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COLO R

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CU T

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COOL

TABLE OF CONTENTS

HOW WE LE A RN

CRE ATIVIT Y

CRE ATIVE PRO B LE M SOLVI N G

PL AY

03

7 LE A R N IN G ST YLES

07

C RE AT IVI T Y DEFIN ED

13

C RE AT IVE P ROB LE M SOLVIN G DEFINED

21

WHY WE PL AY

04

IN DE X OF LE A R N IN G ST YLES

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FLOW

14

T H E C RE AT IVE P RO CESS

22

H A P PY ACCIDEN T S

05

LEF T & R I GH T B R A IN FUN C T IONS

09

32 C RE AT IVE T R A I T S

16

B R A INSTO R MIN G

23

LE T ’S PL AY

06

8 T Y PES OF C RE AT IVE IN TELLI GEN CE

10

15 C RE AT IVE MY T HS

17

MIN DM A P PIN G

24

NOTES

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4 STE PS T H AT C RE ATE C RE AT IVIT Y

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S C A M PE R

12

5 T Y PES OF C RE AT IVES

19

L ATCH

20

WHE RE A RE WE GOIN G

YOU R CRE ATIVE PRO FI LE


As we move through the book, take note of what traits relate to you.


VISUAL (spatial): You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding. HOW WE LE A R N

AU R AL (auditory-musical): You prefer using sound and music.

VE RBAL (linguistic): You prefer using words, both in speech and writing.

PHYSI C AL (kinesthetic): You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.

LOG I C AL (mathematical): You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.

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SO CIAL SOLITA RY (intrapersonal): You prefer to work alone and use self-study.

7 LE A R N IN G ST YLES

(interpersonal): You prefer to learn in groups or with other people.

Š GWEN A MO S DESI GN

OU T SIDE T H E BOX

Seven Learning Styles


Felder and Silverman’s Index of Learning Styles One of the most widely used models of learning styles is the Index of Learning Styles developed by Richard Felder and Linda Silverman in the late 1980s. According to this model (which Felder revised in 2002) there are four dimensions of learning styles. Think of these dimensions as a continuum with one learning preference on the far left and the other on the far right. Once you know where your preferences lie on each of these dimensions, you can begin to stretch beyond those preferences and develop a more balanced approach to learning. Not only will you improve your learning effectiveness, you will open yourself up to many different ways of perceiving the world

SENSORY Sensory learners prefer concrete, practical, and procedural information. They look for the facts.

INTUITIVE Intuitive learners prefer conceptual, innovative, and theoretical information. They look for the meaning.

Sensory Learners – if you rely too much on sensing, you can tend to prefer what is familiar, and concentrate on facts you know instead of being innovative and adapting to new situations. Seek out opportunities to learn theoretical information and then bring in facts to support or negate these theories.

Intuitive Learners – if you rely too much on intuition you risk missing important details, which can lead to poor decisionmaking and problem solving. Force yourself to learn facts or memorize data that will help you defend or criticize a theory or procedure you are working with. You may need to slow down and look at detail you would otherwise typically skim.

VISUAL Visual learners prefer graphs, pictures, and diagrams. They look for visual representations of information

VERBAL Verbal learners prefer to hear or read information. They look for explanations with words.

Visual Learners – if you concentrate more on pictorial or graphical information than on words, you put yourself at a distinct disadvantage because verbal and written information is still the main pr eferred choice for delivery of information. Practice your note taking and seek out opportunities to explain information to others using words.

Verbal Learners – when information is presented in diagrams, sketches, flow charts, and so on, it is designed to be understood quickly. If you can develop your skills in this area you can significantly reduce time spent learning and absorbing information. Look for opportunities to learn through audio-visual presentations (such as video and Webcasts.) When making notes, group information according to concepts and then create visual links with arrows going to and from them. Take every opportunity you can to create charts and tables and diagrams.

ACTIVE Active learners prefer to manipulate objects, do physical experiments, and learn by trying. They enjoy working in groups to figure out problems.

REFLECTIVE Reflective learners prefer to think things through, to evaluate options, and learn by analysis. They enjoy figuring out a problem on their own.

Active Learners – if you act before you think you are apt to make hasty and potentially ill-informed judgments. You need to concentrate on summarizing situations, and taking time to sit by yourself to digest information you have been given before jumping in and discussing it with others.

Reflective Learners – if you think too much you risk doing nothing. There comes a time when a decision has to be made or an action taken. Involve yourself in group decision-making whenever possible and try to apply the information you have in as practical a manner as possible.

SEQUENTIAL Sequential learners prefer to have information presented linearly and in an orderly manner. They put together the details in order to understand the big picture emerges.

GLOBAL Global learners prefer a holistic and systematic approach. They see the big picture first and then fill in the details.

