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Š 2014 Jeffrey S Nesbit All rights reserved No part of this volume may be used or repoduced in any manner without written permission from the author. All work is deďŹ ned under the direction of: Jeffrey S Nesbit Work completed by students of: Urban Design Studio / Shanghai, Spring 2014 College of Architecture, Texas Tech University Cover design, page design, and layouts by Jeffrey S Nesbit + James Cade Hammers

For more information about the Urban + Community Design Program (UCD) contact: Jeffrey S. Nesbit jeff.nesbit@ttu.edu or MaryAlice Torres-Macdonald, UCD Director ma.torres-macdonald@ttu.edu


urban design studio

SHANGHAI 2014 intensive differentiations jeffrey s nesbit

foreword by

CHARLES WALDHEIM


urban design studio

SHANGHAI


urban design studio

SHANGHAI 2014 VOLUME CONTENTS 08

- “Projective Ecologies”, Charles Waldheim

10

- “Intensive Differentiations”, Jeffrey S. Nesbit

22

- Urban Speculations in Puxi, 2014 UCD students

94

- Review Photos

98

- Participants

102

- Acknowledgements


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urban design studio : shanghai

Projective Ecologies

and the First Tier Chinese City CHARLES WALDHEIM

This publication and the work of the Shanghai studio that it presents is almost exclusively the practical and intellectual labor of Jeffrey Nesbit and his students in the Shanghai urban design studio at Texas Tech University College of Architecture in Spring 2014. The projects presented here offer a unique set of case studies in the relation between ecology and urbanization in East Asia. As the pace of urbanization continues across the region, and on the Mainland China in particular, much attention has been focused on the environmental and societal impacts of urban growth and change. Less attention has been devoted to the amelioration of these conditions through landscape strategies, and this studio aspires to question this imbalance. The studio is equally motivated to offer alternatives to the dominant form of the Chinese mega-plot planning framework in general, and in ecology as modality of thinking through urban sites and subjects. In recent years increasing attention has been focused on the potential for so-called second and third-tier Chinese cities to absorb an increasing portion of the overall burden of urbanization. This has to do with a periodicity in the historic development of the national project of urbanization, as well as an acknowledgment of the social, environmental, and economic limits to healthful growth in the first tier Chinese cities. In the development of second and third-tier Chinese cities many designers and planners are presently exploring the potential for landscape architecture and ecological planning as elements of urban restructuring. In this regard the projects assembled here provide an instructive set of cases in the variable roles that landscape might play in the healthful reconsideration of the public realm as embodying specifically ecological value in first tier cities. Many of the projects focus on the reconsideration and remediation of sites left contaminated through previous industrial uses. In the best of these projects, landscape enables the urbanization of what would otherwise be inhospitable or unhealthful sites. Through the lens of ecology, these sites are reconsidered in favor of a rich combination of ecological performance, cultural heritage, and ongoing urban growth. In this regard, these projects enable the ongoing project of urbanization, by insulation populations from the worst impacts of both the previous industrial order and the current urban explosion. The formulation “projective ecologies� has recently been proposed as an extension and elaboration of the landscape urbanist agenda. The projective ecologies project aspires to articulate the contemporary role and status of ecology across the design and planning disciplines. Following from and building upon the discourse around landscape urbanism and


intensive differentiations OUTPUT 2 RATIO 1:5

Richard Lucio, Reclaiming Urban Ecologies

ecological urbanism, the projective ecologies project asks timely questions regarding the status of ecology as an adjectival modifier to urbanism. Christopher Hight has claimed that ecology is among the most important epistemological frameworks of our age. Hight’s assertion is based on the fact that ecology has transcended its origins as a natural science to encompass a range of meanings across the natural and social sciences, history and the humanities, design and the arts. From a proto-disciplinary branch of biology in the nineteenth century, ecology has developed into a modern science in the twentieth century, and increasingly toward a multidisciplinary intellectual framework in the first decades of the twenty-first century. This disciplinary promiscuity is not without its problems, intellectually and practically. The slippage of ecology from natural science to cultural lens remains the source of confusion and limits communication within and across landscape architecture, urban design, and planning. This ecological turn might contribute to reading the work of the Shanghai studio presented in this publication in at least three ways. First, these projects might begin by unapologetically defining ecologies in the plural. Second, the work explores the projective potentials of the ecological framework by illustrating fluency across a spectrum of disciplinary formulations, well beyond the limitations of architect or urban designer alone. Finally, the projects, drawings, and diagrams presented here articulate a robust representational paradigm for the ecological in contemporary design culture more broadly. In this regard, we might consider the impact of these projects not simply in light of their enabling of ongoing urbanization across the region, but equally as significant transformations of the nature of design practice and ecological thinking globally. The new sites, situations, and speeds of urbanization across the region have propelled the emergence of new typologies of landscape project and new modes of landscape practice. In these sites and situations, an ecological reading might offer intellectual and spatial frameworks for ameliorating the worst effects of ongoing urbanization, while providing an alternative to the hegemony of the mega-plot form of development. Equally, as this work is the first chapter among many to come, this approach might afford a critique of the longstanding reliance of neo-traditional urban design strategies on nineteenth century urban form. (Charles Waldheim is John E. Irving Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.)

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urban design studio : shanghai

Intensive Differentiations JEFFREY S NESBIT

This studio investigates alternative solutions to the conventional and widely accepted standards of urban planning models. Rather than following the Classical approach, in which urban components are organized upon a global top-down logic, Intensive Differentiations provides an opportunity to uniquely identify new systems of urban organizations determined by communities of interacting urban-agents. Fundamentally, the studio operates and aligns itself along an ideological discourse based upon notions of “landscape as metaphor”. Capable of responding to transformative behaviors, much like that of microorganisms, a redetermination of landscape urbanism methods allow for identifying innovative strategies of restructuring our highly dense urban topography. In ‘Field Conditions’ Stan Allen (1985) describes object-to-field systemic responses by evaluating how functions differ as you generate through part-to-whole or part-to-part parameters. Allen explains that a point within a network is not an independent entity nor is the relationship about the ‘global’ rule sets for systems to operate as a ‘whole’. This investigation reveals that controlling the clarity of ‘local’, partto-part interactions, will generate a more intense and flexible result. For this urban studio, we will use this logic to analyze and synthesize more integrated systems between infrastructure, buildings, and the complexity of social interactions at both the micro and macro level. No longer can we afford to engage our environments in pretending that infrastructure are sub-systems in relation to our urban public space. They must now be considered as integrated systems of exchange and operate as a series of productive urban layers. Building to Landscape Initial research will involve data extraction through a series of analytical mapping studies to develop a more specific understanding of current conditions. As patterns emerge from the existing fabric, the work will shift into the development of self-generating constructs that will form new field-network parameters. Continually the strategies of implementation into the site of inquiry will test sequences of ‘urban’ space to ‘building’ mass. This particular translation from extensive horizontal surface to expression of formal building mass should be integrated into the ontological systems schema. In other words, strategies of programmatic volumes and horizontal events will transfer and slip from one to the other.

