Page 1

Our park too Latino children are introduced to Grand Teton National Park through the Pura Vida program, 9B.

Obituaries: 17B

valley Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Far Afield

A downright pleasant evening of owling with friends, 2B.

Leslie Jorgensen helps her sister, RoLene Whittaker, back into her chair after changing her diaper in the basement of their home in Alpine. For more than two years, Jorgensen has been the primary care provider for Whittaker as her Alzheimer’s disease has worsened.

Slipping

away

Caregivers struggle as Alzheimer’s transforms their loved ones. Story by Taylor Williams Photographs by Travis J. Garner

T

he living room of Leslie Jorgensen’s basement in Alpine tells the story of how much her life has changed during the last five years. Sheets stapled to the doorways create the impression of a fully enclosed space. Locks bar the door that opens into the backyard. The sound of a river meandering through the nearby mountains is barely audible, replaced by television static. A rocking chair faces the TV, which was moved from its stand to the floor so the chair’s primary occupant, Leslie’s sister, RoLene Whittaker, wouldn’t knock it down. Pictures on the wall and curtains on the windows are scarce for the same reason. “She’ll hear noises, but she can’t really See SLIPPING on 12B

Before being diagnosed with dementia at age 55, Whittaker was an avid skydiver, with hundreds of jumps under her belt. This family photo captures a leap from a hot air balloon.


2B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Look through smoke and see things clearly B

Together, we can make a difference for Teton Area families.

ernie McHugh and Frances driving or biking past the ranch have Clark took me owling. Besides mentioned their astonishment at and being close and expert observ- distress over the size and shape of the ers, birders and botanists, they can see changes being made. Pasture changed through smoke. to hills and wetlands. Despite recent smoke in the Hole Now speculation is yielding to ques(coming, apparently from all over the tioning. Puzzleface is encumbered land, West), regardless of the odds, oblivious having a conservation easement via of rain, sleet and near-dark of night, The Nature Conservancy. And, in turn, one goes owling. Finding short-eared The Nature Conservancy has an obliowls here is always possible in season, gation to assure the conservation easebut it’s not an every-year opportunity. ment is being honored. Frances and Bernie had spotted a pair And so, since Jackson Hole is still of short-ears toward the north end of a small community, some folks intend the Antelope Flats hayfields on two pre- to discover whether or not all of the vious evenings. terms of the conservation easement Short-eared owl nests have been are in force. found in years past near the intersecPresumably, those interested folks tion of the Ditch Creek and Antelope will soon identify themselves publicly. Flats roads in Grand Teton National I’m curious but preoccupied with other Park, so even though lately I jinx concerns. Just wondering who’s mindplanned birding outings, I was happy ing the store. to go along. They found one, The storekeep in this too, pointing into impeninstance is The Nature etrable gloaming. Not only Conservancy. If you’re inthat, the short-eared owl terested and concerned was sparring with a northabout a happy and correct ern harrier, engaging in resolution in this matter, supersonic midair combat. contact Andrea Erickson, Quite a sight. Add prongdirector of Wyoming ofhorn with fawns, coyotes, fice, The Nature Conserbison, a Swainson’s hawk vancy, 258 Main St., Suite close up, vesper sparrows, 200, Lander, WY 82520; or sage grouse, a least chipemail aerickson@tnc.org. Bert Raynes munk and almost no mos• quitoes, and it wasn’t too Field notes: It’s intershabby an outing. esting but frustrating to speculate what As you would guess, short-eared the smoky miasma in the Hole may owls have almost inconspicuous ear be doing to the wildlife, if anything. tufts and don’t erect them often. Short- People, however, are being affected — ears are the size of a small crow, per- stinging eyes, allergies aggravated, anhaps 17 inches. Males are brown, while noyance — and are simply wanting it females are a darker gray. Their flight to go away. resembles the flight of a harrier. In fact, Bill Resor was impressed when harriers and short-eared owls can eas- watching a flight of a dozen common ily be confused: These owls habitually nighthawks a couple of weeks ago on the hunt from midafternoon to dark over west bank. A handful of other observers the same terrain harriers prefer. The have reported nighthawks, but singly or short-ears show large, buffy underwing in small numbers. It has been a lot of patches in flight, while harriers sport a years, say a dozen, since multiple sightwhite rump patch. Both species have a ings have been made in the Hole. kind of floppy flight low over the ground Bernie McHugh and Frances Clark with many changes of speed and direc- watched two short-eared owls hunting tion. They eat mice and voles primar- over Antelope Flats on Aug. 12 and a ily but will take other small mammals, few subsequent days. They also combirds and insects to feed young. pleted their Nature Mapping reports Short-eared owls nest on the covering seven sage grouse, two nightground, on some occasions under- hawks, pronghorn, bison, coyotes and a ground. I have no justification for find- cooperative Swainson’s hawk. ing this fact odd, but I do. Alta residents Carol Travis and Leo • Henikoff have noticed significant numFor the better part of a century, bers of vultures and an increase in many residents and interested admir- large mammal species there, including ers of Jackson Hole have encouraged, bears. Suspect a correlation. In South worked for, voted for, lobbied for, sup- Park, two male wood ducks and a flight ported and donated to attempts to of ibis, probably, were noticed. maintain its scenery. Many of these efBison, deer, elk and bear are movforts have worked. Think Grand Teton ing about, some movements a result of National Park and its history. season, others spooked by hunting. Lee Smaller examples: Scenic values of Cutler has had elk and mule deer at the eastern approach over Togwotee his house last week. Dode Stearns even Pass are well preserved and remain had marmots at her home. glorious. It’s excellent from the north. Citizen scientists are becoming inAn example of what has been lost is the creasingly interested in butterflies, a southern entrance. burgeoning fad. Chuck Herz and parNow the entrance to the Hole from ty found comma and gray butterflies the west — thought by most residents while hiking in Grand Teton National and many visitors to have been, to much Park last week. relief, preserved by conservation easeEffects of drought and heat are ments to land trust organizations — is showing up in deciduous trees and being altered by a significant change to shrubs here. © Bert Raynes 2012 landscape and prior use of the land. Alteration is a mild word for what is –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– happening to portions of the Puzzleface Bert Raynes writes weekly on whatever Ranch along state Route 22, just east suits his fancy with a dash of news on of the Snake River. For months, locals nature and its many ways.

Give today through Old Bill’s Fun Run at www.oldbills.org

DEADLINES

Children’s Workshops Skiers Briggs & Beckwith

Voices of the Valley Programs Photo by David J. Swift

Special Community Projects

Thank you for supporting your history museum through Old Bill’s Fun Run!

Stan Klassen Research Center 241816

In Teton County, 1 out of 4 families with a female head-of-household live in poverty. These families have names and faces…

Please join us in our efforts to ensure that low-income, single mothers receive essential job training and placement,

counseling, parenting and other support services as they strive to transform their lives.

Member of the Human Services Council - Working together to deliver cost-effective human services 241617

Far Afield

The following deadlines apply to various items regularly printed in the Valley section. If items are submitted later than the deadline, they may or may not be printed that week. To submit an item, mark it “Attn: Johanna Love” and drop it by the News&Guide, 1225 Maple Way, e-mail it to features@jhnewsandguide. com, fax it to 734-1160 or call 733-2047, ext 118. Photos marked on the back with a name and telephone number should be dropped by the office

with a self-addressed, stamped envelope if they need to be returned. ■ People items: 5 p.m. Friday ■ Wedding or engagement announcements: 5 p.m. Friday ■ Valley Breeze: 5 p.m. Friday ■ Calendar items: noon Monday ■ Obituaries: noon Sunday ■ Death notices: 10 a.m. Monday


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 3B

PRICE CHAMBERS / NEWS&GUIDE Photos

Longtime children’s librarian Debbie Schlinger reacts as friend Leanne Moore greets her with a card after her final Toddler Time at Teton County Library.

Literacy champion closes chapter After nearly a quarter century, beloved children’s librarian retires. By Johanna Love

D

ebbie Schlinger sang, counted, danced and cried through her final performances of Toddler Time and Storytime on Thursday at Teton County Library. After 24 years of championing early literacy as a children’s librarian and coordinator of youth programs, Schlinger retired. She ended her run of storytelling in front of children who didn’t realize the import of the occasion. “I get to go camping this weekend,” Schlinger said to the Storytime audience, using camping as a euphemism for what she’ll be doing during retirement. She chose the theme of camping for the final Storytime’s flannel board illustrations and books. She broke down during the farewell song and when fellow library employee Pauline Towers-Dykeman handed her a bouquet of flowers. “You keep coming to the library and checking books out,” Schlinger said to the kids, wiping her eyes. Growing up in Indiana, Schlinger always wanted to be a teacher. After graduating from college, she moved to Wyoming and began work first as a teacher’s aide, a substitute and then an English teacher at the Jackson Hole middle and high schools. During her seven years teaching, she also coached volleyball, gymnastics and track, leading the girls to a state volleyball championship. Then, in 1989, she moved to Teton County Library and started her work in the children’s department. At a farewell party for Schlinger on Thurs-

day evening at 43 North, dozens of her former students, co-workers and friends gathered to express their thanks for Schlinger’s dedication. Barbara Hoeft remembers how, more than a decade ago, Schlinger would be on her way out the door when Hoeft would her stop her and ask for recommendations for her then-young children. “She would put down her purse and go and make selections for me,” Hoeft said. “That willingness to go the extra mile meant so much to me and my family.” Now serving as the president of the Teton County Library Foundation Board, Hoeft said Schlinger’s enthusiasm for children’s literacy helped encourage donors. “The things you did made what we do easy,” Hoeft said. Hoeft also recalled Schlinger building excitement for the library’s summer reading programs by donning silly costumes during visits to the schools and keeping themes top secret until the last minute. One of Schlinger’s three daughters, Amy, took the mic and said that even though their mother embarrassed her offspring with “ridiculous skits,” the devotion Schlinger showed was inspiring. “Who else’s mom can be a gorilla, a ladybug, a detective and a safari guide?” Amy Schlinger asked. “And, Mom, all three of us are still Buggy for Books.” On the way to attend Schlinger’s farewell party, Lynn Wegner said she ran into three parents. The first called Schlinger a legend, the second an icon, and the third said, “What are we going to do?” Wegner relayed. “She is magical,” Wegner said to the crowd, then turned to address Schlinger herself. “It was

Schlinger tops off 24 years at Teton County Library with one last book at Storytime on Thursday.

never about you, it was always about the kids. For that, we are all forever grateful.” A handful of area school librarians, most of whom worked directly with Schlinger at the library at some point in their careers, put together a silly poem. They said the letters in Schlinger’s first name stood for Dynamic, Energetic, Bookworm, Beautiful, Ideas, Encouraging. At the end of the remarks, Schlinger stood and thanked her friends and peers for their support. “All my programs and Storytimes wouldn’t have meant anything if you hadn’t enjoyed them,” she said. “For 24 years, I’ve been able to do what I love and love what I do.”


4B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Don’t underestimate power of pie M

Pet of the Week

y rhubarb is gone, which anniversary, and she has yet to bake means summer is consider- a pie. A grim woman, Maudie reably more than half over. No mains fond of statistics. more rhubarb poached in red wine, no The Phillip’s Girlfriend Thanksmore rhubarb bread pudding, so long giving filled me with inspiration and rhubarb-strawberry and rhubarb marked my foray into pie making. custard pies. I did experiment with Following in my grandmother’s and a rhubarb barbecue sauce, which I great-grandmother’s footsteps, no know sounds disgusting but really rolling pin existed in our kitchen. turned out pretty good. In fact, it was “Use this bottle of wine,� my so tasty that I canned a dozen pints. mother said, handing me a bottle of It’s perfect with pulled elk sandwich- Mouton Cadet 1972. “Better yet, go es, so keep that in mind when Christ- to the bakery.� mas comes around and you find me Ignoring my mother, while emand a nicely decorated jar bracing Betty Crocker’s of barbecue sauce at your instructions, I began the door. Yes, I made my rhumysterious process of cutbarb jam too. Thirty-four ting shortening into flour jars. I have a really big till it resembled corncanner that just basically meal. I added iced water showed up in the basespoonful by spoonful. I ment one day. I’d never stayed focused. I made a actually canned anything mess. The piecrust was before its arrival, and I not exactly Phillip’s girlwas somewhat anxious friend’s piecrust. Instead, cooking with an appliance it could best be described Doreen Tome that has both a pressure as a leaden mass. My apvalve and a gasket. These ple pie was rustic. I was things spell nothing but trouble. I’d covered with flour from head to toe, rather make pies. the kitchen ceiling to floor. I made my first pie in high school. I did not give up, but I didn’t rush It was Thanksgiving, and my best out to purchase a rolling pin, either. friend’s brother, Philip, was home I went to school, learned to sing, from college. His girlfriend came vacationed at the Hoover Dam and for a visit and started baking a pie. collapsed from heat stroke. My comFrom scratch. She brought along her panions were not impressed and conown apron. I did not come from a tinued their dam tour while I was led long line of bakers. I had never seen to the infirmary by a gentlemanly someone peel apples, cut shortening guard. I could barely see, I was so into flour, smile and get just a wisp faint. The nurse pointed me to a cot of flour on her freckled nose and au- to lie down on and handed me some burn hair. Truly, Philip’s girlfriend lemonade. I lay there with my eyes was a vision of loveliness rolling out closed while the nurse and guard that pie crust. Ethereal. The woman awaited my recovery. The nurse ofwas ethereal. Philip wasn’t swayed fered some lemonade to the guard. by the pie goddess, ultimately mar- He took a sip, was quiet for a moment rying the girl nobody liked, Maudie. and said, “Boy, oh, boy, do I miss my They recently celebrated their 35th grandmother’s lemon sponge pie. It

KARA POLLARD / COURTESY PHOTO

JH Senior

Paco loves his peeps Paco’s a handsome, young, neutered mixed breed male. He is smart, eager to learn and loves his people. He has some possessive issues with other animals, so he would do best as the only pet. There are many dogs and cats available for adoption at the Jackson/Teton County Animal Shelter, located on Adams Canyon Road south of Jackson. Adoption fees are $45 for dogs and $30 for cats. Call 733-2139 for information, or stop by the shelter during business hours, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday except holidays. Or peruse the pets online at JacksonShelter.petfinder.com.

was so good, that crust so flaky, and that lemon sponge filling was the best thing on this Earth.� Despite my heat stroke, despite my weakness, I uttered, “Did your grandmother use fresh lemon or that stuff in the bottle?� “Fresh,� the guard replied. “Lemon rind. Did she use lemon rind? How many eggs? Did you eat the lemon sponge pie hot or cold? With whipped cream or ice cream or plain?� “My, my, I guess you’re feeling better now,� said the nurse, unimpressed by pie. In moments, my companions returned and off we headed to Las Vegas, where I saw Bill Cosby playing the slot machines with a woman who was exceptionally tall and wore sequins. I could tell she was no pie baker either. Soon I moved to Wyoming and mastered my pie making skills. I favor the hot-water crust method, which makes a dough that can be rolled out warm. With peach season here and a lug of Crest Haven peaches sitting in my kitchen, I could very well be tempted to whip up a couple of peach pies. Later, I could help walk off those warm slices of peach pie — laced with a pinch of nutmeg, topped with whipped cream and a sprinkle of fresh huckleberries — at the Alzheimer’s Walk being held Saturday. The walk will start and end at the Senior Center of Jackson Hole, 830 E. Hansen. Funds received will aid local Alzheimer’s efforts. Afterward, there will be a barbecue and Senior Fair at the same location. You can also just attend the Senior Fair from 11 till 2. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Doreen Tome always crimps and flutes to avoid slump.

We do that. While continuing to provide unparalleled assisted living care for seniors, we’ve expanded our services and support systems to better meet your ever-changing needs‌ like encouraging the community to participate in The Walk to End Alzheimer’s 2012.

r4BUVSEBZ "VHVTU  r3FHJTUSBUJPOJTBUBN r8BMLCFHJOTBUBN PSNJMFT

r$PNFIFBS.BSUIB4UFBSO .%$BSPM5BZMPS -$48TQFBL BUUIF4FOJPS$FOUFSCFGPSFUIF8BMLCFHJOT r4UBSUBUUIF4FOJPS$FOUFS &)BOTFO NEW LOCATION r&OEBUUIF4FOJPS$FOUFSBOEFOKPZUIF4FOJPS'BJS ##2 BOEMJWFNVTJD r7JTJUUIF3JWFS3PDLCPPUIXIJMFZPVhSFBUUIF4FOJPS'BJS Proceeds go to benefit

Join our staff by putting together a team and walking! Call us today for more information (307) 734-0500

3000 Big Trail Drive Jackson, WY 83001 (307) 734-0500 www.riverrockalf.com facebook.com/RiverRockAssistedLiving 240750

Did you know? *UhTFTUJNBUFEUIBU QFPQMFJO8ZPNJOHXJMMCF MJWJOHXJUI"M[IFJNFShTJOŕŹ™ .BLFBEJÄŽFSFODFJOUIFMJWFTPGZPVSGBNJMZ OFJHICPSTBOE GSJFOETCZCFJOHBQBSUPGUIJTXPOEFSGVMDPNNVOJUZFWFOU


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 5B

Science fan lands gross dream job

LOOKING BACK

Twenty-year resident gives tours of recycling center, plots ways to keep trash from landfill. By Kevin Huelsmann On Friday, Mac Dukart spent his morning trying to gross out a group of Teton Science Schools students at the county’s recycling center. The students were taking a “Grossology” course at Teton Science Schools, and Dukart was tasked with showing them some of the unsavory aspects of recycling. He took them to a fruit fly invasion that had besieged a pile of aluminum. He showed them the pools of liquid under the conveyor belts that sort all the materials coming to the center. That afternoon, Dukart went to a meeting about how to keep even more of county residents’ trash from going to a landfill. He’s been researching how to incorporate food composting into the transfer center. “We were looking at coagulated paint in the morning, and by the afternoon I was working on planning for the landfill,” Dukart said after work Friday. Dukart, who will turn 42 in November, has lived in the valley for nearly two decades. In those years, he has held just about every job imaginable. He studied air quality and sewer issues as an intern at the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance. He has taught in several of the valley’s schools. He has worked as an Outward Bound instructor and tracked wolverines. He has even worked as a banana farmer in Hawaii. This year, he snagged a career. Dukart started working at the county’s Integrated Recycling and Solid Waste Division in April. He’s the recycling and outreach coordinator. “It’s a dark and dirty topic, but it’s so telling of a community,” he said, PRICE CHAMBERS / NEWS&GUIDE describing his interest in trash and Mac Dukart is the recycling and outreach coordinator for the county’s recycling. Integrated Recycling and Solid Waste Division. Dukart has had his eye on the job for four or five years. He said the posi- summer working with the Cougar it in the air for about two hours.” Dukart also took a year off from tion combined his love of science with Fund. He tracked wolverines through the valley. He spent about a year in the ability to interact with the rest of the area. “We chased them all over the Hawaii with his girlfriend, who was the community. Tetons,” he said. going to school there. He’s in and out of At the recycling center, schools, working with busiDukart is trying to figure ness owners and their emout how to increase Jackployees and giving tours, son Hole’s diversion rate. among many other tasks. Mac The recycling and solid The diversity of issues Dukart waste division helps divert and responsibilities within roughly 40 percent of resihis job sometimes makes dents’ trash. The national for an interesting dichotomy, like his quick shift from a gross-out tour average is closer to 33 percent. The of the recycling factory to a meeting rate varies from household to houseto discuss expansion options at the hold, though, he said. “Every week, we put out half a county’s transfer station. “Things got a lot more adultlike small trash can, and our neighbors – Mac Dukart and serious in a hurry,” he said of his are putting out two or three overflowRecycling and outreach coordinator ing, large trash cans,” Dukart said. workday. Dukart is excited to discuss the Dukart grew up in a Denver sub“I was the whitest dude on the isurb. He went to Colorado State Uni- possibilities. He is researching ways to compost organic materials at the land,” he said. versity in Fort Collins. The couple lived outside Hilo. He It was there that he landed an in- transfer center for a potential expanworked part time in a middle school ternship at the conservation alliance. sion of the site. “It’s interesting to think about how while she took classes. He also worked He worked on sewer and air quality on a banana farm. issues. When the internship ended, he much we can divert,” Dukart said. Outside work, Dukart has man“They couldn’t believe how white I stuck around Jackson. He started piecing together jobs, aged to amass a diverse array of hob- was,” Dukart said. “They gave me a and within a few years he found him- bies. He’s an avid backcountry skier, big hat.” The farmworkers also gave him a self working as a paraprofessional in a river enthusiast and an extreme kite flyer. couple pieces of important advice. the county school district. “Jackson is such an aggro place,” “They told me watch out for two Dukart started out at Colter Elementary School and ended up teach- he said. “I started to feel like I was things: giant, poisonous centipedes and giant cane spiders,” Dukart said. ing fourth-grade math at Kelly El- being left out.” He took to extreme kite flying. In The couple adapted defensive flyementary School. “There aren’t too many places one outing, he, along with his girl- swatting techniques to keep away the like that anymore,” he said of the friend and dog, launched a recycled large spiders. Kelly schoolhouse. SpongeBob SquarePants kite off “My girlfriend became very adHe then got a job at Teton Science Jackson Peak. ept with a fly swatter,” Dukart said. Schools teaching ecology. In between “With a few minor repairs, we got it “She’s talented and is a gorgeous cane the teaching gigs, Dukart spent a flying pretty high,” he said. “We kept spider slayer.”