Sequential Learners – when you break things down into small components you are often able to dive right into problem solving. This seems to be advantageous but can often be unproductive. Force yourself to slow down and understand why you are doing something and how it is connected to the overall purpose or objective. Ask yourself how your actions are going to help you in the long run. If you can’t think of a practical application for what you are doing then stop and do some more “big picture” thinking.

Global Learners – if grasping the big picture is easy for you, then you can be at risk of wanting to run before you can walk. You see what is needed but may not take the time to learn how best to accomplish it. Take the time to ask for explanations, and force yourself to complete all problem-solving steps before coming to a conclusion or making a decision. If you can’t explain what you have done and why, then you may have missed critical details.


uses logic -analytic facts rule words and language

math and science convergent can comprehend

uses feeling imagination rules symbols and images present and future philosophy & religion can “get it” (i.e. meaning)

Convergent

HOW WE LE A R N

present and past

RIGHT BRAIN

lateral believes

focused

appreciates

acknowledges

spatial perception

knows object name

knows object function

reality based

possibility - what if

forms strategies

fantasy based

practical

presents possibilities

safe

impetuous

objective

risk taking

answer

IN DE X OF LE A R N IN G ST YLES

knowing

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diffused con answer (opposite)

linear reasoning practical conclusive yes, but...

visual associative richness, novelty suspended judgement yes, and...

LEF T & R I GH T B R A IN FUN C T IONS

verbal

© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

LEFT BRAIN

OU T SIDE T H E BOX

Left & Right Brain Functions


8 Types of Creative Intelligence 1

Discuss, exchange ideas, and build relationships

Try collaborating by working with someone who has complementary skills: if you’re a big picture person, find someone detail-oriented; if you’re spatially oriented, find someone lyrical. New insights will catch jet-streams.

2

Attend concerts, play an instrument, hum melodies, sing with others, enjoy rhythms

Those who play musical instruments are better at associative thinking, according to Carla Florin in Psychology Today. So dust off your old guitar. Have you ever used music at work to jack up productivity or change your mood? Interestingly some rhythms induce enzymes in the brain and add amazing well being. Other tunes leave you punchy … and unable to focus. Has it happened to you?

SOCIAL / INTERPERSONAL

5

Solve problems, balance checkbooks, create schedules, budget money

Analysis, predictions and real-world manipulation of models helps foster creative problem solving.

LOGICAL / MATHMATICAL

Check all the traits you have

3

Paint, draw, design web pages, design rooms, make cards, create logos, map out routes, mind mapping

What about new colors in your surroundings. Color your surroundings blue – whether cubicle or office since blue’s a color that boosts creativity. See what difference it makes. Interestingly, there’s a switchboard in the brain that helps us learn and remember simultaneously

MUSICAL

SPATIAL

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Keep a journal, read alone, meditate, study to answer personal questions

To stimulate Intrapersonal intelligence creatively, write a letter to an expert on something you wonder about. Or challenge yourself to develop and present strategies to accomplish a learning task for an audience you would not ordinarily consider working with. Help yourself conquer a problem by reading a selfhelp book and keeping a diary of your accomplishment in that area. Reward yourself when you feel you have accomplished your goal. As you do these activities, you build more dendrite brain cells for intrapersonal intelligence. Your brain literally rewires at night as you sleep based on what you do in the day.

INTRAPERSONAL

Collect specimens, garden, follow animal footprints, photograph landscapes

Bring the natural world into your workspace since nature nurtures the mind. Nature helps stir insights and connections, too.

4

Play sports, enjoy movement, walk on tours, notice body language

A new study confirms that exercise can reverse the age-related decline in the production of neural stem cells in the hippocampus of the mouse brain, and suggests that this happens because exercise restores a brain chemical which promotes the production and maturation of new stem cells.

BODILY KINESTHETIC

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Tell stories, write essays, participate in interviews, converse easily with peers

If you edit as you write, you can stop the flow of ideas. To enhance flow, avoid editing as you write. Reading helps you think of new possibilities. I find this to be true as I read others’ blogs. How about you? Unleash your brain’s thinking box by reading.

NATURALISTIC

VERBAL LINGUISTIC


C RE•A•TIV•I •TY ­—Albert Einstein

­—Linda Naiman, Creativity At Work

Creativity is the ability to find new solutions to a problem or new modes of expression; thus it brings into existence something new to the individual and to the culture ­—Dr. Betty Edwards, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain

­—Rollo May, The Courage to Create

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The state or quality of being creative.

The ability to transcend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, relationships, or the like, and to create meaningful new ideas, forms, methods, interpretations, etc.; originality, progressiveness, or imagination: the need for creativity in modern industry; creativity in the performing arts.

The process by which one utilizes creative ability: Extensive reading stimulated his creativity.

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?

How do you define creativity?

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CRE ATIVIT Y DEFI N ED

Creativity is the process of bringing something new into being. Creativity requires passion and commitment. It brings to our awareness what was previously hidden and points to new life. The experience is one of heightened consciousness: ecstasy.