“Men of experience and foresight have predicted that in another 50 years Shanghai may become the greatest city of the world. This is not the fantastic dream of an untraveled mind. The future holds something great for Shanghai, and that greatness will outstrip all its past achievements, marvelous as they have been.”

- Ching-Lin Hsia, The Status of Shanghai, 1929


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CONTEXT Shanghai : ‘The Showcase City’ Shanghai is one of the largest metropolis’ in the world with over 24 million inhabitants. After major economic and financial transformations in the late 1980’s and into the early 90’s, the city aggressively transformed into a central international ‘showcase city’ for China. Over 50 years ago and still active today, Shanghai acts as a gateway into the new urban expression based on the Chinese tactile and cultural phenomena while negotiating economic reforms, foreign investments, and exploitation of powerful international ambitions. Towards the end of the 20th century, the Shanghai Development Corporation strategically invited international architecture firms to submit urban development proposals for the Pudong district. This project, including a series of subsequent projects such as the Bund, People’s Square, French Concession, and Nanjing Road, have incrementally created a variable identity which transpires into robust visionary manifestations. By the 21st century, China embraced Shanghai as the ‘next great world city’ by officially hosting the World Expo 2010 and bringing in over 73 million visitors. The theme for the international exposition was ‘Better City - Better Life’ and successfully promoted new international agendas and translated traditional Chinese culture. Although Shanghai seems to lack in consistency, upon further investigations, the city presents itself with a collection of layered patterns determined by ad hoc organizational tools and strategies. These findings will be the influence for inverting zones of inactive interference. As compelling as the intensive differentiations of ‘old’ and ‘new’ seem, we now need to embrace these variable difference in developing opportunities of urban connections, rather than abrasive extremities of contrast. The work of mega-development and massive investments are obviously substantial though are not the deterministic vision for future Shanghai. Rather, this studio will focus on re-configuring an urban ecology through three primary issues: (1) housing and development, (2) infrastructure (transportation and public water utilities), and (3) activation of public space. Huangpu Located in the progressive historic center of Puxi, our particular site of inquiry is situated in the Huangpu district bounded by Zhonghua Road, Old City, and the Huangpu River. The site presents itself with primarily low-rise (2 - 3 story) old housing projects while newer high-rise development has begun encroaching into its boundaries. Close proximities include the Nanpu Bridge to the south, Pudong Financial District across the river to the north, The Bund north along the river, and Huahai highway to the north-west. These zones of contextual extensions must be considered as significant external influences from our site of inquiry zone. How do these create opportunities of connections/extensions, boundaries, and/or referential mediums?

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urban design studio : shanghai

Simon Alvarez

Ontological Systems ontology (n.) - a branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature and relations of being Ontology is the philosophical study of the nature of being, becoming, existence, or reality, as well as the basic categories of being and their relations. Traditionally listed as a part of the major branch of philosophy known as metaphysics, ontology deals with questions concerning what entities exist or can be said to exist, and how such entities can be grouped, related within a hierarchy, and subdivided according to similarities and differences. system (n.) - a group of related parts that move or work together - a body of organs that work together to perform an important function of the body A System is a set of interacting or interdependent components forming an integrated whole or a set of elements (often called ‘components’ ) and relationships which are different from relationships of the set or its elements to other elements or sets. After gathering of research materials, data, and information, we initiated the studio design work with an intensive series of NTS (not-to-scale) models, investigating systematic methods of ‘morphology’ rather than ‘geometrical’ regulations. These ontological systems are designed to evaluate operative logics which ultimately utilized as re-organizational processes inserted back into the city fabric. More similar to an ecology, these flexible systems create a zone of what Gilles Deleuze calls ‘space of possibilities’. As intelligent systems grow in population and variation, extensions distribute as critical negotiations. By using both Manuel DeLanda’s definitions developed through simulations of multi-agents and David Grahame Shane’s urban ‘codes’ and ‘actors’, scalar components work themselves through a strategic organizational model. Furthermore, as the systematic models strengthen in complexity and intelligence, the manipulations integrate and manifest into a more clearly controlled and organized urban methodology. Urban Topography + Infrastructure This project addresses an on-going scholarly conversation about the urban environment through approaches taken from two disciplines; landscape architecture and urbanism. The work of Charles Waldheim and David Grahame Shane, indicates that the discipline of urban design and landscape are becoming more fully inter-connected. Thinking of the ‘city as organism’ is both the foundation and the


intensive differentiations

Jigga Patel

processes in the studio. This particular project investigates strategies of landscape urbanism, identifies existing themes of self-generative adaptations, and focuses on evaluating where/how the opportunities for horizontal extensiveness can be implemented. Formerly, infrastructures such as wetlands, sewage systems, transportation highways, and civic utilities have been regarded as tertiary, ‘service’ space. Along with the ontological systems modeling, the work will question generative tools of urban transformation, as evidence of contemporary methods of re-thinking the usefulness of the public realm on, in, below, or between hard edges of large-scale urban infrastructure. The process of activating this residual space by transforming it into habitable, public space provides more effective use of the available land and advances opportunities of creating a more sustainable environment. The ‘horizontal’ as a primary device for organizing and registering urban complexities create new, heightened, opportunities of urban recognition. Learning from Rem Koolhaas, James Corner, and Charles Waldheim, ideas of horizontal landscapes can translate into urban interfaces of data and information. The expression of natural conditions in relationship with city infrastructures both define scenarios of urban patterns which can not be evaluated through traditional urban planning models. The city itself demonstrates a layer of extended, transformable tissues oscillating conditions of time, economics, politics, and social agencies; or ‘codes’ as D.G. Shane would describe. This is precisely why the work critical operates between morphogenetic zones of intermediary dimension and manipulates the horizontal, urban plane. Events As the progress of the systematic studies and contextual analysis developed into a more cohesive narrative, implementation of ‘events’ gain exposure. Rather than describing the project through a strict and definitive development ‘program’, the site of inquiry charges a more operational narrative of flexibility. Like that of Rem Koolhaas’ Parc de la Villette (1982), James Corner’s London Olympic Park (2011), and Plasma Studio’s Xi’an Flowing Gardens (2011), negotiations between the ontological system and existing conditions provide evidence for a new infiltration of urban events which shall establish opportunities of future growth, flexibility, and extensive sequencing. For clarification, ‘growth’ here does not imply traditional phasing units. On the contrary, parameters will inform a space of possibility. Therefore in this studio, each project’s formal event resultants are determined by the particularities of a focus critique; which includes but not limited to the contextual analysis and methodical modulations. The subsequent projects in this volume includes a collection of samples which came out of such inquires during an Urban Design Studio at Texas Tech University in the spring of 2014.

