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H A R V E S T T OGE T H ER

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BL U E T R A I N ≥ ≥ B R A N D R E VI TA L I ZAT I O N ≥ ≥ VU NA


VUNA 02

CONCEPT

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INFLUENCE

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IDENTITY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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APPLICATION

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CONCLUSION

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CONCEPT

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SOUTH AFRICA…has some of the best fine-dining options in the world.

South Africa’s reputation as a gourmet destination has increased by leaps and bounds in the past decade. Internationally renowned chefs have been drawn by the attractive climate and wealth of fresh produce, and global critics acknowledge that the country has some of the best fine-dining options in the world.

Key points »

A Culinary Emphasis & Expansion

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Restaurant Dinning Experience

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Food is a Universal language and a social unifier, From harvesting to consumption.

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South African Cusine is a blend of many cultures, offering a variety of delicious dishes.

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Use of key concept “Rainbow Cuisine”

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A term that reflects the cultural depth, creative spectrum, and spiritual unity of a diverse people.

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With 40 million inhabitants speaking 11 different languages, the country offers a fascinating potpourri of fresh, delectable, eclectic fare.

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Identified 6 influences on South African Cuisine\

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R 3.8 = 470,092.62 USD R 4.0 Value Captured in Billions

R 3.5 R 3.0 R 2.5 R 2.0 R 1.5

R 1.05

R 1.0

R 1.02

R 0.5

R 0.23

R 0.0 * VFR

Holiday

Religious

Business

* Visiting Friends and Relatives is the number one reason for domestic travelers to take a trip.

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139 miles

141 miles

181 miles

2.3 hrs*

2.4 hrs*

3.0 hrs*


sTRATEGY » An expansion of a current strength of the brand. » The Blue train offers award winning cuisine and Service aboard it’s luxurious rail experience. » The Blue Train Currently under utilizes one train set, due to recent damages. » Opportunity to take that set and transform it to be a subset and expansion of the brand. » Market this new train towards an untapped market of Domestic tourists. ROUTE » Stops are added at Klerksdorp, De-ar, Beaufort West & Motjiesfontein. » Chosen primarily for distance and the amount of time to be spent on train. » Shorter ROutes = less time = more passengers = more revenue. » Domestic tourist friendly with several stations. RESTAURANT » Offering 3-4 course meals, depending on the length of trip or segment of the route. » Journeying to one stop then returning. » Social opportunity for local & domestic tourist aboard the train. MENU » Can change weekly between routes

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» Locals can board train on nearest stop & experience a weekly rotating menu.

139 miles

194 miles

136 miles

2.3 hrs*

3.2 hrs*

2.2 hrs*

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INFLUENCE

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“Rainbow Cuisine” defines the food style in South Africa. It’s a term that reflects the cultural depth, creative spectrum, and spiritual unity of a diverse people. With 40 million inhabitants speaking 11 different languages, the country offers a fascinating potpourri of fresh, delectable, eclectic fare.

INFLUENCES 01

ANCIENT AFRICAN

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BANTU

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INDIAN

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MALAY

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PORTUGUESE

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AFRIKAAN

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01 ≥ ANCIENT/TRADITIONAL AFRICAN ANCIENT CUISINE Those who have seen the landscape of the Namib and the Kalahari deserts where the San people live and roam, may easily laugh at the thought of any form of culinary enjoyment in these areas. South Africa food history shows however, that the San people did enjoy a surprisingly varied menu of edible roots, leaves, plants, berries and nuts gathered from the “veld” (field). They also gathered eggs, being particularly fond of ostrich eggs. To complete the menu they hunted for meat such as antelope, birds and small animals. Some of the Khoi people living at the coast close to the beach known as the “Strandlopers” (beach walkers), had a diet just as varied. They dined on mussels, abalone, crayfish, seals and penguins, supplemented with edible wild plants, fruits and seaweed. At a certain stage in their history, influenced by the livestock farming culture of the Bantu people, the Khoi people changed their source of food supply from gathering and hunting to a nomadic type of livestock farming, starting with sheep at first and adding cattle at a later stage. Mutton and meat from other domesticated animals became an important part of their cuisine. South Africa food history tells us that one of their favourite menu items was crisply fried sheep-tail fat called “kaiings” (cracklings). Today one can still feast on delicious “Kaiing” dishes. It is difficult to ascertain to what extend the South African cuisine was influenced by the “Khoi” and the “San” people. Fact is, that the early settlers and later the “Voortrekkers” (migrating farmers) learned from their knowledge of edible plants and herbs in the wild, using these plants and herbs in their “Potjies” (cooking pots), salads and jams. An famous example is “Waterblommetjies” (water-lilies) which grow in abundance in the dams and ponds of the Boland region beyond Cape Town. In season these little creamy white flowers make it to the table in the form of a “Waterblommetjie bredie”, a delicious stew usually (but not necessarily) made with mutton and flavoured with sorel.