CLOSE-UP

“Every week, we put out half a small trash can, and our neighbors are putting out two or three overflowing, large trash cans.”

45 years ago ...

Grand Teton National Park rangers attempted one of the trickiest and most complicated rescues in park history when they evacuated an injured climber from the North Face of Grand Teton. No rescue had ever been attempted from the mountain’s North Face, and the team quickly found that its only option was to lower the climber onto the Teton Glacier before airlifting him. The man suffered double compound fractures of the left leg when he was caught in an unavoidable rock slide. His climbing partner was unhurt. All in all, 14 men were involved in the operation, which one ranger later called “the most difficult rescue ever attempted from the Tetons.” In the days that followed the rescue, rangers were flown to the glacier’s top, and they established an evacuation route down it that included landing space for helicopters.

30 years ago ...

Jackson bankers and real estate brokers began realizing the positive effects of a record-setting week of trading activity on Wall Street. Over a tumultuous seven days, the Dow Jones Industrial Average increased by more than 81 points, the overall level of trading exceeded 455 million shares, and federal interests rates plummeted like the stock exchange circa October 1929. Financiers across the valley jubilantly proclaimed a foreseeable end to the summer recession and prepared for a surge in the market demand for housing, which had been struggling mightily throughout the year. ... A man allegedly blinded by bouncers at the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar settled a lawsuit against the establishment, walking away with an unspecified amount that exceeded $1 million. During the initial hearing, the man’s attorney attempted to re-create the incident by kicking a witness over the jury box rail into the jurors. The judge was outraged. After holding him in contempt of court, he declared the case would not proceed until the plaintiff’s attorney paid his opponent’s court costs, which amounted to nearly $37,000.

15 years ago ...

Reports of people loitering and sleeping in Miller Park for extended periods of time prompted town officials to consider banning alcohol there. The issue was tricky, as Jackson’s vagrancy and loitering ordinances had been rendered unconstitutional under recent federal court rulings, making it illegal for police to roust people for simply hanging out. While the number of individuals lounging around induced mild unease in residents and officials alike, banning booze was about the best they could do. The town’s open container law contained a loophole allowing residents to drink in several public places, including Miller Park. ... Driggs, Idaho, was included in a Men’s Journal write-up on the country’s “dream towns.” The story came on the heels of a story in the Wall Street Journal labeling the valley west of the Tetons a hot real estate market. Both drew the ire of Driggs residents who valued the town for its quiet and anonymity. In his article, the writer subtly complimented the town, saying, “Despite a name that makes it sound like stuff scraped off the bottom of something, Driggs is the epicenter of Teton Valley.”


6B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Bears aren’t the only fans of huckleberries Healthy Huckleberry Muffins A news release sent to me as a huckleberries contain very potent suggestion for a column on health-enhancing chemicals. huckleberries said, “Foraging If you are new to the area and want expert and naturalist Darcy William- to pick huckleberries, be sure to find son says it’s the most berries she has a friend with backcountry experience, seen in 25 years.” especially with foraging for wild foods. In the Rocky Mountains, the re- There are many poisonous berries around, and it’s difficult to tell those lease said, many berries, from the edible ones. There including thimble-, serviceare some very good writand huckleberries, seem to ten guides, as well, but the be growing in record numbook images never seem bers this summer. to aptly describe a huckleI had not heard gushberry or the shrubby plant. ing around town about an Huckleberries like acidunusually abundant berry ic soil and will be found crop in the Jackson Hole along the lower and middle area, so I went to the forflanks of the larger mounest and interviewed locals. tains in the area. Bears I found huckleberries, but frequent berry areas this not any more than usual Therese Metherell time of year, and they esand in some places fewer than usual. The results of pecially love hucklebermy interviews suggest the same. ries, so looking for them is one way Huckleberries are tough to find to find the berries. Another option is and even tougher to pick, yet they are to hike in moist, wooded areas and still worth this late-summer forage, use your nose. Huckleberries have because they are special, delicious a distinctly delicious fragrance and and incredibly nutritious. are easy to find along many Grand Huckleberries are high in vita- Teton and Yellowstone national park min C and fiber. Full of antioxidants, trails. And if you follow this elevation they help fight cancer, heart disease around the valley, you can discover and arthritis. They are a rich source them in the U.S. Forest Service areas. Huckleberries cannot be picked comof polyphenols, an especially potent form of phytonutrient. Along with mercially in the national parks. You other purple fruits and vegetables, would be hard-pressed to pick enough

Sound Bites

Eliminate

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease a 12-cup muffin pan. In a large bowl, stir together all dry ingredients. Gently fold in huckleberries and nuts. In a separate bowl, mix together the rest of the ingredients. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry, and mix just until blended. Spoon into muffin tins. Bake 15-18 minutes or until tops of the muffins spring back when touched. Cool and enjoy. summer. I use them for holiday meals at my house, and the connection to these special days makes them seem even more inviting. To save berries, remove any sticks and leaves, then place the fruit in a zippered freezer bag. Jam, pie, pancakes and cobbler are all yummy ways to use this hard-to-find fruit. This recipe here is a favorite It was developed from a five-star, blueberry muffin recipe at AllRecipes.com. Happy foraging. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Registered dietitian Therese Metherell owns Peak Nutrition. She specializes in sports nutrition and wellness. Send ideas for columns to peaknutrition68@gmail.com.

to make a living, anyway. Gathering a few cups’ worth for a few pints of jam or a batch of muffins can be considered a successful day. Needless to say, be sure to leave a few for the bears, as well as your neighbors. Most importantly, do not pull the bushes up or break them off. Bushes take many years to grow large enough to support fruit. I discovered a fun tool recently at Sunrise Lumber. A friend showed me a special huckleberry-picking rake. A video at HuckleberryRake.com demonstrates its use. I have not tried my new toy yet but will report the results on my Peak Nutrition Facebook page. I generally savor my berries all winter. I consider them the pure scent of

NEW GENTLE TRX®! GENTLE TRX® Mon & Fri 9:00am CIRCUIT TRX®

your performance anxiety

Biofeedback of Jackson Hole

Deborah Clemens & Dr. Margie Kearns

Training Brains Naturally Since 1994

Mon, Wed, Fri 8:00am

215 Scott Lane • (307) 690-8088 TransformativeFitness215.com

JoAnne Scott, RN, BCN Certified Practitioner 557 E. Broadway • 734-9591

233799

233714

3/4 cup all-purpose flour 3/4 cup whole wheat flour 3/4 cup all-natural white sugar 1/3 cup oat bran 1/3 cup old-fashioned oatmeal 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup huckleberries 1/2 cup chopped pecans 1 banana, mashed 1 omega-3-fat egg 1 tablespoon canola oil

DEEP SLEEP

call Karen at 739-9541 or return via Fax at 733-2138. Thanks!

PDF?

Learn how to fall asleep faster & sleep more soundly.

Call for your FREE consultation.

BIOHEALTH

Joy Nelson Lundeen, RN, BCN 555 E. Broadway • 307.739.7532

242029

Wireless

N O I T A I D RA rries?

Mark Menolascino, MD, MS, ABIHM, ABAARM Board Certified Anti-Aging Specialist

Wo

Signs of low testosterone for men and women: n

Fatigue/loss of drive Depression/irritability n Decreased libido/sex drive n Weight gain/unable to lose weight n Loss of strength/can’t gain muscle

n

l o o h c S o t Back ionae lguards c e p S se 2 cellph

NOT SURE? TAKE OUR QUIZ!

www.menoclinic.com/antiaging Check and balance your hormones! Bio-Identical Hormone Therapy is just what you need to get your life back!

Specializing in Bio-Identical Hormone Therapy Visit us at www.menoclinic.com | Call for a consult today! | 307.732.1039

,

tented lidated, Pa a V y ll a c fi ti Scien lutions Practical So

240769

221560

Biofeedback & Behavioral Health

241480

Purcha same day ff o % 0 3 e and receiv t purchase supplemenust Mention Ad. Exp. 9/5/12

M

Roadrunner Apothecary

307-732-0540


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 7B

Black is the new red for tomatoes W hen Grace and Jimmy An- pay more for them. derson invited me down to Heirlooms come in a wide variety of their small acreage south colors, shapes, flavors and sizes. The of town, named Winterset Farms, of Andersons grow at least 15 kinds evcourse I said yes. ery summer. First of all, it was a chance to pick Grace and Jimmy gave me a half tart, red, sun-ripened cherries from dozen different tomatoes to take home their trees, a harvest rather hard to to try. find in Jackson Hole. Some of these tomatoes were yellow, And second, I can always tell when some crinkly, some small and some someone is “garden proud,” and I almost black, a deep purple, dusky hoped to see what they wanted to brown or a smoky dark mahogany. brag about. A wonderful gift, since I had just I took a nice tour of their place. read of tomatoes that black is the Then we picked enough new red. sour cherries for me to Winterset Farms, in make a big luscious pie fact, grows several of the that night. blacks — Carbon, Black Then it got even better, Krim, Paul Robeson and, if that’s possible. I was my favorite name, Black given a tour through the from Tula — which apgreenhouses where they parently is a region somegrow their heirloom tomawhere in Russia. toes. Heirloom tomatoes, Another of their tomayou may already know, toes, the Oaxacan Jewel are a very trendy topic — an orange-pink-yellow Marilyn Quinn currently. globe-shaped type — that I So what, readers might sampled had a bright, comwonder, is an heirloom tomato? plex flavor. Heirlooms are sometimes called I lost track of the names of the oth“heritage” tomatoes. They are old- ers, but, then, I didn’t really care. All timey varieties that have been had intense flavor, and I would rate passed down through decades and then all fantastic as the crucial ingregenerations of gardeners. These va- dient of a BLT. rieties have been saved because of Since the myriad plants on their their good characteristics — one of farm provide more cherries, raspberthe most important of which is their ries and tomatoes each summer than intense flavor. the Andersons can eat, Grace and There is no question that these to- Jimmy sell produce, when available, matoes are superior to those barely to fine-dining restaurants around red, no-taste, hard tomatoes that su- town. Also, they will sell to interested permarkets have offered for years. gardeners any surplus seedlings of Heirlooms are certainly more inter- their heirloom tomatoes in the spring. esting on a dinner plate as well. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Yes siree, heirlooms have been re- Marilyn Quinn has a green thumb, so discovered, and although these toma- once a week she shares her gardening toes are pricey, people seem ready to tips with readers.

Gardening

over

1700

reasons to visit

MARILYN QUINN / NEWS&GUIDE

Wildflower of the Week: Harebell As the cold shuts down the growing season, one of the last wildflower bouquets to grace my kitchen table is a tiny vase of pretty blue harebells. You see, although harebells appear delicate, with drooping bell-shaped 3/4-inch blooms atop multiple hairlike stems, the plants are much hardier than they look. I have found paper-thin harebell blossoms well into September and even October, even after hard freezes have transformed other plants into the brown and tan colors of fall. Harebells grow in a variety of habitats, in sun or shade, on rocky slopes and in woods and meadows. I find the best place to spot this wildflower is along dry road cuts. If you are hiking in the park, you may notice that harebells, which can be a foot tall in the valley, grow shorter and shorter as you climb in elevation.

properties for sale in Jackson Hole properties for sale by owner real estate for rent

WELLNESSdirectory These businesses provide health or wellness services.

apothecary

fitness (cont.)

Suzie Ornowski, PharmD, Babs Melka, PharmD Your Local Compounding Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical grade supplements available 307-732-0540 • 310 E. Broadway, Suite 9

Deborah Clemens, MBA, CPT, Dr. John Zendler, DC, CCSP Private and Small Group Training, TRX®, Zumba® Tone, & much more 307-690-8088 • 215 Scott Lane • www.transformativefitness215.com

RoadRunner Apothecary

behavioral health Biohealth

Joy Nelson Lundeen, RNBA BCN Certified Practitioner Biofeedback and Behavioral Medicine • Peak Performance • Stress • Anxiety • Attention • Pain • and more

307-739-7532 • 555 E. Broadway • biohealth@wyoming.com

Biofeedback of Jackson Hole JoAnne Scott, RN, BCIAC Specializing in anxiety and stress management for adults and children. Practicing in Jackson Hole since 1994. 307-734-9591 • biofeedbackofjh@wyoming.com

chiropractic

Chiropractic & Sports Injury Center of Jackson Hole Dr. John Zendler, DC, CCSP: Specializing in the treatment of chronic pain and injuries of the spine, other joints and soft tissue. Also offering Lordex® and Graston® therapies. (307) 733-8088, 215 Scott Lane, Jackson, www.chiropracticjacksonhole.com

classical homeopath

Traditional Chinese Medicine & Prana Yoga Amanda Botur, MATCM, L.Ac., CHom. • 307-690-7848 • homeopath@wyoming.com

fitness

Transformative Fitness 215

healing arts & sciences The Center For Energy Healing

A Session includes an intuitive scan and infinite possibilities for increased wellness & transformation. Free phone consult. (208)705-8241. Office located at 60 Ashley St., Suite A, Driggs, Idaho. So la meé, (Patricia S. Heneage), is a Certified MATRIX ENERGETICS® Practitioner & Certified Master Instructor of INTEGRATED ENERGY THERAPY®. www.energyheals.net

nutrition

Peak Nutrition

Therese Lowe Metherell, RD • 307-733-5344 • peaknutrition68@gmail.com

preventive health Peek Iridology

Iridology is about assessing the iris to reveal body constitution, inherent strengths and weaknesses, health levels, inflammation, toxicity and transitions that take place in a person’s body according to their way of life. Jennifer Nelson-Hawks, CI, CMA, RPT • 307-699-1740 www.peekiridology.com • jennifer@peekiridology.com

traditional healthcare Teton Laser Center

Functional Training, Active Isolated Stretching, ChiRunning, Nutritional Coaching, Metabolic Testing & much more! 307-734-2808 • 1705 High School Rd. #110. • www.121wellness.com

Training To Be Balanced, LLC

Home of Performance Training - Personal attention, affordable programs and small group settings. Work out with traditional equipment like the pegboard climber, kettle bells, bands, ropes and punching bags. Nationally Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists. 307-413-1621 • 1116 Maple Way · www.t2bb.com • www.t2bb.com

Maura Lofaro, M.D., Jan Bauer R.N. & Lisa Zajanc, M.S.N., C-F.N.P. Wide variety of skin care treatments, laser hair and tattoo removal, varicose vein treatment & chin enhancement. 307-734-0711 • 555 East Broadway Suite 201

Women’s Health Center and Family Care Clinic

Pediatric, preventative, adolescent, sports medicine, gynecology, acute injury, chronic. Laura Vignaroli, MD, Board Certified Family Practice Naomi Albertson, MD, Board Certified Family Practice and Fellowship Trained Sports Medicine 307-734-1313 • 555 E. Broadway, Suite 108

For listing information, call your sales rep at the Jackson Hole News&Guide at 732-7070.

242157

One to One Wellness, Inc.


8B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

People Four years after an advertisement for her services landed on the “The Tonight Show,” valley urologist Lisa Finkelstein finally met show host Jay Leno. Finkelstein said her parents discovered Leno was booked to perform his comedy show in Atlantic City, N.J., in mid-August, coinciding with the family’s trip to the Jersey shore. Finkelstein called Leno’s assistant, whose phone number she had saved from her previous interactions with the NBC celebrity, and finagled a meet-up. On Aug. 11, about half an hour before Leno went onstage at The Borgata Hotel, she and husband Marc Domsky were ushered to a room backstage. Finkelstein brought a shoulder-length rubber glove with her as a gag, and the three chatted for about five minutes. They recounted how Finkelstein’s urology advertisements got on the show to begin with: Leno joked about Finkelstein’s ad campaign, and Finkelstein got even by commissioning area artist Greta Gretzinger to draw a caricature of Leno getting a prostate exam. The gag got her ad on national television for a second time. Meeting Leno “closed the loop,” Finkelstein said Monday. “I think my claim to fame is up. [The ads] have done their job for sure.” • Jackson resident Susan Combs of the law firm Holland & Hart will attend the Leadership Wyoming session that began this month. A Wyoming Heritage Foundation and UW program, Leadership Wyoming invites a group of 40 Wyoming citizens to participate in a nine-month

educational experience. Training sessions provide a practical, nonpartisan, hands-on understanding of a broad spectrum of public policy issues. Participants develop an appreciation for trusteeship, with lasting commitments to civic involvement at the state and local level. Leadership Wyoming gives participants an opportunity to understand general public policy issues, economic and social diversity, and the challenges facing the state. • Jackson native Kyle McDonald, a University of Wyoming master’s student majoring in water resources, is part of a UW team that has been working to make water safer to drink across the globe. UW recently completed a license agreement with the Wyoming Association of Rural Water Systems in which the organization will develop and market the university’s patented technology that removes arsenic from water. • Jackson Hole native Vanessa Garnick Boshoff will guide trips to Botswana and other destinations to promote water conservation with Blue Legacy, an initiative started by Alexandra Cousteau, granddaughter of explorer and filmmaker Jacques-Yves Cousteau. The trips will enable guests to enjoy the thrill of adventure while experiencing places where water is the centerpiece for understanding the landscape, Boshoff said. Go online to AlexandraCousteau.org/travel for information.