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8 T YPES O F CRE ATIVE I N TELLI GEN CE

I define creativity as the act of turning new and imaginative ideas into reality. Creativity involves two processes: thinking, and then producing. Innovation is the production or implementation of an idea. If you have ideas, but don’t act on them, you are imaginative but not creative.

The use of imagination or original ideas, esp. in the production of artistic work. CRE ATIVIT Y

The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science

© GWE N A MOS D E SI G N

OUT SI DE TH E BOX

Creativity Defined


Flow & the Psychology of Discovery & Invention by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi.

WAYS THAT “CREATIVITY” IS COMMONLY USED:

• Persons who express unusual thoughts, who are interesting and stimulating - in short, people who appear to be unusually bright. • People who experience the world in novel and original ways. These are (personally creative) individuals whose perceptions are fresh, whose judgements are insightful, who may make important discoveries that only they know about. • Individuals who have changes our culture in some important way. Because their achievement are by definition public, it is easier to write about them. (e.g., Leonardo, Edison, Picasso, Einstein, etc.)

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CREATIVE PERSONALITY:

Creative individuals have a great deal of energy, but they are also often quiet and at rest. Creative individuals tend to be smart, yet also naive at the same time. Creative individuals have a combination of playfulness and discipline, or responsibility and irresponsibility. Creative individuals alternate between imagination and fantasy ant one end, and rooted sense of reality at the other. Creative people seem to harbor opposite tendencies on the continuum between extroversion and introversion. Creative individuals are also remarkable humble and proud at the same time. Creative individuals to a certain extent escape rigid gender role stereotyping and have a tendency toward androgyny. Generally, creative people are thought to be rebellious and independent. Most creative persons are very passionate about their work, yet they can be extremely objective about it as well. The openness and sensitivity of creative individuals often exposes them to suffering pain yet also a great deal of enjoyment.


Being sensitive helps creativeness in many ways: a. it helps with awareness of problems, known & unknown b. it helps people sense things easier c. it helps to cause people to care and commit themselves to challenges or causes.

Average people, people who dont believe they are creative, people who are fearful or resistant to creativeness or creative thinking prefer to work within limits with limited possibilities. Creative people love to see many, even infinite possibilities in most situations or challenges.

Challenges, problems, new ideas once committed to by a creative person truly excite them and provide them with seeming unlimited amounts of energy; such as Sherlock Holmes once he grasps a sense of the mystery.

Yes creative people challenge most everything, every idea, every rule. They challenge, challenge, and challenge some more to the point that most other people see their challenging as severe criticism

18. SENSE OF HUMOR

28. NON-CONFORMING

Laughter and creativity truly go together. Experts believe that creativity cant occur without a touch of humor believing that seriousness tends to squelch creativeness or creative thinking.

Conforming is the antithesis, the opposite of creativeness and in order to be creative, creative people must be nonconforming and go against the norm, swim up stream.

8. QUESTION ASKER Creative people, especially highly creatives, probably came out of their mothers wombs asking questions. Its in their nature to question. Question yes, not actually criticize. Their questioning nature often mistakenly appears as criticism when it is simply questioning, exploring, examining, playing with things as they are or might be.

9. CAN SYNTHESIZE CORRECTLY OFTEN INTUITIVELY This is the ability to see the whole picture, see patterns, grasp solutions with only a few pieces, even with major pieces missing. Creative people trust their intuition, even if it isnt right 100% of the time.

2. NOT MOTIVATED BY MONEY As important as money is in most societies or economies it is not a driving force for a creative person. Generally they have an intuitive sense of the amount of money they basically need and once that need is fulfilled then money stops affecting or driving them.

10. ABLE TO FANTASIZE Stop looking out the window Billy. Susie pay attention. Teachers, parents, and even friends often tell creative people this. Highly creative people love to wander through their own imaginary worlds.

29. CONFIDENT 19. SELF-ACTUALIZING The psychologist Abraham Maslow created this term in the 1960s representing the ultimate motivator of people the desire to be all you can be, to be what you were meant to be.

20. SELF-DISCIPLINED This is one trait that appears to be ambiguous in highly creative people. They can appear disorganized, chaotic at times while at the same time they are highly self-disciplined. At the same time the greatly resist the discipline of other people who are not of like creative mind.

This is another ambiguous trait in creative people. When they are at their most creative they are extremely confident. When they are in a stage of frustration when nothing seems to be working they often lack confidence. After much positive experience they begin to trust themselves and know that they will become depressed, frustrated nearly devastated but their internal sub-conscious confidence keeps them moving or at least floating until they experience or discover an aha! (a breakthrough idea or piece of information)

30. RISK TAKER

31. PERSISTENT

5. OBSERVANT

Creative people love to use their imagination to play to make seem real to experiment.

Creative people love to diverge from the norm, to look at things from multiple positions, to challenge anything that exists. Because of this they are seen at times to be off-key, deviant, atypical, irregular, or uncharacteristic.

