Page 1

alternate HILLARYPERSONALITIES CLINTON (D)

NATIONAL PULAR VOTE

DESIGN BY LAINIE DUCKWORTH & MICHAEL

“I supported the women’s march because it stands for more than women’s rights. It goes across all human rights. I was photographing it as well because I was trying to get a documentive perspective. It is history in the making and we’re living in it. The experience was eye-opening that people can be M I C H A E L A M I L L E Rso involved in politics and civil rights.”

48.2 % 65,432,202

DONALD TRUMP (R)

JUNIOR GROWS COMFORTABLE AS O YOUNGEST INTERNS FOR KEVIN YOD

ANNIE LOMSHEK, 12

46.3 % NATIONAL 62,793,872 POPULAR VOTE

CAST REVEALS WHAT IT TAKES TO UNLOCK THEIR CHARACTERS FOR “LOVE FROM A STRANGER” NOV. 16-19 more emotional than I am. I was supposed to break down

“I support the women’s march because I believe everyone should have equal rights no matter what. I know women have equal rights on paper, but in society they should be shown that way. Women don’t deserve to be objectified urgency. The whole thing was a series ofand new challenges, shown as weaker than men. In fact, there are women are more successful but by the time we started performing, that I really enjoyed it. than I will be in the future.”

and sob hysterically in the last scene, which just wasn’t

MICHAELA MILLER: I’m not a method actor. Never

W

alking into the Kevin Yoder campaign office, Furla looks around at the other men and wom have been. I can just take a deep breath, and I’m ready to happening at first. Johnny [Shaver] and I ran it over and 20 years old, reporting for their job. Standin perform. Playing Auntie LooLoo was new for me. She over on our own and with [Nathan Smith, director], the crowd of bustling adults dressed in suits and pen was much more feminine and funny than my previous but I couldn’t find the emotion I needed. It wasn’t until eyes scanned the room to spot a group of teenagers characters. Being the comic relief was a breath of fresh the first time the rest of the cast watched the completed air. This role broke my history of being typecast. At first, I scene that things fell into place. Having people observe He quickly walked over feeling anxious. Intimidation could hardly get through my lines without laughing. The us brought the scene to a new level. The difference was At first, being a 16 year old field staffer in a Republi scene where I had to storm back in and grab my bag after incredible. Johnny was threatening and creepy, which yelling at Cecily was the hardest. I just couldn’t do it with made it much easier to find the fear my character was a Republican candidate wasn’t a hard job for Furla, b a straight face. But I really wanted to prove to myself and supposed to feel. At the end, when the poison I slipped tion drew nearer, Yoder’s previously predicted 80:20 to everyone else that I could play a character type that I him finally killed him, I felt intense relief, and I burst favor decreased. The field staffers, including Furla an hadn’t done before. By opening night, I didn’t break for an into tears. It was exhilarating. instant. I just took a breath, did what I was supposed to do, BRENDAN BELL: I had never played a character like other teenagers working at the office, were forced and stormed offstage. I felt so proud of myself. Nigel Lawrence before. I had to focus on being real and to expand their outgoing calls and increase the JOHNNY SHAVER: I had to let loose my crazy side having believable emotions in ways I never had tried Austin Lentz to play Bruce. I made it a stress release about the year, before. I had to come up with new mannerisms; I could number of houses they reached before the Michaela Miller so that I could actually get angry. With the stress no longer put my thumbs in my belt loops or jump up and of students election ended. of applying for college and scholarships, this was down while shouting like I had in past shows. My anger DISCUSSED THE Balancing school and the election was a a breakaway moment where I could get angry and had to be something that made the audience relate to ELECTION IN CLASS completely let go. I don’t know what drove me to the me, not just laugh. So finding this character – finding a troublesome task for Furla, but his grades emotions I had in the last scene. I just felt them in the person for him to be – was more than just putting on an never swayed despite the surplus workload moment. During a performance when I had the knife ugly sweater and saying my lines. I had to stand in front that discussed the in my hand, I sensed the audience jump back and slowly of people and feel genuinely distressed for a whole scene at the campaign office. By the time the election the most SEPTEMBER JANUARY 89 089 sink into their chairs. People told me that I wasn’t Johnny without it becoming boring. I had to be awkward in ENCEMENT OF HIGH SCHOOL MEANS NEW ACQUAINTANCES, NEW CLASSES, election was over, Yoder won with a lead anymore. That made me want to go further. It made me ways that still matched my character and come in at just ESTS, A NEW ATMOSPHERE, AND NEW BEGINNINGS OVERALL. 