COURTESY PHOTO

Jay Leno and Dr. Lisa Finkelstein meet backstage at The Borgata Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J.

CHURCH DIRECTORY Gospel Services New Testament teachings of Jesus, 4 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 30 in Teton Room at Teton Mountain Lodge in Teton Village. Eric Printz and Tim Kamrau. 503-789-9986. St. John’s Episcopal Church 170 N. Glenwood St. Communion at 8 a.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. Sunday school and adult education; 10 a.m. Communion. Centering prayer group 4 p.m. Tuesday. Noon day prayer 12:10 p.m. weekdays; Communion 5 p.m. Wednesday. 733-2603, StJohnsJackson.org. Shepherd of the Mountains Lutheran Church, E.L.C.A. 750 Seneca Lane. Al Schoonover, pastor. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday. 733-4382. First Baptist Church 90 W. Kelly Ave. Ray McDaniel, pastor; Karl Klemmer, youth and family pastor. Contemporary service, 9 a.m. Sunday school and Family Connections, 10-11 a.m. Traditional worship 11 a.m.-noon. Nursery care available for both services. Bible studies throughout the week. FirstBJackson.org, 733-3706.

Holy Family Church Located in Afton, about 70 miles south of Jackson. Mass at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. Good Samaritan Mission Bible studies at 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at 285 W. Pearl Ave. Sunday service at 2 p.m. Breakfast served at 7:30 a.m. and dinner at 5:30 p.m. daily. Lunch served at noon Saturday and Sunday. Chuck Fidroeff, director. 733-3167, GoodSamaritanMission.us. Christian Science Society of Jackson Hole American Legion Hall, corner of Cache Street and Gill Avenue. 10 a.m. Sunday. Testimony service follows regular service on second Sunday of each month. 413-4158. Jackson Hole Church of Christ 690 Lakota Lane off Tribal Trails Road. 9 a.m. Bible study; 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. worship Sunday; 6 p.m. service Wednesday. Alan Bergeron. 733-2611. Jackson Hole Friends (Quakers) Meet at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at the Teton County Building at Simpson Avenue and Willow Street. 733-3105.

Jackson Hole Baptist Church S.B.C. 620 E. Broadway. Worship, 11 a.m. Sunday; Bible study, 9:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Wayne Dyess, pastor. 733-0857.

The Hole Truth Nondenominational Christian Church Meets at 7:30 p.m. Sundays and Wednesdays. Mike Gibson. 739-9716.

Chabad Jewish Center Coffee and Kabbala discussion group led by Rabbi Zalman Mendelsohn 8:30-9:30 a.m. every Sunday at Cafe Boheme. Call 307-462-0847 or JewishWyoming.com.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Meetings at the LDS Church, 420 E. Broadway. First Ward priesthood meeting 9 a.m., Sunday school 10 a.m., sacrament meeting 10:50 a.m.; Second Ward priesthood meeting 11 a.m.,

Sunday school at noon, sacrament meeting 12:50 p.m.; Singles Branch priesthood meeting 1 p.m., Sunday school 2 p.m. and sacrament 2:40 p.m. Visitors sacrament 9 a.m. 733-6337. Jackson Hole Jewish Community Shabbat service, third Friday of the month, 6:30 p.m. in chapel of St. John’s Episcopal Church. 734-1999. Presbyterian Church of Jackson Hole 1251 South Park Loop Road. Sunday worship 8 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday school for all ages 9 a.m.; nursery care provided. Community dinners 6:15 p.m. Wednesdays. 734-0388, PCJH.org. Redeemer Lutheran (Missouri Synod) 275 N. Willow St. Sunday service 10 a.m. and Bible study 9 a.m. Sunday. David Bott, pastor. 733-3409 or 733-6629. Mountain View Independent Baptist Church 1220 W. Highway 22. 9:30 a.m. Sunday school, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. worship. Bible study/prayer, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Nursery, transportation. Jonathan P. King, senior pastor. 733-3604. The Chapel at River Crossing 3205 W. Big Trails Drive. 8:45 a.m. traditional service, 10:30 a.m. contemporary. Mike Atkins, pastor. Visit JacksonHoleChristianCenter.com, or call 733-7770. Our Lady of the Mountains Catholic Church 201 S. Jackson St. Mass 5:30 p.m. Saturday (confessions 4-5 p.m.), 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Sunday (Spanish). 733-2516.

Community Bible Church 1450 South Park Loop Road. 9:30 a.m. fellowship and refreshments, 10 a.m. worship. Home to Jackson Hole Christian Academy, for kindergarten through 12th-grade students, and Jackson Hole Bible College. Don Landis, pastor. 733-1941. Wilson Community Fellowship Meets in Old Wilson Schoolhouse Community Center. Bible study 9:30 a.m., worship 10:45 a.m. Sunday. John Scudder, pastor. 739-4752. Cornerstone Church Service at 4 p.m., dinner at 5:30, second service at 7 Sundays at the Old Wilson Schoolhouse Community Center. Child care provided. Eric Davis, pastor. 307-224-4959. St. Francis of the Tetons Episcopal Church Ski Hill Road, Alta. Worship 10 a.m. Sunday. Christian education for children ages 3-9. Child care for younger ones. 307-353-8100. The General Assembly and Church of the Firstborn Meetings at members’ homes at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. 733-5935. Star Valley Federated Church Meets in gym of Metcalf Elementary School in Etna. Episcopal, evangelical Lutheran, Presbyterian. 10 a.m. worship, Christian education 11 a.m. Sunday. Steve Crittenden, 307-654-7122. Course in Miracles International Located at 4245 Polo Pony Drive. All welcome. 6:30 p.m. Monday. 734-3914.

A Celebration of

Meg Annette Rork’s Life 1971-2012 At the Old Wilson Schoolhouse Saturday, September 1st 11 AM - 2 PM

Celebrating 33 Years Serving Seniors

Please remember us when making your Old Bill’s donations

Donations in lieu of flowers to Meg’s favorite charity are appreciated.

www.dogcopilot.org

241570

Member of the Human Service Council: Working together to deliver cost effective human services.

241859

We will gather to celebrate Meg’s life, not to mourn her. Share stories. Bring a lunch. The entire community of her family, friends and patients are welcome to attend.


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 9B

JACLYN BOROWSKI / NEWS&GUIDE photos

Biologist John Stephenson shows Latino students how to track radio-collared wolves Thursday afternoon in Grand Teton National Park.

Pura Vida Latino kids learn about Teton park. By Brielle Schaeffer

B

efore last week, 12-yearold Daniel Guevara had never been to Grand Teton National Park. The Jackson seventh-grader didn’t know what he’d find there, he said, didn’t know where to go. But after participating in the park’s Pura Vida program, Daniel is practically an expert. One of a dozen kids in the fiveday program, he went canoeing and camping, learned about wolf research and saw firsthand what park employees do. In its third season, Pura Vida links Latino children and their families to the park’s attractions, said Vanessa Torres, Grand Teton’s youth and diversity outreach coordinator. Pura Vida is offered once during spring break and twice in the summer — once for middle schoolers and once for high school students. The program was designed by Teton Science Schools and Grand Teton National Park. In 2009, park officials met to talk about getting Latinos involved

in the park. Visitors have been mostly white and middle-aged, Torres said. “By 2020, the minority is going to be the majority,” she said. “The demographics in America are changing, yet our visitors are not.” Park officials also learned about barriers preventing Latino families from visiting, Torres said. Some Latino families didn’t know about Grand Teton’s recreational opportunities. Others thought there was an immigration office in the park or were hesitant to show their identification, she said. “Our uniforms resemble border patrol uniforms,” she said. By exposing children to park resources, officials hope they will bring their families back to enjoy them, she said. “We need to engage this new population to remain relevant and to have places like national parks exist,” Torres said. Pura Vida has given 13-yearold Jamie Vargas a feel for the park and how important it is, she said. “My dad won’t go camping because he’s scared of bears,” Jamie said. “Since we know how the place is now, it gives us a chance to tell our parents

With help from friends, Aline Garcia, 12, tries on a National Park Service hat during a tour of the new park headquarters.

Ranger Jim Dahlstrom gives students with the Pura Vida program a tour of his patrol vehicle.

about it. ... I’m planning on bringing my family here.” Each student in the free program, sponsored by the Grand Teton National Park Foundation, receives a park pass. “It’s our park too, as well as everyone else’s,” Jamie said. Irais Quiroz, 12, said she wants to bring her family to String Lake for picnics. “It’s really pretty out here,” she said. “I just didn’t know about it.” On Thursday, the kids learned about jobs in the park. They toured an ambulance and talked to ranger Jim Dahlstrom. They sat in the back of Dahlstrom’s vehicle and played with the car’s microphone. “Let’s roll, guys,” one camper said over the loudspeaker. The kids asked Dahlstrom about his scariest time as a ranger. He told them about the time a guy in a campground at another park was threatening

people with a machete. “We almost had to shoot him,” he said. “Most people who visit ... are pretty good.” Yair Sanchez, 15, was a mentor for the Pura Vida program. He has attended the program since it started in 2010, he said. “I started just like them,” he said, motioning to the campers. “I thought it was a really fun experience. Once I started knowing it better, I started doing more.” He recruited several of his younger cousins for Pura Vida this year, he said. “We are really fortunate to actually have it in our backyard,” Yair said about the park. “We should take advantage of what we have. Not everybody has it.” Students also toured the new Grand Teton National Park headquarters to see the behind-the-scenes jobs. “Every department here is

really important and makes this place run,” Torres told the campers. “We have so many different jobs people don’t know about.” A grizzly sighting closed Moose-Wilson Road, so campers went to the Taggart Lake trailhead for lunch. There they snacked on homemade chicharonnes and fried pasta Yair’s grandmother made. They giggled and chatted in Spanish between bites. Then they learned about wolf telemetry from wildlife biologist John Stephenson. “That’s the way we study these guys,” Stephenson said. They tried on the collars used to track wolves and got to listen to the canines via an antenna and radio. Pura Vida is “by far my favorite program I’ve worked this summer,” Teton Science Schools educator Rachel Shaffer said. “These kids are great. They’re so excited to be here.”


10B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Valley Breeze

We would sincerely

like to thank

our loving family, our loving friends, Elks Lodge, Sally Luken, St. John's Hospital, and St. John's Home Care and Hospice for all of the help in the recent passing of Mike Fields. The food, flowers, wishes and other help was very much appreciated, more than you will ever know. 242093

Thank you so very much,

Cindy, Jason, and Leslie Fields

SENIOR FAIR Join us for our 2nd annual Senior Fair! *Free Picnic Lunch *Raffles *Live Music by Hootenanny Musicians *Booths highlighting services & resources for seniors & their families *Emergency Meals Available for pick up *Shuttle Service available from St. John’s Parking lot

SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 11:00 AM – 2:00PM 830 E HANSEN, JACKSON WYOMING Following the Alzheimer Walk at 10:00am CO-SPONSORED

241900

Prints • Mouse pads • Photo mugs • Magnets Order photo reprints from

Library to close Sept. 3-19

As Teton County Library enters its final phase of construction, it will close for Labor Day on Sept. 3 and remain closed through Sept. 19. When the library reopens at 10 a.m. on Sept. 20, library patrons will have access to three new study rooms. Renovations, meanwhile, will continue with crews working on the new west reading area, installing a fireplace and adding windows to the south side of the building to create a cozier place for seating, reading and connecting to the outdoors. The addition and renovation will be completed in February. “We’ve worked hard to keep the library open to the community throughout the construction process,” said Deb Adams, library director. “So, some of our temporary spaces have been tight. Now that we’re in the final stretch, I’m looking forward to unveiling all of the library’s new features in February 2013.” Though construction is still under way, library lovers are already enjoying the new Teen and Children’s Wing, a new computer center for adults and a new lobby. The library also has a new second entrance, accessible from the START bus stop on Snow King Avenue. Just follow the sidewalk through the library’s newly landscaped backyard and check out the whimsical willow fence around the children’s yard, which will provide an outdoor spot for programs. Architects on the project are Gilday Architects with Humphries/Poli Architects, and construction manager is GE Johnson. Although librarians will not be available for reference help or other library services during the closure, patrons can use many online resources via the library’s website, TCLib.org. Use your library card number and PIN to access library databases and your personal library card account, download books from the library’s ebook collection and read staff reviews. Some library programs will continue to happen at off-site locations during the closure. See the library online calendar, TCLib.org/calendar, for event information during the closure and throughout the month. No checked-out library materials will have due dates during the closure except for interlibrary loan materials borrowed from outside of Teton County. These may be returned at any time in the library book drop, located just outside the library entrance. Patrons are

encouraged to hold on to materials that are not due back until the library reopens. This will minimize the number of materials that need to be reshelved during the closure. Visit TCLib.org/Addition for updates.

Outside mag likes UW

Opportunities to participate in activities ranging from rock climbing and fly-fishing to whitewater kayaking and cross-country skiing have landed the University of Wyoming in Outside magazine’s rankings of its top 25 schools. UW is ranked 15th in the list of schools that appeal to the magazine’s readers. “We know what our readers look for in any kind of experience: adventure, grit, sweat, a worthy struggle, tested endurance, goose bump-inducing views, wide-open skies, maybe some roiling water,” the article reads. “So why should college be any different? It shouldn’t.” But to compile the list, the magazine relied on more than just the exhilaration of its readers. It developed a methodology designed to capture all possible aspects of an institution’s ability to cater to “your adrenalinerush cravings.” It found what it was looking for at UW, citing the university’s proximity to national forest lands and the numerous experiences offered through the Outdoor Program (UWyo.edu/rec/ outdoor-program/index.html), including domestic trips and wildernessleadership programs, which take participants into the backcountry year round. The free Friday-night bouldering experience was cited, along with trips to Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon. “Incoming freshmen can choose from six outdoors trips (backpacking, caving, mountain biking, rock climbing, canoeing or a wilderness service project) to meet new friends and bond with classmates,” according to the article. “More seasoned students can earn Wilderness First Responder or scuba certification, borrow from the bike library or rent from a wide selection of gear, ranging from $2 for a bear canister to $38 for a canoe.” Outdoor Program coordinator Dan McCoy is thrilled with the press. “This is fantastic,” McCoy said. “It’s great that a national publication recognizes the services and recreational opportunities that we offer to students, such as our wilderness orientation program and summer outdoor experiences.” The magazine also cites academic programs in recreation and park administration, botany and zoology, where students help manage a fishery. It notes the non-credit lessons in areas such as fly-fishing, cross-country skiing and avalanche safety, and mentions UW’s agreement with the National Outdoor Leadership School for crossover classes, allowing students to go abroad to study adventure topics for credit; a backpacking course in Australia is a popular option. The complete review of UW can be found at OutsideOnline.com/adventuretravel/Outside-University-15-University-of-Wyoming.html.

Fund pays medical bills for kids

236133

Please proof and call Karen at 739-9541 or return via Fax at 733-2138. Thanks!

PDF PROOF?

Jackson Hole families could receive up to $5,000 to help pay for a child’s medical expenses through a grant available through the UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation. The money can be used for a wide range of medical services and equipment, including surgeries, prescriptions, therapy, counseling services, wheelchairs and eyeglasses. To qualify, a child must be under the age of 16. Families must meet economic criteria. For a family of two, total income must be $50,000 or less to apply. Last year, the foundation awarded $648,000 to 248 families across the West. Those interested can apply online at UHCCF.org.


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 11B

Ecowatch Isa Lake Bridge to be rebuilt

To prepare a plan to reconstruct the historic Isa Lake Bridge at Craig Pass, Yellowstone National Park is seeking public comment by Friday. Located at the Continental Divide, the 70-year-old bridge spans Isa Lake on the road connecting Old Faithful and West Thumb. In September 2010, the Federal Highway Administration determined the structure needs to be replaced. Yellowstone is considering a range of alternatives, including complete reconstruction and smaller renovations. Go to ParkPlanning.NPS.gov/yell for an overview of the plan and instructions on how to comment. Request a hard copy of the newsletter by calling 307-344-2017.

Help with Public Lands Day

The BLM’s Pinedale office has invited volunteers to participate Saturday in a National Public Lands Day at the Warren Bridge Recreation Area. The event, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., will include wildlife-friendly fence maintenance as well as the construction and installation of bat houses. The BLM and U.S. Forest Service, which is cohosting, will also provide educational opportunities and activities. Volunteer registration will begin at 9 a.m. To attend, turn left 200 yards north of the Green River Bridge when 20 miles north of Pinedale on Highway 191. Follow the gravel road to Green River access site number four. For information, call Josh Hemenway at 307-367-5322.

NEWS&GUIDE FILE PHOTO / BRADLY J. BONER

Colter Bay Indian Art Museum needs a new home because of a redesign plan for the Colter Bay area that leaves it out. Its location must be in the park.

Give input on Colter Bay work

Grand Teton National Park is accepting comment until Sept. 13 to shape a redesign of Colter Bay Village. Redevelopment plans released in an environmental assessment show a new, smaller visitor center and a smaller footprint overall. Under the park’s proposal, the existing visitor center will be razed and replaced nearby with a “smaller visitor contact station,” the document said. The facility “would have about 60 percent less overall indoor space than the exist-

ing visitor center and would not include an Indian arts museum or a theater.” Grand Teton estimates the preferred alternative will cost about $9.5 million. Three other options are included in the environmental plan. Copies of the Colter Bay proposal are available online at NPS.gov/grte/ parkmgmt/planning.htm. A comment form can be accessed on the same site.

Plan released for uranium mine The BLM has released a environmental impact statement for a uranium

project in Sweetwater County about 40 miles northwest of Rawlins. The plan is not a final decision document; written comments will be accepted until Sept. 17. The Lost Creek uranium project encompasses 4,377 acres, though no more than 345 acres will actually be disturbed. The plan includes well pads for injection, production and monitoring, wellhead houses, a central processing facility, an access road network and pipeline system. The nearby Jeffrey City area was mined for uranium starting in the 1950s, but a price drop in the 1980s halted production. Comments may be emailed to Lost_ Crk_Mine_WY@blm.gov, or mailed to the BLM Rawlins Field Office, Lost Creek Final EIS Comment, P.O. Box 2407, Rawlins, WY 82301. For information, call John Russell at 307-328-4252.

