexual harassment training at their workplaces and if they have had experience with harassment at their workplace. After sending out the survey, we began to realize how many people around us were sexually harassed, witnessed instances of harassment or were unsure of whether or not they were sexually harassed in the workplace. Out of 52 respondents, 46 were between the ages of 18 to 30 years old. From these 52 participants, 24.8% stated that they had been or witnessed sexual harassment, while 26.9% were unsure if they had been or witnessed sexual harassment. This sends a clear message that people are not properly educated about sexual harassment in the workplace or how to handle these situations.

have been sexually harassed have witnessed sexual harassment

26.9%

are UNSURE if they have experience

57.7%

have NO experience

Visual aid for percentage of sexual harassment experienced by particpants

21

TIME February 22, 2017

7

The pictures were used to give a human aspect to our editorials and how to demonstrate how subtle sexual harassment could be. It could be in just simple forms of shoulder touching as though your work was being monitoring and etc.

Judy Zhen

18

MARKETING

Angela Won


Am I a victim? A harasser? A bystander? Sexual harassment is hard to define. It encompasses a wide range of explicit and subtle actions. Many times, people do not understand if they are victims or if sexual harassment has occurred. Let’s start with the basics. Sexual harassment is not merely sexism and does not need to be of a sexual nature. It is discrimination based on sex through unwanted conduct or attention.1 A person is targeted because he/she is male or female. Sexual harassment is not always an unwanted sexual advancement, but depends on the situation and the individuals involved. An important thing to note is that it is always unwanted. Sexual harassment is illegal in the U.S., because it deals with a protected characteristic. For individuals in a company with more than 15 employees, they are protected under federal law and should not experience retaliation from a

NOT IN MY OFFICE.

Robert Won

TIME

February 22, 2017

There are two types of sexual harassment in the workplace:

unwanted physical touch can be considered sexual harassment

quid pro quo and hostile work environment. Quid pro quo, which means “this for that” in Latin, is a coercive situation usually in which an employee feels forced to provide sexual favors. Often, a

by Maxine Lui

32

company for involvement in a sexual harassment case.

superior employee brings this on by threatening to fire, demote, Newly elected President Donald Trump is no stranger

or create improper treatment. Hostile work environment is

to controversy. While campaigning, a tape surfaced of him

when an employee feels uncomfortable in the workplace because

discussing an incident where he had allegedly sexually

of intimidating, offensive, or hostile actions. These actions can be

assaulted a woman with continued unwanted sexual advances.

made by employees, clients, or anyone a person interacts with in

Since then, he has been associated with his quote, “grab ‘em by

their workplace. Offensive slurs, mockery, and offensive objects

the pussy.” Despite the concrete evidence of his misconduct,

are examples of ways a hostile work environment can be created.

his campaign for presidency was unaffected, and he was

These two types are distinct, but can occur together in a situation.2

ultimately elected President of the United States. His comments

Understanding this definition is helpful for identifying and

were dismissed as “locker room banter.” Placing politics aside,

stopping sexual harassment. While most people have a vague

Trump’s admission to sexual harassment is an issue that should

idea of what it is, they are unaware of how broad this issue is. This

not be taken lightly.

leads to people not reporting sexual harassment because they

This is a prime example of the climate surrounding how

are unsure if the situation is indeed harassment. Other times,

sexual harassment is treated in America. As one of the most

victims do not report it because they feel that it is not worth it.

powerful political figures in the world, Trump has not been held

Some victims opt to endure the situation, avoid the harasser,

accountable for his poor behavior. If the President’s actions go

or downplay the seriousness of the harassment. Some victims

unpunished, what does this mean for sexual harassment cases

do not want to report sexual harassment because many cases

around the country? Unfortunately, President Trump is not

go unresolved or end in favor of the harasser. While retaliation

the exception in the workplace. Every year, harassers continue

from a company, such as firing the individuals involved in a

to go unpunished or even unreported because of the lack of

harassment case, is illegal, many companies continue to get

support for victims. Victims still struggle to obtain justice,

away with it because company sexual harassment policies are

and these cases are often “swept under the rug.” Why does it

not enforced or strictly defined. Even with the federal laws and

happen? How can we change the mentality concerning sexual

company policies in place, victims have to jump through hoops

harassment in the workplace? This issue is not simple so let us

to get their claims heard. Understanding exactly what they are

break it down for you...

dealing with is just the first step.

