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New name for old mall Q&A with The Retail Coach Americans still shopping

November 2013

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THE NORTHEAST MISSISSIPPI


BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013

A new identity

Midtown Pointe shakes off former name, changes focus BY DENNIS SEID BUSINESS JOURNAL

TUPELO – In its four decades of existence, the former Tupelo Mall has been renamed Gloster Creek Village and, most recently, Gloster Creek Professional Medical Mall. And it now has another new name – Midtown Pointe. Signs will be going up soon to illustrate the rebranding. The change coincides with the opening of the Midtown District, a group of stores and restaurants in the area which also wanted to carve their own niche in the AllAmerica City. Midtown Pointe now becomes the anchor for the district. “It’s a new day and a new identity,” said Daniel Hicks, the owner of Fame Creative and part of the marketing and advertising team advising Midtown Pointe’s owners. “Nothing connects a new direction like a new brand.”

The owners – Chris Mills, Dr. Steve MIlls, Sean Koehn and Jason Perry – bought the center in June 2012. Their plan all along was to turn the struggling retail mall – which had been home to a handful of shops and restaurants over the years – into a true medical mall, a home for medical-industry related tenants. Its

proximity to the North Mississippi Medical Center and a cadre of related medical providers and services is ideal. Hicks and Tracey Morton of the TSM Agency, will market and advertise the 217,000-square-foot complex as a premier site for additional professional and medical tenants.

Midtown Pointe already is home to Cardiology Associates, an orthodontist, an optometrist and Acclaim, the third-party administrator for North Mississippi Health Services. Retailing, to no one’s surprise, is no longer a priority as the old mall has moved into a new era. “The medical mall idea is something that’s been growing in popularity over the years, especially with older malls,” said Chris Mills. The restaurants – Honeybaked Ham, Sir Antony’s, Miss Ruth’s Express, Sweet Tomato Pizza Kitchen – will remain. The iconic Carmelcorn Shop isn’t going anywhere either. Koehne said he and his fellow owners appreciates the long-time tenants who have stayed with them during the center’s evolution. Mills said Midtown Pointe has a 70 percent occupancy rate and expects that number to grow soon.

“We’ve made a lot of changes but we’ve got a lot more coming,” Koehn said. The facade of the complex has been renovated with a more uniform look. The roof has been replaced. Landscaping has been reworked. Old signs have been replaced. During the next few weeks, the restaurants in the food court will get new facades and signs. Wood flooring will replace the tile in the area, and new furniture will be placed. The restrooms are being replaced, as is plumbing throughout the facility. Plans include opening a highend coffee shop and creating an Internet cafe-like atmosphere. Meeting and catering space are available now, and long-term plans call for the addition of 8-10 extended-stay suites for physicians, residents and others who TURN TO MIDTOWN, 18

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acts and figures. Data. Statistics. For some people, crunching numbers is a fun exercise in trying to figure out what it means. Take, for example, the retail sales for Mississippi during fiscal year 2013, which covers July of last year to June of this year. According to the state Department of Revenue, the state pulled in $46.8 billion dollars in gross retail sales, compared to $45.2 billion for FY 2012. That’s a 3.65 percent increase. You’re probably wondering what Lee County – the retail hub of Northeast Mississippi – registered. How does $1.8 billion sound? That, my friends, is no small chunk of change. But what exactly are people like you and I buying? Here’s a sampling of where some of our dollars went last year across the state. Some of it what you find may surprise you: • Automobiles (new): $3 billion. Mississippi is home to a Nissan and Toyota plant.

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Where our money goes • Automobiles (used): $759 million. And you wonder why CarMax wants to come to Tupelo? • Auto parts, DENNIS tires and accessories: $809.1 SEID million. I’ve got an 11-year-old car with 300,000 miles, so I contribute. A lot. • Gasoline service stations: $210.1 million. I’m betting gas prices helped. • Motorcycle dealers and repair: $124.2 million. Sorry, no help here. • Auto repair shops: $667.4 million. See comment above regarding auto parts, etc. • Car washes: $9.1 million. When spring rolls around, chaching! • Farm equipment: $258.2 million. No surprise here, really. • Grocery stores, general: $2.1 billion. Remember the tip:

Never grocery shop when you’re hungry. • Quick-stop grocery stores: $1.8 billion. Who doesn’t want some beef jerky for the road? • Restaurants and cafes (no alcohol served): $2.4 billion. I contribute my fair share. • Restaurants and cafes (alcohol available): $977 million. Ditto above comment. • Package liquor stores: $304.5 million. No comment. • Furniture stores: $417.6 million. Buy early and often. You’re keeping Northeast Mississippians employed. • Department stores: $6.49 billion. Almost what Walmart makes in a week. • Shoe stores: $188.92 million. My son and I share the same shoe size now. I see savings down the road. • Fence dealers: $22.14 million. Fences do make good neighbors sometimes. • Neon and other signs: $22.86 million. Check with City Hall before you get order sign, though. • Monuments and tomb-

stones: $21.7 million. You’re dead – what does it matter? • Drug stores: $370 million. Because we just don’t have enough pharmacies. • Antique and secondhand stores: $123.69 million. Not my cup of tea. • Books and stationary: $246.6 million. This should be much higher. • Sporting goods and bicycles: $378 million. If you have a kid playing a sport, you know. • Jewelry stores: $112.8 million. I’m surprised it’s this low. • Florists: $92.36 million. Ditto. • TV cable service: $326.5 million. That’s nearly $223 million, or 40 percent less than the previous fiscal year. • Hotels, courts and motels: $691.4 million. I wonder how many more hotels we’ll see in Tupelo? • Laundry, dry cleaning: $85.8 million. Worth it if you hate to iron. • Shoe repair: $2.5 million. A dying art. • Exterminating services:

$87.3 million. We’ve got bugs. Lots of bugs • Soft drinks: $13.7 million. Seems a bit low, but that’s what the department said. • Beer: $489.3 million. Wow. That’s about $163 per person in the state. • Distilled alcoholic beverages: $313 million. That averages about $104 per Mississippian. • Electric power associations: $291.7 million. Electricity – can’t live without it. • Motion picture shows: $65 million. Do people still call them motion picture shows? • Bowling, billiards and pool: $14.7 million. I need more practice. • Skating rinks: $4.3 million. Skating and I do not make a good combination. • College athletics: $30.97 million. And none of that is going to any student-athlete. So now you know where some of your money is going. Shop til you drop. dennis.seid@journalinc.com

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013


BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013

Christian bookstore still strong after 25 years |

BUSINESS JOURNAL

CORINTH – When Gary and Donna Holley opened New Life Christian Supply in 1988, they hadn’t followed the usual – or recommended – path to starting a new business. Rather than seeking out a void in the marketplace and developing a solid business plan, Gary Holley said he followed the plan God led him to pursue. “I come from a Christian family and had worked for ITT for 20 years,” he said.“In my 15th year I began to pray about a business to serve God and make a living. One day I heard God say, ‘Open a Christian bookstore.’” Gary Holley said he didn’t want to argue with God, but thought,“We’ve already got a Christian bookstore” here. Then he heard the response: There are gas and grocery stores on every corner, so why not another Christian bookstore? Donna Holley was caring

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NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN

BY LENA MITCHELL

EST.: 1988 OWNERS: Gary and Donna Holley EMPLOYEES: 6 PHONE: (662) 287-5885 Corinth; (662) 538-3311 New Albany; (662) 287-2088 H & L Monuments ADDRESS: 2686 S. Harper Road, Corinth, MS 38834; 126 Chrystal Plaza Drive, New Albany, MS 38652

THOMAS WELLS | BUY AT PHOTOS.DJOURNAL.COM

Gary and Donna Holley opened New Life Christian Supply in 1988, and have since expanded the business. for their two young children, so both had long, challenging days. But together they began to visit stores in Memphis, writing down an inventory list of the kinds of merchandise they wanted to offer.

Letters sent to 30 different suppliers drew little positive feedback to help them get their business off the ground. However, they saw it as God’s affirmation of their intent when a major gift company representative and

a major Bible company representative agreed to work with them if they could make full payment for their first orders. They were off and running, with money from the sale of other assets and fi-

nancial backing from a relative. In the 25 years since they began – including the first five years until the business could pay the couple a salary, and a financially challenging 2012 – the Holleys have expanded.The opened H & L Monuments to sell burial monuments and tombstones in 1993, and a second store location opened in New Albany in 1998. They enjoy having a Christian business environment

where they can welcome their five granddaughters. Their daughter Carrie Loncar – who is married to Josh Loncar and has three daughters – works in the business, as well as their son Cory Holley, married to April Holley and with two daughters. The merchandise in the stores includes Bibles and other literature, church supplies, music, lots of gift items for all occasions, custom embroidery, handbags, Tshirts, jewelry and much more. “We’ve struggled like many other bookstores with single-song downloads from the Internet, but we burn CDs for folks and sell a tablet with downloadable books,” Gary Holley said. “It’s been hard and we might have quit if we didn’t know it was God’s will. This is a ministry first and a business second. It’s not all about the money, we want to meet people’s needs. Our motto is ‘Our family serving your family.’” lena.mitchell@journalinc.com

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THOMAS WELLS | BUY AT PHOTOS.DJOURNAL.COM

Consumers may be a little worried about what they’re paying for holiday gifts this year, but spending is expected to be higher than last year, most retail analysts say.