Comment on Shoshone plan

After eight years and more than 75 public meetings, Shoshone National Forest officials have released a new draft forest plan and draft environmental impact statement. The public is encouraged to submit comments during the 90-day comment period. The deadline is Nov. 1. The draft plan and environmental impact statement are available at FS.USDA.gov/shoshone and also at libraries and ranger district offices near the 2.4 million-acre Shoshone. To request the documents in hard copy or on a compact disc, call the forest supervisor’s office at 307-527-6241.

SUPPORT CALENDAR WEDNESDAY

Best Beginnings for Healthy Families prenatal group, 5 p.m. Wednesdays at 460 E. Pearl Ave. Are you pregnant and looking for ways to have a healthy pregnancy and infant? Free. Register: 733-6401. Choices & Changes supports women helping women make choices and changes on the road to healthy relationships. Professionally facilitated, safe, confidential. Support, information and guidance. Meets evenings in a private office in Jackson. Sponsored by Community Safety Network. For information, visit CommunitySafetyNetwork.org or call 7333711. Memory loss and care partners group supports those suffering from persistent memory problems and their caregivers. 10:30-11:30 a.m. third Wednesday of every month in the Moose/ Wapiti Room, St. John’s Medical Center. 7397434. Bereavement support group meets at noon every other Wednesday in St. John’s Medical Center chapel. Group size limited. RSVP required: 739-7467. Cancer support group meets at 3:30 p.m. every other Wednesday in St. John’s Medical Center chapel. 739-6195. Al-Anon Works meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday, noon Friday and noon Monday at First Bap­tist

Church, at Kelly and Glenwood. 733-3706.

THURSDAY

Overeaters Anonymous meets at 6 p.m. in the Owl Room at St. John’s Medical Center, in the basement below the emergency room. Information: Jen, 413-4420. Caring From a Distance supports those living here who have loved ones elsewhere who suffer from persistent memory problems. Meets the third Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. in the Owl Room, downstairs at St. John’s Medical Center. Professional caregivers welcome. 739-7434.

FRIDAY

Celebrate Recovery program meets at 6:30 p.m. at The Chapel at River Crossing in Rafter J. This Christ-centered 12-step program for any hurt, hang-up, habit or addiction. Food, fellowship, child care. 208-390-9242. Al-Anon Works meets at noon, First Bap­tist Church, Kelly and Glenwood. 733-3706.

MONDAY

Al-Anon Works meets at noon, First Bap­tist Church, Kelly and Glenwood. 733-3706. Adult Children of Alcoholics meet at 6:45 p.m. in the Genesis Room at Presbyterian Church of Jackson Hole. For information, call:

690-3439. Childbirth classes meet at 6 p.m. Mondays in the basement of St. John’s Medical Center. Registration required for each six-week session. Emily Kritzler, ekritzler@tetonhospital.org. See schedule of sessions at TetonHospital.org.

TUESDAY

Crohn’s support group meets 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. once a month in the Owl Room at St. John’s Medical Center, in the basement below the emergency room. For information, call Carol at 739-7410. Centering prayer according to the tradition of Thomas Keating, at 4 p.m. at St. John’s Episcopal Church. For anyone seeking spiritual growth through meditation. 733-2603. Weight Watchers, weigh-in at 5:30 p.m., meeting at 6 p.m. at Shepherd of the Mountains Lutheran Church, 750 Seneca Lane. 733-4382.

ONGOING

Alcoholics Anonymous meets at noon and 8 p.m. daily in the basement of Browse N’ Buy, 139 N. Cache St. 733-5322. Veterans who need any assistance are welcome to call Lori McGee at Wyoming Veterans Commission, 307-438-2101. Family caregiver support group meets at 2 p.m. the second Friday and 6 p.m. the third

WHEN MAKING YOUR OLD BILL’S DONATION

Latino Resource Center

PLEASE KEEP US IN MIND! 24 hour crisis services Visit us at jhccc.org

Facilitating the Integration of Latinos into the Greater Jackson Hole Community

640 East Broadway • Jackson, WY 83001 • 733-2046

Our Community, Our Lives. Stronger, Balanced, Diverse. We rely on private donations for over

and Mountain House

70% of our funding. Please support Latino Resource Center at Old Bill’s Fun Run!

• 307.734.0333 • P.O. Box 3362, Jackson, WY 83001

Contact to donate online: www.cfjacksonhole.org

241654

TRANSLATIONS - REFFERALS AND RESOURCES CULTURAL EVENTS - EDUCATION - YOUTH PROGRAMS

The Jackson Hole Community Counseling Center offers essential mental health services and support to hundreds of people annually, regardless of ability to pay.

Member of the Human Service Council… working together to deliver cost-effective, essential human services 242067

www.latinorc.org •

Tuesday of each month at the Senior Center of Jackson Hole. Confidential. RVSP at 733-7300. Western Wyoming Family Planning offers low- to no-cost medical services and advice. Open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, at 460 E. Pearl Ave. 732-1694. Jackson Hole Perinatal Advocacy Project offers a weekly group for new parents experiencing postpartum anxiety and mood disorders. Bring lunch. Babies welcome. Details: 690-0484 or JHPostPartum.org. Care and Share Group for new and breastfeeding mothers meets intermittently at St. John’s Medical Center. Call Janet, 739-7572. PFLAG — Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays — meets 7 to 8:30 p.m. the third Monday of each month at St. John’s House, part of St. John’s Episcopal Church. Info: Mark Houser, 733-8349 or JacksonPFLAG@yahoo.com. Call Curran-Seeley Foundation at 7333908 for relapse prevention, violence prevention (English and Spanish), substance abuse assessments, adolescent education/prevention, adult education/prevention and state-certified driving while intoxicated education. Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous meets weekly. Email to slaajh@gmail.com for time, site. Good Samaritan Mission, 285 W. Pearl Ave. 733-3165. Daily Bible studies at 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.


12B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 13B

An album in RoLene Whittaker’s home contains many pictures of her life as a thrill-seeker, including this image from a bungeejumping adventure, before being diagnosed with dementia at age 55. She also was an avid skydiver.

Registered Nurse Brenda Kentner of Access Home Care talks with RoLene Whittaker as Certified Nursing Assistant Martha Guerrero prepares the next bite of Whittaker’s breakfast. While Whittaker’s sister, Leslie Jorgensen, is her principal caregiver, professional assistance is a godsend when dealing with Alzheimer’s disease.

SLIPPING

Continued from cover

focus on the picture or the story,” Jorgensen said. “At first we had to tape up the buttons because she’d be pressing them so much we wouldn’t have a picture anymore.” Whittaker was diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer’s variety at the age of 55. Now 61, she has reached the advanced stages of the disease. It has robbed her of her basic motor skills and made walking without assistance difficult. A woman who made hundreds of skydiving leaps in her younger years has involuntarily traded the freedom of the heavens for the confinement of a basement. She needs round-the-clock aid from her family and professional caregivers to get through the day. But like many Alzheimer’s patients in the advanced phases, she has moments of awareness, flashes of verbal coherence.

Signs and symptoms Early, specific indicators of Alzheimer’s include the following: - Memory loss: forgetting recently learned information, increased use of memory aides, constantly misplacing things - Cognitive lapses: general confusion, difficulty solving problems, following instructions, completing routine tasks like paying bills, recording television shows or balancing a checkbook - Time or place confusion: forgetting important dates or events, visual and spatial disorientation, having trouble understanding something if it’s not happening immediately - Communication breakdown: losing trains of thought, struggling with vocabulary, repeating oneself frequently - Poorer judgment: less attention to appearance and hygiene, making unconventional financial moves - Personality changes: withdrawing socially, losing interest in hobbies, experiencing mood swings and sudden feelings of anxiety, irritability or depression SOURCE: Alzheimer’s Association

When Jorgensen asks herself out loud if her husband is working outside, her sister answers, “I think so. It’s OK to go out.” Jorgensen has been her sister’s primary caregiver for more than three years. And while she knows no two days are the same, she prepares for the unexpected. She knows she needs to keep the bathroom cabinets locked, to buy easy-to-swallow foods and to let someone else lift her sister when necessary. Whittaker’s family began worrying about her in 2007 during her father’s funeral in Utah, where she served as the executor. She seemed distracted, and she struggled noticeably whenever she had to read something. Two years later, her ex-boyfriend ran into her in a Kmart, and she appeared lost and couldn’t find her car. She began falling behind on her bills, forgetting to pay them or signing her checks improperly. She sent $4,000 for a $400 car payment. Normally punctual and detail-oriented, Whittaker began showing up late for work and missing meetings. Her employers suspected drug use, and she was eventually let go. By late 2008, Whittaker was eating as infrequently as once every three days. Her finances were a catastrophe. She had been jailed after an officer pulled her over and attributed her slow and aimless driving to being under the influence. It became clear her declining mental state had left her unable to take care of herself. She had been living in northern California, and obtaining full-time professional care was too expensive. So Jorgensen helped her move to Wyoming and took her in, an act of compassion that has drastically changed her life. “It’s tough to put into words what you go through as a caretaker,” she said. “It takes so much time and effort, along with the pain and frustration of watching a loved one deteriorate. I’ve had to learn as I go, like a new mother has to learn to raise her child.” In the early stages, Whittaker could still communicate and get around the house. But as her condition worsened, she became uncharacteristically combative and destructive. She took to dismantling furniture and ripping decorations off the wall. She suffered from insomnia and

TRAVIS J. GARNER / NEWS&GUIDE photos

Barbara Mallory embraces Marylou Amendola, her principal caregiver, at a picnic with friends. Amendola has become a social safety net for Mallory, helping her to navigate a busy schedule and keep up with friends.

would roam the house at all hours. When she did sleep, it was rarely without tearing the bedclothes apart first. Whittaker once followed her dog, Scully, down to the river and couldn’t find her way back. Unable to recall phone numbers, she dialed her sister’s husband using the voice-command feature on her cellphone. When he answered, she calmly explained she was in the river, and would he please come get her? Becoming disoriented and experiencing mood swings are common symptoms of middle-stage Alzheimer’s. The family consulted medical professionals. But when Whittaker began taking medicine to mitigate those symptoms, she suffered a seizure, so they discontinued the drugs. When her sister moved in, Jorgensen and her husband were working full time. They took frequent hunting and camping trips. Their five children and 10 grandchildren could visit as they pleased. But as the disease gradually consumed Whittaker, family outings and visits grew less feasible. There was always the danger of her wandering off or getting hurt if left unsupervised. The difficulties of squaring Whittaker’s outstanding car payments, medical bills and mortgage to creditors in California fell directly on Jorgensen, who acknowledges that the stress may have affected her performance at work. She began to have to use her sick days to cover her sister’s various appointments. But she never complained. And though she no longer holds the full-time job she had in 2010, Jorgensen never faults her sister. Jorgensen’s devotion is unwavering and her gratitude for the help of her husband and the professional caregivers from Access Home Care and Hospice, who arrive at 7:30 sharp every morning to feed, shower and provide some extra company. The daily struggles can be grueling, but they can also bring people together. “I couldn’t do it without my husband,” Jorgensen said. “And the girls in the morning are great about helping me relax then and keep tabs on her health issues.” Sandy Dillon, one of Whittaker’s professional caregivers, said the challenges of the job yield fulfillment in their own right. “There’s satisfaction in knowing that you’re helping

Remember to walk Saturday The Alzheimer’s Association encourages Jackson residents to support the cause by participating in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Saturday at the Senior Center of Jackson Hole, 830 E. Hansen Street. Participants should arrive at 9:30 a.m. for the 1- or 2.5-mile walk, which begin at 10 a.m. Music, a raffle and barbecue will be held after the walk, beginning at 11 a.m. All donations will support the research and care initiatives of the national Alzheimer’s Association. Raffle proceeds will benefit local programs at the Senior Center and St. John’s Institute for Cognitive Health: training for dementia-specific caretaking, community presentations featuring Alzheimer’s experts and support groups for patients and families. Admission to the walk is free. Participants can register at the event or online at Alz.org/walk. people shoulder the burden,” Dillon said. “It leaves you with serious compassion and empathy.” _________________ Barbara Mallory’s kitchen is a model of order. Cabinets and drawers are marked with thin strips of white paper, their contents labeled in large type. Foods along the counter and in the pantry are separated by group. Next to the bowl of bean salad and a non-alcoholic bottle of chardonnay is a detailed list of other items that have been prepared for lunch. Mallory walks into the kitchen, smiling, laughing, welcoming guests into her home. As the party moves outside, the hostess glances at her watch and pushes a button. A monotone voice announces the time and date. The labels ensure she can find what she needs quickly. The talking watch helps her associate morning, afternoon and evening with their typical activities. Both are weapons in Mallory’s fight against the cognitive lapses seen in the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s. “Not being able to remember is frustrating, especially because I’ve always been good with names and details,”

Mallory listens to water aerobics instructor Jill Russell during her biweekly Aqualogix class at the Jackson/Teton County Recreation Center. Although she sometimes has trouble putting names to faces, Mallory strives to maintain her active and social lifestyle.

she said. “I’ve tried to figure out why God gave me this. Sometimes I just have to step away and say to myself, ‘You can remember this.’ And I usually remember it.” Mallory is battling the disease with everything she has. Every day is a rigorous workout of mind and body. Her success in countering its advances are evinced by her quick wit and immaculate garden. She plays golf, participates in water aerobics class and takes long walks or hikes every day. She loves to pick wildflowers and is looking forward to See BATTLING on 14B


12B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

An album in RoLene Whittaker’s home contains many pictures of her life as a thrill-seeker, including this image from a bungeejumping adventure, before being diagnosed with dementia at age 55. She also was an avid skydiver.

Registered Nurse Brenda Kentner of Access Home Care talks with RoLene Whittaker as Certified Nursing Assistant Martha Guerrero prepares the next bite of Whittaker’s breakfast. While Whittaker’s sister, Leslie Jorgensen, is her principal caregiver, professional assistance is a godsend when dealing with Alzheimer’s disease.

SLIPPING

Continued from cover

focus on the picture or the story,” Jorgensen said. “At first we had to tape up the buttons because she’d be pressing them so much we wouldn’t have a picture anymore.” Whittaker was diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer’s variety at the age of 55. Now 61, she has reached the advanced stages of the disease. It has robbed her of her basic motor skills and made walking without assistance difficult. A woman who made hundreds of skydiving leaps in her younger years has involuntarily traded the freedom of the heavens for the confinement of a basement. She needs round-the-clock aid from her family and professional caregivers to get through the day. But like many Alzheimer’s patients in the advanced phases, she has moments of awareness, flashes of verbal coherence.

Signs and symptoms Early, specific indicators of Alzheimer’s include the following: - Memory loss: forgetting recently learned information, increased use of memory aides, constantly misplacing things - Cognitive lapses: general confusion, difficulty solving problems, following instructions, completing routine tasks like paying bills, recording television shows or balancing a checkbook - Time or place confusion: forgetting important dates or events, visual and spatial disorientation, having trouble understanding something if it’s not happening immediately - Communication breakdown: losing trains of thought, struggling with vocabulary, repeating oneself frequently - Poorer judgment: less attention to appearance and hygiene, making unconventional financial moves - Personality changes: withdrawing socially, losing interest in hobbies, experiencing mood swings and sudden feelings of anxiety, irritability or depression SOURCE: Alzheimer’s Association

When Jorgensen asks herself out loud if her husband is working outside, her sister answers, “I think so. It’s OK to go out.” Jorgensen has been her sister’s primary caregiver for more than three years. And while she knows no two days are the same, she prepares for the unexpected. She knows she needs to keep the bathroom cabinets locked, to buy easy-to-swallow foods and to let someone else lift her sister when necessary. Whittaker’s family began worrying about her in 2007 during her father’s funeral in Utah, where she served as the executor. She seemed distracted, and she struggled noticeably whenever she had to read something. Two years later, her ex-boyfriend ran into her in a Kmart, and she appeared lost and couldn’t find her car. She began falling behind on her bills, forgetting to pay them or signing her checks improperly. She sent $4,000 for a $400 car payment. Normally punctual and detail-oriented, Whittaker began showing up late for work and missing meetings. Her employers suspected drug use, and she was eventually let go. By late 2008, Whittaker was eating as infrequently as once every three days. Her finances were a catastrophe. She had been jailed after an officer pulled her over and attributed her slow and aimless driving to being under the influence. It became clear her declining mental state had left her unable to take care of herself. She had been living in northern California, and obtaining full-time professional care was too expensive. So Jorgensen helped her move to Wyoming and took her in, an act of compassion that has drastically changed her life. “It’s tough to put into words what you go through as a caretaker,” she said. “It takes so much time and effort, along with the pain and frustration of watching a loved one deteriorate. I’ve had to learn as I go, like a new mother has to learn to raise her child.” In the early stages, Whittaker could still communicate and get around the house. But as her condition worsened, she became uncharacteristically combative and destructive. She took to dismantling furniture and ripping decorations off the wall. She suffered from insomnia and

Barbara Mallory embraces Marylou Amendola, h

would roam the house at all hours. When she di it was rarely without tearing the bedclothes apar Whittaker once followed her dog, Scully, dow river and couldn’t find her way back. Unable t phone numbers, she dialed her sister’s husban the voice-command feature on her cellphone. W answered, she calmly explained she was in the ri would he please come get her? Becoming disoriented and experiencing mood are common symptoms of middle-stage Alzheime family consulted medical professionals. But whe taker began taking medicine to mitigate those sym she suffered a seizure, so they discontinued the d When her sister moved in, Jorgensen and her h were working full time. They took frequent hunt camping trips. Their five children and 10 grand could visit as they pleased. But as the disease gr consumed Whittaker, family outings and visits g feasible. There was always the danger of her wa off or getting hurt if left unsupervised. The difficulties of squaring Whittaker’s outs car payments, medical bills and mortgage to cred California fell directly on Jorgensen, who ackno that the stress may have affected her perform work. She began to have to use her sick days her sister’s various appointments. But she nev plained. And though she no longer holds the fullshe had in 2010, Jorgensen never faults her siste Jorgensen’s devotion is unwavering and her g for the help of her husband and the professional ers from Access Home Care and Hospice, who a 7:30 sharp every morning to feed, shower and some extra company. The daily struggles can be g but they can also bring people together. “I couldn’t do it without my husband,” Jorgens “And the girls in the morning are great about hel relax then and keep tabs on her health issues.” Sandy Dillon, one of Whittaker’s profession givers, said the challenges of the job yield fulfill their own right. “There’s satisfaction in knowing that you’re


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 13B

TRAVIS J. GARNER / NEWS&GUIDE photos

her principal caregiver, at a picnic with friends. Amendola has become a social safety net for Mallory, helping her to navigate a busy schedule and keep up with friends.

id sleep, rt first. wn to the to recall nd using When he iver, and

d swings er’s. The en Whitmptoms, drugs. husband ting and dchildren radually grew less andering

standing ditors in owledges mance at to cover ver com-time job er. gratitude caregivarrive at provide grueling,

sen said. lping me

nal carelment in helping

Remember to walk Saturday The Alzheimer’s Association encourages Jackson residents to support the cause by participating in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Saturday at the Senior Center of Jackson Hole, 830 E. Hansen Street. Participants should arrive at 9:30 a.m. for the 1- or 2.5-mile walk, which begin at 10 a.m. Music, a raffle and barbecue will be held after the walk, beginning at 11 a.m. All donations will support the research and care initiatives of the national Alzheimer’s Association. Raffle proceeds will benefit local programs at the Senior Center and St. John’s Institute for Cognitive Health: training for dementia-specific caretaking, community presentations featuring Alzheimer’s experts and support groups for patients and families. Admission to the walk is free. Participants can register at the event or online at Alz.org/walk. people shoulder the burden,” Dillon said. “It leaves you with serious compassion and empathy.” _________________ Barbara Mallory’s kitchen is a model of order. Cabinets and drawers are marked with thin strips of white paper, their contents labeled in large type. Foods along the counter and in the pantry are separated by group. Next to the bowl of bean salad and a non-alcoholic bottle of chardonnay is a detailed list of other items that have been prepared for lunch. Mallory walks into the kitchen, smiling, laughing, welcoming guests into her home. As the party moves outside, the hostess glances at her watch and pushes a button. A monotone voice announces the time and date. The labels ensure she can find what she needs quickly. The talking watch helps her associate morning, afternoon and evening with their typical activities. Both are weapons in Mallory’s fight against the cognitive lapses seen in the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s. “Not being able to remember is frustrating, especially because I’ve always been good with names and details,”

Mallory listens to water aerobics instructor Jill Russell during her biweekly Aqualogix class at the Jackson/Teton County Recreation Center. Although she sometimes has trouble putting names to faces, Mallory strives to maintain her active and social lifestyle.

she said. “I’ve tried to figure out why God gave me this. Sometimes I just have to step away and say to myself, ‘You can remember this.’ And I usually remember it.” Mallory is battling the disease with everything she has. Every day is a rigorous workout of mind and body. Her success in countering its advances are evinced by her quick wit and immaculate garden. She plays golf, participates in water aerobics class and takes long walks or hikes every day. She loves to pick wildflowers and is looking forward to See BATTLING on 14B


14B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

TRAVIS J. GARNER / NEWS&GUIDE photos

Certified Nursing Assistant Martha Guerrero of Access Home Care and Hospice tries to coax a smile from RoLene Whittaker during a morning meal at her home in Alpine. Nurses stop by each weekday morning to help care for Whittaker, giving her sister Leslie Jorgensen a much-needed break from her duties.