Sexual harassment is illegal. 33

Maxine Lui

MARKETING

19


Brochure Draft As part of our effort to educate our audience on sexual harassment, we created brochures containing information on sexual harassment statistics and defintions that sexual harassment could fall under. We decided to go with a roll fold so that our reader can slowly reveal information as they read along. To grab our reader’s attention, we open up with a quote and have statistics to add white space and break apart the text so the information does not look overwhelming. Along with our brochure, we also added persona cards.

on workplace sexual harassment

“All of my male coworkers have touched my ass at one point or more” -Anonymous

45% Sex 34% Race Filed Complaints by type in 2015

5% Religion 13% National Origin

What is your experience with sexual harassment in the workplace?

(Private Sector)

11.5% 13.5%

have been sexually harassed have witnessed sexual harassment

26.9%

are UNSURE if they have experience

57.7%

have NO experience

Contact us:

19% Disability

15% Age

contact@drawtheline.com www.drawtheline.org 1 (800) THE-LINE

Our initial measurements were 5.5 x 17 inches, but after factoring our persona cards measurements into our brochure, we decided to add small subtle changes.

on workplace sexual harassment

“All of my male coworkers have touched my ass at one point or more” -Anonymous

20

MARKETING

45% Sex 34% Race Filed Complaints

5% Religion 13% National Origin

by type in 2015 (Private Sector)

15% Age

19% Disability

What is your experience with sexual harassment in the workplace?

11.5% 13.5%

have been sexually harassed have witnessed sexual harassment

26.9%

are UNSURE if they have experience

57.7%

have NO experience

Contact us:

contact@drawtheline.com www.drawtheline.org 1 (800) THE-LINE


on workplace sexual harassment Final Our brochure is now an extra inch taller at 6.5 x 17 inches per side so our persona cards can fit and we rearranged our information so that the text was easier to follow.

45% Sex 34% Race Filed Complaints by type in 2015 (Private Sector)

5% Religion

Our brochure does not have a section for a mailing address because they wll only be given out at our workshops or mailed together with our kit to participating campuses and workplaces.

13% National Origin

15% Age

19% Disability

“All of my male coworkers have touched my ass at one point or more� -Anonymous

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: https://www.eeoc.gov/

Draw the Line: 391 Sutter St. Suite 410 San Francisco, CA 94108 contact@drawtheline.com www.drawtheline.org 1 (800) THE-LINE

Contact us: contact@drawtheline.com www.drawtheline.org 1 (800) THE-LINE

MARKETING

21


Persona Cards Draft To go with our brochures, we created persona cards because it is easier for our target audience to relate and understand the nuances and defintions of sexual harassment through the use of characters. These characters have traits that many incoming workforce individuals so that they can put themselves in their shoes and understand and see if they were ever put into situations where there might have been sexual harassment. For our character cards, we decided to do with a more simple vector look so the characters would not be to distinctive and allow anyone to empathize and relate to their situations. For the backgrounds, we kept the layout simple and clean using our color palette. Initially, we decided to keep them as just heads with different hairstyles, but decided against it since floating heads could be off putting to some.

22

MARKETING


Final Thus, we added bodies to our characters with clothes that somewhat correlated to their respective careers. Instead of the rounded stroke around the edge of the cards, we switched to a full color background instead to allow for easy rounded cuts. The final measurements for our cards are 3 inches by 5 inches.

MARKETING

23


DIGITAL MEDIA The campaign utilizes a website accompanied with a mobile app in order to provide a more interactive experience with the audience. On both the website and app, users are able to share their own harassment stories as well as read others in order to learn about others’ real life situations and to help them find the right solutions for their own situations. Photos are used on the website in order to add a human quality to the campaign. Persona icons are also used to provide a human quality in circumstances that anonymity is preferred. From the website, education resources and character profiles are viewable and downloadable, so workplaces can distribute them. Users also have the ability to contact the campaign in order to ask questions or give feedback.