Despite worries, Americans still will shop BY DENNIS SEID BUSINESS JOURNAL

The government shutdown last month put a dent in the economy, and it also stoked some economists’ fears that consumer confidence would take a dive and hurt holiday sales. We won’t know if that turns out to be the case until another couple of months. At least one group agrees that American consumers are anxious. But the concerns are about the cost of holiday shopping. RetailMeNot, which is the nation’s largest digital coupon site, and Ipsos Public Affairs conducted its eighth annual international survey of holiday shopping behaviors. The online survey was conducted in June, with more than 10,000 people in 11 countries responding. About 1,000 interviews were done in each of Australia, France, Germany, Italy, the U.S., Canada, Great Britain, India and China, and 500 interviews were done in Sweden and the Netherlands. Results were weighted to the general adult population ages 16–64 in each country (or in the U.S. and Canada, 18–64).

The result showed that about 25 percent of Americans are worried about costs, yet more than half (56 percent) surveyed think they’ll spend about the same or more than they did last year. The survey also showed about 40 percent planned to start shopping before October to spread out the costs. Only Australia (42 percent) and India (41 percent) had more shoppers starting this early. “We saw a lot of the early shopping being in September, following a soft back-to-school season,” said Trae Hodge, a senior editor with RetailMeNot. “So a lot of consumers found some good deals. ... and they’ll continue through the holidays.” Back-to-school is a precursor to the lucrative Christmas shopping season, but disappointing results forced retailers to begin discounting and offering special deals earlier than usual. “The stores had to clear space for that holiday merchandise that was coming in,” Bodge said. But even with the early start to deals, she doesn’t think Black Friday sales will be negatively affected. Retailers have long lined up electronics, apparel

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DID YOU KNOW?

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• Global shoppers are spending for the holidays. Gift-givers in Sweden (71 percent), Germany (64 percent), and Canada (59 percent) expect to spend about as much or more than last year. • China leads online shopping. Nearly all (99 percent) of Chinese respondents plan to do some of their shopping online, compared to 90 percent of U.S. consumers. Of those Americans, 24 percent plan to buy their gifts online. Source: RetailMeNot.com and other special buys for the day after Thanksgiving, and won’t be altering their game plan. Still, to ensure consumers keep shopping, retailers will continue to offer deals now through the holidays. “As a consumer, you just have to keep your eyes peeled out for the items on your shopping list,” Bodge said.

BUYING PATTERNS

And that will play into the hands of Americans who like to shop yearround for their holiday TURN TO SHOPPING, 18

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013


BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013

Online reviews a thorny issue for small-business owners BY VIRGINIA BRIDGES THE NEWS & OBSERVER

RALEIGH, N.C. – Mobley’s Shoes’ whole business concept depends on its customer service. Since 1950, the store has been providing and fitting shoes for children and women and has depended on its customer service to compete against larger stores. That’s why the owners of the Raleigh, N.C., shop are concerned about the filtering of online reviews onYelp, a website that allows customers to rate and review businesses. The site has a practice of filtering reviews and showcasing ones that have been chosen by data processing software. Mobley’s Yelp site shows that the shoe store has one review with a three-star rating from 2008. There are additional reviews, but they have been filtered by Yelp. The filtering system, said Clifton Mobley, who runs the store with his father and his brother, is frustrating be-

cause it makes it hard for others to see those positive reviews. Also, one review can end up representing the company for years, he said. Yelp was founded in 2004 and has an average of 108 million unique monthly visitors and more than 42 million reviews. According to a 2013 Nielsen study, about 85 percent of consumers find local business information online. Also, about 70 percent of consumers trust online reviews somewhat or completely, according to a 2012 Nielsen study. Online opinion was second only to recommendations from people they know. Mobley and others are learning to navigateYelp and its review and filtering process. Here are some things to know before using Yelp. WRITING FAKE REVIEWS IS ILLEGAL: Federal truth in advertising guidelines require transparency any time there is a product or service review, according to Glen Gilmore, an attorney and social media

MCT

Clifton Mobley waits on customer Ameya Marshall, 2, as she sits in a special booster chair at his family business, Mobley Shoes, in Raleigh, N.C. Mobley is concerned about the impact online feedback site Yelp has on his business. expert who teaches at Rutgers University Center for Management Development in New Jersey. In 2009, the Federal Trade Commission updated its endorsement guidelines to include social media, Gilmore

wrote in an email. The guidelines say any connections between a reviewer and the business that’s being reviewed need to be disclosed.This means reviewers should disclose whether they are an employee or a relative, or whether they received a free or discounted service or product, Gilmore said. When people sign up for a Yelp account – either as a consumer or as a business claiming an account – they agree to limit their reviews to first-hand experiences and to not endorse themselves or write negative reviews about competitors. Many states have laws similar to the federal regulations. REVIEWERS CAN BE SUED: Reviewers can be held accountable for malicious and false reviews. “People are entitled to express their opinion about a meal or service online, but they’re not entitled to lie in what they post without exposing themselves to a lawsuit,” Gilmore wrote. There is no protection from being sued for defamation, the communication of false fact that damages the reputation of another, just because they post it on a third-party website, he said. If a business has concerns about aYelp review, it should first reach out to the site. Mobley contacted Yelp after suspecting that a negative review had been posted by a former employee; Yelp removed the review.

If the site refuses to remove a fake review, the business can file a lawsuit that seeks to establish the identity of the reviewer to demonstrate a case for defamation. “Unfortunately, this is a lengthy and costly process,” Gilmore wrote. Review sites are protected by a federal law that essentially gives immunity to providers of interactive online services from claims related to content posted by third parties, he wrote. ALGORITHM USED FOR FILTERS: Yelp representatives said the company uses an algorithm to highlight and identify useful and authentic reviews, but some owners say that the practice is used to leverage advertising. About 25 percent of Yelp reviews are filtered, said Darnell Holloway,Yelp’s senior manager of local business outreach. The system, which sometimes allows authentic reviews to be filtered while fake reviews get through, isn’t perfect, but the company’s intention is to provide useful information to consumers, he said. “Our software treats advertisers and non-advertisers exactly the same,” Holloway said. “There is no correlation between whether or not a business chooses to advertise and the activity of a review filter.” Yelp started to recognize fake reviews shortly after it was founded, Holloway said. So it created a filter to highlight authentic content. The

filtered reviews are located on each business’ Yelp page. To see them, however, users must click a link and fill out a “Captcha” code. “Business owners thought they could gain traction in the online space by creating testimonials for themselves and leaving negative reviews for competitors,” Holloway said. Some small-business owners complain about Yelp’s practices. Joey Ashley, co-owner of theThe Organic Bedroom in Raleigh, said he has had issues with Yelp. His company’s Yelp page has two reviews – a one-star and a five-star – but also has 16 five-star reviews that have been filtered. Last spring, Ashley expressed his concerns to a Yelp advertising representative who had contacted him and then suggested that the filters wouldn’t be as strong if Ashley bought advertising, Ashley said. A couple of days later, about four positive reviews were released, Ashley said. But later, after Ashley said he wouldn’t advertise, those reviews went away. “It is completely a company that holds small businesses hostage,” Ashley said. Holloway reiterated that advertising on Yelp has no influence on the filtering system. Reviews may shift, he said, if a reviewer’s activity increases or there’s a change to the filtering algorithm. RESPOND TO NEGATIVE REVIEWS: Don’t obsess over negative reviews, said Angela Connor, senior vice president and group director at Capstrat, a full-service marketing agency in Raleigh. Owners should have a system that will help them decide whether and how to respond to negative reviews. When owners do respond, they should demonstrate some sort of sympathy or acknowledgment and then offer to take the conversation offline, she said. “You will never win if you try to fight in a review forum,” Connor said. “And no one is going to look bad but the business owner.” If owners don’t like the way a site has treated them, they should claim their brand on other sites such as Facebook and share content that shows the great things their business is doing, Gilmore said.

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Q&A with The Retail Coach Kelly Cofer has worked with clients in 25 states

BY DENNIS SEID BUSINESS JOURNAL

TUPELO – Kelly Cofer, the CEO and president of The Retail Coach, has been in the retail industry since 1985. After graduating college, he worked in the Dallas/Fort Worth area as a retail broker, finding sites for retailers and restaurants, and worked for a developer leasing retail space in the metroplex. He then moved to Tupelo to work in the real estate division for Hancock Fabrics for several years, finding sites nationwide for the company. He then opened his own consulting practice in 2000 in Tupelo. The Retail Coach is a national retail recruitment and development firm, which has worked for clients in 25 states from coast to coast. Business Journal Editor Dennis Seid recently interviewed Cofer.

the demographic profile. They don’t want to see dramatic demographic shifts. They want to see a growing, stable community where they can proQ. FOR THOSE who aren’t tect their investment. quite sure what you do, They want to minimize describe your company. risks. That’s why we’re A. WE’RE BASICALLY REbusiest in certain states. TAIL STRATEGISTS in the in- Illinois is good for us bedustry and work for cause it’s a growing state. municipalities, economic Texas is always a mainstay development organizafor us because they are tions and, a really growing the last to go in a slowpart of our business, real down and always the first estate developers. From to recover. the consulting standIf I were to say in 2013 point, I started my busiwhat retailers are looking ness as a commercial for, because of our conbrokerage firm in Tupelo sumer confidence being a and was able to land a yo-yo. …. retailers are number or retailers here, looking for areas where including Logan’s Roadthere are lower unemhouse. Then this consult- ployment rates and where ing practice for the housing market is municipalities grew out of starting to recover. my experience with marIt’s happening in many ket analyses, site selection markets across the counand those kinds of things. try, but they’re the most Q. IN YOUR YEARS of dramatic in Illinois and doing this, what are retail- Texas. ers looking for when Q. DURING THE DEPTHS of they’re looking for a site? the recession, how much A. THERE ARE A FEW COM- activity was going on? MON DENOMINATORS that A. KNOCK ON WOOD, our retailers – and I’m also in- business is somewhat recluding restaurants – are cession-proof. During looking for. 2008-2009, when things They want a stable were so bad, communicommunity, and by that I ties then, as they do now, mean in terms of growth, were looking to expand