BATTLING

Aid available in Jackson Hole

Continued from 13B

strapping on her cross-country skis this winter. She and her husband, who has been a rock of support since Mallory’s diagnosis, enjoy an active social life. She just needs a little reintroduction sometimes. But no matter where Mallory’s day takes her, Marylou Amendola is sure to be close by. Amendola is her shadow, shopping partner, outdoor companion, facilitator and friend. She began working with the Mallorys 10 months ago. She wasn’t hired to live with them, just to help with the logistics of moving to Jackson from Florida. She now lives with Patricia Gomez, the Mallorys’ cook and helper, in an upstairs suite in their house. “I never expected my stay to be this long,” Amendola said. “I have a husband back in West Palm Beach. But you get so involved, leaving feels like walking away from your own family.” Above all else, caregiving has given Amendola a renewed perception of what it means to be patient. The biggest challenge is recognizing the need for repetition — she keeps three calendars of daily events — and not asking questions that force Mallory to recall specific incidents. She has had to learn when and how to give Mallory her privacy while helping her with much of her daily routine. Never one to be waited or doted on, Mallory shares a special bond with Amendola, driven by a mutual love of the outdoors and transcending any sort of employer-employee relationship. “Sometimes it’s tough getting accustomed to having other people live with you,” Mallory said. “It’s like you all of a sudden you have a new sister you have to get along with. And you really have to work together. But when they’re extremely thoughtful and willing to help, it works.” _________________ Whether they are relatives or professionals at the beginning, caregivers for people who have Alzheimer’s become family at the end. They comprise a large group — more than 15

After losing her son to a skydiving accident, Whittaker was still unable to walk away from the sport she shared with many of her friends. But then Alzheimer’s disease grounded her forever. In this picture, Whittaker is fourth from the left in the front row.

million people nationwide — bound by sacrifice and selflessness. Caregivers provide the people they look after one more reason to keep fighting, often just by showing up and talking. Erin Crow has experienced this firsthand. The former activities director at River Rock Assisted Living, Crow is one of several caregivers for a Jackson man in his 70s who is battling Alzheimer’s. The man, a former Jenny Lake climbing ranger, loves going into Grand Teton National Park and identifying peaks his memory still clings to, and Crow takes him a couple times a month. Simple companionship, profound impact. “Family members sometimes see what’s been lost in a person, but caretakers can see what’s left,” Crow said. “Caretaking is the most rewarding thing in my life. Everyone has their own techniques with it, but knowing your limitations is just as important.” In 2011, caregivers provided more than 17 billion hours of unpaid services for the 5.4 million Americans

suffering from the disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Families administering aid at home constitute about 80 percent of the caregiver population. Nearly a third of that group has reported symptoms of depression. More than half has reported high levels of emotional stress. The toll Alzheimer’s exacts can be financial as well as psychological. In 2012, the total cost of providing care to those living with the disease is projected to exceed $200 billion. Based on industry numbers and the current minimum wage, the Alzheimer’s Association rated the economic value of unpaid hours of caregiving services at about $210 billion. In Wyoming, the number of people 65 and older living with Alzheimer’s increased by 43 percent between 2000 and 2010. The association lists more than 10,000 cases throughout the state, with about half living in nursing homes or assisted-living residences. Researchers have identified some common characteristics associated

If you or a family member is suffering from Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, the community is here to help. St. John’s Institute for Cognitive Health, an affiliate of the University of Utah Center for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research, can assess and develop an integrated continuum of care plan for anyone in Jackson Hole struggling with memory impairments. Led by Dr. Martha Stearn and Carol Taylor, LCSW, the institute offers brain screenings, memory assessments and counseling for patients and families. They work directly with primary care providers, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapists around the community. The ladies will be speaking on memory loss and expounding on the institute’s mission at 9:45 a.m. Saturday during the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. with the lapses in memory and other cognitive processes, most notably the accumulation of a protein-like substance called beta amyloid. When broken down inadequately, beta amyloid fragments form hardened “plaques” that become attached to nerve cells in the brain, gradually breaking down the tissue. At the heart of Alzheimer’s research is the quest to determine what causes the brain to begin breaking down the substance improperly. But the recent efforts of major pharmaceutical companies to develop drugs that either clear beta amyloid plaques or prevent their formation have come up short. While researchers generally agree that a link of some type exists between Alzheimer’s and beta amyloid buildup, it hasn’t been labeled the definitive root of the problem. Alzheimer’s is an epidemic. It’s the sixth-leading cause of death in America. It’s an ailment that turns cognition into confusion and loved ones into strangers. But it’s not something that should be fought alone.


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 15B

Community

Calendar

of Events

August 22 – 28, 2012

Wednesday, August 22

a.m. at Teton County Library. Ages 3 and younger enjoy 20-minute program featuring books and songs. Free. 733-2164.

Summer skating with Grand Teton Skating Academy, 5:30 p.m. today-Thursday at Snow King Sports and Event Center. Competitive skating for adults and classes available. $15 an hour. Akopm@aol.com, 733-0066.

Capoeira, 6:15 p.m. at Phil Baux Park. Beginners welcome. Free. 733-1055. Treasure Hunt Tuesday: geocaching and treats, 6 p.m. at Jackson campus of Teton Science Schools. Bring your family to learn how to navigate using a GPS. For ages 6 and older. $15. 733-1313.

At the Senior Center of Jackson Hole: Leslie’s Fitness, 9:30 and 10:30 a.m.; blood pressure checks, 11:30 a.m.; bingo, 12:45 p.m.; contract bridge, 1 p.m.; Pilates, 5:30 p.m. All classes free for seniors, $5 for others. 733-7300.

Community acupuncture and chiropractic clinic, 4 p.m. Tuesdays at ProMotion and Celestial Crane O.M. in Aspens on Wyo. 390. Affordable walk-in clinic. South side of Teton Sports Club on START Blue Line. $30-$50 sliding scale. 690-9540.

Hike to Taggart Lake, 6 p.m. Join the Sierra Club on 3- to 6-mile hike. Steve Deutsch, 7333988, MeetUp.com. Jackson Hole Rodeo, 8 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays through Sept. 5 at Teton County Fairgrounds. $15 and higher. 733-7927. TRAVIS J. GARNER / NEWS&GUIDE

Oneness blessing/deeksha, 7:30 p.m. at Akasha Yoga. Gentle meditation with handson energy transmission, helps shift the brain to a oneness state of consciousness. May include chakra opening and chanting. All are welcome. By donation. Call 733-5523 or visit OnenessJacksonHole.com

Help Habitat for Humanity build four homes in Teton Village, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. every Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. Volunteers also needed in the ReStore 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday. No experience necessary. RSVP to Amanda, 734-0828 or amanda@tetonhabitat.org.

Fly fishermen float through a smoke-filled Snake River canyon recently in a drift boat. Smoke from fires actively burning in Idaho has continued to blow into the Jackson valley this week, making for hazy skies and poor air quality.

cream, 6 p.m. at Jackson Campus of Teton Science Schools. For those age 6 and older: $15. 733-1313.

Grocer. Free. 733-0450.

Water Wednesdays: evening canoe tour and picnic, 4 p.m. Paddle on a pristine waterway. Teton Science Schools provides transportation and equipment and teaches basic skills. Adults: $60, child ages 6-17, $40. 733-1313.

End-of-summer celebration, 5-8 p.m. at Phil Baux Park. Join the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance for free food, corn hole and live music. Beer proceeds will benefit the alliance’s work keeping the valley wild and beautiful. Free. 733-9417.

Hike to Green Lake with the Sierra Club. Ten to 15 miles over moderate to steep terrain at a moderate to fast pace. John Spahr, 734-0441, MeetUp.com.

Drinking water bacteria testing, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at 460 E. Pearl. Bottles and instructions can be picked up 8 a.m.-5 p.m. MondayFriday. Tests conducted every Monday and Tuesday. Bring sample in before 2 p.m. $15. 732-8463.

Walk to End Alzheimer’s, 10 a.m. from Senior Center of Jackson Hole. Senior Fair, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. features free picnic lunch and live music. 733-7300.

Hour-long walking tours of historic downtown Jackson meet in the center of Town Square, 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 2 p.m. on Saturday. Free.

Teton Science Schools’ 35th annual Auction, 3-6 p.m. at Jackson campus of Teton Science Schools. Free admission. 733-1313.

Ongoing/Upcoming

Free computer tutoring, 10 a.m., 11 a.m. or noon at Teton County Library. One-on-one tutoring Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sign up: 733-2164, press 1. Bouncing and Books for Baby, 10:30 a.m. at Alta Branch Library. This lap-sit program brings together parents (or other caregivers) with their babies from birth to 18 months old for weekly half-hour reading and play sessions. Free. Storytime, 11 a.m. for ages 2-5 and their caregivers. 353-2505.

At the senior center: restorative yoga, 9:30 a.m.; Ingrid Weber bead class, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; line dancing, 10:30 a.m.; duplicate bridge, 12:30 p.m.; mahjongg, 1 p.m.; Zumba, 5:30 p.m. All classes free for seniors, $5 for others. 733-7300. Toddler Time, 10:05 a.m. at Teton County Library. Kids age 3 and younger enjoy books, songs, finger plays. Storytime, 10:30 a.m. for ages 4-6. Free. 733-2164.

Figure drawing open studio, 6 p.m. at Art Association. Drop by to draw, paint or sculpt from the figure. A different nude model will be present each week. Bring supplies. $10. 733-6379.

Oneness blessing/deeksha, 1:30 p.m. at Akasha Yoga. May include chakra opening and chanting. All are welcome. By donation. OnenessJacksonHole.com, 733-5523.

Heart-centered meditation, 7:30 p.m. at Inversion Yoga. Soul reader Carol Mann leads every Wednesday evening all summer. Free. 585-329-5209.

Yoga on Sculpture Trail, noon-1 p.m. every Thursday at National Museum of Wildlife Art. Free, donations accepted.

Jazz Foundation of Jackson Hole rehearses big band music, 7 p.m. at Center for the Arts. Free. 733-4596.

Thursday, August 23 Pocket sketching workshop, 10 a.m. todaySaturday at Art Association. Kath Macaulay teaches how to paint and sketch on the go. Great way to document travels. $345 for members, $370 for others. 733-6379. “Recent Advances in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS Research,” noon at St. John’s Medical Center, Moose-Wapiti Classrooms. Zach W. Hall discusses similarities and differences among these diseases, the role of genetics in neurodegenerative disease, what it has taught us and potential therapies on the horizon. 739-7244. Homewood Suites by Hilton hosts chamber mixer, 5-7 p.m. Third annual summer barbecue with Italian sausages, onions, peppers, other refreshments. Free. 733-3316. Tracking Thursday: evening stroll and ice

Saturday, August 25

Jackson Hole Rodeo, 8 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays through Sept. 5 at Teton County Fairgrounds. $15 and higher. 733-7927. Happy hour yoga class, 6 p.m. at Inversion Yoga. Unwind after your week in hourlong session of power flow set to music. $10. 733-3038. QiGong for Health, 10 a.m. at The Harmonic Spa. All ages and abilities welcome. By donation. Ellie, 699-4943.

Monday, August 27

Introduction to craniosacral therapy is Aug. 29-30 at Cowboy Village. $295. 699-2503. Dancers’ Workshop is on a break. Fall classes begin soon. 733-6398, DWJH.org. Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum hosts discussion on “Mountains Beyond Mountains” and Paul Farmer, 7 p.m. Aug. 29. Organized by InterConnections 21 in preparation for Farmer and Ophelia Dahl’s public presentation Sept. 6 in Walk Festival Hall. IC21.org/PIH.

Hike to Spalding Falls via Garnet Canyon with the Sierra Club. Eight-mile hike over steep terrain with boulders, moderate pace. Lucina Horner, 205-249-6186, MeetUp.com.

Senior walk and lunch at Jenny Lake Lodge departs at 10 a.m. Aug. 30. Explore the trail along String Lake and enjoy lunch at Jenny Lake Lodge. Walk 1-2 miles over easy terrain. $11 plus money for lunch. 739-9025.

ServeSafe basic food safety certification class, 10 a.m. at 4-H Building. Suitable for food service workers, grocery store and deli employees, hospital/nursing home dietary staff, day care/preschool staff and nonprofit food handlers. $20. 733-3087.

“Skills to Energize Your Life” workshop, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. today and Tuesday at Cowboy Village. Based on the book “Full Body Presence.” Practice stress management skills such as creating healthy boundaries, nourishing oneself and remaining grounded, steady and present during challenging situations. $295. 699-2503.

Yoga Indian dinner, 6 p.m Aug. 31 at Teton Yoga Shala. First, engage in an all-levels yoga flow class with Adi Amar from 6 to 7:15 p.m., detoxifying the body and stimulating the digestive system. Then, quench your hunger with an Indian food dinner made by certified natural chef Christy Fox. $60. 690-3054.

At the senior center: Leslie’s Fitness, 9:30 a.m.; qigong, 10:45 a.m.; brunch, 11 a.m.; cribbage, 1 p.m. All classes free for seniors, $5 others. 733-7300.

Young at Art, 10:30-11:15 a.m. at National Museum of Wildlife Art. Toddlers 5 and younger focus on simple art concepts. Free with museum admission. 733-5771.

Trilingual yoga, 5:15 p.m. at Akasha Yoga. Practice the universal language of yoga in English, Spanish and Sanskrit. $10. 413-0509.

At the senior center: massage, 9-11 a.m.; Leslie’s fitness, 9:30 and 10:30 a.m.; line dancing, 10:30 a.m.; Bible study, 12:45 p.m.; knitting group, 1 p.m.; Spanish, 2 p.m.; bridge, 5 p.m. All classes free for seniors, $5 others. 733-7300.

Friday, August 24 Backpack from Teton Village tram to Cascade Canyon. Four-day backpacking trip over easy to steep terrain at an easy pace. Caroline Rhodes, 602-430-5026, MeetUp.com.

Happy hour yoga class, 6 p.m. at Inversion Yoga. Unwind in our hourlong session of power flow set to music. $10. 733-3038. Wine tasting, 4 p.m. at Jackson Whole

Tuesday, August 28 Toddler Time Tuesdays, 10:05 and 10:35

Jackson Hole calendar

@

Log onto our e-calendar to list events in the Jackson Hole News&Guide and on our website. Visit JHNewsAndGuide.com/Calendar to sign up and submit information. The deadline is noon on Mondays. Those with questions may call 733-2047.


16B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

On the Record

TETON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT #1

REGULAR MEETING

Marriage licenses

The following marriage licenses were issued Teton County in July:

Wednesday, August 22, 2012 MEETING LOCATION Davey Jackson Elementary School Commons AGENDA CANDIDATES MEET AND GREET: INFORMATION SERVING AS A SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER - 4:00-4:45 PM EXECUTIVE SESSION 4:45 PM – Land, Personnel and Legal Issues 6:00 PM – Regular Meeting - DJES To view the agenda, go to the school website tcsd.org Click on DISTRICT, then SCHOOL BOARD, then “BoardDocs”

240713

Please proof and call Amy at 739-9542 or return via Fax at 733-2138. Thanks!

pARTners projects integrate the arts into math, language, science and social studies classes.

PDF

pARTners

Supporting the Art of Education

pARTners artists teach students, kindergarten through 12th grade, in all Teton County schools.

Please remember pARTners at Old Bills.

Please proof and call Adam at 739-9538, or return via Fax at 733-2138. Thanks!

241558

www.edu-partners.org • 733-2565

PDF?