24

MARKETING


PROMOTIONAL ITEMS Promotional items with our logo will be given has freebies at events and will be included in our educational kit in order to advertise our campaign. These items include office supplies such as notebooks and pens because we want our campaign to have a lasting presence in the workplace in order to reinforce the educational materials. T-shirts sporting the campaign logo will help spread awareness about the campaign in public settings.

MARKETING

25


CONCLUSION


DESIGN ANALYSIS Designer’s Job Description

Research

Communication

I was the lead researcher. I compiled definitions of sexual harassment from various sources such as the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, U.S. Department of Labor, Harassment and Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program, and Workplace Bullying Institute websites. Because I handled most of the factual information, I dealt with the copy for the campaign. I either wrote the copy or edited one of my team member’s copy. For the proposal, I helped with some of the layouts of the text because I was working on the pages that were all text.

Our campaign required us to get a good understanding of the current conditions of the workplace in terms of sexual harassment. We looked at various EEOC reports to see who is at risk of being a victim and where efforts need to be put to fix the issue. We soon saw that younger, inexperienced workers were the easiest target for sexual harassment and people of higher position were often the harasser. The existing harassment policies were not being enforced or did not successfully protect employees, making it easy for harassers to get away unpunished. We wanted to use this information to urge the demographic of young students that they should be especially wary and that they can and should stand up for themselves. It also drove us to realize that education on this topic is important to getting people to speak about the issue and to spread the thought that sexual harassment is not to be tolerated.

We will reach out to high schools and colleges, first in the state of California. We will reach out to their HR departments to see if they would like to use some of our materials such as our posters and brochures. We will also reach out to employment organizations that provide jobs and job readiness training to students. Sexual harassment training should be just as important as learning how to write a resume or take an interview.

I collaborated with Angela on the character cards as she did the character graphics and I laid out the information. In terms of graphics, I mostly oversaw my other member’s work, gave critiques, and guided them through the details. I only took over to clean up the design or lead them in another direction. Usually I would draw sketches to give them a better idea of what I am envisioning to help move along the design process.

Defining the Design Problem There is not enough education about what is considered to be sexual harassment. This leads to victims being unsure if they can claim sexual harassment and perpetrators being unaware of the seriousness of their actions. Many people entering the workforce are young, impressionable, and at risk of being taken advantage of. Victims do not know if they should speak up or how to report the issue. Employees, especially victims, need to have more power against sexual harassment through accessible resources and clear education. Companies need to implement stricter sexual harassment policies, because the lack of enforcement of these policies allows for sexual harassment to continue with little punishment. To get to students, we want to provide resources straight to them through school departments, such as the Internship and Career Center at UC Davis. We wanted to provide resources to students before they even start working so they go into a job with knowledge about sexual harassment. Prevention is key to stopping sexual harassment overall. We kept our colors, typography, and graphics simple and friendly to keep the seriousness of the issue, yet feel humanistic and approachable. Serious issues can sometimes seem too powerful and unchangeable, but we want our audience to never feel intimidated by the issue.

Through our research we found many of the existing resources and campaigns for sexual harassment. We noticed that these resources were not very active. They did not go straight to the people, but rather looked to the companies to change their policies and training. While this is important, it is important to put the power in the victim’s hands, because they cannot always rely on the company. It is important to empower victims by letting them know they should not be ashamed and that they should get justice so that the negativity that surrounds sexual harassment is not left with the victim.

Planning

We will also reach out to the city planner or bus ad agencies to put up our ads on bus shelters and in subway stations. Many students take public transportation and so advertising at these bus stations will further reach to them. The general public will also benefit by seeing these signs.

Implementation We will keep in touch with the schools and organizations to see what the reception of our campaign is like. We will ask them to keep a count of how many of our materials get taken so we can determine how much they need to restock. We will also conduct surveys yearly to see if there is a trend. We will reach out through our own website and personal reach as well as ask the schools and organizations to help send out the survey as well. This survey will help us figure out if students are becoming more informed about sexual harassment. Comparing responses over years can help us see if our campaign is having any effect.

Maxine Lui

Our materials will be mass produced and distributed in large quantity to schools and student employment organizations. Therefore we will be in contact with printers and shippers. We will also be working with people at the schools and organizations to decide when to send them materials, how much they would need, and how to get it to them. We will need to raise money to produce our materials. This can be through grants from the government and through donations from the organizations and schools we work with. Getting the word out about our campaign and gaining support will determine how much of our marketing and educational materials we can produce and send out.