ADAM ROBISON | BUY AT PHOTOS.DJOURNAL.COM

their tax base. We’re finding traditional economic development doesn’t trickle down in this day and age. The days are behind us where economic developers are waiting for a major project to land in their lap. They have to be proactive. The definition of economic development has changed to include retail as a component. I don’t think it’s the driving force behind economic development, but it’s definitely a part of it. Q. THERE ARE ONLY so many manufacturing jobs available. A. THAT’S RIGHT, and we can talk about a lot of our businesses going offshore that’s gone on in the past 10-20 years. Retail is a quick fix to some of that. And it’s a quality of life issue. One place in Illinois we’re talking to, the plant manager is concerned that his wife has to drive miles to do their shopping. So again, retailing is a part of economic development. Keeping those retail dollars in your community is important. … and depending on your community determined your

potential for retails. Q. YOUR OUTREACH is nationwide and you’re based in Tupelo. How would you describe Tupelo and Northeast Mississippi, and how would you market the area? A. TUPELO HAS A COUPLE OF ADVANTAGES. One, it’s where it’s located geographically. It’s the hub to many satellite communities. Geography has been key for Tupelo, set between Memphis and Birmingham, with arterials coming through that really put it on the map. Tupelo is ground zero for a large trade area. And it’s employment base is absolutely key to that as well. But I don’t use Tupelo as an example or case study in my work a lot because its somewhat of an anomaly.

For a community of 35,000 people to have a few million square feet of retail development, is absolutely unheard of. It’s almost a perfect storm that we’re in a rural state, people are willing to drive long distances to shop and Tupelo was able to recognize this years ago. It developed the mall area and the rest is history. Very unusual to see that in a community this size. Q. AND THERE ARE STORES AND RESTAURANTS in Tupelo that normally wouldn’t be here. A. OH, absolutely. Q. THERE’S ALWAYS TALK of additional big-name retailers and restaurants looking at Tupelo. We have to bring up Target, of course. What are your thoughts? A. IT’S INTERESTING ABOUT

TARGET. Incentives have been such a big part of the retail game. Historically, they’ve been a part of the industrial economic development game, and now incentives are part of the retail economic development game. Target is accustomed to be given 14-15 acres in order to enter a market. They’re getting it all across the country. Until Tupelo, a developer, a property owner is willing to pony up 14-15 acres, they (Target) are going to be patient because they’re getting it elsewhere across the country. They’re not going to do anything different for Tupelo than they are anywhere else in the country. TURN TO COFER, 18

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013


O

BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013

Why are you ‘whelming’ the public?

ur vocabulary includes “overwhelmed” and “underwhelmed,” so why not “whelmed?” I would like to think it is an indicator of how low an impact it makes on us when our expectations are met. We will brag when we’re overwhelmed with a good experience. We will certainly complain when our expectations are not met. The negative impact of being underwhelmed begets a high degree of attention. We have enough books to fill several libraries on the subject of not disappointing customers. Even more books are titled and subtitled “meeting customer expectations.” Too many times organi-

zations are concentrating so diligently to not disappoint a customer and wind up only Marketing meeting their exMatters pectations. JOSH Most MABUS business owners would call an experience in which a customer’s expectations were met a success. I call it “whelming” the customer. The role of all marketing and advertising is to facilitate word of mouth. It tells people to talk and it in-

For one reason, we’ve been lied to. Over and over marketers tell us that people are much more likely to talk about a bad experience than a good experience. Because risk is weighted heavily toward a bad experience, we put our efforts toward preventing them. This fits logic, but in the end, we’ve used up all our time and resources trying to prevent the bad. We should’ve been creating the great. forms them on what to say. Customer experience is a key part of marketing. You need to know that customers do not talk about expectactions simply being met. So why do we govern for the lowest common denominator – to not disappoint the customer? Well, for one reason, we’ve been lied to. Over and over marketers tell us

that people are much more likely to talk about a bad experience than a good experience. Because risk is weighted heavily toward a bad experience, we put our efforts toward preventing them. This fits logic, but in the end, we’ve used up all our time and resources trying to prevent the bad. We should’ve been creating the great. A recent study by Keller

Fay Group and MediaVest proved that positive is more powerful than negative. According to their study, positive experiences (75 percent) are more likely to generate word of mouth than negative experiences (25 percent). The study also pointed to the customer experience being an important motivator in creating word of mouth (20 percent).

In basic math, the study says a customer is three times more likely to share a good experience than a bad one. That tells me you should devote three times the resources toward creating a wonderful experience for your customer. Begin to make the shift from the old paradigm of avoiding negative reviews and create overwhelmingly positive experiences for customers. You will not be able to make every area of your business overwhelming, but make sure you are not simply “whelming.”

JOSH MABUS is the owner of The Mabus Agency, a marketing and advertising company in Tupelo. Contact him at (662) 823-2100 or josh@mabusagency.com.

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PAGE 8


ChamberConnection A publication of Journal Publishing and the CDF Chamber Division – November 2013

That’s the Ticket HAVE YOU PURCHASED YOUR TICKET? CDF Chamber of Commerce Staff

After years of organizing the Taste of Tupelo and evaluating the return on investment for all participants, we decided it was time for an upgrade. Not only has the event had a complete overhaul by combining two events, the Taste of Tupelo and Business to Business Expo into one much larger event, we've decided to increase the event's professional value by requiring the purchase of a ticket. Whether through referrals or the expansion of your professional network, your return on investment will be well worth it. Change is good- see for yourself at the new Taste of Tupelo!

Taste of Tupelo Tuesday, November 5

The 2013 Taste of Tupelo Premier Busi- event. Exhibitors and attendees are enness Expo will be held Tuesday, Novem- couraged to find new vendors, strategic ber 5 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the partners, and clients, all while expandBancorpSouth Arena. The Taste is a high- ing their visibility within Tupelo/Lee energy, high-traffic event offering area County’s business community. Exbusinesses an opportunity to grow their hibitors will offer product demonstraprofessional networks and meet new tions, complimentary samples, and leads and customers, all while giving the first-hand information about their goods Northeast MS business community a and services. “taste” of the latest and greatest services Kathy Cofer, The Imaging Center Ditheir businesses have to offer. rector of Marketing said, “The Imaging The annual business Center has participated expo, formerly an invias an exhibitor since the tation only event for first year the business Community Developexpo was held. In addiment Foundation tion to the valuable net(CDF) members, has working opportunities extended its hours and the Taste of Tupelo prois now open to the vides, it has also been public. The event is an invaluable asset in held specifically for the growing our business. promotion of local One year we offered $99 businesses, restaucardiac scoring screens rants, and caterers, ofexclusively to the expo fering more than 90 attendees. In the three businesses the oppormonths following, we tunity to showcase performed over 400 their products and screenings all as a direct services to hundreds of result of our booth at the attendees. Last year, Taste of Tupelo.” more than 1,300 attenThe Taste of Tupelo is dees enjoyed sampling the largest exhibition of delicious drinks and its kind in Northeast Mistastes while networksissippi and provides an ing with exhibitor opportunity to meet with booths. In addition to a variety of companies local restaurants, doing business in the recaterers, and bakeries, gion. Whether in search Kathy Cofer the Taste of Tupelo will of a contractor, advertisfeature exhibitors from ing agency, caterer, or inThe Imaging Center various industries interior decorator – the cluding health-related, Taste of Tupelo is a onebanking, manufacturstop-shop for discoverers, retailers, educational institutions, ing numerous local businesses. and more. Throughout the evening, attendees “The Taste of Tupelo is beneficial to all will register for door prizes offered by exbusinesses big or small,” said Karen Ged- hibitors. die, VP of the Chamber. “It provides the Doors to the Taste are open to the pubperfect opportunity for exhibitors to lic from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. Tickets are availshowcase their products and services to able for adults ages 21 or older and may a large group of people at one time.” be purchased for $5. Produced by CDF, the event is in it’s For more information about the 2013 eigth year of providing a business-to- Taste of Tupelo or to purchase a ticket, business and business-to-consumer call (662) 842-4521 or visit one-day power sale and networking www.cdfms.org/events.

‘One year we offered $99 cardiac scoring screens exclusively to the expo attendees. In the three months following, we performed over 400 screenings all as a direct result of our booth at the Taste of Tupelo.’