Teton County School District

Home Schooling of Students 2012-2013 Teton County School District #1 is required to enforce the compulsory school attendance laws of the state of Wyoming for children between the ages of 7 and 16, as provided for in Enrolled Act 94, 1985. It is the responsibility of the TCSD#1 Superintendent of Schools to enforce this policy within the District. TCSD#1 will follow the relevant state statutes (W.S. 21-4-101-107) and W.S. 21-4-301) in cooperating with parents who wish to have their child(ren) receive education in a home school environment as an alternative to attending public or private schools. A home-based educational program shall meet the requirements of a basic academic educational program pursuant to W.S. 21-4-101(a)(vi). It shall be the responsibility of every person administering a home-based educational program to submit a curriculum to the local board of trustees each year showing that the program complies with the requirements of this subsection. Failure to submit a curriculum showing compliance is prima facie evidence that the home-based educational program does not meet the requirements of this article. If you wish to home school your child(ren) during the 2012-2013 school year, log on to the school district website – www.tcsd.org under “Parents - Parent Documents - Homeschool Form” to download the necessary forms which consist of the Home School Policy, Home School Guideline, and Notice of Home Schooling Form to be filled out in their entirety. Forms are also available at District Office – 260 West Broadway. Parents must submit, in writing, prior to August 31, 2012, complete curriculum information for each student to the Superintendent of Schools in Teton County, P.O. Box 568, Jackson, WY 83001. If you have any questions please contact Michele Doyle, Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent at 733-2790. 242207

Visit us online at

Lisa Michelle Hermans and Jesse John Paciorek Cheryl Wood Niemi and Michael Benjamin Schaefer Lindsay Steinbrecher and Brian Joseph Tanner Katelyn Elizabeth Gasser and Justin Williams Love Amanda Coulter McElroy and William Winfred Moore III Rachel Ann Leslie and Ryan Daniel Murphy Brian John Perry and Angela Kylean Rivera Laurie Porter Halter and Thomas Alexander Patrick II Hannah Mary Chilen and Peter Jay Kolehmainen Melissa Ann Ribbeck and Matthew Earl Schreiber Katie Robin Critchley and Bradley Stephen Nelson Kristina Karina Herrmann and Ryan Joseph McCrate Lucas Buck Mallon and Katherine Ann Trewick Neysha Ainsworth McCluskey and Jonathan Jay Osborne Joshua Allen Hayes and Karen Lynn Jarrett Johnathon Robert Bridges and Ralitsa Georgiev Eftimova Brandi Sue Hollars and Johnathan Michael Shatto Ashley Claire Gillam and Joshua Alan Minalga James Robert Debloom II and Camille Lillian Mason Kellyann Neville and Stanley John Zalak Jr. Ali Rene Shafranek and Henry Burnett Wheeler Jere Cecil Overdyke III and Patricia Elizabeth Scoggins Lorie Ann Miller and Arrick Lyle Swanson Ted William Hornbeck and Linda Gail Schwartzkopf Colleen Ann Alexander and Wayne David Green Annie Allison Brewer and Gregory Taft Jackson Alex Hiro Morin and Elizabeth Anne Warshaw Gregory Thomas Belliston and Lyndsey Henderson Joseph Daniel Kelly and Anne Therese Sullivan Jeramy Steven Stroble and Anna Dorothea Vicalvi Kyrstin Marie Carpenter and Shaun Allen King Adam Stuart Bennett and Alaina Janine Town Alison Lynn Deines and Sam Merrick Sehnert John Thomas Jennings and Presley Ann Taylor Edward Daniel Frantz and Caroline Ilsley Trainer Kelly Ann Gitchel and James Albert Russo Richard Michael Bumpus Jr. and Dulcie Dawn Roberts Lynne Marie Mugisa Bennett and Ryan William Stanko Matthew Alain Enthoven and Alison Lindsay Watts Tina Louise Arnieri Luka and Michael Leonard Williams Caitlin Lillard Caldwell and George Daniel Myers Mark Howard Fishman and Joanna Coates Lewis Kathleen Rose Kowal and Joseph Bernard Nowak Jody Rene Martin and Michael Stephen Perry Melissa Danielle Eakins and Bryan Douglas White Patrick Fitzjames Henrie and Angela Lynn Moffitt Jesssica Lynn Castles and Michael Alan Heath Farshid Laghaei and Julie Ann Riodan Daniel Robert Wedt and Roxanna Rose White Claire Fuller and Brent Patrick Tyce Lauren Deanna Dempsey and Benjamin Scott Hinkle Anne Elizabeth Bergman and Timothy Jospeh Giattina Joanne Carey and Darius Esfahani Jarrel Dan Festervan and Angela Celeste Rice Jeffrey Robert Burnside and Rachel Helen Tracy Brady Irvin Maddox and Laura Renee Shafer Virginia Lee Ballato and Bryan Keith Potter Marissa Lyn Carr and Michael Thomas Moeri Jennifer Marie Dungey and Adam Scott Stembridge Jacob Mathew Martin and Rachel Ann Zimmer Alexis Audrey Thorpe and Brandon Jabonski Yunger Kevin Patrick Brough and Dominique Kimberly Schmid Lynda Jeanne Bell and Donald Albert Hindman Hannah Melissa Barker and Brevan Michael Daniel Peter Browning Dolan Jr. and Taylor Elisabeth Swift Mark Stephen Kollath and Connie Marlene Pohl Gregory Brian Hughes and Michele Lynn Kranick Racquel Ray Banaszak and Patrick William Hegi Maryclare Mulherin Hewitt and Jon Charles Pauley Jenette Marie Aschoff and Samuel Dale Lewis George Rolan Dreher Jr. and Alexa Rachel Masek Ronald Lewis Cole and Karen Virginia Fitzwater Christopher David Johnson and Chantelle Nicole Loy Steven Ronald Florence and Teresa Siobhan Fogarty

Charlotte Elisabeth Davis and Jonathan Robert Souter Millie Frances Parks and Lane Charles Raper Peter Elis Hoglund and Madeline Vogenthaler Jessen Kristoffer Como and Marianna Marcelle Greene Chadwick John Haszier and Natasha Grace Williams Rose Marie De Ninno and Kyle Todd Robertson Michael Anthony Morris and Kara Lee Needles Jeremiah Paul Handschin and Shauna Christine Nacewicz Kent Arthur Jansen and Chelsea Victoria Ware Tamara Lynne Buck and Douglas J. Carlson Brittany Ann Hanson and Coleman Owen Horton Christopher A. McCloskey and Molly Elisabeth Rosenman Joyce Marlene Miller and Stephen Lynn Poynor Melissa Geisinger Brown and Mitch Gayle Rumsey Thomas Roy Lower and Samantha Marie Turnbull Cecily Gordon Parks and Nicholas Yagoda Scott Edward Renfro and Lindsy Rich Lisa Patrice Harper and Thomas Joseph Kennedy Jonathan Scott Griffith and Cass Abigail Morgan Linda Sue Perkins and Richard Gordon Worley Fabiola Robles-Alonso and Frederik W.H. Van Oppen II Ryan Lauren Kobrick and Jennifer Louis Stone-Gerardy Kayla Ann Greene and Thomas Brendan Wilkinson

DUI

The following people were convicted in July of driving under the influence of alcohol: Christopher Lloyd Andrews, of Jackson Joel G. Bianchi, of Jackson Howard Cameron Harper, of Jackson Hance Day Hughes of Baton Rouge, La. Carson L. Lilly, of Jackson Terrie L. Moore, of Riverton, Utah Mary Katheryn West, of Taylors, S.C.

Small claims

Teton County’s small claims court made the following judgments in July. Accelerated Receivables Solutions, of Torrington, v. Kassie Nicole Mulligan, of Jackson: $954.74 to Accelerated Receivables American Collection System Inc., of Laramie, v. Shaun Thomas Oakley, of Jackson: $430 to American Collection Asset Acceptance LLC, of Casper, v. Johanne Holton, of Jackson: $6,052.31 to Asset Acceptance Citibank, of Cheyenne, v. Jennifer Beastrom, of Jackson: $5,975.97 to Citibank CollectionCenter Wyoming, of Rawlins, v. Scott and Susan Kerley of Jackson: $482.58 to CollectionCenter CollectionCenter of Wyoming, of Rawlins, v. Larry and Jackie Hansen, of Jackson: $1,761.14 to CollectionCenter Collection Professionals, of Missoula, Mont., v. Megan Madigan, of Jackson: $612.50 to Collection Professionals International Order of Oddfellows Jackson Hole Lodge No. 8 v. Elizabeth Dixon Talermo, of Jackson, and Jackson Hole Knits Inc.: $9,023.70 to Oddfellows Midland Funding LLC, of Sioux Falls, S.D., v. Felipe Lopez Sandoval, of Jackson: $744.32 to Midland Funding RT Capital Inc., of Casper, v. Cortney H. Bowman, of Jackson: $11,326.42 to RT Capital RT Capital Inc., of Casper, v. Carl Henry Jacubetz, of Jackson: $3,669.24 to RT Capital

Fire/EMS

Jackson Hole Fire/EMS received 322 calls between June 22 and Aug. 9. EMS: 245 Fire: 77

Warranty deeds

Recorded between Aug. 13 and 17 in Teton County: Recorded Aug. 17 From: Frederick M. Peightal III et ux See ON THE RECORD on 17B


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 17B

Obituary

McCollum, 70, loved family, served church

On the record Continued from 16B

To: Zachary S. Crosby From: Thekla M. Von Hagke To: Stephen R. Koch et al trustee From: Crystal Springs Ranch Inc. To: Jensen 45 LP From: Charles C. Baker trustee To: Robert G. Berkheimer et ux From: James Pierce Scarlett To: MKGS Investments LLC From: Mike McKelvey et al trustee To: Mike McKelvey et ux From: Irene G. Casper et al To: Charles Mohler et ux From: Randall S. Mayers To: Larry L. Teuber From: Fannie Mae To: Amy Aronowitz Recorded Aug. 16 From: Beverly Halpin To: Game Creek Ranch II LLC From: Game Creek Ranch LLC To: Beverly Halpin From: Rex V. Ecoff trustee To: Kellerstrass Land and Leasing LC From: Shirley Anne Anderson To: Ryegrass Owners Association From: Stanley Henning et ux To: Ryegrass Owners Association From: Kathleen H. Menzel To: Bluegrass Owners Association From: Ricegrass Owners Association To: Paul K. Sybrowsky et ux

In Your Giving This Year At Old Bill’s Fun Run!

COURTESY PHOTO

Laraine Christensen McCollum

needlework and reading. She was preceded in death by her parents, Ivan and Ida Christensen, and sister, Katherine. She is survived by her husband, James E. McCollum Jr.; children Cindy McCollum, Jim McCollum and Cherie (Israel) Flores Hernandez; and grandchildren Stephenie, Cheyenne, Forrest, Alfred, Roice, Rylee and Henry. She also is survived by siblings Wayne (Ann) Christensen, of Shelley; Robert (Stephanie) Christensen, of American Fork, Utah; Linda (Leland) Matheson, of Price, Utah; Julie Hicks, of Oregon City, Ore.; Colleen; and Lynn (Jill) Christensen, of Canby, Ore. She also leaves behind many treasured friends. Laraine has chosen to be cremated and requested that there not be a funeral or memorial. In lieu of flowers, friends are asked to make a contribution to St. John’s Hospital Medical Center Oncology, P.O. Box 428, Jackson, WY 83001 (online at StJohns HospitalFoundation.org/donate) or to the Huntsman Cancer Institute, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112. Every dollar does make a difference. Those we love don’t go away. They walk beside us every day. No longer in our lives to share, but in our hearts, she’ll always be there.

229945

You can find a donation form at many local retailers or online at cfjacksonhole.org. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

It’s time to Join a Credit Union. Meridian Trust Federal Credit Union. Here’s why:

Free Checking & Debit Card Free Bill Pay Free Online Banking Free Mobile Banking

While banks are for-profit, credit unions are not-for-profit. Here, you’re not a customer, you’re a member. Like you, we’re here in the 307. We’re local to Wyoming for 58 years!

You can join! Open an account at your local Jackson branch at:

690 S. Hwy 89 Lobby

M - Th 9:00 am - 5:00 pm F 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

307.734.8034 MeridianTrustFCU.org

unt Open an acco and get a free ive commemorat e, at license pl s while supplie in ng ri B last. this ad. 241658

Your funds are federally insured to at least $250,000

Recorded Aug. 15 From: James Fulmer et ux To: Sean Scarlett et al From: Robert L. Gill et al trustee To: Paul G. Kimball et ux From: James D. Brunk Jr. To: Triumph Properties LLC et al From: John R. Wilson et ux To: James Carr et ux From: Winslow S. Bent et al trustee To: Bernard Ernest Burst III et ux From: Colby R. Colonel et al To: Christopher T. Davenport From: Roca Enterprises To: Thomas Seitz et ux Recorded Aug. 14 From: Citimortgage Inc. To: Donald J. Blackwell From: MKGS Investments LLC To: James Pierce Scarlett From: Messinger Company LLC To: Vance N. Buell et ux Recorded Aug. 13 From: William F. Raimer et ux To: Eric Balsa et ux From: Jill D. Veber et vir To: Jill D. Veber et vir From: Ralph L. Gill trustee To: Ralph L. Gill et al From: Ralph L. Gill Trustee To: Ralph L. Gill et al From: Ralph L. Gill trustee To: Ralph L. Gill et al From: Betty Chain To: Robert D. Chain et al trustee

241176

Beloved mother, grandmother, sister and friend Laraine Christensen McCollum died Aug. 12 at home in Jackson after a courageous battle with leukemia. The following was provided by her family. Laraine was taken from this Earth far too soon. She lived her life to the fullest and chose to live every day in a positive light. She was kind and loving and would do anything for her family and friends. She will be remembered for her quick sense of humor, inner strength and joy in life. She was born April 13, 1942, a beautiful spring day with the lilacs in full bloom, to Ivan J. Christensen and Ida Wright Christensen in Shelley, Idaho. She grew up in the Jameston area on the family farm. She loved the farm and farm work. She graduated from Shelley High School in 1960. She attended Utah State University (1961-62) and graduated from Idaho Falls’ Ex-Cel-Sis beauty school in 1963. She married James E. McCollum Jr. on June 14, 1963. In 1965, she moved to Jackson, where she lived until her death. She worked with her husband for Overland West Hertz Rent-A-Car for many years. She had many interests. She loved spending time with her family, especially her grandchildren. She enjoyed being in the out-of-doors, gardening, fishing, hunting and camping. She loved all animals from birds, rabbits, dogs and cats to buffalo, moose, elk and deer. Owls and eagles held symbolic meaning for her. She enjoyed trying new restaurants, shopping and taking cruises in Canada and Alaska. For nearly 28 years, she relished teaching the children in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She also worked in the Scouts, Relief Society and young women’s program and was a visiting teacher for many years. Her many gifts and talents included cooking, writing and self-publishing cookbooks, numerous handicrafts,

Just A Reminder To Remember


18B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Obituaries

Fields, 56, built career as chef

Joe Reeb

COURTESY PHOTO

Reeb, 58, launched businesses, loved hikes In accordance with Joe Reeb’s outgoing nature and love of entertaining, a celebration of his life will be held at 1 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Reach Foundation, 622 N. 8th St. W. in Riverton. Reeb died Aug. 2 at home in Jackson Hole. He was 58. The following was provided by his family. Joe was born July 9, 1954, to Mary and George Alvin (Jerry) Reeb in Riverton. Joe spent his life proving he could excel at everything he set his mind to do. He began his entrepreneurial career at age 9, when he started hosting backyard carnivals and selling worms to local fishermen. While in high school, Joe began his first career at Sears. He maintained his employment with Sears throughout high school as well as his college accomplishments, which led him to Cheyenne and Denver. After obtaining his degree in Denver, he relocated to Casper, where he used his entrepreneurship skills full force to create the highly successful businesses Rent to Own and Cost Plus Appliances in 1980. Joe continued to build and grow his business throughout Wyoming and Montana. He had a passion for business and a true love of real estate. His love of real estate fueled his love for travel. Joe’s adoration of hiking and the outdoors led him to begin to split his time between Casper and Jackson Hole. He loved any outdoor adventure and could hike for days! Joe was an extremely generous man. His heart warmed in sharing with blessings through Ryan’s Friends, the Casper Humane Society and playing secret Santa in Casper and Jackson Hole. One of Joe’s strongest heartfelt passions was time with friends and family. He had a soul-tickling laugh, and he knew no strangers. He delighted in cooking, hosting and entertaining, and everyone was always welcome, the more the merrier. He is survived by his father, George (Jerry) Reeb; four brothers and their spouses: Larry and Gloria Roemmich, Ronnie and Stephanie Roemmich, Donny and Linda Roemmich and Pat and Linda Reeb; his sister and her husband, Mary Ann and Bob Foster; several nieces and nephews; and his beloved feline, Raga Muffin. He was preceded in death by his mother, Mary Reeb. In lieu of flowers, condolences can be made in the form of donations to two of Joe’s favorite charities: Jason’s Friends Foundation, 340 W. B St., Suite 101, Casper, WY 82601 or Casper Humane Society, 849 East E St., Casper, WY 82601.

Jackson Hole resident Michael Robert Fields, past exalted ruler of Elks Lodge No. 1713 and chef extraordinaire, died Aug. 7 after a difficult fight with cancer. He was 56. The following was provided by his family. Mike enjoyed camping and fourwheeling with his loving wife of 32 years, Cindy. He was a hero to his children, Jason and Leslie. Mike was a fantastic Papaw to Alex Michael and Levi Wyatt. Mike was a terrific big brother with a talent for teasing his younger brother and sister, Drew and Karyn. He was a loving son to his parents, Robert and Sandra Fields. He had many great and longtime friends in and around the valley. Mike was born in Denver. He lived in a number of states but fell in love with Wyoming and chose it as his home. Mike had a giving heart and was closely involved in his family, community and nature. Mike never met a stranger and never lacked for jokes that would make you smile. Mike’s love of cooking started at Daylight Donuts in 1982. His in-laws, Robert and Vera Arthur, started the business, and Mike began serving his own special recipes for lunch. He continued his career by being a hunting camp cook for Triangle X Ranch. From there, he went to Tags Restaurant. In 1992, Nora Tygum hired him to work at Nora’s Fish Creek Inn. Nora gave him reign of the dinner menu, and he began to blossom as a chef. In 2003, he and Cindy were hired at Flat Creek Ranch, where he became the personal chef for all the guests. He enjoyed being able to talk to everyone as he was cooking, and he always had a story and many jokes to tell. Since 2009, he had been a personal chef and caretaker for a private residence. Mike’s love for the Elks Club was

COURTESY PHOTO

Mike Fields cooked for several places in the valley, from Daylight Donuts to Triangle X hunting camps, Elks Lodge No. 1713 and Nora’s Fish Creek Inn.

apparent by the many years of service he gave it. He cooked Friday night dinners and did countless benefits, holiday dinners and catering. He was the inspiration and backbone of the food booth for the World Championship Snowmobile Hill Climb for the Jackson Hole Snow Devils. His entire family and circle of friends will miss him dearly. He will live on through his loving wife, Cindy; son Jason (Jessica), grandsons Levi Wyatt and Weston Arthur Fields; and daughter Leslie and grandson Alex Michael. His mother, Sandy, preceded him in death. He is survived by his father, Robert Fields, sister Karyn (Dave) Castles, brother

Andrew Fields, in-laws Robert and Vera Arthur, Lennis and Teresa Arthur, Yvonne Arthur and Brian and Lori Beck, and nieces and nephews Jared and Jenny Arthur, Jessica and Alesha Beck and Savannah and Colten Castles. He was a free spirit who chose to live life on his own terms. He has enriched the lives of all around him, and we will carry his love of life and laughter with us. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Elks Lodge No. 1713. In celebration of his life, a service will be held at 11 a.m. Oct. 6 at the Elks Lodge. “Getting five minutes better every day!”