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FRAGMENTED ENVIRONMENTS James Cade Hammers The study involves defining and describing tendencies revealed in the city of Shanghai, China that have generated fragmented environments located throughout the city but explicitly apparent in the Puxi district, west of the Huangpu River. The analyses provide a vocabulary to describe five characteristics of nine study samples that operate or perform their own fragmentation in response to immediate conditions. Conditions created at the juncture of the Chinese government’s social or political agendas associated with the built environment and the many adaptive protocols the people inhabiting the city have produced. From this collision, these (sometimes) well-defined environments of difference then emerge, forming their sinews from networks of shifting forces that allow for their cohesion and assemblage into moments of intensive differentiation within Shanghai. Through the development of the system, the collections of “entangled� units simultaneously exist as and generate a field of fluctuating intensities that directly influence and disturb one another. At the extents of these intensities, there exist residual environments that are dismissed as dilapidated, decaying ruins that are still inhabited but deteriorate due to their proximity and proportion to moments of accelerated development agendas. It is these zones that can enforce their presence and rehabilitate through combinative performances that will allow them to strengthen their layer in the network of fragmented environments. In Shanghai, the zones of interest present an intense segregation in the urban landscape that brings about a contrast between both the built forms and the space of things.


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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

EVENT TYPOLOGIES Uses And Descriptions The project introduces new spaces and surfaces that allow for specified or unspecified events to occur within. These events have been extracted from the observations and research documentation and fit into three primary categories: passive, active, and productive use.

PR01

FIVE / 五 definitions of fragmented environments

分割的環境的定義

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Local Ecology Garden / Productive with Restraint Local ecology gardens are where the many vendors of independent goods are able to grow their own vegetables and fruits in season. Obviously as the seasons change or needs change, the garden may transform into a passive state and be allowed to overgrow with local fauna.

PR02

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Commercial + Retail / Productive with Low Restraint These activations host either residential or commercial towers that hold retail storefronts on ground and second levels to bring more productive use to areas suffering from little purpose

ENCROACHMENT

[en-krohch-muh nt]

the act of one zone being influenced or affected by another

別的影響或影響的一個區域操作

PA01

-

A C C U M U L AT E

become larger in size, typically as a result of a gathering within weak or malleable constraints

Walk + Manipulated Infrastructure / Passive Low Adaptability A walk describes an introduced layer of pedestrian organization and infrastructural connection. A manipulated infrastructure describes a specific system of infrastructure that has been reorganized, excavated, or removed from the site to allow for the new implementation to exist.

[uh-kyoo-myuh-leyt] 在大小上,典型地變得大由於在 弱或展性的約束之內的收集

AMBIGUOUS LIMITS

[am-big-yoo-uhs lim-its]

a condition where the extents or bounding criteria of a zone begin to fail or become less defined

情況區域的區域或限制的標準 開始發生故障或變得定義的地方

PA02.1

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A refined plaza is a public area not designated for vegetated use strictly productive events. These areas have an adaptability to what can happen there and are not limited to just the use of one event.

CLUSTER

[kluhs-ter]

a number of objects of the same kind, growing or held together

Refined Plaza + Elevated Walkway / Passive High Adaptability

一定數量的對象同樣親切,增長或者相連

S U R FAC E L E G I B I L I T Y [sur-fis lej-uh-bil-i-tee]

the morphology and syntax of how the edges of a space are formed and read as a continuation

PA02.2

-

形態學和語法空間的邊緣如何被形 成并且讀作為繼續

biodiverse surface surface acts as host to multiple plant species that can be segregated, integrated or allowed to grow without intervention

Walkway + Canal / Productive with Low Adaptability With the popularity of selling fish as well as the need to transport goods by way of water, a new, public use canal is introduced so that fishermen and women can keep their product clean, and have a more abundant hold of fish and easily transport these and other goods to another part of the river.

AC01

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Plaza + Pavilions, Kiosks / Active with Shifting Use Pavilions and Kiosks provide these spaces with specific merchandise and other goods exchange. These spaces hold this activation with no change in performance but can change in the individual’s use of the space.

local farmer’s market close proximity to crops to keep it fresh vertical component available for expansion

biodiverse surface surface acts as host to multiple plant species that can be segregated, integrated or allowed to grow without intervention

URBAN FARMING // Programming the Surface 都市種田 // 編程表面 local farmer’s market close proximity to crops to keep it fresh vertical component available for expansion

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urban design studio : shanghai

in progress construction an inevitable component of context in the city

operative wall added walls allow for a new understanding and definition of integration and segregation within the context

operative wall added walls allow for a new understanding and definition of integration and segregation within the context new activation plaza + park

new activation tower new activation plaza + park

operative wall

existing tower water’s edge local ecologies chinese bamboo chinese chestnut

local ecologies japanese maple chinese chestnut

manipulated infrastructure roadways are pushed below the surface to allow for the park and plaza to connect the river to the interior of the site

inoperative wall the inoperative wall is an existing condition that heightens the fragmented state of a given area, however they do not allow for added program or events to exist

Within the fragmented site, there are certain components of conflict (such as building demolition sites, 15’ walls that deny physical exchange, collections of materials barricading whole streets) that restrict the development of a part-to-part relationship required for an environment to send and receive information between others so that they may react, evolve, or exchange properties. Instead the objects remain in a state of stagnancy that produces a field of non-communicating objects void of exchange.

DNA-01 // Performances + Events 脫氧核糖核酸-一 // 性能 + 活動

new activation dock

DNA-02 // Performances + Events 脫氧核糖核酸-二 // 性能 + 活動


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added tower

new activation tower

new activation drive in market marketplace

new activation elevated walkway existing tower

new activation plaza + park operative wall added walls allow for a new understanding and definition of integration and segregation within the context

in progress construction an inevitable component of context in the city

inoperative wall the inoperative wall is an existing condition that heightens the fragmented state of a given area, however they do not allow for added program or events to exist

DNA-03 // Performances + Events 脫氧核糖核酸-三 // 性能 + 活動

local ecologies chinese bamboo yulan magnolia

DNA-04 // Performances + Events 脫氧核糖核酸二 // 性能 + 活動


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urban design studio : shanghai


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These environments were required to intensify to regain local control of building and urban programming.