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A CDF


CHAMBER CONNECTION

Chamber Focus “It’s not what you know, but who knows you!”

events, like the Business Roundtable, and large events, like the upcoming Taste of Tupelo Business Expo. Our Tupelo Young recent article Professionals’ Lunch with on Reuters.com Leaders targets a particuabout the lar group, while Business power of business Geddie After Hours is open to networking included a members and non-memcomment from a reader that bers of all ages. added the twist above to the old The most successful business adage “It’s not what you know, network is a two-way street, but who you know.” Of course it’s where value is added to both parmore complicated than that, but ties. Networking with other busiit makes a valid point about why ness leaders can provide Chambers of Commerce provide opportunities to do joint vena variety of networking events. tures with other local businesses. By definition, networking is We have also witnessed relationbuilding connections between ships that provide mentoring for individuals, and networking is other member businesses, which important for business for a is also a primary focus for our number of reasons. Whether Ambassadors. you're seeking out contacts that A healthy business network is could help grow your business or an asset that provides a wealth of reliable sources for different serv- benefits. Your Chamber team is ices and products, there's no bet- working to provide the ideal netter way to achieve your overall working opportunities for you. goal than networking. Join us. As a member of the CDF Chamber, we try to offer a variety Karen Geddie of networking opportunities for Vice President our members. There are small Chamber of Commerce

A

New CDF Members BNI United Professionals Ms. Teresa Baker 1018 N Gloster St., Ste. C Tupelo, MS 38804 (662) 322-8207 www.bni.com Organizations ChopStick Mr. Yueling Zheng 150 S Industrial Rd. Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 842-1688 Restaurants & Catering Golden Crown Textile Mr. Brian Leathers 398 E Main St., Ste. 209 Tupelo, MS 38804 (662) 213-8197 Fabrics H & H Fabrication Mr. Kenny Hutcheson 1022 CR 222 Blue Springs, MS 38828 (662) 534-6960 Manufacturers/ Distributors

Community Development Foundation’s 2013-2014 Board of Directors CDF’s goals and objectives are accomplished through the efforts of members appointed to committees operating under one of CDF’s three divisions: Chamber of Commerce, Economic Development, and Planning and Property Management.

2013-2014 Executive Committee Mr. Chauncey Godwin, Jr., Chairman Mr. Shane Hooper, First Vice Chairman Ms. Lisa Hawkins, Second Vice Chairman Mr. David Rumbarger, President/Secretary Mr. David Copenhaver, Immediate Past Chairman

Mr. Tillmon Calvert Mr. Scott Cochran Mr. Clay Foster Mr. Bryan Hawkins Ms. Blair Hughes

Mr. Guy Mitchell III Mr. Barry Smith Ms. Jane Spain Mr. Buddy Stubbs Dr. Dick White

2013-2014 Board of Directors Mike Armour Bernard Bean Jim Beane Roger Bland David Brevard Mark Burleson Bo Calhoun Tillmon Calvert Gary Carnathan Grace Clark Mike Clayborne V.M. Cleveland Scott Cochran David Copenhaver Nettie Davis

Mike Eaton Doug Formby Clay Foster Chauncey Godwin, Jr. Julianne Goodwin Bryan Hawkins Lisa Hawkins Reed Hillen Frank Hodges Shane Hooper Blair Hughes Trentice Imbler David Irwin Jamie Kennedy Bob Kerley

Jeff King Gearl Loden Neal McCoy Robin McGraw Larry Michael Guy Mitchell Ted Moll Mabel Murphree Mary Pace Jim Pate Aubrey Patterson Jason Shelton Darrell Rankin Harry Rayburn Jack Reed, Jr.

NOVEMBER 2013

Scott Reed Eddie Richey Drew Robertson Ty Robinson Chris Rogers David Rumbarger Barry Smith Bobby Smith Jane Spain Gary Sparkman Buddy Stubbs Kiyoshi Tsuchiya Jimmy Weeks Dick White Tollie White

Hutcheson Electric Mr. Kenny Hutcheson 1022 CR 222 Blue Springs, MS 38828 (662) 534-6960 Electrical JP’s Ms. Janet Patterson 205 N Gloster St. Tupelo, MS 38804 (662) 842-7205 Restaurants & Catering Krispy Krunchy Chicken Ms. Ruth Erar 1001 Barnes Crossing Rd. Tupelo, MS 38804 (662) 419-9933 Restaurants & Catering Magnolia Health Plan Ms. Sharon McAlister 272 Tishtontee Rd. Mantachie, MS 38855 (662) 321-3842

McDonald Law Firm, PLLC Mr. Ned McDonald, III 111-D Town Creek Dr. Saltillo, MS 38866 (662) 869-0011 www.mcdonaldfirm.com Attorneys

Steele’s Restaurant, Inc. Mr. Jason Steele 4187 W Main St. Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 205-4345 www.steelesdive.com Restaurants & Catering

Sallye Stewart Event Planning Ms. Sallye Stewart P.O. Box 978 Tupelo, MS 38802 (662) 823-7737 Event Planning

TROVE Ms. Rebecca Lawrence 1725 McCullough Blvd. Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 269-3197 Retail & Specialty Shops

Simply Southern Sisters Ms. Vickie Ramirez 1336 CR 180 Blue Springs, MS 38828 (662) 316-2656 Restaurants & Catering

Tupelo Cab Mr. Malcomb Driskill 813 Varsity Dr., Ste. 9 Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 871-5039 Transportation

www.magnoliahealthplan.com

Insurance

2013-2014 Ambassadors Club Don Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mutual of Omaha Jesse Bandre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exceed Technologies Betty Baxter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bishop's BBQ Grill Belinda Brooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heartland Payment Systems N MS Stephanie Browning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hampton Inn & Suites Tupelo/Barnes Crossing Cindy Childs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mall at Barnes Crossing Matt Conway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gum Tree Mortgage Shirley Curry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crye-Leike, Realtors Sheila Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PPI, Inc. Barbara Doles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trustmark National Bank Demetria Donelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Hannahouse ADC Becki Duffie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kelly Services Romanda Fears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hampton Inn & Suites Tupelo/Barnes Crossing M. O. Harris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water Depot of Tupelo Toby Hedges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelter Insurance Jim Jolly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cracker Barrel Old Country Store Dana Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crye-Leike, Realtors Bea Luckett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRI, Inc. Realtors Brad McCully. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportsman Lawn & Landscape Katie McMillan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Key Staff Source Holley Meriweather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community Bank Leigh Monroe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Main Street Family Dentistry Carolyn Moss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quality Inn Ricky Orr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Renasant Bank Allen Pegues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Premium Productions Mendy Ramey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Renasant Bank Torrie Robertson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scruggs Lawn Care Connie Snell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Beginnings Mary Sue Tudor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lamar Advertising Lisa Wadley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sylvan Learning Center Ross Weems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BancorpSouth Stephanie West. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Best Western Plus Grady Wigginton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Shield - Grady Wigginton & Associates June Wigginton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Shield - Grady Wigginton & Associates

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Local Students Participate in BEST Robotics Competition Twenty-four high school student teams presented their robot creations October 18-19 during the 2013 Mississippi Boosting Engineering, Science, and Technology Robotics (BEST) competition in Starkville, Miss. Mississippi BEST is designed to inspire creativity in high school and middle school students who have an interest in the engineering, science, and technology. This year’s “Gatekeeper” theme focused on the fabrication of a central processing unit (CPU), with students competing to create the newest and fastest option. Teams were given six weeks to design and build a remote-controlled robot from the raw materials provided. The final product must complete a specific task. During the competition each team

Saltillo High School

Tupelo High School

Tupelo and Saltillo High School students competed in the 2013 Mississippi Boosting Engineering, Science, and Technology Robotics (BEST) competition held October 18-19 in Starkville. It was both schools first year to enter the competition each advancing to the semi-finals. Tupelo High was awarded 3rd place in the overall BEST competition. was judged on a marketing presentation, a vendor/sales booth, spirit, sportsmanship, engineering skills, a technical notebook, and robot per-

formance. The contest is free for students and schools to enter. A non-profit organization operated by volunteer groups, BEST is

designed to motivate students to think critically and compete at the highest level by introducing real situations encouraging them to work together

DEEP SOUTH CHARM – SCHOOL OF ETIQUETTE

In celebration of its grand opening, Deep South Charm – School of Etiquette held a ribbon cutting. Deep South Charm provides classes to inform children, adults, and businesses how good manners lead to success. Deep South Charm can be contacted at (662) 587-7500.

Wake Up! Tupelo/Lee County Friday, December 6 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. BancorpSouth Conference Center $12 Pre-registration $15 at the door Register at www.cdfms.org/events

to deliver the best solutions. The winning teams from the Mississippi BEST competition will travel to Auburn University to

compete in the South regional competition December 7-8. For more regarding the competition, visit www.msbest.msstate.edu.

ESTES GARAGE

Estes Garage recently held a ribbon cutting in celebration of its annual Customer Appreciation Day. Estes Garage is a family owned business delivering honest and professional auto repair and maintenance services to customers of the Tupelo and surrounding areas. Located at 5315 Purnell Rd. in Belden, Estes Garage also held a cookout and door-prize giveaways. They can be contacted at (662) 842–2696 or on the web at www.estesgarage.net.

AMBASSADOR OF THE MONTH Ross Weems, Commercial Loan Officer at BancorpSouth, was named Ambassador of the Month for September. Ross attended 13 events, mentored three CDF members, and volunteered at Down on Main. Congratulations, Ross!

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CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013


CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013

KRISPY KRUNCHY CHICKEN

LOLLIPOP BOUTIQUE

Krispy Krunchy Chicken at the Mall at Barnes Crossing held a ribbon cutting to celebrate its grand opening. Krispy Krunchy Chicken features Cajun-style signature dishes of tenders, jambalaya, catfish, and honey butter biscuits, as well as freshly prepared Mediterranean cuisine. They can be contacted at (662) 419-9933 and are located at 1001 Barnes Crossing Rd. in Tupelo inside the food court at the Mall at Barnes Crossing.

In celebration of its grand opening, Lollipop Boutique held a ribbon cutting. Lollipop Boutique is a children’s consignment shop carrying name brand, boutique, and trunk show children's clothes and shoes. They are located at 2301 W Main St., Ste. F in Tupelo and can be contacted at (662) 350-3238 or online at www.lollipoptupelo.com.