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02 ≼ BANTU INFLUENCE EARLY BANTU COOKING TRADITIONS Having migrated from the north, the Bantu people settled themselves in South Africa around 1000 AD at the end of the Southern Migration. Using for those days sophisticated iron tools, they introduced agriculture in South Africa, practising the cultivation of a variety of crops such as maize, sorghum, millet and vegetables amongst others and keeping herds of domesticated cattle. An important protein supply for the Bantu people were insects as Mopani caterpillars, locusts and termites. Fried, grilled or cooked they are still considered delicacies today.

‌ caterpillars, locusts and termites. Fried, grilled or cooked they are still considered delicacies today.

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03 ≥ INDIAN INFLUENCE THE INDIAN TOUCH About two hundred years after the arrival of the Malay slaves, the first boatload of indentured labourers from India arrived in the harbour of Durban to work un the sugarcane fields of Natal (KwaZulu-Natal). When their 10 year contracts were over, they stayed. The essence of the Indian cooking tradition, is said to be the large variety of curries (there are 22 main varieties) they use in their recipes. Curry dishes have become very popular in South Africa among people of all ethnic groups. Curry and rice is a national favourite almost as popular as “pap en vleis” (maize meal porridge and meat). In the process rice has also become popular as a staple food next to maize. Both coming from the Far East, there are similarities between the malay and Indian cuisines and they often supplement each other. An essential feature of Indian cooking whether vegetarian or not, is the use of spices, mostly in the form of curries. Curries, served sweet, mild or hot, are combinations of spices, of which there are 22 main ones used in Indian recipes. Curries are mostly made from the so called “C” spices, cassia, cumin, coriander, cardamom, coves, chillies and cinnamon. Another important feature is the use of masalas, which are mixtures of herbs and spices with ingredients such as chillies, garlic, ginger, salt and oil. Leaving out the ginger, the Zulu people in KwaZulu-Natal embraced the Indian curry in their cookery as if it was their own. Rice is a staple food in the Indian culture. It is often prepared with tasty ingredients such as nuts, saffron, sultanas, lentils, and vegetables to create pilau. Other starches often served with a meal are oven-baked bread (naan), unleavened bread (roti), spiced pancakes (poora) and fried yeast bread.

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04 ≼ MALAY-INDONESIAN MALAY - INDONESIAN INFLUENCE The so-called Malay slaves imported into the Cape by the Dutch East India company in 1658, came from Indonesia, Malaysia and Madagascar. Indonesia was a Dutch colony at the time. They brought with them their cooking traditions, which were characterized by the use of a large variety of spices. Many of them, particularly the women, were employed in the households and kitchens of the settler families. Their ability to adapt their recipes to locally available ingredients soon became apparent and their cooking talents, using the aromatic spices from the Far East, greatly enhanced the local settler cuisine. This was an important development in the South Africa food history. The Cape Dutch cuisine that has emerged from this culinary fusion, owes at least as much to the cooking traditions of the slaves, as it does to the European styles of cooking imported by the settlers. The Dutch cooking customs in the early days of the Cape colony were changed forever with the arrival of the slaves from the Far East. Malay slaves began to arrive at the Cape towards the end of the 17th century. Among the man were skilled fishermen, and the women were expert cooks who included a multitude of spices in their dishes. They brought aniseed, star fennel, turmeric, cardamom and ginger (both green and dried) amongst others. They brought a variety of massalas, mixtures of different spices used for different dishes, common to the Indonesian culinary culture and they brought saltpetre, the miracle ingredient for pickling. The intermingling of the early Dutch and Malay cookery is known today as the Cape Dutch cuisine, a fragrant style of cooking which is unique to South Africa.

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05 ≼ PORTUGUESE Portuguese The Portuguese were the first Europeans to round the Cape of Good Hope and to set foot on South African soil in the 15th century. At the time they were not interested to establish a settlement in South Africa. Instead they choose at a later stage to colonize Angola on the west of the continent and Mozambique on the east, both of them bordering onto South Africa, which included Namibia at the time. They brought with them their talents for flavouring with spices and their techniques of roasting and marinating, blending them with local African cuisine and ingredients to produce spicy dishes. From their Asian colonies they brought the orange, lemon and lime. and from Brazil, their colony in South America, they brought chillies, peppers, corn, tomato, pineapples, banana and the domesticated pig.