New Intensities 新的強度


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urban design studio : shanghai

CONTINGENT URBANISM Scott Russell Wooten Shanghai is a city of cranes: Building, modifying and demolishing to accommodate a consistently evolving urban and social environment. They occupy the space between forms adding themselves to a transitory skyline as they create the more static urban landscape. The facade of this landscape is all but static, with intricate, seemingly infinite facades that are redesigned each day by the inhabitants and their push to utilize the facade however they see fit. On almost every facade, families create Ad hoc cages for an extra closet or extend a frame for clothing lines. Few projects are permanent; most are subject to change and for this reason Shanghai is a Contingent City. This is an exploration into the potentials of utilizing the contingent nature of the city as an urban design strategy. This is done by developing a system that is infinitely adaptable and varied with respect to specific urban conditions. For example, the emergence of an ad hoc market, or the walling off of a new residential super complex. Rather than these conditions having a subconscious affect on the city they are actively used to adjust and reshape the system, allowing for the accommodation of every contingency. This is a study into embracing the transitory nature of the city instead of having two conflicting forces, one being the master plan and the other consisting of the actual contingent conditions of the urban landscape that is Shanghai.


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urban design studio : shanghai

UTILIZING URBAN VOIDS Simon Alvarez The investigation began with an evaluation of the rapidly expanding Shanghai Metro system. Since the first line opened in 1993, it has become one of the fastest growing rapid transit systems in the world growing to 14 metro lines with plans to expand to 22 lines spanning 877 kilometers by 2020. With almost 9 million riders annually, the expansion of the metro system is unmatched by any system in the world. The metro system began in an already existing and functioning city. In order for the metro to expand as quickly as it is, there is a system of excavation that occurs below an already existing landscape of buildings and underground systems. As this excavation occurs, a network of pathways is created by navigating around existing conditions of the underground landscape. These paths create their own networks with gravitational nodes being the metro stops. Through the creation of these paths a new landscape is created from these paths that weave and connect together at these nodes of convergence. As the network above ground continues to expand, so does the network of paths underground. As the city expands it begins to stretch out the urban fabric and create moments where the fabric ruptures and then rebuilds itself. This rebuilt edge creates void places in the fabric. It is when these are rebuilt that zones are created that could be conflictive. In a city where almost every space is occupied, its these voids that become plastic and adapt to the needs of the new space. These void spaces begin to describe what is left behind. These emptyfull sequences are created by the extensivity of the existing urban fabric and the void places from the ruptures in the urban fabric. These void spaces are not spaces meant to be reinvented or reequipped, but these voids could become spaces that are accepted for their plastic and adaptive qualities.


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Zhon

gshan

Rd South

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Fux

ing

Eas

t Rd

g East

Fuxing East Rd

Rd

Wangjiazuijiao

St.

Zhongua Rd

Henan South

Rd

Xizang South Rd

Zhon

gshan

Rd South

Fuxin

Dongjiadu Rd Dongjiadu Rd

Dongjiadu Rd

Pattern A Pattern b

Pattern d

Zhong

sha

n So

uth

Rd

Pattern c

Patterns showing extents of main axis of buildings

As the site gets more developed the density of the patterns begins to break

newly developed areas have little to no orthogonal organization

Region closest to the River has a stronger directionality than the rest of the site

Zhon

gsha

n Sout

h Rd

//Differentiating PATTERNS

Shanghai 2014 Scale: 1:1000 N

Fux

ing

Eas

t Rd

g East

Fuxing East Rd

Rd

Wangjiazuijiao

St.

Zhongua Rd

Henan South

Rd

Xizang South Rd

Zhon

gsha

n Sout

h Rd

Fuxin

Dongjiadu Rd Dongjiadu Rd

Zhong

sha

n So

uth

Rd

Dongjiadu Rd

EXTENSIVITY OF HARD EDGE

EXTENSIVITY AXIS

NEW VOID PLACE

HARD EDGE

Shanghai 2014 Scale: 1:1000 N

VOID PLACE CENTROID NETWORK

//EXTENSIVITY

Void Cluster Network

Void Locations

Zhon

gsha

n Sout

h Rd

Void territory

Fux

ing

Eas

t Rd

g East

Fuxing East Rd

Rd

Site Fractures

St. Wangjiazuijiao

Zhongua Rd

Henan South

Rd

Xizang South Rd

Zhon

gsha

h Rd n Sout

Fuxin

Dongjiadu Rd Dongjiadu Rd

Zho

ngs

han

South

Rd

Dongjiadu Rd

//Void Networks

Shanghai 2014 Scale: 1:1000 N


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urban design studio : shanghai

Pedestrian and bicycle commuter Paths [The connections of the agricultural voids serve as a pedestrian circulation path that allows the pedestrian several experiences of the same space.]

Circulation Path [These paths connect the main access routes that border the site of inquiry]

Existing Lilong [These show the stark contrast between the old housing units that are now disappearing and the new apartment towers that are being built on the site]

Individual and community scale agricultural area: wheat and corn fields [Previously unused spaces now allow for a recultivationof the land. This allows a 1:1 ratio of urban agriculture to area of developed land.]

Intimate Public Park forest Expansion [This is meant to rehabilitate the natural plant ecologies of Southern China as well as expanding on the biodiversity of the area. This brings a new hierarchy to the center of Shanghai by explicitly bringing nature back into the center of the city.]

Existing Residential Apartment Building [This area thrives because of the dense population that formed its own distinct neighborhood. These existing buildings house most of the people that work in the area. This allows the area to form their own identity and be self sufficient.]

Individual and community scale agricultural area: soybean fields [The scale of production ranges from commercial crops,to permaculture, to neighborhood scale food productionto support the local markets.]

Elevated Circulation Paths [By elevating the circulation, the use of previously unused or even unnoticed space is now essential to moving about the site.]

DNA_01


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Hardscape [The hardscape park allows for a meterial change that reflects the diverse material palette being used in the new construction and older building types]

Pedestrian and bicycle commuter Paths [The connections of the agricultural voids serve as a pedestrian circulation path that allows the pedestrian several experiences of the same space.]

Circulation Path [These paths connect the main access routes that border the site of inquiry]

Existing Residential Area [This area thrives because of the dense population that formed its own distinct neighborhood. These existing buildings house most of the people that work in the area. This allows the area to form their own identity and be self sufficient.]

Intimate Public Park forest Expansion [This is meant to rehabilitate the natural plant ecologies of Southern China as well as expanding on the biodiversity of the area. This brings a new hierarchy to the center of Shanghai by explicitly bringing nature back into the center of the city.]