CDF WOMEN’S EVENT The Community Development Foundation recently held its annual Women’s Event. Designed to offer networking and educational opportunities for female project managers in the region, this year’s event included a tour of the Toyota Motor Manufacturing plant as well as a seminar on Japanese business etiquette.

Does your business have exciting news to share? Contact Mallory Rutledge at mrutledge@cdfms.org or (662) 842-4521 to have it published in CDF’s monthly e-newsletter, Chamber Connection 2.0.

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HUT NO. 8

Hut no. 8 held a ribbon cutting to celebrate its grand opening in the Barnes Crossing Shopping Center. Hut no. 8 buys and sells brand name clothes, shoes, and accessories for teens and young adults. They are located at 4376 Mall Dr. in Tupelo and can be contacted at (662) 350-3437 or on the web at www.hutno8.com.

THOMAS STREET COFFEE CO.

AVAILABLE To celebrate its grand opening, Thomas Street Coffee Co. held a ribbon cutting. A division of the American Family Association, Thomas Street Coffee Co. roasts premium coffee blends from around the world whose sales contribute to numerous evangelistic efforts. They are located at 161 S Coley Rd. in Tupelo and can be contacted at (662) 401-5797 or on the web at www.thomasstreetcoffee.com.

FLOWERDALE MARKETPLACE

103 TRIANGLE STREET TUPELO, MS 38804

ELOW S ARE B UES E C I R P G AL OFFERIN RD MARKET V A STAND

• 188,835 SQUARE FEET • INDUSTRIAL BUILDING • LOT SIZE: 6 ACRES Inquiries can come by: • www.huntergroupms.com • Call (662) 841-1557 • MLS# 13-2780 • www.Loopnet.com

ID 18377164 For Sale Information

• www.Loopnet.com

ID 18377182 For Lease Information

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES

• 78,000 square feet + Manufacturing facility for sale

• 635,000 Warehouse / Manufacturing / Office Space on Harper Road, Corinth, Miss,

266 Meadowbrook Drive, Hickory Flat, Miss

AVAILABLE FOR SALE OR LEASE!

• 1.5+/- Acre CORNER LOT at Old Belden

• 29 ACRE PRIME located at McCullough Blvd and I-22. Will build to suit!

Circle and McCullough Blvd., Tupelo, MS

JAMES R. HUNTER 662-841-1557

A ribbon cutting was held to celebrate the grand opening of Flowerdale MarketPlace. Specializing in unique antiques, home furnishings, gifts, original art, and vintage silver, Flowerdale is located at 146 S Industrial Rd. in Tupelo and can be contacted at (662) 840-8842 or at www.flowerdalemarketplaceandcafe.com.

www.huntergroupms.com

1547 MCCULLOUGH BLVD • TUPELO, MS 38804

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CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013


CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013

BAR-B-Q BY JIM

CHASE COMPUTER SERVICES

Bar-B-Q by Jim Smokehouse & Grill held a ribbon cutting to celebrate 20 years in business and the launch of their new dinner menu. Offering a variety of Bar-B-Q menu items, their new dinner menu also features pork and beef ribeyes and catfish, among other items. Bar-B-Q by Jim is located at 203 Commerce St., and can be contacted at (662) 840-8800.

In celebration of its first year in the Renasant Center for IDEAs, Chase Computer Services held a ribbon cutting. Chase Computer Services is a full service web and software development company. Located in the Renasant Center for IDEAs at 398 E Main St., Ste. 217, Chase Computer Services can be contacted at (662) 655-2019 or on the web at www.chasecomputerservices.com.

SWIRLZ

A ribbon cutting was held at Swirlz in Downtown Tupelo to celebrate five years in business and its new location. Swirlz, an invitation printing business that also offers gifts and monograming services, is now open at its new location at 130 W Main St. in Tupelo. Contact Swirlz at (662) 791-7822 or at www.swirlzonline.com

Join us for Business After Hours featuring the Budweiser Clydesdales! Thursday, December 12 || 5:00 – 6:30 p.m. Mitchell Distributing Warehouse 545 Commerce Street || Tupelo Free for CDF members || $5 for non-members Register online at www.cdfms.org/events

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LOCAL MOBILE

FISH LIPS WINE & SPIRITS

To celebrate its grand opening, local MOBILE held a ribbon cutting. Tupelo's first food truck, local MOBILE serves sliders, po’boys, and a truck cooked special, all made with fresh, local ingredients. Follow local MOBILE on twitter or “like” them on Facebook for their daily location. They can be contacted at (615) 337-2660 and are available for catering.

Fish Lips Wine & Spirits held a ribbon cutting to celebrate its grand opening. Explore new wine and spirits in a friendly atmosphere at Fish Lips, located at 119A City Market Dr. in Saltillo. They can be contacted at (662) 869-3646.

UPCOMING RIBBON CUTTINGS Join us in support of our Chamber members!

BNI United Professionals Wednesday, November 6 9:45 a.m. Renasant Center for IDEAs Lobby 398 E Main St. Dharma Wellness Wednesday, November 6 3:00 p.m. Renasant Center for IDEAs Lobby 398 E Main St. TROVE Thursday, November 7 2:00 p.m. 1725 McCullough Blvd.

Crye-Leike Realtors Thursday, November 7 4:00 p.m. 1289 N Gloster St., Ste. A Vista Ridge Apartments Friday, November 8 10:00 a.m. 699 Nation Hills Dr. JP’s Friday, November 8 3:00 p.m. 205 N Gloster St. Tupelo Cab Monday, November 11 4:00 p.m. 813 Varsity Dr., Ste. 9 ChopStick Tuesday, November 12 10:45 a.m. 150 S Industrial Rd.

Scruggs Lawn Care Wednesday, November 13 4:00 p.m. CDF Parking Lot 398 E Main St. Hampton Inn Thursday, November 14 4:00 p.m. 1516 McCullough Blvd. Charlie’s Catfish Friday, November 15 11:00 a.m. 2299 Hwy 145 Saltillo

Caron Gallery Thursday, November 21 4:30 p.m. 128 W Main St. Bishop’s BBQ Friday, November 22 10:00 a.m. 3018 McCullough Blvd. The Byrne CPA Firm Thursday, January 9 3:00 p.m. 343 E Main St., Ste. B1

McDonald Law Firm Tuesday, November 19 9:00 a.m. 111-D Town Creek Dr. Saltillo

Are you interested in promoting your business with a ribbon cutting? Contact Emily Addison at (662) 842-4521 or eaddison@cdfms.org.

Business Roundtable Wednesday, November 20 4:00 p.m. 398 E Main St. CDF Center CDF Boardroom For more information or to appear on the agenda, contact Karen Geddie at (662) 842-4521 or kgeddie@cdfms.org.

Business Boxed Lunch & Learn “Tax Avalanche in 2014” Sponsored by Watkins Uiberall, PLLC

Tuesday, November 19 11:45 – 1:00 p.m. CDF Boardroom This event is free to attend. Lunch provided by Watkins Uiberall, PLLC. Register online at www.cdfms.org/events

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CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013


CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013

Chamber Member Sponsors Local Business’ Chamber of Commerce Membership Through the Community Development Foundation’s (CDF) new “Pay it Forward” initiative, community members are supporting Tupelo/Lee County’s business community by sponsoring a one-year membership to CDF’s Chamber of Commerce for local businesses. Sponsors hope to assist the business’ growth through the benefits provided by being a Chamber member. For Lisa Hawkins, the latest Pay it Forward contributor, sponsoring a one-year membership for Dustin Parker, owner of AdHouse Agency, was a no-brainer: “The Chamber of Commerce is an excellent resource for all businesses whether new in town, established, small, or large. The Chamber provides multiple channels for brand awareness, networking opportunities, and helpful educational seminars. Being a member of the Chamber myself has really made a difference in helping expand my business visibility, growth, and

development in the area and I know it will do the same for AdHouse Agency.” With a Chamber membership, Dustin Parker is able to take advantage of numerous benefits provided to its members such as valuable professional development seminars, networking opportunities, and promotional tools and resources. "When I first opened AdHouse, I was looking for ways to market my business and expand my professional network. When Lisa Hawkins sponsored my CDF membership, I was given the chance to do both. Having the support of another business owner is encouraging and reminds me of why I have chosen Tupelo as the town in which I do business.” “In the three months we have offered this program, we’ve already had great response. It’s always exciting to see our business community support one another. We are all working for the same

cause – the betterment of Tupelo and Lee County,” said Emily Addison, Director of Membership Development for CDF. With nearly 1,200 members, the CDF Chamber of Commerce works diligently to help local businesses grow by working as an additional business partner and serving as an additional voice in the economic growth of Tupelo/Lee County. As a division of CDF, the Chamber provides business development seminars, networking opportunities, community leadership classes, publicity for your business, and much more. For more information about AdHouse Agency, call (662) 315–8709 or visit www.adhouseagency.com. To support your favorite small business and give back to your community with the valuable gift of a one-year CDF membership, contact Emily Addison at eaddison@cdfms.org or call (662) 842 – 4521.

Dustin Parker, owner of AdHouse Agency in Tupelo, discusses the benefits provided through the Community Development Foundation’s (CDF) new “Pay it Forward” initiative, in which community members support Tupelo/Lee County’s business community by sponsoring a one-year membership to CDF’s Chamber of Commerce for another local business. Sponsors hope to assist the business’ growth through the benefits provided by being a Chamber member.

JIM INGRAM CLI CLASS OF 2015

Lunch with Leaders Thursday, November 14 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 398 E Main St. || CDF Center || CDF Boardroom This event is free to attend. Lunch is provided. Space is limited. Register online at www.cdfms.org/events.