1. AP Government of 51-40. get more serious. the right time at the end with just the right amount of U WERE nervous the night before; Seeing all of the work that went into 2. English slept with a calm and quiet sense Maybe that morning you ate a big Yoder’s campaign changed Furla’s maybe you were so anxious you ate Madison Sechrist •Head in her Agatha Christie script, Christine Hysell Brendan Bell, Christine Hysell International Relations works on lines for the fall play “I had3. my script with Alyssa Quast ll. Maybe your mom drove you to views about the candidates. me all the time,” Hysell said of the play in which ybe you walked. Either way, the she was rarely off stage. “I’d take it with me to “Having respect for [the candiu stepped on that grass for the restaurants. I even took it to church. I’d rehearse ou became something new. with my mom or brother up to a point, but I’d give dates] is one thing,” Furla said. “But them a page limit. I didn’t want to spoil the ending Follow Donald J. Trump ETED for them.” (Photos: Amy Hysell, Bridget Gillespie) to high school for the first time can working side by side “I E-MAIL LOOK Going often be a nerve racking and anxiety-inducing ® with Yoder @RealDonaldTrump experience. After surviving the tortures of and seeing him on a daily basis and ORWARD middle school, freshman often come in with fall play EVENTS expectations of what their high school TRUMP’S LEWD REMARKS PROVOKE STUDENTS. working toward a common goal is TO MY major career will be like. For some, the fear that this will be just as bad-- no, worse-- than middle completely different.” “[He] sets a terrible example for young “I find it appalling that one of his main school hangs over them as they step into their DANCE TON’S EMAIL SCANDAL DOMINATED HER CAMPAIGN. first class. Others quickly find that high school men on how to treat women. Yes, the defenses to the tape was to say ‘no one Furla moved past the intimidation from is much more enjoyable than middle school. CLASS.” video of Trump is ‘locker room talk,’ which respects women more than me,’ as if his egal, and she should have“High gotten “Comey did the right thing reopening the school is less restrictive-you can walk day one, past the challenges of managing election around at lunch. At middle school I couldn’t do lots of people do, but there is more to words can just cancel out his actions. It ble for it as Secretary of State. Her investigation before the election, because that,” said freshman Adam Rosales. Having work and school. Being a small part of a large can make high women than their legs and what she does. is pretty horrifying to me that a man can were very disrespectful, these and new, the basiciffreedoms Hillary would’ve won and it came out school more exciting than anxious. whole gave Furla a very real-life experience that you curious His derogatory terms towards women show consistent disregard for the feelings candal was about? worse than Trump not afterWhat thatareComey had about? more evidence, you curious Freshmen also can more elective classes his career. For make me sick.” and struggles of 51% of Americans.” g his tax returns.” it take would’ve tarnished he couldn’t get elsewhere. An experience that than allowed in middle school. “I look forward Democrats to my simply blame the emails for to going to dance class. That’s like favorite SADIE OSBORN, 10 JESSIE PETERSON, 12 he would take with him to further his own future EMMA STANFORD, 12 class ever,” said PaigeWhat Barrella, freshman inspired you to have an interest in planes? Hillary’s loss isa absurd.” who is also in theater and show choir. career. of the afterlife? CHRISTINE HYSELL: My character, Cecily, was a lot

HOW EAST VOTED ON

CARSON JONES, 10

HOW EAST VOTED ON

CLINTON 56% ELECTORAL COLLEGE VOTES

34% TRUMP

232

302

ELECTORAL COLLEGE VOTES

79%

VS.

EW PERCEPTIONS would NOT

TOP 3 CLASSES

22% vote for

THEIR PARTY’S CANDIDATE

J

82 SCANDAL RVER

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HECTIC

Draw what inspires you.

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A

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science life.

M. SINDELAR

stats 1

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2

Job No.

Page No.

186

School Name

Show & tell

ROCKHURST

JOSEPH BROUILLETTE, 11

number of students taking Advanced Placement science courses

NAMI CLUB

Front row: Felipe Avila, Trixy Angelie Ibis, Amaya Gregory. Back row: Keegan McLean, Stephanie Fentzke, Nicole Morgan, Avery Van der Linden, Christine Oh.