Individual and community scale agricultural area: tea field [The scale of production ranges from commercial crops,to permaculture, to neighborhood scale food productionto support the local markets.] DNA_02

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urban design studio : shanghai

ECONOMIC VOLATILITY Matt Blake The single most powerful driving force behind the ever-changing urban landscape of Shanghai is money. Having the best of the best and looking wealthy is as integral to the upper class Shanghai elite as it is to the city’s global image. Shanghai exists where a Rolex or Omega store only a few blocks a way at any point and $200,000 Bentley’s float through the dense motor scooter traffic. Wealthy businessmen are wooed at expensive and exclusive nightclubs to convince them to lean toward closing the deal. Many of these deals include major land development deals that directly affect the urban fabric of Shanghai. These urban shifts are amplified by the Chinese government’s ability to manipulate the urban structure at will. Mega-corporations and land developers collude with the government to expand new development to increase the Gross Domestic Product or GDP. This is an extremely common occurrence all over the world however, Shanghai in particular has a desire to expand quickly and the government has the power to implement this progression uninhibited. Although this stimulates the economy, thousands of lower class individuals are forced out of their homes to make way for new construction. That being said, new development pushes onward, puncturing the existing urban fabric to rapidly expand into new territory. These disruptions create oscillating conditions between new and old than is reflective of the economic tendencies of Shanghai. Just as corporations cause large economic shifts that have repercussions, the aggressive new development into the remaining portions of old Shanghai drastically alters the urban fabric as a whole.


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urban design studio : shanghai TO PARIS TO SEOUL

ISOLATED PRIVATE PARK

RESIDENTIAL & RETAIL

TO LONDON


TO MONACO TO PUDONG

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TO THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

TO VANCOUVER

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TO BEIJING RIVER FRONT PARK

TO TOKYO

NR

SHA NG ZHO

FERRY TERMINAL

D

OA

PUBLIC PARK

PRIVATE CLUB TOWER

CENTRAL PLAZA YACHT CLUB & MARINA

TO SYDNEY

TO LAS ANGLES

MASTER PLAN

SCALE: 1=750M

N


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urban design studio : shanghai

RECLAIMING URBAN ECOLOGIES Richard Lucio Shanghai is a vibrant center for trade, economics, and culture maintaining a distinct identity that is a blend of Western and Chinese influence. The primary artery that feeds Shanghai’s existence is the Huangpu River. It is a source of water for the locals while also acting as the primary avenue for shipping manufactured products out of the city. The river however is heavily polluted, ranging from Class V up to Class VII pollution levels, creating a detriment to the area at large. The exponential growth of Shanghai in conjunction with the conversion of native marshlands, streams and river to hard-surface has allowed the water quality to deteriorate at alarming rates. The primary emphasis of this proposal is to re-introduce natural marshland ecologies to cultivate landscape contexts that are native to Shanghai. Said ecologies would counteract pollution levels by cleansing water through a five step filtering process. The strategy would display the filtering process and educate the community on the native systems used to clean the river water. Mutual interventions between existing site conditions and the performative topography would be intertwined via a series of paths, corridors, overpasses, tunnels, and platforms that lead people to the permeable edges of the filtering pools. The proposal is ultimately a snapshot in time regarding the potential re-introduction of filtering marshland ecologies as a factor in eradicating Shanghai’s water pollution epidemic while establishing a useable public space for the people of Shanghai.


intensive differentiations

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OUTPUT 1 RATIO 1:5

OUTPUT 2 RATIO 1:5

OUTPUT 3 RATIO 1:5

urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai Shachang Rd

Shacha

ng Rd

Zixia Rd

13

Zonghua Rd

Bio Swale

Storm Water Catchment

Miezhu Rd

Wangjiazuijiao St

12

Bio Swale

5

4) Sand for Filtering Water Infiltration Wetlands

3) Filtering Wetland Bands Infiltration Wetlands

Xiaonanmen

Line 9

Station

Bio Swale

5

Wangjia Matou Rd

2) Terraced Wet

Wangjia Matou Rd

Main Water Cou

5

B

Wangjiazuijiao

St

Miezhu Rd

Dongjiadu Rd

Elevated Performance Plaza:

Vegetated platforms that connect to provide an open public space to allow for cultural events and performances.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

boat docks public space |passive| elevated performance plaza |active| ecological interpretive center |productive| water run-off inlet pavilion |passive| boardwalk |passive| aquatic life threshold wild life habitat |productive| pond gardens |passive| wildlife observation deck |productive| fishing shore bank |active| floating gardens |passive| crop gardens |productive| passenger ferry docks the cool docks

Water Filtering Plants + Decorative Trees

river current direction circulation access points tunnel road ferry path direction circulation flow direction river water inlet flow exposed striation pattern hidden striation pattern hidden topography facets water drainage flow

mount

bulrush

foxnut

pickerel weed

japanese roof iris

common reed

thalia

papyrus rush

thalia

arrowhead

umbrella papyri

maiden grass

river club-rush

aquatic canna

river club-rush

manchurian wild rice

small reedmace

chinese plum tree


15

intensive differentiations

- 55 BEI RD.

PU RIVER HUANG

ANG DONGT RD.

JIANG

JUNG GON G RD. NG

RD.

GJIA

DONGGOU GANG

KON

ANG GCH LON

13

YA BR NGP ID U GE

RD.

RD.

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UPU GSH YAN

U

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GP

RD.

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YANG

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RD.

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SHA

JIAN

LUO

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13

DONGDAMING RD.

RD.

NAN

JING

FU ZHOU

RD.

RD.

ANG ZHANGY

EAST

YAN

AN

RD.

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RD.

PU DONG

U GP R

RD.

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RENMIN

RD.

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RD.

SOUTH

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EAST

GANG

JING

EAST

HUANGPU RIVER

JING

BEI

RD.

YANG

EAST

14

Infiltration Wetlands

EAST ZHONG SHAN NO. 1 RD.

NAN RD.

SUZHOU CREEK

MING

CHUAN RD.

MIDDLE HE

MIDDLE SI

14 5) Cleansed Water Reservoir

DA

SOUTH

EAST

RD.

ZHONG

HE NAN

SHAN NO. 2 RD.

ZHANGJIA BANG

RD.

SHA

RD. DONG

NA NP BRIDG U E

N

TH

ZHO LONG

SOU

YANG

RD.

AN LUB

14

Site of Inquiry

RD.

NG

Main Water Course

SOUT H PU

LU JIA BANG

5) Cleansed Water Reservoir RD.

LING

RD. BAILIAN

LING

Bio Swale

LUPU BRIDGE

LON

GHU A GAN

G

HU AN GP

U

RI

VE

R

Elevated Surfaces

9

G HE

CHUANYAN

Bio Swale

11

DIANPU HE

Bio Swale

10

9

10

Bio Swale

7

9

8

7

6

tland

urse

1) Sediment Ponds Main Water Course

4

Pavilion:

A non-enclosed volume that is formed by the path striations. the pavilion opens onto a large public space.

Bio Swale

1) Sediment Ponds River Feed

5

2

3

River Feed

1 Ecological Interpretive Center:

Educating about the native marshland ecologies that are being employed to filter and cleanse the polluted Huangpu River water.