Interested in starting a business? Let the Renasant Center for IDEAs and the MS Small Business Development Center help you get started. The Jim Ingram Community Leadership Institute (CLI) class of 2015 held its opening dinner at the Elvis Presley Birthplace September 24. Created by the Community Development and CREATE Foundations, CLI is a two-year leadership program that enhances the development of community leadership, in addition to increasing personal and professional growth. The program entails one year of instruction and training and one year of community leadership re-investment. Pictured from L-R: (seated) Rhonda Chrestman, Amanda Angle, Rhonda Goss, Anita Knowles, Reta Doughty, Tammy Rodgers, Melony Armstrong, Mary Ann Plansencia, (standing) Jay Richer, Charlie White, Jimmy Weeks, Louis Marascalco, Greg Thames, Ben Beavers, Wesley Webb, Allie West, Robby Parham, Lane McClellan, Steven Blaylock, Jesse Bandre, Shelly McKee, and Gerald Patterson. Not pictured: Tommy Abney.

‘How to Develop a Business Plan’ November 5 1:00pm – 2:30pm

‘Starting a Business – First Steps’ November 14 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

‘Business Issues – Disaster Recovery’ November 12 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

November 21 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. To register for a workshop or for more information, contact Charles Killebrew at 1-800-725-7232 or umsbdc3@olemiss.edu.

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CHAMBER CONNECTION

NOVEMBER 2013

Chamber Member Sponsors Local Business’ Chamber of Commerce Membership Through the Community Development Foundation’s (CDF) new “Pay it Forward” initiative, community members are supporting Tupelo/Lee County’s business community by sponsoring a one-year membership to CDF’s Chamber of Commerce for local businesses. Sponsors hope to assist the business’ growth through the benefits provided by being a Chamber member. For Lisa Hawkins, the latest Pay it Forward contributor, sponsoring a one-year membership for Dustin Parker, owner of AdHouse Agency, was a no-brainer: “The Chamber of Commerce is an excellent resource for all businesses whether new in town, established, small, or large. The Chamber provides multiple channels for brand awareness, networking opportunities, and helpful educational seminars. Being a member of the Chamber myself has really made a difference in helping expand my business visibility, growth, and

development in the area and I know it will do the same for AdHouse Agency.” With a Chamber membership, Dustin Parker is able to take advantage of numerous benefits provided to its members such as valuable professional development seminars, networking opportunities, and promotional tools and resources. "When I first opened AdHouse, I was looking for ways to market my business and expand my professional network. When Lisa Hawkins sponsored my CDF membership, I was given the chance to do both. Having the support of another business owner is encouraging and reminds me of why I have chosen Tupelo as the town in which I do business.” “In the three months we have offered this program, we’ve already had great response. It’s always exciting to see our business community support one another. We are all working for the same

cause – the betterment of Tupelo and Lee County,” said Emily Addison, Director of Membership Development for CDF. With nearly 1,200 members, the CDF Chamber of Commerce works diligently to help local businesses grow by working as an additional business partner and serving as an additional voice in the economic growth of Tupelo/Lee County. As a division of CDF, the Chamber provides business development seminars, networking opportunities, community leadership classes, publicity for your business, and much more. For more information about AdHouse Agency, call (662) 315–8709 or visit www.adhouseagency.com. To support your favorite small business and give back to your community with the valuable gift of a one-year CDF membership, contact Emily Addison at eaddison@cdfms.org or call (662) 842 – 4521.

Dustin Parker, owner of AdHouse Agency in Tupelo, discusses the benefits provided through the Community Development Foundation’s (CDF) new “Pay it Forward” initiative, in which community members support Tupelo/Lee County’s business community by sponsoring a one-year membership to CDF’s Chamber of Commerce for another local business. Sponsors hope to assist the business’ growth through the benefits provided by being a Chamber member.

JIM INGRAM CLI CLASS OF 2015

Lunch with Leaders Thursday, November 14 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 398 E Main St. || CDF Center || CDF Boardroom This event is free to attend. Lunch is provided. Space is limited. Register online at www.cdfms.org/events.

Interested in starting a business? Let the Renasant Center for IDEAs and the MS Small Business Development Center help you get started. The Jim Ingram Community Leadership Institute (CLI) class of 2015 held its opening dinner at the Elvis Presley Birthplace September 24. Created by the Community Development and CREATE Foundations, CLI is a two-year leadership program that enhances the development of community leadership, in addition to increasing personal and professional growth. The program entails one year of instruction and training and one year of community leadership re-investment. Pictured from L-R: (seated) Rhonda Chrestman, Amanda Angle, Rhonda Goss, Anita Knowles, Reta Doughty, Tammy Rodgers, Melony Armstrong, Mary Ann Plansencia, (standing) Jay Richer, Charlie White, Jimmy Weeks, Louis Marascalco, Greg Thames, Ben Beavers, Wesley Webb, Allie West, Robby Parham, Lane McClellan, Steven Blaylock, Jesse Bandre, Shelly McKee, and Gerald Patterson. Not pictured: Tommy Abney.

‘How to Develop a Business Plan’ November 5 1:00pm – 2:30pm

‘Starting a Business – First Steps’ November 14 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

‘Business Issues – Disaster Recovery’ November 12 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

November 21 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. To register for a workshop or for more information, contact Charles Killebrew at 1-800-725-7232 or umsbdc3@olemiss.edu.

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Right niche key to successful downtowns BY ALAN J. HEAVENS MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

It’s the “Main Street” approach to revitalizing older towns and city neighborhoods. “Main Street,” as in Manayunk, Penn., where a postindustrial resurgence in the 1990s created a vibrant dining, club, and retail scene that’s still a draw today. Pick a walkable community and it has traveled a similar road back from the commercial abyss into which shopping malls drove many a downtown district. Restaurants, special events, festivals, and resurrected movie palaces lure visitors, who often become residents, attracted by relatively affordable homes and easy access to public transit. But it’s the third side of this revitalization triangle – retail – that often proves the toughest to build, local real estate and community-development observers say. What works in one town doesn’t necessarily work in

another. And what used to work doesn’t necessarily work now. What does offer promise time and again, these observers say, is finding the right retail niche to fill. On East Passyunk Avenue in South Philadelphia, a restaurant renaissance has “changed the dynamics” of neighborhood retail, resulting in a commercial vacancy rate of just about 4 percent, said Sam Sherman, executive director of the Passyunk Avenue Revitalization Corp. “The older retail shops catered to the day trade, but the new shops are focusing on the ‘working couple demo’ ” who come either for dinner or drinks when they leave work, Sherman said. The new retailers stay open in the evenings, to capture the growing after-dark crowd. The retail spaces there are not big, he said – 1,000 square feet or less – but they draw “high-quality shops.” “They don’t need much

MCT

East Passyunk Avenue in South Philadelphia has found the stores to complement its restaurant boom. because they aren’t going up against chains, and they know how to do social media, so the Internet is as important as a physical presence,” he said. Investment-grade retail is driven by traffic counts

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and household incomes, said Spencer Yablon, regional manager and vice president for real estate investment services firm Marcus & Millichap in Philadelphia. The big names locate where park-

ing is plentiful and free, where square footage is unlimited, and where other retailers already have succeeded, Yablon said. “The national retailers can’t step outside this box,” he said.

It’s often difficult for those responsible for nurturing business districts to figure out what else consumers might be looking for, said Danielle Redden, executive director of Lansdowne Future, the borough’s economic-development arm. To find out, her organization surveyed some of the thousands of area residents who frequent Lansdowne’s downtown farmers’ market each Saturday. A possibility the survey revealed: “some arts and crafts-based” businesses, Redden said. “The crafters who have booths at the farmers’ market do really well, so that kind of retailer might work well.” To encourage niche retail, it has to be easy for such businesses to set up shop, and for rents to be affordable. The “niche” part of the equation is the products or services these retailers offer, and each store typically depends on the others to generate traffic.

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013


BUSINESS JOURNAL

Cofer

peripheral development take place. So it’s a project for additional retail development. But again, for a FROM PAGE 7 smaller community, it’s reQ. SO ARE INCENTIVES ally hard to go to your GOOD OR BAD in the retail local retailers, your momindustry? and-pops, your independA. I’M NOT A FAN. It’s hard ent retailers and say, “we’re to offer incentives to a going to incentivize Lowe’s company to come in when or Home Depot or you’re going to compete whomever to compete with local businesses that with you.” have been there for 10, 15, Q. RETAIL HAS CHANGED 20 years that you haven’t DRAMATICALLY over the incentivized. past few years, particularly I’m not a fan, but I’ve with the online experilearned to accept it’s part ence. How does that affect of the game. what you do in recruiting I can agree with incenretailers and getting bricktives if they’re part of a cat- and-mortar locations alyst project, in a built? community where you can A.INTERESTINGLY ENOUGH, bring in a retailer, incenit really provides us more tivize them, then take a opportunities for our step back and watch the client communities.