King, 78, developed Rafter J, Aspens Floyd King, a longtime resident of Jackson, died Aug. 12 in Billings, Mont., from complications of Parkinson’s disease. He was 78. The following was provided by his family. Floyd was born to James and Afton Hoyt King on July 1, 1934, in Salt Lake City. The second of five children, he grew up in Reno, Nev., and Ogden, Utah. He graduated from Ogden High School. Floyd spent two years in the Army, from 1954 to 1956, and was stationed in Stuttgart, Germany, as part of the occupation army. After his discharge, he returned to the University of Utah and graduated with a degree in banking and finance. He then enrolled in and graduated from the University of Wyoming Law School. He met Kay Reber at UW, and they were married in 1960, during his senior year. While Floyd was in undergraduate school, he spent one summer in Jackson. Anna and Burns Ferrin were kind enough to let Floyd and his friend “Whitey” stay in an old log cabin. Asked if it had running water, Floyd said it did when it rained, but he couldn’t remember if there was a sink. Floyd and his friend stacked hay (which didn’t stay up) for Burns, bussed tables at Moore’s Open Range and pumped gas at the station on North Cache. There were only two or three other college students in Jackson that summer. In the spring of 1962, Floyd and Kay moved to Jackson, where Floyd opened a law office over Jackson Drug, with Kay as the secretary, struggling with an old portable typewriter and sheets of carbon paper. There were three other lawyers and two doctors in Jackson at that time.

Floyd King

COURTESY PHOTO

Floyd was active in the Jackson community for the next 35 years. He served for varying length of times as the U.S. magistrate for Grand Teton National Park, attorney for the town of Jackson and attorney for the school boards before and after they consolidated. He was elected county attorney and was paid a salary of $300 a month. He also served on numerous boards and as president of the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce. He enjoyed his association with the local politicians and businessmen. It was an interesting time in Jackson, and Floyd had many great stories to tell, often illustrating with his dry wit. And, of course, there were many stories about which he had to keep quiet. Jackson had more than its share of eccentrics. Floyd and friends Jerry Wilson and Chuck Lewton developed Rafter J, and Floyd and Chuck developed the Aspens. It was hard work, but they

were proud of how well the subdivisions turned out. Floyd never backed down from a challenge. He climbed the Grand, became a certified scuba diver, obtained his pilot’s license and owned a Cessna 210. He was one of the founding directors of Arts for the Parks, a nationally known art competition. For 11 years he, Paul Von Gontard and another partner owned a small hotel in Costa Rica called Hotel Sugar Beach. He and Kay made numerous trips to Costa Rica, thoroughly enjoying the beautiful country and the ‘Ticos.” In 1997, he retired from the law business and moved to the family’s Porcupine Butte Ranch at the base of the Crazy Mountains in Melville, Mont. He was active in the ranch operation and enjoyed Montana and being able to watch the grandchildren’s soccer and baseball games. He had great memories of his time in Jackson and the many friends made over the years. He especially enjoyed golf, skiing and the picnics and boating on Jackson Lake with family and good friends. Floyd is survived by his wife of 51 years, Kay; son Bret (Susan) King, of Jackson, daughter Susan (Robert) Harrick, of Redding, Conn., and son Steven (Kaonii) King, of Melville, Mont.; grandchildren Jessica, Austin and Annika, of Melville, Bradley (Mallory), of Seattle, Spencer and Jordan, of Jackson, and Michelle (Brady) Crawford, of Alpine; and great-grandchildren Miles and Avery, of Alpine. He also is survived by brothers James, Randall, and Todd and sister Donna King. The family gathered for a memorial service Sunday on the top of Porcupine Butte.


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 19B

Some more Southern charm at River Rock A s another spectacular sumRegistered hikers will meet at the mer in the Rocky Mountains Wilson Post Office to carpool to the draws to a close, it is time to History Trail without any canine comsign up for the Teton Pass history panions. They are encouraged to wear trail hike sponsored by the Bridger- good hiking shoes and to bring along Teton National Forest and the Jack- plenty of water and some snacks. son Hole Historical Society and Mu- Most of the trail is downhill hiking, seum. The hike is schedmoderate in difficulty. uled to begin at 9 a.m. on The featured resident in River Rock Lodge AsSept. 7. sisted Living for August There is room for only is Eva Jepsen. Eva grew 15 hikers on this threeup in Nebraska on a farm mile interpretive adventure, so do not dawdle in with five siblings. She met her husband while making your plans for playing a game of basethis trip down the history trail, which begins ball with her Lutheran church group. She and on Teton Pass and ends at Trail Creek. her husband owned and operated a successful catWith the guidance of tle and hog ranch in NeLinda Merigliano, recCeci Clover reation program manager braska and enjoyed befor the Bridger-Teton, and Karen ing social. They had one child, Bill, Reinhart, curator of education and who lives here in Jackson and was outreach for the history museum, a pilot for many years. Eva came to hikers will travel back in time on a Jackson nearly 15 years ago, shortroute retracing much of the original ly after her husband passed away. wagon route from the top of Teton She worked in several local retail Pass to Trail Creek trailhead. The clothing stores and was named St. history of Teton Pass is rich and full John’s Medical Center’s volunteer of interesting stories. Participants of the year in 2001. Eva is a very will hear tales of settlers traversing active 86-year-old. the pass, an early ski area, cattle River Rock Lodge has a new didrives and more. In addition, there rector of operations. The familiar are intriguing relics of days gone by face of Laurie Krenke is back at along the recently constructed trail. the helm after Dana Jackson’s re-

Circling the Square

cent departure. Laurie piloted the center between a previous shift in directors, and there are many River Rock residents who wish she would make the move from Wichita, Kan., to Jackson a permanent one. River Rock’s new health care coordinator, Alison Sabens, and manager of business development, Kate Boyle, have made the move to Jackson with their families from Memphis, Tenn., to become part of the crew. The center has no shortage of Southern charm with these two ladies on the premises. Two other new faces at River Rock are Jo Lynn Conrad and Teal Van Kirk. Teal is the outfit’s administrative assistant and Jo has taken over the wheel as activities coordinator. Also known as a life enrichment coordinator, Jo came to River Rock with a desire to foster an uplifting, fun and engaging environment for all of the residents. She thoroughly enjoys hearing all the ideas and stories, and is striving to engage tenants in activities and outings that will bring joy, connectedness and excitement to their lives. Jo came to the area from Virginia nearly 16 years ago, lured like so many others by love of the mountains, wildlife and skiing. She has a background in architecture and tends to think outside the box and

‘Oh, Really?’

BY Freddie Cheng / E dited

ACROSS 1 Polo need 7 Some ballroom dances 14 Go by again 20 Figures in TV’s “V” 21 Acid, e.g. 22 One-two wager 23 Ultranationalism? 25 Sunday best 26 Keep on hand 27 View from une chalet, maybe 28 Reforms? 29 Scream, so to speak 31 Gray shades 35 Mil. stat 36 Dame ___ Everage 39 “Thriller” Grammy sweep? 44 Appear that way 46 Zero 47 More than dislike 48 Speed at which the apocalypse is coming? 51 Having allegorical meanings 56 43-Down follower 57 Brought in 61 Gold-compound salt 62 Balkan native 64 Obsessivecompulsive soap purger?

by

The New York Times No. 0819

W ill S hortz

66 Source of indigo 70 Kate who married a prince 73 Classic Jags 74 Big gambling loss in the Biggest Little City in the World? 77 Venetian strip 80 Louis Armstrong played one 81 More gung-ho 84 Excitement 89 Former Treasury secretary Paul and former Yankee Paul 91 Bad precept for U.S. foreign policy? 93 Spa item 97 L-P center 98 Non compos mentis 99 Not a happy ending on the yellow brick road? 105 Choice word 106 “Are you ___ out?” 107 Do a hula, e.g. 108 Swerve 110 Goes (for) 112 Nastily slander 116 Wrong 120 What a chair may hold 121 TV detective with his unbalanced suspect? 125 Solemn pieces

Answers for puzzle # 0812

pay close attention to detail. Her caring nature and easygoing personality are great assets to this position. Two long-standing members of River Rock’s administrative staff remain as familiar faces: Stephen Fralin and Ross Baker serve as dining services manager and maintenance supervisor, respectively. Ever wonder what happened to Tom Betts, his lovely wife Beth and their two fine children? Wonder no more. After leaving his post as the South Gate Ranger in Yellowstone, Tom and his family were moved by the National Park Service to Alaska, where Beth was active in Alaskan school organizations while Tom worked toward and attained retirement. Tom is now back working for the NPS as chief ranger at Bandelier National Park in New Mexico. Their oldest child, Dana, goes to college in Boston, and their youngest, Drew, is just starting college at a secret location known only to Tom so he can send the tuition payment. ... Just kidding, I do not know where Drew decided to go to school. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Ceci Clover writes weekly on the doings and doers in and around Jackson Hole. Submissions may be sent to circlingthesquare@hotmail. com or call 733-8348.

126 Like the Boston Tea Partiers 127 Whence the phrase “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts” 128 Opposite of dethrone 129 Big name in pasta 130 Curses out? DOWN 1 Some mil. brass 2 Settled down 3 Lead-in to type 4 Bikers’ woes 5 Japanese mushroom 6 J.F.K. search party? 7 Clandestine group 8 Link letters 9 Joint concern 10 Opposite of flat 11 Part of a bray 12 Santa ___ 13 Dump 14 Dump 15 Red-letter word 16 Article of apparel that’s not made where you might think 17 Like CH3CO2H 18 Run 19 Asserts something 24 Plaster support 28 1980s New York Philharmonic maestro 30 Peter of “The Last Emperor” 32 Part of some e-mail addresses 33 Radar anomaly 34 Class action grp.? 36 Spanish 101 word 37 Many-layered 38 “Little” comics boy 40 Rear 41 J’adore perfumer 42 Perennial succulent 43 Religious figure 45 Sandbox frequenters 49 Manhattan Project physicist

50 Jazz vocalist Shaw 52 Antelope related to the gemsbok 53 Cram 54 “Am ___ only one?” 55 Mitt Romney and others, once 58 Pizzeria order 59 “The Lord of the Rings” tree creature 60 U.K. mil. decorations 63 Con 65 China’s Zhou ___ 66 With the bow, in music 67 Really bright 68 Memo intro

69 Blonde Anderson 71 Appropriate 72 Death Row Records co-founder, familiarly 75 Chap 76 “Finally!” 78 Like election laws, typically 79 Ugly one 82 Watson of the Harry Potter films 83 Musical with the song “Seasons of Love” 85 Sabotage 86 Dump, say 87 A long time

88 Big vein 90 Some Blu-ray players 92 Louis XIV, for one 94 Wreath source 95 Solution reaction 96 Miss’s partner 99 It might result in a meltdown 100 Tchaikovsky’s “Eugene ___” 101 Bag handlers 102 House of ___ 103 Broadway smash starting in ’87 104 Pizzeria need

1 09 Chart holder 111 Spark, so to speak 113 Consort of Zeus 114 Big oil exporter 115 Mini’s counterpart 117 Summer cooler 118 Record problem 119 Lays the groundwork for? 121 Half a laugh 122 New element in each of this puzzle’s theme answers 123 Geog. abbreviation 124 Tiny application

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-2855656, $1.20 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554.


20B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

What is a How to place a Public Notice Public Notice? Jackson Hole News&Guide • PO Box 7445

Public

NOTICES TETON COUNTY NOTICES Teton County Board of Commissioners • AGENDAS • Teton County Board of Commissioners Agenda – Special Meeting 200 S. Willow, Jackson, Wyoming Monday, August 27, 2012, 2:30 p.m. CALL TO ORDER HEARING ON BUFFALO VALLEY RESORT vs. TETON COUNTY PLANNING DIRECTOR DOCKET NO. APL 2012-0002 ADJOURNMENT Agendas are subject to change please visit www.tetonwyo.org, for posted updates. Publish: 08/22/12 Teton County Board of Commissioners Agenda – Voucher Meeting 200 S. Willow, Jackson, Wyoming Monday, August 27, 2012, 9:00 a.m. CALL TO ORDER MATTERS FROM COMMISSION AND STAFF 1. Authorize Payment of the August 20, 2012 Vouchers CONSIDERATION OF UNFINISHED BUSINESS ADJOURNMENT Agendas are subject to change please visit www.tetonwyo.org, for any proposed changes. Publish: 08/22/12 Agenda for the Regular Meeting of the Teton County Board of Commissioners Teton County Administration Building 200 S. Willow - Commissioners Chambers Tuesday, August 28, 2012, 9:00 a.m. CALL TO ORDER PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE APPROVAL OF MINUTES for meetings dated 8/3/2012, 8/6/2012, 8/7/2012, 8/13/2012, and 8/20/2012 COUNTY COMMISSIONER CORRESPONDENCE REPORT (received before Noon on the Wednesday before the meeting) PUBLIC COMMENT ON CORRESPONDENCE ADOPTION OF AGENDA MATTERS FROM COMMISSION AND STAFF 1. Consideration of a Resolution Approving and Designating Ski Hill Road from Approximately Teton Canyon Road up to Grand Targhee Resort 2. Consideration of the Appointment of a County Health Officer 3. Consideration of a Proclamation Honoring Terri Gregory 4. Consideration of a Vehicle Purchase by Jackson Hole Fire / EMS 5. Consideration of a Wild-land Vehicle bid for Jackson Hole Fire / EMS 6. Consideration of the Acceptance of a Grant from Wyoming Department of Health Hospital Preparedness Program for Jackson Hole Fire / EMS 7. Consideration of Approval and Issuance of a Microbrewery License for Roadhouse Brewery LLC 8. Consideration of 5-Year Contract with CenturyLink for Telephone Long Distance Service 9. Consideration of Social Services Agreement for Town of Jackson Drug Court Funding 10. Consideration of Amendments to Consultant Contracts for the BJA Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Planning Grant 11. Consideration of an Agreement with Artemis Institute for Munger View Park Boardwalk/Bridge Project 12. Consideration of an Award of Bid / Approval of Contract Owen Bircher Park Storage Building 13. Consideration of an Award of Bid/Approval of Contract Alta Park Restroom Installation 14. Consideration of an Award of Bid/Approval of Contract Munger View Park Irrigation Well 15. Consideration of an Award of Bid/Approval of Contract High Tennis Courts Backstop Netting Project 16. Consideration of Contract Agreement for Teton County Parking Lot Sealing and Striping NEW BUSINESS / OLD BUSINESS 1. Applicant: RENDEZVOUS LANDS CONSERVANCY Agent: N/A Presenter: Susan Johnson Permit No.: AMD2012-0001 Request: Amend the Text of the Land Development Regulations, pursuant to Section 5150, Amendments to the Text of These Land Development Regulations or the Official Zoning District Map, to allow not-for-profit organizations to own land in the Park and Open Space zoning district, and to allow detached single-family residences in the Park and Open Space zoning district. The following regulations are pertinent to the amendment; other sections of the Land Development Regulations may be amended for consistency: Section 2150.F, Park and Open Space District and Table 2200, Use Schedule. Location: This amendment would apply countywide on lands zoned Parks and Open Space. 2. Applicant: RENDEZVOUS LANDS CONSERVANCY Agent: Pierson Land Works Presenter: Susan Johnson Permit No.: DBA2012-0001 Request: District Boundary Amendment, pursuant to Section 5150, Amendments to the Text of These Land Development Regulations or the Official Zoning District Map, of

These pages include a variety of notices required by Town, County and State statutes and regulations. These notices include Meeting Agendas, proposed city and county ordinances, tax and budget information, Liquor Licenses, foreclosures, summonses and bid invitations.

Jackson, WY 83002 • (307) 733-2047

Rate: $8.40 per column inch Preferred Method of Submission is via Email in a Word/Text document to Legals@jhnewsandguide.com. Legals submitted via hard copy or PDF will be charged a typsetting fee of $10.00 per typed page

LEGAL DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3:00 PM

the Teton County Land Development Regulations, to rezone land currently zoned Neighborhood Conservation-Single Family to the Parks and Open Space zoning district. Location: Lots 2, 3, and 4, River Springs Subdivision. Located northeast of the intersection of Highways 22 and 390 (S23, T41N, R117W). The properties are zoned Neighborhood Conservation-Single Family and are within the Natural Resources Overlay. CONSIDERATION OF UNFINISHED BUSINESS ADJOURNMENT Agenda Items are subject to change, please visit www.tetonwyo. org for the latest updates. Please Publish as a Legal Ad: Wednesday, August 22, 2012. Requested Changes to the Agenda: To Postpone: MFS #1 - Ski Hill Road Resolution to September 11, 2012 and both of the Rendezvous Lands Conservancy items to September 11, 2012 Publish: 08/22/12 • PUBLIC NOTICE• NOTICE OF PUBLIC REVIEW TETON COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MEETING Tuesday, September 11, 2012 Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held by the Teton County Board of County Commissioners for the purpose of considering the applications listed below as authorized by the Wyoming State Statutes, Sections 18-5-201 through 18-5-203, et. seq. The Public Hearing will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room of the Teton County Administration Building at 200 S. Willow in Jackson, Wyoming on Tuesday, September 11, 2012, in their regular meeting which begins at 09:00 AM. Information regarding the applications listed below may be obtained from the Teton County Planning and Development Department, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., telephone 307-733-3959. 1. Applicant: KELLY WALKER JENSEN Permit No.: S/D2012-0006 Request: Final Plat approval, pursuant to Division 6100, Final Plat, of the Teton County Land Development Regulations, to vacate a 60-foot wide area reserved for a future roadway across Lot 54 of the Owl Creek Subdivision. Location: 25 Reed Drive; Lot 54, Owl Creek Subdivision. Generally located south of the Solitude Subdivision, east of the Snake River. The property is zoned Neighborhood ConservationSingle Family and is within the Natural Resources Overlay. 2. Applicant: CRYSTAL SPRINGS RANCH, INC. Permit No.: S/D2012-0007 Request: Final Plat approval, pursuant to Division 6100, Final Plat, of the Teton County Land Development Regulations, to create 13 residential townhouse lots, one lot for a non-profit office, a common lot, and a lot reserved for future development. Location: Lot 1, Village Core, 2nd Filing. Generally located south of the new employee housing on Parcel I, east of Teton Village (S19, T42N, R116W; S24, T42N, R117W). The property is zoned Planned Unit Development - Planned Resort and is within the Scenic Resources Overlay. 3. Applicant: RENDEZVOUS LANDS CONSERVANCY Permit No.: AMD2012-0001 Request: Amend the Text of the Land Development Regulations, pursuant to Section 5150, Amendments to the Text of These Land Development Regulations or the Official Zoning District Map, to allow not-for-profit organizations to own land in the Park and Open Space zoning district, and to allow detached single-family residences in the Park and Open Space zoning district. The following regulations are pertinent to the amendment; other sections of the Land Development Regulations may be amended for consistency: Section 2150.F, Park and Open Space District and Table 2200, Use Schedule. Location: This amendment would apply countywide on lands zoned Parks and Open Space. 4. Applicant: RENDEZVOUS LANDS CONSERVANCY Permit No.: DBA2012-0001 Request: District Boundary Amendment, pursuant to Section 5150, Amendments to the Text of These Land Development Regulations or the Official Zoning District Map, of the Teton County Land Development Regulations, to rezone land currently zoned Neighborhood Conservation-Single Family to the Parks and Open Space zoning district. Location: Lots 2, 3, and 4, River Springs Subdivision. Located northeast of the intersection of Highways 22 and 390 (S23, T41N, R117W). The properties are zoned Neighborhood Conservation-Single Family and are within the Natural Resources Overlay. Publish: 08/22/12