Creative people constantly are using their senses: consciously, sub-consciously and unconsciously, even non-consciously.

14. INTUITIVE

24. CURIOUS Like the Cheshire Cat of Alice in Wonderland, creative people are continuously curious, often child-like.

6. PERCEIVE WORLD DIFFERENTLY

The more creative a person is the more they tap their intuition skills; the abilities to see answers with minimum facts, to sense problems even when they arent happening.

Charles Goodyear (discover & inventor of vulcanized rubber) and Chester Carlson (inventor of electrostatic copying, the Xerox process: xerography) are two of the best examples of this trait in creative people. Both of them worked over 30 years trying to make a solution they discovered work. Creative people do not give up on things that mean a lot to them.

11. FLEXIBLE Creative People are very flexible when they are playing with ideas. They love to look at things from multiple points of view and to produce piles of answers, maybes, almosts, when other people are content with the or an answer or solution.

4. TOLERANT OF AMBIGUITY

12. FLUENT

Two or more things or ideas being right at the same time challenges the thinking of a creative person. They love to be ambiguous to challenge other people and ideas. Ambiguity helps them see things from many different perspectives all at the same time.

It could be a door stop, a boat anchor, a weapon, a prop, a weight for holding down papers, etc., etc., etc. This is what a creative person would say about the possible uses of a brick.

13. IMAGINATIVE

Thoreau talked about people drumming to a different drum beat. Creative people thrive on multiple ways of perceiving: seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, tasting, sensing things. These different perspectives open up their minds to unlimited possibilities.

22. SPECIFIC INTERESTS

32. SENSE OF DESTINY 25. OPEN-ENDED

15. ORIGINAL Being original is a driving force for creative people. They thrive on it.

In order to explore many possibilities creative people tend to stay open-ended about answers or solutions until many have been produced.

16. INGENIOUS

26. INDEPENDENT

Doing the unusual. Solving unsolvable problems. Thinking what has never been thought of before. These are all traits of a creative person that make them be ingenious at times.

Creative people crave and require a high degree of independence, resist dependence but often can thrive on beneficial inter-dependence.

Intuitively creative people know that they have a purpose, a destiny or they realize that they can choose or create one to drive them to reach greater heights of skill, ability, or talent.

Check all the traits you have

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32 C RE AT IVE T R A IT S

23. DIVERGENT THINKER

3. ADAPTABLE Without the ability to adapt people could not become creative. But rather than adapt to something they choose to adapt things to suit them, their needs or the goals they are striving towards.

Keep somee form of journal and were constantly striving to better understand themselves.

FLOW

This is still another ambiguous trait of creative people. They appear on the surface to be interested in everything, while at the same time they have very specific interests that they commit their true energies and efforts to. By being willing to be exposed to seemingly unlimited interests they discover more about their particular specific interests.

This trait is a general mis-understanding of many non-creative people or people who fear the creativeness of creative people. Highly creative people are not really risktakers because they do not see what they are doing as a risk. They simply see it as a possible solution or path towards a solution. They have other possible solutions, often many others in their head or their notes to use if a particular idea or solution does work. As Thomas Edison once said when asked how it felt to have failed nearly 7,000 times trying to discover the best filament for an incandescent light bulb, those are not failures, they are solutions to problems I havent started working on yet.

21. SELF-KNOWLEDGEABLE

C RE AT IVIT Y

1. SENSITIVE

27. SEVERELY CRITICAL

Š GWEN A MO S DESI GN

by Robert Alan Black, Ph.D

17. ENERGETIC

OU T SIDE T H E BOX

Thirty-Two CreativeTraits

7. SEE POSSIBILITIES


10 Creative Myths

2. “THAT’S A STUPID [OR SILLY, OR RIDICULOUS] IDEA”

9. “IF IT AIN’T BROKE, DON’T FIX IT.”

1. “I AM NOT CREATIVE”

7. “THAT’S A GOOD IDEA. LET’S RUN WITH IT”

4. “CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM WILL HELP MY COLLEAGUE IMPROVE HER IDEA.”

8. “DRUGS WILL HELP ME BE MORE CREATIVE” 3. “CREATIVE PEOPLE ALWAYS HAVE GREAT IDEAS”

10. “I DON’T NEED A NOTEBOOK. I ALWAYS REMEMBER MY IDEAS”

6. “IN ORDER FOR OUR INNOVATION STRATEGY TO BE A SUCCESS, WE NEED A SYSTEM OF REVIEW PROCESSES FOR SCREENING IDEAS AND DETERMINING WHICH IDEAS TO IMPLEMENT.” 5. “WE NEED SOME NEW MARKETING IDEAS FOR THE UPCOMING PRODUCT LAUNCH. LET’S GET THE MARKETING PEOPLE TOGETHER AND BRAINSTORM IDEAS.”