What’s happening is that the online effect is causing retailers to shrink their brick-and-mortar footprints, and when you do that, you shrink your investment dollars to go into markets. So now, that opens up opportunities to go into markets they would not have considered before. The online pressure is incredible on retailers Best Buy, Staples, Office Max, Office Depot. … all of them are shrinking their footprints and only carrying what flies off the shelves. And they’re directing them in-store to online purchasing. They’ll say we’ll get that to your home or business the next day, trying to make it as painless as possible. Amazon

NOVEMBER 2013

has totally changed the game, no doubt about it. Q. WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE for communities and economic development organizations seeking to land retailers? A. WE REALLY SAY the foundational tool a community needs is they need to realize who they are. They need to know what their retail trade area is. That’s simply the boundary lines of how far shoppers are driving in to shop in your community. It’s not a circle, it’s not a drive=time. It’s always an irregularly shaped polygon based on road systems as well as competition from other communities. A lot of communities make the mistake of selling themselves as a popu-

lation and asking “are you interested in our community?” I can tell you, if someone isn’t familiar with Tupelo, the problem is, No. 1, you’re in Mississippi with a population of 35,000. That’s not large enough. Well, the story to be told is the retail trade area is 200,000 or 300,000 or whatever. Then you have something to sell. So determine what your trade area population is and sell yourself that way and not just as a population. If not, you’re limiting yourself. Q. AND THAT GOES FOR ANY COMMUNITY no matter the size. A. ABSOLUTELY. We’ve worked with communities with 2,500 people with trade areas of up to 40,000 |

Midtown FROM PAGE 2

have ties with tenants of Midtown Pointe.

EARLY CHALLENGE

While the business partners’ originally planned to renovate the entire complex over the next five years or so, their plans were scrambled not long after they bought it in June of last year. Less than a month later, a severe storm dumped several inches of rain in the area. And that’s when the new owners discovered they needed to accelerate their renovation plans.

95

“There wasn’t a single tenant that didn’t have a leak of some kind,” said Chris MIlls. A roofing company was already at work replacing the most critical areas of the 18-year-old roof. “Then the rain came and we had to redo the whole roof at one time, instead of spreading out the work as we had planned,” Mills. “We’re very blessed to be where we are,” he added. “When the rain hit our roof, we weren’t sure it we’d still be around.” After that rough start, the owners were able to resume giving makeovers to the exterior of the building and the landscaping. To date, not including

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of smart phone users search for local info on their mobile phones.

Is your website mobilefriendly?

http://thrive.ms

FROM PAGE 5

gifts. The RetailMeNot/ Ipsos survey revealed that more than one-fifth (22 percent) of holiday shoppers in the U.S. tend to buy products all yearround to spread out the cost. And while Black Friday is big in the states, it isn’t so elsewhere. For example, 47 percent of shoppers in Sweden and 40 percent in the Netherlands are more likely than others to wait until December– but before Christmas – to start their shopping. And nearly 1 in 5 (18 percent) shoppers in Italy are planning to shop in December immediately

the purchase of the building, they’ve spent more than $2 million on the improvements. With more work planned, that figure will grow. But it is an investment that will pay dividends down the road. “A large part of the vision we had is creating a community that all the tenants can be part of,” Koehn said. Said Hicks, “We’ve got CPAs, IT staff, billing, shredding services, ad agencies all at your fingertips under one roof . ... and it should be noted that this is all being done by local entrepreneurs, not some outside group.” dennis.seid@journalinc.com

after the holidays. That compares to the average of 5 percent for all countries surveyed. Among all countries surveyed, 84 percent of holiday shoppers plan to do at least some of their holiday shopping online, with 21 percent planningto do the majority of their shopping online. Online shopping is particularly prevalent in China (99 percent), Great Britain (95 percent), Germany (94 percent) and India (93 percent). But on the flip side, those in the Netherlands (69 percent), Italy (71 percent) and Canada (73 percent) are among the least likely to shop online at all this holiday season. dennis.seid@journalinc.com

Ashley Furniture adds Ripley support facility

RIPLEY – Ashley Furniture Industries, which employs about 3,000 people in Northeast Mississippi, is buying an expandable 260,000-square-foot building in Ripley to supplement its existing manufacturing operations. The building is the former Albany Industries plant. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The company= has manufacturing plants in Ecru and Ripley and bought a 275,000-squarefoot building in Verona earlier this year. Ashley said the latest move is part of its $116 million reinvestment plan for 2013. Ashley said in the past six weeks, it has added 749 new employees, and has additional opportunities available at its facilities.

people. The key is having an accurate trade area. One of the biggest things we have to deal with managing the expectations of our clients. Everybody wants a Target, Kohl’s, a Chili’s. But you really have to educate them up front. We determine what your potential is. Then we fit the retailers to your market. You can’t determine the retailers you want and then go after them. You can have a wish list, but you have to qualify that with our analysis of who you are, what your demographic profile is, what your income threshold is, how much disposable income you have, then we can match that with the retailers who can come to your community.

BUSINESS REWIND is creating 38 new jobs. American Land and Timber began operating in Prentiss County in 1984. The company produces hardwood and pine lumber for domestic and foreign markets, as well as pallet materials and crossties.

Franklin named to furniture hall of fame

HOUSTON – Hassell H. Franklin, the founder, chairman and CEO of Franklin Corp., was among three industry leaders inducted into the American Furniture Hall of Fame. Franklin was inducted along with John D. Bassett III, chairman of VaughanBassett Furniture; and Eugene Rosenberg, a founder of Bob’s Discount Furniture and Planned Furniture Promotion. The trio joined 91 other Hall of Fame members during the American FurMaple Land and Timber niture Hall of Fame Foundation’s 25th anniversary expanding, adding jobs banquet last month in BALDWYN – Maple High Point, N.C. Land and Timber has anFranklin launched his nounced the company is Houston-based small, expanding its operation lo- family-owned business in cated near Baldwyn. 1970. It is among the The plant, which operlargest privately owned ates as American Land and U.S. furniture manufacturTimber, will produce lum- ers with more than 1,300 ber for export to overseas employees. markets. The expansion includes the addition of a Pizza Doctor gets new sawmill and the connew owner, name struction of a 20,000square-foot facility. The TUPELO – Pizza Doctor project is a $1.95 million is officially no more, but corporate investment and the original recipes, plus

|

some new ones, are available in the same location in the Food Court at Gloster Creek Professional Medical Mall. The restaurant is now called Sweet Tomato Pizza Kitchen, and the owner is Ben Burt. He bought Pizza Doctor in early October. Burt said the employees are still the same, but the menu is being tweaked, with pasta and other pizzas being added. Delivery also is available. The restaurant opens at 10:30 a.m. The phone number is (662) 844-2600.

Cooper Tire celebrates 325 millionth tire TUPELO – Employees at Cooper Tire and Rubber Co.’s plant on South Green Street recently produced its 325 millionth tire. But the premium touring tire that rolled off the line won’t be sold and placed on somebody’s car. Instead, it now sits in the plant training room. The plant produced its first tire on Dec. 1, 1984. It once was a production plant for the now-defunct Pennsylvania Tire Co., but had been vacant for five years before Cooper acquired the facility three decades ago. When the plant opened, it covered 600,000 square feet. It has nearly tripled in size. The Tupelo plant produced its 250 millionth tire during its 20th anniversary celebration in 2004.

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Business Directory Antiques/Auctions

Bank

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Apartments Homes

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Barley Court Apartments

1608 S. GLOSTER TUPELO

Accepting applications for 1, 2, 3, & 4 bedroom

Call Robin Barnett today!

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840 Barley Court • Tupelo, MS 38801

662-566-2553

M-F 9am - 12pm • 1 pm - 5 pm Office Manager: Melissa Phelps

Apartments Homes

Affordable Luxury Apartment Homes 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom

111 Grand Ole Oaks Drive Belden, MS 38826 Carey Wilson Manager

office: 662.823.1470 • fax: 662.823.1474 • cell:662.231.7508

THE FAST LANE FOR SMALL BUSINESS

CALL JIM BROWN 662.231.2392

Ratliff Body and Glass 365-8245

431 W Main Suite 201 Jamie Osbirn Ron Roper Leslie Stacy

www.GrandOleOaks.com Apartments Homes

Automotive Services

Now Accepting Applicants

for 1,2,3,4 bedroom apartments.

RICK’S CHASSIS WORKS Foreign - Domestic

• Insurance Claims Welcome • Free Estimates • Body & Paint Repair

These units are subsidized through HUD and are based on income. 320 Monument #106 • Tupelo, MS Office Hours: M-F 9am-5pm 842-4267 or TTY711 or 1-800-582-2233 for the hearing impaired

“We Specialize in Frame Work”

1875 Nelle St. Tupelo, MS

844-0260

DILLARD RICHARDSON Realty & Appraisals

State Certified Residential Real Estate Appraiser ~ MS License #RA-830

“Appraising Properties Since 1997”

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Bank Of Okolona

Okolona Houston Banking Center P.O. Box 306 321 W. Madison St. Okolona, Mississippi 38860 Houston, Mississippi

(662) 447-5403

(662) 456-3347

Equal Housing

LENDER

Blinds Budget

Blinds a style for every point of view

Budget Blinds of Tupelo

FREE In-Home Consultation Shutters, Wood Blinds, Draperies and more!