River Feed

Constructed Water Inlet

To Z

ha

ng

jia

ba

ng

Ca n

al

japanese cherry tree

weeping chinese cypress

an To N

yulan magnolia

pu

Br

idg

e

A

Flow

of Wat er Cur

rent

Huangpu River

Master Plan

Shanghai 2014 Scale: 1:750 m


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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

NIP / TUCK Jigga Patel Those undergoing cosmetic surgery fall into a wide gamut of individuals with a wide range of needs and desires. However, it must be noted that with the proliferation of cosmetic surgeries, a sense of normalcy has been skewed to an environment where only a small percentage of individuals can attain perfection through non-surgical means, and the larger percentage achieving their personal goals and desires by going “under the knife.� With aesthetic beauty serving as a requirement for success in many fields, there has been a sharp rise in operations catered to those who must maintain an optimal physical appearance in order to succeed (or even compete). In the end, we are left to question notions of beauty and how it is achieved within a society peering through warped lens. In order to begin a discussion on beauty and notions of duality within current society, several Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery Centers are utilized within the project. Located in Shanghai, China, the facilities will focus on the physical, the associated psychological care of patients, and the development of surgical care techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. To confront the often conflicting aims of the public and private realm, this project includes the development of three primary event types; active, passive, and productive. The event types act to transition and/or juxtapose the private facilities with the surrounding public landscape. This project ranges in scale from the master plan to the detail, oscillating between extremes of scale as required to enable the investigation.


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

LEVEL 1 // productive 1級 // 生產力的事件類型

LEVEL 2 // passive 2級 // 被動的事件類型


intensive differentiations

LEVEL 1 // productive 1級 // 生產力的事件類型

LEVEL 2 // passive 2級 // 被動的事件類型

LEVEL 3 // active 3級 // 活動的事件類型

LEVEL 4 // infrastructure 4級 // 基礎設施系統

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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

COMMUNAL POCKETS Anaelisse Elias For centuries in China, more specifically Shanghai, communal lifestyles have dominated. Families have aspired to house many generations under one roof. This has created a culture of communalism, encouraging children to put the group first and themselves second. But because of the rapid urban and economic growth of the city, this sense of communalism is being lost and a more individualistic china is emerging. Many Chinese like to do things together, from washing dishes to watching TV. At home, at work, and at school, people are encouraged to do things as a group. This is a culture where people often put the group first and personal space second. This type of living though is not just about socializing with each other, but it is also about sharing. In many Chinese neighborhoods, people are often required to share toilets, and other water facilities between many families. Communalism in Shanghai is dying because of the rapid urban and economic growth of the city. Many families have been forced to relocate to new towers in order to redevelop the area where their home is. But often, once people move into the towers that sense of communalism disappears. Many don’t even have an idea of who their neighbors are, leading to a more individualistic lifestyle. Communal living in Shanghai is disappearing and people are being forced to adapt to a new lifestyle, individualism. From a western point of view this can be completely normal, but from an eastern perspective it can be more shocking. Many are not only having their homes taken away, but also their friends, families, lifestyles and memories.


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

public / social plaza living communities urban farming / fruit trees

public / social plaza public plaza (various events)

semi private community spaces

bike and pedestrian pathways

living communities

community produce garden

urban farming

bike and pedestrian pathways

community markets

public plaza (various events)

public plaza (various events)

DNA 2 Shanghai 2014 Not To Scale DNA 1 Shanghai 2014 Not To Scale


row houses

public plaza

row houses

row houses

semi-private plazas

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row houses

communal garden

row houses

communal garden

surrounding area

semi-private plaza

public plazas

semi-private garden

market / commercial area

semi-private plazas

intensive differentiations

public park

surrounding area

Transverse Section Shanghai 2014 Scale: 1:750 m

circulation

row houses

housing communities semi-private social areas

markets

vegetation

relationship between markets, produce gardens in the community

produce garden & urban farming

produce gardens markets row houses

main circulation paths

zoning

transition area

residential / semi-private (social) area

socail / public area

commercial / public area commercial space may also be used to socialize

Longitudinal Section Shanghai 2014 Scale: 1:750 m

Concept Diagrams Shanghai 2014 Not To Scale


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urban design studio : shanghai

FUTURE MEMORIES Gilbert Perez Initially upon arriving in Shanghai China, the original focus critique derived from the broken street facade. Looking upon various cities like New York, Rome, and Dubai, (just as examples) there is a sense of logic which organizes the layout of urban infrastructures, parks, plazas and dwellings. There lies an inherent and continuous repetition of fluidity from structure to street, from street to sidewalks, etc. For the site of Inquiry located in Shanghai China, this is not the case. Because of Shanghais ability to demolish buildings through such careless means, the old city of Shanghai is quickly vanishing, leaving nothing but debris and faint memories of what once was. The site of inquiry contains various locations where demolition has occurred. Within these locations lie a disruption of fluidity within the site and its fragmented facade. Demolition causes disruptions and leaves void where there was once memory. Essentially the critique evolved, much like the city has over the years, after having visited the site of inquiry. The people that live in the residential areas on site are content with their surroundings and accept their living conditions as is, as a way of life. Venturing through the site, there are many special moments that one experience. Hidden paths which connect throughout the entire site expand and create unique spaces. The existing structures have aged over time and obtained a unique patina which expresses the city’s historical memories. The overall goal of the proposal is to recreate active and productive spaces using what already exists, not to be preserved for historical values but rather for experiential values.


intensive differentiations

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FUTURE MEMORIES DNA I WATER FRONT ACTIVITES BUSINESS OFFICE PLAZA RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY SPACE MIXED USE BUSINESSES OUTDOOR SEATING AND RESTUARANT PARK AND PARKING METRO ENTRANCE

urban design studio : shanghai

FUTURE MEMORIES DNA II WATER FRONT ACTIVITES HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL PARKING RETAIL MIXED USED HOTEL OUTDOOR SHOPPING/ VENDORS FUTURE MEMORIES MALL PARK


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

COLLAGED ECOLOGIES Annette Bajema As she exits the subway, wind carries the smell of dumplings, the laughter of groups crowed around the Mahjong table, and the distant drill of construction. Looking across the street, she saw the familiar sprawling market, mingling with open green space dotted with trees and benches. Small gardens are starting to bloom, being carefully attended by some of the women living in the shukimens nearby. Walking through the market, each tent provides shade for local artisans, and street venders that have been living in this neighborhood since she could remember. The windows of the upper level apartments are open, displaying laundry on lines cross crossing overhead and small faces peaking out the window. Continuing through the alley between the patchwork of walls that make up the growing neighborhood, doors open up onto the street, displaying some shop, workshops, and any other facets of life. If she looked closely, she could still find the seam between the original walls and the walls made of the recycled bricks form demolished buildings from the demolition site a few blocks down. Tin, bricks, tiles, and wood flesh out the once disintegrating skeletons of the historic housing, creating new community space out of the rubble. She enjoyed the exotic smell of Bar-B-Que, looking through the windows into the nice stores, and the shaded seating areas taking full advantage of the view. At the water’s edge, the buildings shift from new materials back to the familiar materials of the neighborhood and stretches out over the water. Boats dock here to take advantage of the shopping and food available around the public plaza formed. Sitting on a bench on the edge of the dock, she let her mind wonder over the captivating Shanghai skyline.