Page No.

RATH

School Name

TRUMP’S GRADE

A-

STUDENTS VOTE WHICH ITEMS ARE MOST IM

5

35%

1 While on the ASB winter retreat, Chad Campbell takes pictures of Amanda Rowe ice skating in Heavenly. 2 On Nov.28, Claire Body paints a base coat on the tile for the Evolutus club to be placed on the path to the library. 3 During the Club Rush Sept. 22, Gabriel Irvine questions Elliot Stroope about ROTC. 4 At the annual Sierra Elementary School fall carnival on Oct. 28, Ashley Shirhall hands a child a bean bag to throw into the pumpkins mouth. Shirhall was volunteering as a community JERSEY service project for CSF. 5 At the military ball, Joseph Nobriga walks off stage after COOLERS recieving the Daughters of the War of 1812 award.

TAILGATES

CHASE TETRICK, 12

other members and we have gotten to know each other

“When I started going into art, I well.” noticed that everything has a beauty THE DAY WE in it, but you just have to sometimes JIANA LAUNCHED OUR BIBBEE find it,” McGrath said. “The world has MODEL ROCKETS, 3 taught me that there’s so much going I FELT LIKE I WAS 4 on right now that it’s hard to find STANDING ON hope and stuff. But, it’s always there. THE SHOULDERS You just have to find it.” OF GIANTS. “My McGrath favorite part of the Rockhurst tailgate Art wasn’t just a way for — senior Chirag Gokani Astronomy was world, just seeing the football aspect ofandthe Planetarium Operations to capture the beauty of the Extraordinaire rivalry unfold before game time. Everyone but a way to escape from reality. knows how great the basketball games are, but this was something new. I was actually kind of nervous before the game. My dad went to Rockhurst, and the only thing I’ve heard the last three successful East football seasons is how Kansas football doesn’t compare to Missouri football, and how even in a Rockhurst down year, East couldn’t compete with them. I wanted people to know East football was the real 187 Page Job No. deal, andNo. I was nervous that they wouldn’t come out and perform to the ability I knew School Name they could.”

EINDRA KHINE

number of students at school who are currently enrolled in two or more science courses

Job No.

M.HAWKINS

TCID:PP

QUICK TAKES

196

1. Economy 2. Foreign policy

TOUR C+ OF THE D. TRAN

B

School Name: Santa Susana High School

BOLD

TOP TWO ISSUES

TRUMP’S GRADE

112

Page No.

Job No.: 18027

A. BLISS

BEN WALBURN, 9

UNIQUE

B. FLINT

CLINTON’S GRADE

Run Prepare for Submission for Color ID information.

THIS ELECTION WAS...

83

STORY BY HOLLY FRIGON

1. Immigration 2. Taxes

1. Economy 2. Immigration

fe, afterli ts of the chez though know. San their s on her nts to ns and reflect at she wa religio religions chez erent nt a San and wh of diff differe said. knows beliefs to look up ,” Sanchez t she by the ow like ed “I foll inspir erlife. e and the aft believ ws on at people wh d see

Her life had never been easy, but she found happiness in things no one could imagine was possible. “I became interested in music and art when I was very little because of my past. At the age of three, I was put in a foster home and I wasn’t adopted until the age of eight. They have been a big help for me and coping with all my emotions because I don’t like sharing Drawing from Isabele MAYLENE SHANBURN attends my emotions with McGraths’s journal Santa Susana because of their large people, so it’s just focus of the arts. Since it is her first an easier way to year here, she is not sure whether From Instagram and Twitter to express it.” she is going to pursue dance or Facebook and Pinterest, all you ever “Being in foster graphics as a major. Maylene says, see are images and videos of people care affected me in many ways. “It’s too early to make up my mind that seem to be happy and living what about what my emphasis will be, It’s caused me to get a lot of most people would call the “perfect since there are so many options, but issues, like really bad depreslife.” You see people loving their life it will be within the arts programs.” sion and anxiety, and I have trust and enjoying the beauty of it, but issues,” she said. that’s only a cyber fantasy, with the Doing what she does best, exception of sophomore Isabele McGrath worked hard to turn McGrath. her negative situation into a McGrath vividly brought to life positive lesson for herself. what others only dreamed about and “It taught me to be a idealized online. She found meaning stronger person and it taught in all of life’s challenges and wasn’t me that actions speak louder scared to ask questions along the way. than words. It also helped me “I think the world has inspired learn different perspectives me to just be who I am,” McGrath of life and I feel like now when said. “And it’s taught me not to try to 113 COLOR like, Run Prepare for Submission for Color ID information. everyone’s ‘oh there’s a No.have Job No.: to] not someone else [andPage be18027 good life and a bad life,’ I just to worry about how I look to some think, ‘well, it depends how School Name: Santa Susana High School people.” you look at it.’” As McGrath grew, the world “You never know what started to unfold before her. She a person has been through. didn’t want to miss a single ounce of Every song has a story just its beauty, so she decided to capture “In Vegan Club, I started to be like every person has a story began to show her what the world really comfortable with the TCID:PP of their own to tell.” through art - the beauty and love of