Tupelo: 662.823.6455 Oxford: 662.281.0586 cell: 662.380.0958 fax: 662.281.0585 rlloomis@budgetblinds.com

www.budgetblinds.com An Independently Owned and Operated Franchise

Rex & Diannah Coggins, Owners

1359 CR 811 Saltillo, MS 38866

email rdillardrealty@bellsouth.net Veterans Blvd. just north of Highway 78 www.dillardrichardson.com

662.844.3419

Building Supplies

Bank

Appraisals & Realty

Bus. (662) 842-6531 Cell (662) 231-2784 Fax (662) 841-1104

Tupelo Lending Office

Body Repair • Auto Glass •Insurance Claims

“You pay the premiums, you choose the shop.” www.ratliffbodyandglass.com

HILLDALE APARTMENTS

Bank

Automotive Services

Bank of Mantee 54 1st Street Mantee, Mississippi

(662) 456-5341

www.bankofokolona.com

Ph: (662) 365-7021

N H A R Fax: (662) 365-8902 Y DW & DW AR L SUPPLY, INC. E BA • Full Service • Hardware • Building Supplies • Plumbing • Hydraulic Hoses

• Electrical • Glass • Valspar Paints • Welding Supplies • Portable Carports

1187 North 4th St. • Baldwyn, MS 38824

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013


BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013

Business Directory Building Supplies

Computer Sales & Services

Lumbe ville e n o o r B Company Full Line of Lumber, Hardware, Plumbing and Electrical Supplies 2300 E. Chambers Dr. • Booneville • 728-0094

Booneville Hardware & Supply 403 Church St. • Booneville • 728-0032 "For all your hardware needs"

CONTRACT COMPUTER SERVICES • Custom Built Systems w/ 3 Year Warranty • Printer Sales & Service • Custom Software Packages System • POS System

We take care of all types of back injuries including Work & Car Accidents!

New Patients Welcome Most Insurances Accepted

2087 Cliff Gookin Blvd. • Tupelo, MS

Dr. Ron Herndon

842-8413

589 N. Coley Rd. Tupelo, MS

www.contractcomputer.com 109 Desert Cove • Saltillo, MS

662-869-3250

Great Employment Opportunities

Concrete

Foundation Repair & Problem Flooring

Chiropractic

IN PAIN? HERNDON CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC

Employment Opportunities

Castillo Concrete Construction, LLC • Driveways • Sidewalks • Concrete Walls • House Slabs 15 Years Experience Call for FREE Estimate

662-586-8409

Collision Repair

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types of floor and slab footing problems.

• Concrete Bell Bottom Pier System • Helical Steel Pier System • Conventional Flooring Leveling • Sill, Joist and Beam Repairs • Totally Rebuild Floor Foundation • Wood Floor Deterioration mold, mildew, fungi, dry rot, brown rot - wet rot • Specializing in Bathroom Repair • Moisture Proofing Airvents - improper ventilation & additional foundation vents Force Air Blower fans, (increase circulation)

Roger Rakestraw

1-877-288-7395 662-534-6698

Furniture

Concrete

We’ve got all your

home furnishings

24 Hour Wrecker Service

◆ Junior Burns - Cell 662-728-0524 ◆ David Denson - Cell 662-416-5591 100 W. Veterans Drive • Booneville, MS 38829

Phone 662-728-4459 • Fax (662) 728-4150

at affordable prices.

401 Elizabeth St. • Tupelo 662-842-7305

7540 Veterans Hwy. West • Pontotoc, MS 38863

Contractors

Gifts

Commercial Cleaning Services

SS & G Contractors Saltillo, MS • 869-0052

224 Starlyn Ave. New Albany, MS 38652

662-534-4448

Commercial Plumbing

RH PLUMBING, INC. Commercial Plumbing, Gas & Industrial Piping RICHARD HANLON (662) 447-3213

P.O. BOX 417 Okolona, MS 38860

Thank you for choosing RH Plumbing. We appreciate your business

• Driveways & Gravel • Metal Carports • Dozer & Bobcat • Treatment Plants • Storm Shelters (Licensed and Fema Approved)

• • • •

Septic Tanks Excavating Lot Clearing Mobile Home Pad

Call for Estimates Licensed & Bonded

Dentist

662-489-1176

Okolona Drug Co.

Complete Prescription Service

We Accept All Medicare Part D Plans • • • • •

Gifts & Fenton Glass Tyler Candles Aromatique Arthur Court Lenox & Gorham China

• Adora Dolls & Lee Middleton Dolls • Ole Miss & Miss. State Collegiate Items • NEW Casseroles to Go!

210 West Main Street Okolona, MS (662) 447-5471

Giftware & More 2494 US Hwy 43 Winfield, AL 35594 Across From Wal-Mart Supercenter

205-487-8910 Mon. - Sat 9 am - 5 pm

GIFTWARE, ANTIQUES & MORE Be sure to like us on Facebook • New Shipments Arriving Every Day!

Over 20,000 sq. ft. of shopping pleasure

Visit Our Website: www.abbynicoles.com

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Business Directory Glass & Overhead Doors

Kennels

Medical

, PA

Serving Tupelo for 3 Generations

24 Hour Emergency Service

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Store Fronts • Mirrors Shower Doors • Garage Doors Commercial Doors Hollow Metal Doors

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711 ROBERT E. LEE DR. • TUPELO, MS

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Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome

Mon-Fri. 8 - 6:30 Sat. 9 - 6 Sun. 1 - 6

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(662) 963-2825

rafcomhs@gmail.com

Windows, Doors, Tubs, Skirting, Fixtures, and More!! Installation available!!!

Insulation

David W. Bell, MD Leigh Ann Weatherly, CFNP

FRIENDSHIP MEDICAL CLINIC, LLC. Walk-Ins Welcome

Hours: Monday-Friday: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Sunday: 1:00 - 5:00 pm

5482 Hwy 15 N. • Ecru, MS 38841

662-488-8799

Livestock

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840-8010

Lee Wallace, CFNP

Medical

Landscaping

SCRUGGS

1154 Cross Creek Dr. (Next to Home Depot)

PONTOTOC STOCKYARD SATURDAYS

Motorsports

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568 RockyFord Rd. • Hwy 76 West, Pontotoc 489-4385 or 213-7080

Goats, Hogs, and Horses at 11:00 am, Cattle at 1:00 pm

Locksmith

Like us on FACEBOOK Facebook.com/MotorSportsSuperStore

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Moving

MILLER’S SAFE & LOCK SERVICE, INC.

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Member of the QCN Network. Saving You Money And Making You More Comfortable For Over 38 Years Residential & Commercial Insulation, Installation Blown-In Attic Insulation - Blown-in Wall Insulation - Batting www.nsul8or@att.net www.nsul8or.com

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3166 West Jackson, Tupelo, MS

Insurance

Hancock Insurance Agency INSURANCE AND FINANCIAL SERVICES ATV • Life • Health Annuities • RV • Automobile Motorcycle • Home Mobile Home Medicare Supplements

Scott Hancock

Allen Hancock

Monthly Rates Available

662-534-2661 720 W . Bankhead St. New Albany

• Safes Serviced & Installed • Locks Installed • Locksets • Combinations Changed • Locks Rekeyed • Lost Keys Replaced • Master Key Systems • High Security Keys AUTO RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

(662) 842-7720

1219 1⁄2 NELLE STREET • TUPELO

Medical

Call for a Free Estimate

Bronzie Morgan Relocation Specialist

662-842-1120

“The Morgan Family has been moving families like yours for over 50 years”

Paint

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013


BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2013

Business Directory Real Estate

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Monday-Saturday 7 am -10 pm • Sunday 10 am -6 pm

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renttupelo.com Call 662.844.2772 • Hoyet & Helen Pitts

709 S 4th St. • Baldwyn, MS Mon.-Thurs. 11-10 • Fri.-Sat. 11-11 • Sun. 12-10

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Johnson Tree Service

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INC.

Daniel Johnson Owner

Free Estimates Insured & Bonded dpjohnson012@yahoo.com

662-401-9370 Uniforms

OF

ING

“A Family Business Since 1946”

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial FREE Estimates LICENSED & INSURED

411 CLARK ST. ❖ TUPELO ❖ 844-4481

Scrap Metal

P&R Scrap Metal Recycling

WE BUY JUNK CARS $ SCRAP METAL 11174 HWY 45 NORTH. ❖ COLUMBUS

499 Gloster Creek Village, Tupelo, MS 38801 Phone: (662) 844-4888 Fax: (662) 844-3006

662-534-4500

JCS ROOFING SERVICE

Party Trays for all Occasions!

Restaurant

204 Starlyn Avenue • New Albany, MS

Tree Service

Restaurant

1101 W. Main • Tupelo 842-3774

Monday-Saturday 7 am -10 pm • Sunday 1 pm -8 pm

Roofing

Recreational Vehicles COLUMBUS, MS Your One-Stop Recreational Vehicle Headquarters!

Town Creek Center

2546 Hwy 145 #A Saltillo • 662-869-0086

Located at the old Ellis Construction Gravel Pit Scale House 662-434-0007 • Cell 662.549.9988

Keeping Professional People Looking Professional 795 S. Gloster, Tupelo • (662) 844-4272 2316 Hwy. 45 N. Columbus • (662) 328-7777 1151 D. Frontage Rd. Oxford • (662) 513-0341

www.scrubsandco.com Advertising

Please Contact

Teresa Harris at 678-1530

If you are interested in Advertising in

The Business Journal

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BUSINESS JOURNAL

PERSONALIZED SOLUTIONS. PERSONAL SERVICE. Introducing C Spire Business Solutions. C Spire has greatly expanded our portfolio of communications solutions for business to include Wireless, Phone and Internet. To ensure that you get the most out of this new portfolio of options, we have deployed dedicated teams who live and work near you so they can not only help

All trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners. Š2013 C Spire Business Solutions. All rights reserved.

you quickly, but also understand your business, your market and your challenges.

Save 10% on IP Voice Phone System when you sign up for Wireless.

Get Personalized. Contact your Client Account Executive or Assist for Business. 1-855-CSPIRE2 (277-4732) | cspirebusiness.com | assistforbusiness@cspire.com

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NOVEMBER 2013


BUSINESS JOURNAL

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