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

HYBRID TYPE_03_B

DNA_01

NEW NEW SURFACE:RUBBLE

HYBRID TYPE_02_F

RECYCLED MATERIAL_01_A

NEW OLD SURFACE:OLD BUILDING OPEN

BLUE TIN

RECYCLED MATERIAL_02_A GRAY BRICK

RECYCLED MATERIAL_02_B RED BRICK

HYBRID TYPE_02_F

RECYCLED MATERIAL_01_B

NEW OLD SURFACE:OLD BUILDING CLOSED

GRAY TIN

HYBRID TYPE_03_A NEW NEW SURFACE::OLD BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE_03_B

NEW NEW SURFACE:NEW PUBLIC SPACE

HYBRID TYPE_02_D

NEW OLD SURFACE:NEW PUBLIC SPACE

HYBRID TYPE 01: OLD OLD A) SURFACE 1: EXISTING LANDSCAPE B) SURFACE 2: RUBBLE C) SURFACE 3: DEMO D) SURFACE 4: NEW LANDSCAPE E) SURFACE 5:NEW BUILDING F) SURFACE 6: EXISTING BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE_02_F NEW OLD SURFACE:OLD BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE 02: OLD NEW A) SURFACE 1: EXISTING LANDSCAPE B) SURFACE 2: RUBBLE C) SURFACE 3: DEMO D) SURFACE 4: NEW LANDSCAPE E) SURFACE 5:NEW BUILDING F) SURFACE 6: EXISTING BUILDING HYBRID TYPE 03: NEW NEW A) SURFACE 1: EXISTING LANDSCAPE B) SURFACE 2: RUBBLE C) SURFACE 3: DEMO D) SURFACE 4: NEW LANDSCAPE E) SURFACE 5:NEW BUILDING F) SURFACE 6: EXISTING BUILDING

DNA_03 HYBRID TYPE 01: OLD OLD A) SURFACE 1: EXISTING LANDSCAPE B) SURFACE 2: RUBBLE C) SURFACE 3: DEMO D) SURFACE 4: NEW LANDSCAPE E) SURFACE 5:NEW BUILDING F) SURFACE 6: EXISTING BUILDING HYBRID TYPE 02: OLD NEW A) SURFACE 1: EXISTING LANDSCAPE B) SURFACE 2: RUBBLE C) SURFACE 3: DEMO D) SURFACE 4: NEW LANDSCAPE E) SURFACE 5:NEW BUILDING F) SURFACE 6: EXISTING BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE_02_F

NEW OLD SURFACE:EXISITING BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE 03: NEW NEW A) SURFACE 1: EXISTING LANDSCAPE B) SURFACE 2: RUBBLE C) SURFACE 3: DEMO D) SURFACE 4: NEW LANDSCAPE E) SURFACE 5:NEW BUILDING F) SURFACE 6: EXISTING BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE_03_E

NEW NEW SURFACE: NEW BUILDING

RECYCLED MATERIAL_03_B LIGHT WOOD

RECYCLED MATERIAL_01_C RED TIN

RECYCLED MATERIAL_04_A ROOF TILES

RECYCLED MATERIAL_02_D WEATHERD BRICK

RECYCLED MATERIAL_05_A STONE

HYBRID TYPE_02_F

NEW OLD SURFACE:EXISITING BUILDING

HYBRID TYPE_03_B NEW NEW SURFACE: RUBBLE


intensive differentiations

- 77 -

SECTION_02

HYBRID_02

HYBRID_03

PRODUCTIVE_01

ACTIVE_01

MARKET

HOUSING_02

STREET

EXISTING

SECTION_01 HYBRID_02 HYBRID_03

HOUSING_01

HOUSING_02

PRODUCTIVE_01

NEW

EXISTING

MARKET

LONG SECTION_01

THE BANK OF SHANGHAI

THE COOL DOCKS WORKSHOP

RESTAURANT

HYBRID_02

PRODUCTIVE_01

ACTIVE_01

MARKET

STREET

TURTLE RESCUE HYBRID_02

HYBRID_03

HOUSING

HYBRID_03

PRODUCTIVE_01

ACTIVE_01

MARKET

STREET

HOUSING

PRODUCTIVE_01 MARKET

PUDUNG


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urban design studio : shanghai

PHASE-LESS SHANGHAI David Isern As a city Shanghai has embarked in an ever changing, multifaceted, and diverse culture. From the French concession of the 1920s to the American housing development, and the fast industrial outbreaks that the city has within, all happens with a constant changing phases. Shanghai will keep changing for centuries to go. Its rapid growth creates a phase-less city that inherently leads to have a phase-less identity. Regardless of what it is done to the city, Shanghai will keep changing; new instantaneous moments will keep occurring and outbreaks of the city living will keep permeating Shanghai. This will ultimately maintain the medley of features of the city and not allow for a singular identify to be ever created over a period of time. It can be said, therefore, that Shanghai’s identity is that it has no identifiable identity. This is true in the Site of Inquiry, where despite any changes that have occurred on the city over the years, the space and the vivacity of the voids are simple phase-less and unidentifiable. Therefore, with this fast changing spaces of the city many of the spaces of plasticity are created, nestled in-between outburst of the phase-less-ness. These can start to create and maintain and identity. Clusters start to become space of possibilities that allows for identity to be created and maintain not as a singular unit but as a continuous collection of dissimilar identities that create the city itself. All of this occurs in a negation between the city’s speed, the city spaces, and the voids within. It is at this moment that the city can unveil its’ true identity, itself. Shanghai as a city can keep operating at its fast pace, and utilizing the speed and the phase less changes as the driving force for the city to find its own identity.


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

THE URBAN CREASE Valeria Sierra With a shift towards urban tendencies, Shanghai has reached a point of intensive differentiation due to its fast growing urban sprawl. With a population increase of 40% seen between the past 15 years, Shanghai has seen a large shift in its agricultural affinities. The percentage of agriculture land use decreased from 71.45% to 41.32%, while the urban land-use held 18.2% in 1994 yet rose to 41.9% in 2000 (Wang, MedLine). The city has grown so rapidly it very quickly decreased its agricultural terrain towards a more modern landscape of the city. In the collision of tensions and forces, the now urban land is left with a crease caused by the scenario of these clashing conflicts. The crease is caused by strain in the programmatic spaces causing the terrain to fold. The continuity between the spaces and forces allows for the fold to wrap and unwrap. Cultivating both aspects of what makes up Shanghai, the urban crease responds to the intermediate space that occurs in the collision. The site located opposite the financial district of Shanghai, amidst the tallest towers, feeds the extreme difference between urban land and rural land, combining them in an ecological coexistence. The field will then be “irrigated with potential�: that is to say, architecture and infrastructure create concentrations of density that in turn trigger concentrations of activity. Shanghai’s transformable terrain becomes a canvas for its volatile folds, creasing the transition to a rapid growing urban environment.