CONCLUSION

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Designer’s Job Description

Research

Communication

As a member of my team, I aided in the creation of graphics relating to marketing strategies for our campaign proposal. I created the character graphics for our persona card set. I also created the posters and edited them into our bus stop and subway ad mockups. For our editorial, I researched the statistics related to sexual harassment at the workplace. In the process manual, I put together the print media section for our marketing strategies.

After researching about sexual harassment in the workplace, the results showed how important it was for sexual harassment training to become more prominent in the workplace. According to our survey, there were a lot of people within our demographic who had no received sexual harassment training at their previous or current jobs. Due to this, it is unlikely many students would be knowledgeable about the workplace and the definition of sexual harassment in the workplace. Those who did have training stated that their organization’s methods were not engaging and could easily be dismissed.

Our campaign intends to contact various organizations working for high schools and colleges to send these educational kits to hold workshops. Though our main demographic are students, we will mainly be communicating with these organizations to make sure our workshops go as planned. To put up our posters, we will work with the city to display our posters at various bus stops around the city of Davis. Once our campaign becomes more successful, we will expand into bigger cities and put posters up in subway stations to further advocate for our campaign on sexual harassment.

Defining the Design Problem

With the lack of discussion on sexual harassment, we decided that our campaign demographic would be high school and college students so that they would have prior knowledge. To tackle the problem of disinterest, we created more interactive method of sexual harassment training with our educational kits that contain characters that our audience can relate to. This will give them more power to fight against sexual harassment and internalize that being sexually harassed is nothing to be ashamed and have their power and resources to fight back.

There is not enough education about what is considered to be sexual harassment – leading to victims being unsure if they can claim sexual harassment and perpetrators being unaware of the seriousness of their actions. Many people entering the workforce are young, impressionable, and at risk of being taken advantage of. Victims do not know if they should speak up or how to report the issue. Employees, especially victims, need to have more power against sexual harassment through easily accessible resources and clear education. With our campaign, we hope to help the incoming workforce (high school and college students) learn more about sexual harassment. We will assist in educating them about the available resources that they can turn to when experiencing problems with sexual harassment. To do this, we will provide educational kits to organizations within high school and colleges to hold workshops. These kits will contain brochure, posters and persona cards for the organizations to use. Promotional items will also be sent along as part of the kit as an incentive for students to participate in these workshops. During these workshops, our website and hotline will be promoted as extra tools that the students can access. Our website will have resources for students to access for further information. An anonymous story section will be available for anyone to tell their experiences with sexual harassment to motivate people to work against sexual harassment.

28

CONCLUSION

Planning For more information, we visited UC Davis’s HDAPP (Harassment and Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program) and contacted them for more information. However, we were unable to obtain any information regarding statistics and their sexual harassment training methods at UC Davis. So, we used EEOC as a base for how to approach our sexual harassment training using their statistics and information. Using external sources, our website will be a consolidated list of different resources that people can use if they have questions regarding sexual harassment.

Implementation To test the effectiveness of our campaign, we will release a survey that the students can take to evaluate and rate the effectiveness of our training and give us feedback on what we can improve. As an incentive, we will work with the city and schools for respondents to obtain coupons for certain food canteens. We will also ask the organizations to give us feedback on what is working or not in our educational kits.

Angela Won


Designer’s Job Description

Research

Communication

I aided in designing the marketing material including the printed brochure and the digital mockups for the website and mobile application. Additionally, I collaborated with my design team members on brainstorming logo ideas and I finalized the logo.

For our research, our team learned about existing sexual harassment educational materials (Equal Employment Opportunity Counselor Program (EEOCP)) and campaigns online and at UC Davis. We felt that the resources presented information but did not engage the audience enough, so we wanted to add a human aspect to our educational materials so the audience can relate and feel comfortable with interacting with our campaign. We wanted to consolidate sexual harassment education and resource educations to make them accessible to the average user.

Our campaign plans to contact organizations that interact with young adults and deal with the workplace (e.g. high schools, colleges, student organizations, student employment organizations, etc.). For example, we can contact the Internship and Career Center (ICC) and Harassment & Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program (HDAPP) at UC Davis to offer our educational kits and promote our campaign. We can also contact the City of Davis in order to organize public display of our marketing posters. We will aim to build a relationship with these organizations and work together to create a safe workplace for all. Earning the support of these organizations will help to change our society’s attitude toward workplace harassment.