TOP TWO ISSUES

TOP TWO ISSUES

22

S

I. MCG

Though it can be hard to adjust at first, as the year goes on freshmen often grow more confident in themselves and begin to feel more Are you trying toas pursue flying in the future? at home. You may enter freshman year a nervous middle schooler, but you leave as something else-- something a little smarter, a little taller and a littler better at understanding the world.

THIS ELECTION WAS...

120

N

2 0 17 D E SIGN CON T E ST RESER HALL, 11

s of the afterlife?

E

Life was all about stepping out of comfort zones, according to senior Alexis Stevens-Drake. After battling through her junior year academic stress and losing friends, Stevens-Drake realized that being shy wouldn’t get her far. “If you don’t [step out of your comfort zone], you won’t get anywhere or get what you want,” Stevens-Drake said. Stevens-Drake also learned to be true to herself throughout her years in high school. She found new ways to grow and evolve her character. “In middle school I always wanted to be like everyone else; I wanted to fit in as much as I could,” Stevens-Drake said. “Now it’s not about that. I just want to be happy. I want to strive to be better for myself, instead of others.” Getting a tattoo in honor of her grandmother, changing her hair color, and acquiring an individual and unique style were some of the ways Stevens-Drake choose to express herself. “I switch up my hair color as much as I can. I like to experiment to see what color will look best with different outfits,” Stevens-Drake said. “I also get inspiration from my mom. She lived through the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s, so I look at old pictures of her and draw inspiration from those.”

NATALIE

26%

DESIGN BY HALEY MAISCH

LANCER DAY

“For Lancer Day everyone was in such a great mood because it was the first football game of the season. It’s just always so exciting. Everyone on cheer bonded a lot at tailgating because we listened to music. It was such

112

follow your curiosity sept. a positive environment to beZ.in. When we19 tailgate, we Page by: A. Aquino, B. Kwon, D. Jenkins, Page D. Shah, by: K. E. Mayer, Cheswick, Turner. S. Brimmer O. Bradish

Page sponsored sponsored by: by: Gill Holy Roy’sFamily Hardware stunts forget aboutPage all of our nerves about performing or chants, and just think about the fun things and how happy everyone is. We just really enjoy each other before we have to get out on the track in front of the students.”

MAGGIE GRAY, 10

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

“The best part about tailgating is getting to see all my friends at the games, because a lot of the time we only see these people when we tailgate instead of seeing them year-round. We have had a spot in the lot since I was 2-years-old, and when we were younger my mom used to sing the fight song to get us pumped for the games, even though KU sucks at football.”

SMASH CLUB

Front row: Enzo Biondi, Reilly Sears, Carl Illustrisimo, Connor O’Brien, Samuel Gonzales. Back row: Nathaniel Reeder, Trenton Martinez, David Brosnan, Darrius Bias, Jarod Alega, Casey Carr, Maxwell Olding.

FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATH

Front row: Emma Thomas, Madeline Roe, Jane Z Megan Soares, Ellisa Phillips. Back row: Jadon Bu Dodge, Austin Shields, Jacob Harbert, Josiah Will

HAILEY MOHR, 12

number of enlisted courses in the Lower, Middle and Upper School Science Department

CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP FEDERATION

Front row: Sydney Schreiner, Micheal Hamp, Zachary Schreiner, Jack Scaglione, Karissa Castueras, Fatehrajinder Bajwa, Micheal Silveira, Andrew Franco, Ashton Davis, Bethany Oh, Alyssa Pearce, Arielle McPherson, Kasandra Murillo, Isabella Cortez, Alexandra Smith, Emma Totaro. Row 2: Jillian Madden, Peyton Gillen, Amaia Caballero, Madeleine Mehren, Carly Snell, Morgan Schaefer, Tomlinn Cox, Megan soares, Callie Totaro, Mikayla Barkve, Madeline Cortez, Julia Ruccione, Brooke Giorgi, Brenden Jacoby, Jessica


GRAND GRANDPRIZE PRIZE GRAND PRIZE Lainie Duckworth Shawnee Mission East High School Prairie Village, KS Dow Tate, adviser

MORE THAN A DESIGN BY LAINIE DUCKWORTH

SENIOR EMMA VAUGHTERS SPEAKS ON THE WOMEN’S MARCH, RELAYING HER THOUGHTS ON EQUALITY AND POLITICS

Q: What were your thoughts on the women’s march in KC?

people who feel the same way I do about equality and the current political situation.

A: It was really empowering. I felt like a lot Q: What do you think the message Donald of people banded together to show support for each other. The atmosphere was very inviting and welcoming, and it felt really good to be there with that many people. I stayed for about three hours.

Q: Why did you go? A: I’m very pro-equality, and I knew that

Trump being president sends to women?

A: It sends the message that no matter how skilled, smart or how much experience you have, it doesn’t matter. It says that if a man is in the same position as you, then he will be better than you.

Q: What was the most important message I couldn’t miss such an important and that these women’s marches sent out? impactful event. As much as I would’ve loved to go to the one in D.C., I was just happy that A: Probably just that unity is really important and no matter what your political there was one in KC. I wanted to be around beliefs are, you’re still a woman. We need to

stand by our gender because there’s a lot of disparity in the world and despite people saying that we’re equal, we’re not equal in a lot of ways. That’s what’s most important to me, that everyone needs to stick together.

PHOTO BY KATIE KUHLMAN

BOY’S GOLF 088 88 FEATURE

STORY BY ADDIE VON DREHLE


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST 2017 PHOTO CONTEST

4marched MILLION globally 10,000 1 IN 5

marched in KC

WOMEN’S MARCH TOOLBOX pink hat

+

MOST IMPORTANT ISSUES DISCUSSED AT THE MARCH

22%

27%

1. WOMEN’S RIGHTS East students 2. RACIAL EQUALITY marched 3. LGBTQ RIGHTS

51%

of East students

SUPPORTED THE MARCH

MARCHING TOGETHER BOTH MEN AND WOMEN SUPPORTED THE MARCH. “I supported the women’s march because it stands for more than women’s rights. It goes across all human rights. I was photographing it as well because I was trying to get a documentive perspective. It is history in the making and we’re living in it. The experience was eye-opening that people can be so involved in politics and civil rights.”

ANNIE LOMSHEK, 12

“I support the women’s march because I believe everyone should have equal rights no matter what. I know women have equal rights on paper, but in society they should be shown that way. Women don’t deserve to be objectified and shown as weaker than men. In fact, there are women that are more successful than I will be in the future.”

CARSON JONES, 10

SEPTEMBER JANUARY 89 089


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

1ST PLACE Ryan Krogh Santa Susana High School Simi Valley, CA Matthew Abbe, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

2ND PLACE Athena Aquino Grand Blanc High School Grand Blanc, MI Ava Butzu, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

3RD PLACE Omar Rana St. Mark’s School of Texas Dallas, TX Ray Westbrook, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Susan Wang Arrowhead Christian Academy Redlands, CA Crystal Kazmierski, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Sam Lewis Grand Blanc High School Grand Blanc, MI Ava Y. Butzu, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Bailey Eubanks Highland Park Middle School Dallas, TX Aaron Cappotelli, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Grace Young and Aubrey Dowdle Round Rock High School Round Rock, TX Sharon Kubicek, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Ethan Abbott Round Rock High School Round Rock, TX Sharon Kubicek, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION McKenzie Baker Sims Middle School Pace, FL Stacy Grice, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

ONE NATION INDIVISIBLE

“I’m just a little worried about what’s next, you know? I always hear what other people say, and if I don’t disagree it’s more like, ‘I respect your opinion but I feel differently.’ I don’t have to internalize it.”