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

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intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

SYNTHETIC SENSITIVITIES Taylor Patton Alien interference causes disruption, but also creates new evolutions. These Collisions create a series of oscillations that are consistently conflicting with one another. These oscillations are developed by direct and indirect conflicts. They do not necessarily have to touch one another in order for a conflict to arise. The presence or the encroachment upon the existing condition enforces engagements between one another. A majority of the conflicts resolve in one condition overcoming the other, whether it is subtle or complete domination, but in some cases the engagements stay in constant balance. Even though they are not able to claim superiority, indentations are placed as a result of this conflict. In particular to Shanghai, the developed are dominating over the neglected Lilongs causing social and economical conflicts between the two. These conflicts create a wide range of agitated surfaces that are particularly sensitive to the existing site conditions. The new Synthetic Surface enhances the life of the neglected rather than destroying the social and cultural atmosphere that is already presented.


intensive differentiations

- 89 -


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urban design studio : shanghai

EventSubtraction : [Method] Synthetic SurfaceEngagesand occupies the void left behind from construc tion. Blurs the line between private and public space. The user is able to inhabit the Lilong without actually interfering the private spaces.

Existing Structure [private] Subtraction [engages]

EventInsertion : Synthetic Surface [viewing platform / courtyard]

[Method] Synthetic SurfaceInserts/ Puncturesthrough the once unhabitable structure in order to develop new social interaction between user and structure.


intensive differentiations

- 91 -

EventIsolation : [Method] Synthetic SurfaceEncroachesbut never fullyEngagesthe Lilong. Creates tension between the new surface and the existing structure. Enhances existing public social interaction. Synthetic Surface [viewing platform / courtyard]

Insertion [path] Unhabitable Structure

Enhance Social / Public Interaction

Isolation [encroachment] Existing Structure [private]


ogies

- 92 -

urban design studio : shanghai Park / Playground

Fishing Pond Wetland Ecologies

Manicured Ecology

Zhongshan South Road

Planted Facade

Access Elevated Pathway

from

Street

Farmer’s Market

Picnic / Park Manicured Ecology Woodland Ecology

Pier

Event : Imbrication / Indendation Path / Park / Market / Pier / Pond

Huangpu River

Elevated Pathway [above] Farmer’s Market [below]

Event : Imbrication / Indendation Path / Park / Market / Pier / Pond

Fishing Pond / Wetland Ecologies Huangpu River

Event : Addition Apartment / Lofts Public Plaza [level 1]

Elevated Pathway [above] Farmer’s Market [below]

Event : Imbrication / Indendation Path / Park / Market / Pier / Pond

Elevated Path [above] Market Row [below]

Existing Building Pond / Wetlands

Fishing Pond / Wetland Ecologies

Hike / Bike Trail Woodland Ecologies

Huangpu River

Pond / Wetlands

Longitudinal A

[1 : 750]

Event : Addition Apartment / Lofts Public Plaza [level 1] Event : Addition Apartment / Lofts Public Plaza [level 1]

Event : Addition Apartment / Lofts Public Plaza [level 1]

Existing Apartments

Interpretive Center

Recreational Facility

Existing Building

Park / Garden Soccer Field

Elevated Path [above] Market Row [below] Transverse C

Event : Addition Apartment / Lofts Public Plaza [level 1] Elevated Path [above] Market Row [below]

Existing Building

Pond / Wetlands

Recreational Facility

Park / Garden

Fishing Pond / Wetland Ecologies

Existing Building Pond / Wetlands

Hike / Bike Trail Woodland Ecologies

[1 : 750]

Recreational Facility

Pond / Wetlands

Transverse D

[1 : 750]

Longitudinal A Park / Garden

Transverse C

Existing Building

Pond / Wetlands

Soccer Field

[1 : 750]

Event : Addition Apartment / Lofts Public Plaza [level 1]

Existing Apartments

Interpretive Center

Recreational Facility

Existing Building Elevated Path [above] Market Row [below] Fishing Pond / Wetland Ecologies

Park / Garden

Transverse D

[1 : 750]

[1 : 750]


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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Review Photographs by Denny Mingus


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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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Review Photographs by Denny Mingus


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urban design studio : shanghai


intensive differentiations

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urban design studio : shanghai

Jeffrey S Nesbit holds a Master of Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, and a first Master of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Architecture from Texas Tech University. Nesbit is the founding director of Haecceitas Studio and currently teaches design studios and seminars on urban theory at Texas Tech University along with an architecture studio abroad in Seoul Korea. His work focuses on the investigations of urban organizational strategies based upon the generation and evolution of topological behaviors. Furthermore, Nesbit has concentrated his architectural inquiry into issues of urbanism and the constructed landscapes, through projects such as the waterfront landscapes of downtown Detroit, the post-industrial sanitation site in West Harlem, New York City, and more recently his research in megalopolis’ of Northeast Asia. Nesbit has received various honors for both his works and research, including gallery exhibitions in Philadelphia, New York City, Beijing, and Seoul.


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2014 Participating Students: Simon ALVAREZ Annette BAJEMA Matthew BLAKE Anaelisse ELIAS James HAMMERS David ISERN Richard LUCIO Jigga PATEL Taylor PATTON Gilbert PEREZ Valeria SIERRA Scott WOOTEN


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urban design studio : shanghai

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS SPECIAL THANKS TO INDIVIDUALS WHO AIDED THE STUDIO

Jerry Del Fierro and Effie Yu (Neri & Hu, Shanghai) Tien-Hao Lin and Scott DeLoache (5+ Design, Shanghai) Ricky Hele, (RAHDBS, Shanghai) Yang Nan (Aedas, Beijing) Carl Wen (Beijing) Charles Waldheim (Urban Agency, Boston) Elizabeth Mcdaniel (TTU Study Abroad) Denny Mingus (TTU) FINAL REVIEW JURORS: John Cays (NJIT) John Clegg (Page/) David Driskill (TTU) Kevin McClellan (UTSA, Tex-Fab) Victoria McReynolds (TTU) Christian Pongratz (TTU) Martha Skinner (Clemson) Dustin White (TTU)


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urban design studio : shanghai

Urban Design Studio: Shanghai  

This body of work investigates alternative solutions to the conventional and widely accepted standards of urban planning models. Rather than...

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