Defining the Design Problem There is not enough effective education about what is considered to be sexual harassment. A lot of sexual harassment incidents are left unpunished. Victims need to know how to effectively identify harassment and know about the available resources to report these incidents in order to have justice in the workplace. The campaign aims to educate new and current workers about identifying and reporting sexual harassment in the workplace. We wanted to create an interactive experience that has a human quality that keeps the audience engaged by sharing sexual harassment stories and situations. We also wanted to raise awareness about sexual harassment in the workplace in order to change the mentality about ignoring the incidents. We will build relationships with existing organizations on campus to get support. Sexual harassment kits will be given to these organizations that provide employment, internships, and job readiness training. Through our marketing materials, the campaign will spread amongst young adults and help them learn about resources.

Planning We plan on utilizing campus organizations such as HDAPP and CARE to learn how to improve upon existing campaign materials. We want our campaign to work in conjunction with existing resources and consolidate information to make the education accessible to everyone. Additionally, we will utilize our own resources such as the website and app to create a “safe space” for victims to share their experiences, form a community, and help each other.

Implementation Our campaign will conduct surveys in order to test the effectiveness with users. We will stay in contact with organizations that distribute our materials and see how the audience responds to the campaign. We will also allow feedback on our website to understand what our audience wants from the campaign.

Robert Won

CONCLUSION

29


Designer’s Job Description

Research

Communication

Throughout the planning and designing of the message campaign, I was responsible for organizing the information we were planning to have in the proposal and process manual. I did the layout design and compile the information and graphics from my teammates into the books. I was in charge of designing and ordering the materials for the marketing items such as the t-shirts, pens and notebooks. I helped and critiqued my teammates work when they needed it.

We wanted to see what types of materials are offered to those who needed it. We did research on the internet to see what types of campaigns are already out there and how they dealt with the problem. Each campaign had their own unique way of carrying out the process, which I found very inspirational. There were some that came up with different phrases that changes the situation from how it was worded. We noticed how their approach reached out to those who are looking for help and not really for those who might need the assistance later. We want to be able to educate the students about this issue and provide them with more resources when requested.

Our campaign focuses on educating students but we will be providing our materials and promotional items to organizations that offer help to students who are entering and are already in the workforce. Those organizations are free to spread out the resources to other departments so that the materials are more accessible for students. Our campaign will also be communicating with other similar campaigns to share ideas and help promote more awareness depending on the type of audience we are reaching out for.

Defining the Design Problem There is not enough education about what is considered to be sexual harassment. This leads to victims being unsure if they can claim sexual harassment and perpetrators being unaware of the seriousness of their actions. Many people entering the workforce are young, impressionable, and at risk of being taken advantage of. We want to give students, as the next generation of workers, the tools to fight against sexual harassment in the workplace. The campaign will focus on bringing resources and education on sexual harassment to students in high school and college. Sexual harassment kits will be given to organizations that provide employment, internships, and job readiness training. We hope that these kits will provide a boost in awareness and a greater need for improvement for this social problem.

30

CONCLUSION

Implementation Planning We went to the Human Resources Department of UC Davis to see what they offered, but they did not have anything and directed us to the Harassment and Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program. This program at UC Davis offered consulting assistance and some materials from other programs on campus as well. We wanted to create more materials that they can offer to victims and make these resources more convenient for students. Our resources are offered to all the students who are planning to work soon. Our campaign has a website that is considered as a safe space for those who wants to share their stories with the world. We will also contact the City of Davis to have our marketing applications applied throughout Davis.

We will have surveys for students sent out to the organizations we associate with to have a better understand of whether the resources we provided are informative enough. The organizations will also provide us with statistics that tell us how successful their workshops are with the materials we provide them. The website is also another way of gathering the statistics of how successful this campaign will be by checking the number of visits per page per day over a span of a year.

Judy Zhen



DRAW THE LINE ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT Maxine Lui | Angela Won | Robert Won | Judy Zhen DES 154 | Winter 2017 | Gale Okumura


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