ELLA STOTTS, 10

DESIGN BY LAINIE DUCKWORTH & MICHAEL HAMILTON

P

hones were ringing left and right. Canvassers knocked on people’s brown wooden doors in hopes that the owner would not slam it on their faces. Campaign posters were seen in millions of grassy yards across the nation. All of this was leading up to the 2016 election, and for senior Brena Levy, that meant taking a fellowship with the Hillary Clinton Campaign. “I’m from the Democratic candidates office, do you have a moment to talk to me about the upcoming election?” Levy sat at a long table shared with eight other people. The Johnson County library was filled with Clinton Campaign fellows. She called people to recruit them for her next swing state canvas trip to Iowa. She went door to door asking people protocol questions, hoping they would volunteer at their local phone bank and proposed that they should vote for Clinton. Growing up in a politically split family, Levy always knew that she was a part of the Democratic Party. She didn’t decide to be a part of the campaign because of her mom or sister, she chose because of her individual beliefs as a U.S. citizen. She knew she was bound to be a Democrat. Levy heard about the internship from a friend who had taken the same internship last election season. She contacted the campaign office and was accepted into the program. “Even though [Clinton] didn’t win, doing [the internship] showed me that there was a change, and that doesn’t mean we didn’t make any impact,” Levy said. Levy plans on pursuing a career behind the scenes of politics, hoping to become a lawyer and be involved with other future campaigns. Taking the fellowship was a huge step in Levy’s political career and could be a large contributor to her future. Making an impact on her country was always a dream of Levy’s, and the first step to get there was through her community. The first step to become a bigger part of an even larger whole.

HILLARY CLINTON (D)

NATIONAL POPULAR VOTE

ELECTORAL COLLEGE VOTES

22

THEIR PARTY’S CANDIDATE

SERVER SCANDAL

Follow

@RealDonaldTrump

TRUMP’S LEWD REMARKS PROVOKE STUDENTS.

CLINTON’S EMAIL SCANDAL DOMINATED HER CAMPAIGN.

EMMA STANFORD, 12

that discussed the election the most

1. AP Government 2. English 3. International Relations

Donald J. Trump

DELETED E-MAIL

“It’s illegal, and she should have gotten in trouble for it as Secretary of State. Her actions were very disrespectful, and the email scandal was worse than Trump not showing his tax returns.”

ELECTORAL COLLEGE VOTES

of students DISCUSSED THE ELECTION IN CLASS

TOP 3 CLASSES

would NOT % vote for

“Comey did the right thing reopening the investigation before the election, because if Hillary would’ve won and it came out after that Comey had more evidence, it would’ve tarnished his career. For Democrats to simply blame the emails for Hillary’s loss is absurd.”

“[He] sets a terrible example for young men on how to treat women. Yes, the video of Trump is ‘locker room talk,’ which lots of people do, but there is more to women than their legs and what she does. His derogatory terms towards women make me sick.”

“I find it appalling that one of his main defenses to the tape was to say ‘no one respects women more than me,’ as if his words can just cancel out his actions. It is pretty horrifying to me that a man can show consistent disregard for the feelings and struggles of 51% of Americans.”

SADIE OSBORN, 10

JESSIE PETERSON, 12

RESER HALL, 11

TOP TWO ISSUES

A-

302

79%

TOP TWO ISSUES

CLINTON’S GRADE

34% TRUMP

VS.

THIS ELECTION WAS...

IMAN JAROUDI, 11

HOW EAST VOTED ON

232

THIS ELECTION WAS...

1. Gender equality 2. Education

46.3 % NATIONAL 62,793,872 POPULAR VOTE

CLINTON 56%

STORY BY HOLLY FRIGON

DISAPPOINTING

DONALD TRUMP (R)