C RE AT IVIT Y

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10 C RE AT IVE MY T HS

2

10 11

3

4 STE PS T H AT C RE ATE C RE AT IVIT Y

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© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

OU T SIDE T H E BOX

4 Steps That Create Creativity


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1

TH E I NVEN TO R

TH E CR A F T SM A N

Example: Leonardo Da Vinci

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Example: Chirs Ware

T YPE S O F C R E ATIVE S

TH E CR ITI C

3 TH E CON N EC TO R

Example: Marcia Lausen

Example: Andy Warhol

4 TH E CU R ATO R Example: Tina Roth Eisenberg


The art of seeing the problem differently in order to see a broader range of alternatives. Assumptions, patterns and inertia are three major obstacles to creative problem solving. ­—Chas Martin, Innnovative Eye

Creative-problem-solving techniques can be categorized as follows: • Creativity techniques designed to shift a person’s mental state into one that fosters creativity. These techniques are described in creativity techniques. One such popular technique is to take a break and relax or sleep after intensively trying to think of a solution.

• Creativity techniques designed to increase the quantity of fresh ideas. This approach is based on the belief that a larger number of ideas increase the chances that one of them has value. Some of these techniques involve randomly selecting an idea (such as choosing a word from a list), thinking about similarities with the undesired situation, and hopefully inspiring a related idea that leads to a solution. Such techniques are described in creativity techniques.

To qualify as creative problem solving the solution must either have value, clearly solve the stated problem, or be appreciated by someone for whom the situation improves.

The situation prior to the solution does not need to be labeled as a problem. Alternate labels include a challenge, an opportunity, or a situation in which there is room for improvement.

Solving school-assigned homework problems does not usually involve creative problem solving because such problems typically have well-known solutions. Many of the techniques and tools for creating an effective solution to a problem are described in creativity techniques and problem solving.

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C RE AT IVE P ROB LE M SOLVIN G DEFIN ED

• Creative-problem-solving techniques designed to efficiently lead to a fresh perspective that causes a solution to become obvious. This category is useful for solving especially challenging problems. Some of these techniques involve identifying independent dimensions that differentiate (or separate) closely associated concepts.[1] Such techniques can overcome the mind’s instinctive tendency to use “oversimplified associative thinking” in which two related concepts are so closely associated that their differences, and independence from one another, are overlooked

Creative problem solving always involves creativity.

5 T Y PES OF C RE AT IVES

• Creativity techniques designed to reframe the problem. For example, reconsidering one’s goals by asking “What am I really trying to accomplish?” can lead to useful insights.

Creative problem solving is the mental process of creating a solution to a problem. It is a special form of problem solving in which the solution is independently created rather than learned with assistance.

C RE AT IVE P ROB LE M SOLVIN G

http://www.innovativeye.com/definitions

© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

OU T SIDE T H E BOX

Creative Problem Solving Defined


Discover

The Creative Process

Define

Managing the Design Process Concept Development An Essential Manual for the Working Designer Terry Lee Stone

PROJECT INITIATION

ORIENTATION / RESEARCH

STRATEGY

EXPLORATION

Client identifies need or goal.

Client provides any relevant background information and materials.

Designer analyzes and synthesizes the research and information gathered.

Based on client-approved strategy, designer develops preliminary design concepts

Designer leads client through creative briefing sessions.

Designer develops: • Design Criteria • Functionality criteria • Media delivery method plan

Designer’s ideation can take the following forms: • roughs thumbnails • storyboards • flowcharts • mood theme boards / look and feel • POP (Proof of Principal or proof of concept models

Client develops preliminary budget. Client develops creative brief. Client identifies potential clients. Client and designer meet for preliminary discussion and portfolio review. Client creates and sends out RFP. A designer responds by submitting proposals. Client accepts proposal and confirms designer. Designer typically requests deposit payment 1/3 on the project.

Client and designer commence research as need regarding: • competitive landscape • Target audiences • Market research • Design research Using any or all of the following: •Observation • Interviews • Questionnaires • Audits

Designer presents all of the above for client input or approval. Designer develops preliminary plans: • Information architecture, pagination maps, and or wireframes (if appropriate) Designer presents all of the above for client input or approval.

Designer presents the above to client for discussion, input and approval. Client provides insights and initial validation that the concepts direction will meet the project’s stated goals and objectives. Typically, the designer will create several alternative concepts that will be narrowed down to only a couple of concept ideas to be developed further.

Client and designer confirm any technical or functional parameters. Client and designer confirm needs assessment and begin design problem formulation.

Goal: Establish Basic Project Parameters Selection of Designer

Goal: Clarify Objectives and Goals Identify Opportunities Set Broad-based requirements

Understand

Goal: Overall Strategy Design Approach Confirmed lists of deliverables

Goal: General Preliminary Ideas Evaluate these ideas

Ideate


Deliver

PRODUCTION

MANUFACTURE / LAUNCH

Based on client-approved concept ideas, designer further develops the design concepts.