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06 ≥AFRIKAAN AFRIKAANS “Afrikaners” are mostly descendents from the original Dutch, French and German settlers, who founded the Cape colony in the 17th century. The cuisine that stands out as typical “Afrikaner”, is to a large extend based on the Dutch settlers cuisine, with contributions of the French and German settlers. Add to that a large portion of Malay cooking and temper it all by years of migrating on the Great Trek. And so we inherited today’s fabulous legacy of “Potjiekos” (potfood), “Braais” (barbecues), “biltong” (spicy dried meat) and “Boerewors” (farmers sausage). Hunting was the order of the day on the Great Trek, to keep the cooking pot filled with meat. Today amongst the “Afrikaners” hunting is still regarded as a must to provide the venison for their delicious game dishes.

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LOGO DEVELOPMENT

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The development of the Vuna Identity is attempting to convey the essence of South Africa's unity amongst cultural diversity across culinary influence. The mark itself is the solution to the problem and the identity of the concept. In the following pages the Development stages of this concept will be previewed.

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22 LOGO DEVELOPMENT


The logo is an abstraction of several key elements that I wanted to directly relate to what I had uncovered in the research about South Africa's cuisine being a "Rainbow" of influence. I have learned that without the depth of the research I would not have been able to develop a mark that has so much meaning and relevance to the essence of the concept.

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LOGOTYPE & SIGNATURE

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LOGO GUIDLINES The success of our brand depends on the consistent and frequent use of key elements, which when used effectively, produce a powerful and lasting impression in the minds of our customers

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04 LOGO GUIDLINES


SIGNATURE

Mark/Avatar

Logotype

The Preferred placement of the logo in print is directly to the left of the logotype with the rounded forms rising and dropping slightly above and below the cap height and baseline.

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SIGNATURE WITH TAGLINE

Inside edge, Right Stem of “U”

Standard Signat ure

X-HEIGHT

X-HEIGHT

HARVEST TOGETHER

1/3 X-HEIGHT

Always leave the minimum clear space around the Logo to frame and set off our identity. In print, the clear space requirement is at least one x height of the logo on each side.

Alternate Logotype. Use primarily for multimedia applications. Can also be used for print at minimum size requirement.

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Mark is an abstraction of ≥ Rainbow ≥ Train wheels ≥ Unity amongst diversity ≥ Motion ≥ Life cycle ≥ Sowing & harvesting

≥ Six bands represent the six major culinary influences.

minimum scale for print collateral is 1/4 of an inch.

Maximum Scale. No scale restrictions on how big you go.

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TYPOGRAPHY » Typeface: DEMOCRATICA » Serifed typeface with medium-high contrast in stroke » Unique serifs showcase the typeface’s strength & elegance » Rounded letterforms relate to the mark. » Oldstyle text lining numerals

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ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUV wXYZ abcdefghijkl mnopqrstuv wxyz 1234567890 31


PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE

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PHOTOPGRAPHY All Images used in Vuna’s Communications express the quality and strength that is inherent in the Vuna brand.

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Traditional & Ancient African When creating collateral for the Ancient African & Bantu influenced theme, use strong images of tribal men & Women. These images illustrate the core value of cultural elegance that Vuna stands for. Use only Duotone Images people in their traditional dress, up close and personal communicate the idea of a personal cultural experience that one will experience aboard Vuna.

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36 PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE


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APPLICATION

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ARTIFACTS & COLLATERAL Key applications that represent real future scenarios need to be identified. Dwell in the possibilities.

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40 APPLICATION


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42 APPLICATION


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01 LOGO GUIDLINES


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46 CONCLUSION


In conclusion, I feel that Vuna has the potential to become a strong piece of my portfolio. The beauty of the mark and the contrast developed between photography style, color and culture makes me wish this train actually existed. I know that might sound biased, but I don't think I would have been able to develop such a concept without the amount of research involved. My only regret is that I didn't have anything to show for the Spring Show and that I didn't have more articles designed.

The beauty of the mark and the contrast developed between the photographic style, color and culture makes me wish this train actually existed. Throughout the course of this semester, I have learned several things that I hope will stick with me the rest of my career. The first of those lessons is how to sift through a tremendous amount of research and how to filter that research, reaarange it and analyze it effectively. Through the amount of research I have learned that it really does add an amazing amount of depth and meaning to what we design or create. I have also learned the value of working in a team as a class because without it there is no way I would have been able to find all of that research on my own. I have learned to push the contrast between elements I use and to effectively edit and critique my own work. Gwen I thank you again, for forcing us to grow no matter how uncomfortable it may have been for all of us. I personally feel that I can walk away from this program prepared for what this profession entails, and I look forward to learning more and growing into my own.

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JOEL FELIX GRAPHIC DESIGN 155 CORPORATE IDENTITY SPRING 2008

BL U E T R A I N ≥ ≥ B R A N D R E VI TA L I ZAT I O N ≥ ≥ V UNA


Vuna Brand Book