48.2 % 65,432,202

HOW EAST VOTED ON

HOWEVER

SENIOR EXPERIENCES THE ELECTION FROM HER OWN EYES WORKING FOR HILLARY’S CAMPAIGN

HECTIC

1. Economy 2. Immigration

CLINTON’S GRADE BEN WALBURN, 9

B

JUNIOR GROWS COMFORTABLE AS ONE OF THE YOUNGEST INTERNS FOR KEVIN YODER

W

alking into the Kevin Yoder campaign office, junior Jack Furla looks around at the other men and women, all over 20 years old, reporting for their job. Standing amongst the crowd of bustling adults dressed in suits and pencil skirts, his eyes scanned the room to spot a group of teenagers from East. He quickly walked over feeling anxious. Intimidation sank in. At first, being a 16 year old field staffer in a Republican state for a Republican candidate wasn’t a hard job for Furla, but as the election drew nearer, Yoder’s previously predicted 80:20 lead in their favor decreased. The field staffers, including Furla and the other teenagers working at the office, were forced to expand their outgoing calls and increase the number of houses they reached before the election ended. Balancing school and the election was a troublesome task for Furla, but his grades never swayed despite the surplus workload at the campaign office. By the time the election was over, Yoder won with a lead of 51-40. Seeing all of the work that went into Yoder’s campaign changed Furla’s views about the candidates. “Having respect for [the candidates] is one thing,” Furla said. “But working side by side with Yoder and seeing him on a daily basis and working toward a common goal is completely different.” Furla moved past the intimidation from day one, past the challenges of managing election work and school. Being a small part of a large whole gave Furla a very real-life experience that he couldn’t get elsewhere. An experience that he would take with him to further his own future career. STORY BY HOLLY FRIGON

THIS ELECTION WAS...

UNIQUE

BOLD

1. Immigration 2. Taxes

1. Economy 2. Foreign policy

TOP TWO ISSUES

TRUMP’S GRADE

C+ CHASE TETRICK, 12

056 ELECTION

TOP TWO ISSUES

TRUMP’S GRADE

ANATALIE HARDY, 11

NOVEMBER 057

HONORABLE MENTION Lainie Duckworth Shawnee Mission East High School Prairie Village, KS Dow Tate, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Haley Maisch Shawnee Mission East High School Prairie Village, KS Dow Tate, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Kyle Canyon St. Mark’s School of Texas Dallas, TX Ray Westbrook, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Killian Green St. Mark’s School of Texas Dallas, TX Ray Westbrook, adviser


2017 PHOTO CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Ashley Pestrue Trinity High School Euless, TX Christine Davis, adviser


JOSTENS/ADOBE ® 2017 DESIGN CONTEST

HONORABLE MENTION Hannah Blackwell Whitney High School Rocklin, CA Sarah Nichols, adviser


JUDGES

2017 PHOTO CONTEST

2017 PHOTO CONTEST

AMY MORGAN

LINDA DRAKE

Amy Morgan teaches journalism and advises the student publications at Shawnee Mission West High School in Overland Park, Kansas. She is a frequent workshop and convention presenter. She is the secretary of the Kansas Scholastic Press Association executive board and has also served on the board for the Journalism Educators of Metropolitan Kansas City. She was the local co-chair of the 2010 JEA/NSPA National High School Journalism Convention in Kansas City. She was recognized as the Jackie Engel Award Winner for outstanding advising in Kansas in 2011, and was named a JEA Special Recognition Adviser in 2014. The publications have earned local, state and national recognition over the years.

Linda Drake, MJE, has advised the yearbook for 36 years, the newspaper for 22 years and the publications website for three years at Chase County Jr./Sr. High School in Cottonwood Falls, Kansas. Drake received the Kansas Associated Collegiate Press Engel Award in 1999 and was inducted into the Kansas Scholastic Press Hall of Fame in 2009. She has received both the Special Recognition and Distinguished Adviser awards from the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund. She has been honored with the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s Gold Key Award and the National Scholastic Press Association’s Pioneer Award as well as the Journalism Education Association’s Teacher Inspiration Award and the Medal of Merit Award. In 2008, Drake was named the JEA National Yearbook Adviser of the Year. Drake is currently serving on the JEA Awards Committee.

MARY PATRICK Mary Patrick is the retired adviser for the Maize South Middle Stampede yearbook. The Stampede has won numerous CSPA Gold and Silver Crowns, NSPA Pacemakers, KSPA AllKansas awards, and is a member of the NSPA Journalism Hall of Fame. A former JEA board member, Patrick has been the recipient of the JEA Distinguished Adviser and Lifetime Achievement Awards and the NSPA Pioneer Award. She also has been very active in promoting middle journalism in Kansas through her work with KSPA, and teaches middle and high school workshops.

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