With a client approved design direction, designer further refines the design.

With an approved design, the designer begins implementation of the design across all the required deliverables. This may include:

Depending on the project and delivery media, the Production materials are often handed over by the Designer to others. Although other professionals outside the design firm actually do the work in most instances, the designer must supervise these suppliers and their work. This can include:

Designer and client have a project debriefing (exit interview) to review • Project procedures • Outcomes: success or failure • Feedback loops • Additional opportunities

• Pre-Press/Separator/Printer • Fabricator/Manufacturer • Engineer/Programmer • Media outlet • Broadcast/on-air • Launched on Wed/Live

Designer archives project files. Also, writes up a case study while the project.

These further iterations of the concept(s) will be provided as tigher representations of the design: • Comprehensive layouts • Animatics • Typical pages or spreads • preliminary Prototypes

Typically the changes/modifications are: • Based specifically on client request • Minor in nature • Finessing of aesthetic elements Designer presents the above to client for discussion, input, and approval.

These will incorporate preliminary, often placeholders: • copy/Messaging • Imagery • Motion • Audio Designer presents the above to client for discussion, input, and approval. Client provides insights a and validation that the design direction will meet the project’s stated goals and objectives.

Designer initiates reproduction meeting with additional team members if needed. These might include:

Web: modeling phases, detailed flowchart, all content, finished art for pages and graphic elements, programming, testing. Motion: creating all project elements, animation making movies, shooting live action, editing, final rendering, mastering. Environment: specifications, final prototyping, 3-D digital models, testing in preparation for production, coordinate/manage technical team. Packaging: high-resolution file prep per specifications, color correction, Structural prototyping.

Details are fresh. This is preparation for the project as a self-promotional tool. Designer closes out and invoices project.

Designer may be engaged in the supervision or management of any or all of the above suppliers or it may be the client’s responsibility.

Client pays the designer.

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Ongoing maintenance, especially in the case of Web design, may be an aspect of the project, or it will be determined under a separate agreement.

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• Print, Fabricators, Manufacturers, Photographers, Illustrators, Audio engineer, Programmers.

Goal: Further Develop Ideas Select a Design Direction

Goals: Final Design Approval

Ideate

Goal: Final Production Materials for Release

Goal: Design Materials Completed and in Use

Execute

Goal: Relationship building Sales opportunity for designer Begin new project

T HE DESI GN P RO CESS

Typically, the client will approve one design direction that will then be refined by the designer.

Testing of the design may occur and this may lead to another round of refinements. Testing may include: • Validation • Usability testing • Designer would then present these additional refinements to client for approval

Print: mechanicals/key lines, finished art, digital Files, camera-ready art, all elements finals.

PROJECT COMPLETION

T HE DESI GN P RO CESS

REFINEMENT

C RE AT IVE P ROB LE M SOLVIN G

DEVELOPMENT

© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

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Develop


The Step by Step Guide to Brainstorming

1

“In what ways might we...?” or “How could we...?”

by Jeffrey Baumgartner, 2012

Creative challenge should be concise, to the point and exclude any information other than the challenge itself.

PURPOSE:

An effective way to generate lots of ideas on a specific issue and then determine which idea – or ideas – is the best solution.

Example: “In what ways might we improve product X?” or “How could we encourage more local people to join our club?”

2

PEOPLE:

Best with 8-12 people: A varied group of people from various departments across the organization and have different backgrounds specialist areas, Don’t forget to bring outsiders- they can bring fresh ideas.

3

ATMOSPHERE:

Openly collaborative idea that are safe and allows participants to build on each others’ ideas. There is no bad idea and their is no negative comments. SUPPLIES:

White board(s) Flip-chart Big felt tip pens Post-its

SHOUT IT OUT Brainstorming starts by shouting out solutions to the problem while the facilitator writes them down Laughing is to be encouraged. Criticism is not.

4a

(TYPICAL) Time up - select 5 ideas that show possibilities. Include everyone in the discussion

4b

(ACHIEVING MORE IDEAS) Inventory what you have by putting them in some categories What ideas share the same beginning, end.... What different ideas when put together have a unique story point Can we expand on any ideas to see the range this idea could have Which ideas are more cost effective What do you see as missing rearranging always gives you new idea summarize

ENVIRONMENT:

A relaxed environment - when the brain is relaxed so is the flow of ideas - play and have fun.

GIVE YOURSELVES A TIME LIMIT. A good time frame is around 25 minutes Give yourself an idea limit. At minimum, push for 50 ideas. But 100 ideas is even better.

A FACILITATOR :

responsibilities include guiding the session, encouraging participation and writing ideas down.

DEFINE YOUR PROBLEM OR ISSUE AS A CREATIVE CHALLENGE. This is extremely important. A well designed creative challenge generates the best ideas to solve your problem. Creative challenges typically start with:

Stop and let the mind keep working for another day subconsciously -ideas come when you incubate the all the potential – some ideas will fall to the side others will come closer to solving the problem two unrelated ideas make for a better solution.... NEXT DAY: Another Brainstorming meeting to open up the potential... Summarize Organize and begin the design process


STEP-BY-STEP 1. BLANK PIECE OF PAPER

MIND-MAPS

2. USE PAPER AS LANDSCAPE 3. START IN THE CENTER 4. MAKE CENTER THE TOPIC YOU WANT TO BRAINSTORM

A method of accessing intelligence, allowing rapid expansion and exploration of an idea in note form. ­—Tony Buzan

A picture is worth a thousand words Color coding could do sub sets Connect the image because the brain works by associations - not by having to finish 5. START CONNECTING SECOND LEVEL THOUGHTS Attach whatever word or picture stimulates the association Allow for random movement - you do not have to finish The connective lines are branches and demonstrate the level of importance.

6. ADD A THIRD OR FOURTH LEVEL OF DATA AS THE THOUGHTS COME TO YOU

Use images as much as you can Allow for your thoughts to come freely Jump about - this is really how the mind works in random pattern

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7. ADD MORE CONTRASTS TO THE LINES - GIVE THEM COLOR RELATIONSHIPS

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8. CONTINUE TO MAKE MORE MIND MAP AND IMPROVE ON ARTISTIC STYLES

using color to show relationships be more imaginative and dimensional create something that is beautiful

9. HAVE FUN - ADD HUMOR, EXAGGERATION OR ABSURDITY WHEREVER YOU CAN.

MIN D M A P PIN G

Enclose shape, add color. These provide immediate visual linking-also encourage follow-up

Tony Buzan’s Structure:

B R A INSTO R MIN G

C RE AT IVE P ROB LE M SOLVIN G

A method of visually representing ideas and of aiding the brainstorming “free association” process. A visual method of mapping information to stimulate the generation and analysis of it.

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Mind Mapping


S.C.A.M.P.E.R. Questions that will help you come up with creative ideas for developing new products, and for improving current ones. Below you’ll find examples of questions you could ask for each letter of the SCAMPER mnemonic.

SUBSTITUTE • What materials or resources can you substitute or swap to improve the product? • What other product or process could you use?

COMBINE • What would happen if you combined this product with another, to create something new? • What if you combined purposes or objectives?

• What rules could you substitute? • Can you use this product somewhere else, or as a substitute for something else? • What will happen if you change your feelings or attitude toward this product?

• What could you combine to maximize the uses of this product? • How could you combine talent and resources to create a new approach to this product?

ADAPT

PUT TO ANOTHER USE

ELIMINATE

REVERSE

• How could you adapt or readjust this product to serve another purpose or use?

• How could you change the shape, look, or feel of your product?

• Can you use this product somewhere else, perhaps in another industry?

• How could you streamline or simplify this product?

• What would happen if you reversed this process or sequenced things differently?

• What else is the product like?

• What could you add to modify this product?

• Who else could use this product?

• What features, parts, or rules could you eliminate?

• What if you try to do the exact opposite of what you’re trying to do now?

• Who or what could you emulate to adapt this product?

• What could you emphasize or highlight to create more value?

• How would this product behave differently in another setting?

• What could you understate or tone down?

• What components could you substitute to change the order of this product?

• What else is like your product?

• What element of this product could you strengthen to create something new?

• Could you recycle the waste from this product to make something new?

• How could you make it smaller, faster, lighter, or more fun?

• What other context could you put your product into? • What other products or ideas could you use for inspiration?

Find it here: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCT_02.htm

MODIFY

• What would happen if you took away part of this product? • What would you have in its place?

• What roles could you reverse or swap? How could you reorganize this product?


There are mainly five ways to organize information and these are applicable to most situations. The acronym LATCH can help you remember them. C RE AT IVE P ROB LE M SOLVIN G S C A M PE R

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L ATCH

http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/we-design-information-too/

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L.A.T.C.H.


Where We Are Going

R ich a r d FLO R I DA

Da n ie l PI N K

Ma t t B ROWN


TO LEARN

­—John Cage The difficulty lies not so much in developing new ideas as in escaping from old ones. ­—John Maynard Keynes

TO CREATE TO FEEL CHALLENGED TO PASS TIME COMPETITIVELY TO WIN

Play is simultaneously a source of relaxation and stimulation for the brain and body. A sure (and fun) way to develop your imagination, creativity, problem-solving abilities, and mental health is to play with your romantic partner, officemates, children, grandchildren, and friends.

COOPERATIVELY

Play is often described as a time when we feel most alive, yet we often take it for granted and may completely forget about it. But play isn’t a luxury - it’s a necessity. Play is as important to our physical and mental health as getting enough sleep, eating well, and exercising. Play teaches us how to manage and transform our “negative” emotions and experiences. It supercharges learning, helps us relieve stress, and connects us to others and the world around us. Play can also make work more productive and pleasurable.

FOR THE FUN OF IT

PLAYING AT WORK • keeps you functional when under stress • refreshes your mind and body • encourages teamwork • helps you see problems in new ways • triggers creativity and innovation • increases energy and prevents burnout

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T H E I M PO RTA N CE OF PL AY

Taking the time to replenish yourself through play is one of the best things you can do for your career. When the project you’re working on hits a serious glitch (as often happens), heading out to the basketball court with your colleagues to shoot some hoops and have a few laughs does a lot more than take your mind off the problem. If basketball isn’t your cup of tea, having a model airplane contest, telling stories, or flying kites in the parking lot will also allow your relationship to the problem to shift and enable you to approach it from a new perspective.

FOR THE JOY OF IT

W HE RE WE A RE GOIN G

TO FOCUS OURSELVES AS SPECTATORS

THE IMPORTANCE OF PLAY

Despite the power of play, somewhere between childhood and adulthood, many of us stop playing. We exchange play for work and responsibilities. When we do have some leisure time, we’re more likely to zone out in front of the TV or computer than to engage in creative, brain-stimulating play. By giving ourselves permission to play with the joyful abandon of childhood, we can continue to reap its benefits throughout life.

PL AY

I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.

© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

Why we play

OU T SIDE T H E BOX

The Importance of Play


Happy Accidents


PL AY

H A P PY ACCIDEN T S

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© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

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Let’s Play

LE T ’S PL AY


Notes Write It.

Sketch It.


NA ME:

INTUITIVE

SENSITIVE

ENGERGETIC

AU R A L

V I S UA L

VERBAL

N O T M O T I VAT E D BY M O N E Y

SENSE OF HUMOR

VERBAL

AC T I V E

REFLECTIVE

A DA P TA B L E

S E L F -AC T UA L I Z I N G

P H YS I C A L

SEQUENTIAL

GLOBAL

TOLERENT OF AMBIGUITY

SELF-DISCIPLINED

LOGICAL

O B S E R VA N T

S E L F - K N OW L E DA B L E

SOCIAL

P E R C I E V E WO R L D D I F F E R E N T

SPECIFIC INTERESTS

S O L I TA RY

SEE POSSIBILITIES

D I V E R G E N T T H I N KE R

A LWAY S A S K I N G Q U E S T I O N S

CURIOUS

C A N S Y N T H E S I Z E I N T U I T I V E LY

OPEN-ENDED

A B L E T O FA N TA S I Z E

INDEPENDENT

FLEXIBLE

S E V E R E LY C R I T I C A L

FLUENT

NON - CONFORMING

I M AG I N AT I V E

CONFIDENT

INTUITIVE

R I S K TA KE R

ORIGINAL

PERSISTENT

INGENIOUS

SENSE OF DESTINY

CHECK / F ROM PAGE 03- 0 4 / 7 LE A RN I N G ST YLES & LE A RN I N G I N DE X

CI RCLE ONE / F ROM PAGE 05 / LEF T & RI G HT B R AI N FU N C TIONS

SOCIAL

LOGICAL

MU S I C A L

INTRAPERSONAL

S PAT I A L

N AT U R A L I S T I C

KINESTHETIC

LINGUISTIC

CHECK / F ROM PAGE 09 / 32 CRE ATIVE T R AIT S

NOTES

S E N S O RY

C RE AT IVE P ROFILE

V I S UA L

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CHECK / F ROM PAGE 06 / 8 T YPES O F C RE ATIVE I NTELLI GEN CE

THE CRAFTSMAN THE CONNECTOR T H E C U R AT O R THE CRITIC CHECK / F ROM PAGE 12 / 5 T YPES O F CRE ATIVES

YOU R C RE AT IVE P ROFILE

THE INVENTOR

© GWEN A MO S DESI GN

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Your Creative Profile


Resources Page 03 / The Seven Learning Styles http://people.use.edu/~bwjames/tut/learning-styles/stylest.html

Page 04 / Felder and Silverman Index of Learning Styles http://www.mindtools.com/mnemlsty.html

Page 08 / Flow & The Psychology of Discovery & Invention Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi http://cre8ng.com/about-me/32-ways-to-be-more-creative/32-traits-of-creative-thinking

Page 09 / 32 Creative Traits 32 Traits of Creative People Robert Alan Black, Ph.D

Page 13 / Creativity Problem Solving Defined Chas Martin http://www.innovativeye.com/definitions

Page 14 / The Creative Process Managing the Design Process Concept Development An Essential Manual for the Working Designer Terry Lee Stone Rockport, Publisher

Page 16 / The Step by Step Guide to Brainstorming Jeffrey Baumgartner http://www.jpb.com/creative/brainstorming.php

Page 18 / SCAMPER http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCT_02.html

Page 19 / LATCH http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/we-design-information-too/


Outside The Box