TETON COUNTY DIVISION OFFICES • AGENDAS• AGENDA TETON COUNTY, WYOMING PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING TETON COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING COMMISSIONERS MEETING ROOM 200 S. WILLOW IN JACKSON, WYOMING Monday, August 27, 2012, 06:00 PM PLEASE TURN OFF ALL CELL PHOES AND PAGERS DURING THE MEETING. CALL TO ORDER

APPROVAL OF MINUTES MATTERS FROM COMMISSION AND STAFF 1. Alex Norton – LDR Update OLD BUSINESS/NEW BUSINESS 1. Applicant: VOLPI-CUPAL FAMILY TRUST Agent: Pierson Land Works, LLC Presenter: Jennifer Kocher-Anderson Permit No.: VAR2012-0007 Variance, pursuant to Section 5160, Variances, Request: of the Teton County Land Development Regulations, to allow redevelopment of a residential property with Variance requests to stream setbacks, street yard setbacks and development on slopes steeper than 25%. Location: 12880 Antelope Flats Loop Road. Grand Teton National Park in-holding located approximately 1 mile north of Moose Junction and 1/4 mile east from Hwy 89 North (S30, T43N, R115W). The property is zoned Rural with no overlays. CONSIDERATION OF UNFINISHED BUSINESS MATTERS FROM THE PUBLIC DEBRIEFING ADJOURNMENT Publish: 08/22/12 • PUBLIC NOTICE • The Teton County Weed and Pest District will hold its regularly scheduled board meeting on Tuesday, August 28th at the TCWP office, 6:00 p.m. sharp. Any questions call Amy Collett 733-8419. Publish: 08/22/12 Notice of Final Payment Notice is hereby given that the Town of Jackson has accepted the work for the 2012 Sewer Replacement Project as complete in full as of August 8, 2012. The project has been completed in conformance with the contract with Westwood-Curtis Construction of Jackson, Wyoming. Westwood-Curtis Construction is entitled to final payment due on September 17, 2012. Claims for labor and materials furnished to the Contractor must be submitted to the Town of Jackson (Attn: Jeremy Parker – Associate Engineer), P.O. Box 1687, Jackson, WY, 83001 prior to the specified date of final payment. Publish: 08/22, 08/29, 09/05/12 •CONTINUED PUBLICATION• INVITATION FOR BIDS Parking Lot Sealing Project: 3-12-M Teton County, Wyoming Invitation for bids for the 2012 Parking Lot Sealing and Striping Project for the County of Teton, Wyoming: Notice is hereby given that the County of Teton, Wyoming, will receive sealed bids no later than 10:00 A.M. Friday, August 24, 2012 at the Teton County Road & Levee Department, 3190 S. Adams Canyon Road (mailing address: P.O. Box 9575, Jackson, WY 83002) for Parking Lot Sealing project. The bid opening will be held at the Teton County Road and Levee office at 10 A.M. Friday, August 24, 2012. A representative from each company submitting a bid must be present for the bid opening. A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday August 22, 2012 at 10 A.M. at the Teton County Road and Levee Office. A site tour will follow the meeting. The 2012 Teton County Parking Lot Sealing and Striping Project will consist of various county parking lots with Bid Specifications and Bid documents available for pick up at the Road & Levee Department office located at 3190 S. Adams Canyon Road, Jackson, WY. A Bid Bond equal to 5% of the Bid Price will be required with each bid submitted. A 5% preference will be given to resident Wyoming contractors in accordance with the applicable Wyoming State Statutes. The County reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive informalities and irregularities in proposals. Publish: 08/15, 08/22/12 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR A TRANSFER OF A RESORT LIQUOR LICENSE Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of August 2012, Snake River Lodge Hotel Investors LLC dba Snake River Lodge & Spa filed an application for the transfer of a Retail Liquor License from CPI-LCP Jackson Hole Operator LLC dba Snake River Lodge & Spa, in the office of the clerk of the county of Teton for the following described place: Lot 1 JH Ski Corp, Lots 214 & 215 JH Ski Corp 19th filing & Condo Plat 1018, 1019 & 1043 Teton County, Wyoming And protests, if any there be, against the issuance of the license will be heard at the hour of 9:00 A.M. , on the 11th day of September, 2012, in the County Commissioners Chambers in the Teton County Administration Building. Publish: 8/15, 8/22, 8/29 & 9/5/2012 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR NEW MICROBREWERY PERMIT Notice is hereby given that on the 27th day of July, 2012, the following Applicant filed an application for the possible issuance of Microbrewery Permit in the office of the Clerk of the County of Teton for the following described locations: Continued on page 21


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 21B

• Public Notices •

Continued from page 20

1. The Roadhouse Brewery, LLC. dba Roadhouse Brewing Co.: PT. SW1/4, NW1/4, Sect 13, T41N, R117W, BC zoning, Teton County, WY. And protests, if any there be, against the issuance of the license will be heard at the hour of 9:00 A.M., on the 28th day of August, 2012, in the County Commissioners Chambers in the Teton County Administration Building. Publish: 08/01, 08/08, 08/15, 08/22/12

TOWN OF JACKSON NOTICES • REQUEST FOR BIDS • ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Pending City Council approval of funding on August 27th, 2012,The Teton County School District announces their interest in receiving Bids to build and install Solar Electric Photovoltaic System at the New Concession Stand facility at McIntosh Field. The project is Time Sensitive and as such the start date is as soon as all contract documents are signed. The schedule completion date is set for Wednesday, October 17th 2012. The general project description calls for the following: TCSD seeks the highest quality, lowest cost and best practices in construction services relating to labor and all required materials including but not limited to the specified grid-interactive solar electric power system, including photovoltaic modules, mounting support system, inverter(s), wiring, conduit, disconnects, and monitoring equipment. Complete installation of solar electric power system, including interconnection with the New Concession Stand building’s electrical service: a. The system shall be a Grid-Tied Solar Electric interactive, battery-less, solar electric power system, connected to the building’s electrical system, and generating in parallel with the utility grid, in accordance with Lower Valley Energy’s net metering agreement. b. The system shall have a rated capacity equal to or greater than 11.8 kW DC power rating. c. The photovoltaic modules shall be roof mounted. See attachment of concession building plans, and note the south facing roof area is the proposed location for the general layout which shall supply roof racking and mounting system. d. Two grid-interactive inverters capable to meet and exceed 11.8 KW DC power rating. e. The system shall have web-based monitoring system that is capable of recording and displaying (via the internet) PV system parameters. The preferred system is E-gauge solar production and consumption monitoring. f. The project calls for Forty-eight 245 watt Solar Electric panel modules with high power density so as to minimize the physical foot print of the installation. g. Over-current protection, disconnects, wiring, conduit, lighting protection and grounding equipment. h. To be North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) is the “gold standard” for PV and solar heating installation certification. Pursuant to W.S. 16-6-106, “preference is hereby given to materials, supplies, agricultural products, equipment, machinery and provisions produced, manufactured, supplied or grown in Wyoming, quality being equal to articles offered by the competitors outside of the state”. The Contract shall be bid to the most responsible certified resident making the responsive proposal, if the certified resident’s bid is not more than five percent (5%) higher than that of the lowest responsible nonresident bidder and the resident bidder does not propose to subcontract more than thirty percent (30%) of the WORK to nonresident contractors (W.S. § 16-6-101, et seq.). Please provide detailed Qualifications for at least three (3) successful projects your firm has worked on covering the areas listed above in the last two years. Provide the most recent information on the following; year of WORK, contract amounts and types of WORK. Also provide reference names and phone numbers that we can contact about the quality, timeliness, and cost for projects. Separate sealed BIDS clearly state “TCSD Concession Stand Solar Electric Panel Project” shall be received by the Teton County School District #1 at 260 West Broadway Jackson Wyoming, until 2:00 P.M. (Local Time), Friday September 7th, 2012 and then at said office opened and read aloud. The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined and/or obtained at the following location: Michele Doyle & Kevin Thibeault Teton County School District #1 P.O. Box 568/260 West Broadway Jackson, WY 83001 THE OWNER RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY AND ALL PROPOSALS Publish: 08/22, 08/29, 09/05/12 • CONTINUED PUBLICATIONS • LEGAL NOTICE “Request For Bid” The Town of Jackson will be accepting sealed bids for the following vehicles in a current model. Bid 13-02; three (3) AWD 4 door sedans. Each bidder must furnish a cash or surety bond per Wyoming Statutes, in the amount equal to (5) five percent of the bid. Successful bidder’s bond will be retained until faithful performance has been satisfied. Bid should be submitted to the Town Clerk’s office no later than 3:00 PM Thursday, August 30th, 2012. Bids will be opened and acknowledged at 3:05 PM, in the Council Chambers of the Jackson Town Hall. For detailed specifications, please contact Roxanne DeVries Robinson at 307-733-3932, or e-mail rdevries@ci.jackson.wy.us or Eric Hiltbrunner at 307-7333079. Dated this 10th day of August

Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12

Bob McLaurin Town Administrator

GENERAL PUBLIC NOTICES

• ESTATE PROBATE• STATE OF WYOMING IN THE DISTRICT COURT NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COUNTY OF TETON IN PROBATE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SAMUEL J. KLUTZNICK, PR No. 2895 Deceased.

) ) ss.

Notice of Election

)

Notice is hereby given that on the 6th day of November, 2012, the qualified electors of the Skyline Ranch Improvement and Service District will be entitled to vote for the election of one (1) director of the District. The following properties are within the boundary of the District:

) ) ) )

NOTICE OF PROBATE TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE: You are hereby notified that on the 13th day of August, 2012 the Last Will and Testament of the above-named decedent was admitted to probate by the above-named Court, and that James B. Klutznick was appointed Personal Representative thereof. Any action to set aside the Will shall be filed in the Court within three months from the date of the first publication of this Notice, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the decedent or to the decedent’s estate are requested to make immediate payment to the Personal Representative, c/o Carl L. Lathrop, 1920 Thomes Ave., Suite 500, Cheyenne, WY 82001 (P.O. Box 4068, Cheyenne, WY 82003). Creditors having claims against the decedent or the decedent’s estate are required to file them in duplicate with the necessary vouchers in the office of the Clerk of the Court, Teton County Courthouse, 180 S. King, Jackson, WY 83001, on or before three months after the date of the first publication of this notice, and if such claims are not so filed, unless otherwise allowed or paid, they will be forever barred. DATED this 13th day of August, 2012. Klutznick, Personal Representative Publish: 08/22, 08/29, 09/05/12

James B.

TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF GREGORY I. MCHURON: You are hereby notified that Gregory I. McHuron died on the 24th day of July, 2012. In accordance with Wyoming law, you are further notified that the trustee of the trust of Gregory I. McHuron intends to have the property of Gregory I. McHuron, Settlor, distributed as permitted under the terms of the trust. Creditors shall make all claims in writing to Linda L. McHuron, Trustee, c/o C. David Clauss, 320 East Broadway, Suite 2A, P. O. Box 1172, Jackson, Wyoming 83001, not later than 120 days following the second date of the publication of this notice. Dated this 13th day of August, 2012. C. DAVID CLAUSS Attorney for Trustee Publish: 08/22, 08/29/12

State of Wyoming In the District Court Ninth Judicial District County of Teton Probate No. 2894 In the Matter of the Notice of Proof of Will Estate of Ling Tung, Without Administration Deceased

For further information, please contact Patti Harmon, Office Administrator, Teton Village Special Fire District at (307) 7335457. Publish: 08/22, 08/29, 09/05/2012.

) ) ) ) ) ) )

TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE: You are hereby notified that on the 13th day of August, 2012, the Last Will and Testament of Ling Tung was admitted to probate by the above named court and there will be no present administration of the estate. Any action to set aside the Will shall be filed in the Court within three (3) months from the date of the first publication of this notice, or thereafter forever be barred. Dated August 16, 2012 Theodore M. Wong, Proponent Publish: 08/22, 08/29, 09/05/12 • PUBLIC NOTICE • LEGAL NOTICE “CALL FOR BIDS” Teton Village Special Fire District is requesting sealed bids for one (1) 100ft+ Fire Fighting Ladder Truck. Rear-mount platform is preferred; however due to size limitations of the firehouse bids will be accepted without platform. Sealed bids should be submitted to the Teton Village Special Fire District Office, 7020 Rachel Way, P.O. Box 56, Teton Village, Wyoming 83025 by 11:00 a.m. (local time) Friday October 5, 2012. Four (4) complete copies of the bids, including blueprints must be included in the submission. Please note the following information on the envelope: Bid #2012-1 Teton Village Special Fire District Apparatus Bids should be accompanied by a bid bond, a certified check or a cashier’s check, payable to the Teton Village Special Fire District in the amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. Said surety shall be returned no later than November 5, 2012. The successful bidder’s bond will be retained until faithful performance has been satisfied. Bidders who are residents of the State of Wyoming will receive a five percent (5%) preferential on bids from Teton County, in the event bids are also received from non-resident bidders. Pursuant to W.S. 16-6-106, “preference is hereby given to materials, supplies, equipment, machinery, and provisions produced, manufactured, supplied, or grown in Wyoming, quality being equal to articles by competitors outside that state.” Bid specifications will be available at the Teton Village Special Fire District office located at 7020 Rachel Way, Teton Village, Wyoming 83025.

Skyline Ranch Subdivision first filing lots 1 through 43; Skyline tracts 2-1 through 2-10 and tracts 3-1 through 3-35; and Skyline Ranch second filing, lots 4-1 through 4-5. Nominations are currently being accepted for this four (4) year term. Nominees must be property owners within the above noted boundaries of Skyline Ranch. Nominations must be submitted by October 11, 2012, and must be accompanied by three elector signatures. The election will be held by mail ballot election with all ballots to be returned by the 6th day of November, 2012, by 5:00 p.m. to PO Box 3601 Jackson, WY 83001. There will be one polling place, the Teton County Clerk’s office at 200 S. Willow Jackson, WY. Publish: 08/22/12 • FORECLOSURES • FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE 4 WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory note (“Note”) and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”). The Mortgage dated February 15, 2008, was executed and delivered by Robert Graham Middleton and Susan Carol Nunn (“Mortgagor(s)”) to First Bank Idaho, fsb, dba First Bank of the Tetons, as security for the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded on February 25, 2008, at Reception No. 0723711 in Book 691 at Page 718 in the records of the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, State of Wyoming; and WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: 2010-3 SFR Venture, LLC Assignment dated: December 27, 2010 Assignment recorded: April 12, 2011 Assignment recording information: at Reception No. 0791911 in Book 780 at Page 635 All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, Wyoming. WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $596,796.94 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $569,206.92 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $23,859.62, plus other costs in the amount of $3,730.40, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE 2010-3 SFR Venture, LLC, as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on September 18, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse located at 180 S. King St., Jackson, WY, Teton County, for application on the above-described amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being described as follows, towit: UNIT 2116-230 TETON MOUNTAIN LODGE CONDOMINIUMS, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING, ACCORDING TO THAT PLAT RECORDED AUGUST 6, 2002 AS PLAT NO. 1058 AND FURTHER DEFINED AND DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS, AND RESTRICTIONS RECORDED AUGUST 6, 2002 IN BOOK 465 OF PHOTO, PAGE 632 TO 664. with an address of 3385 West Village Drive #230, Teton Village, WY 83025. Together with all improvements thereon situate and all fixtures and appurtenances thereto. 2010-3 SFR Venture, LLC By: Castle Stawiarski, LLC 330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202 Casper, WY 82609-0000 (307) 333 5379 Publish: 08/22, 08/29, 09/05, 09/12/12 • CONTINUED PUBLICATION • IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR AND IN THE COUNTY OF TETON, STATE OF WYOMING DORIS ANN GORDON, individually, DAVID LEE KIDDER, individually And DORIS ANN GORDON as Civil Personal Representative of the Estate of ILLAGALE KIDDER, deceased; ) Civil No. 16164 Plaintiffs, vs. RITA LYLE, deceased, The Estate of RITA LYLE, and Does 1 – 3 of the RITA LYLE ESTATE in their official capacity

) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) Continued on page 22


22B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

• Public Notices •

Continued from page 21

Defendants.

)

NOTICE OF PROPOSED SETTLEMENT AND COMPROMISE Heirs and interest holders in the estate of ILLA GALE KIDDER, please take notice: Doris Ann Gordon has been appointed to as the Personal Representative for the purpose of pursing a wrongful death claim against the estate of Rita Lyle in civil number 16164, District Court of the Ninth Judicial District for and in the County of Teton, State of Wyoming. The wrongful death claim arose because ILLA GALE KIDDER died as a result of an automobile accident that occurred on November 30, 2011 in the County of Teton, State of Wyoming. As the Personal Representative, Doris Ann Gordon has made a claim on behalf of the Estate of Illa Gale Kidder and those individuals who may have a claim under the wrongful death statutes of the state of Wyoming. Doris Ann Gordon has filed a petition to have a settlement approved by the Court in civil number 16164, District Court of the Ninth Judicial District for and in the County of Teton, State of Wyoming. Part of the proposed settlement and comprise agreement is that the automotive insurance carrier of the vehicle driven by Rita Lyle will be paid to Doris Ann Gordon and David Kidder. No other heir or interest holder in the Estate of Illa Gale Kidder would receive payment based on the proposed settlement. A hearing on the proposed settlement is set for September 13, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. in the District Court for the Ninth Judicial District, County of Teton State, of Wyoming. The Courthouse being located in Jackson Wyoming. Any person desiring to intervene or to file an objection should file the objection prior to the hearing, with District Court of the Ninth Judicial District for and in the County of Teton, State of Wyoming. A copy of any written request to intervene or object should be provided to John D. Bowers at P.O. Box 1550, Afton Wyoming. 83110, attorney of the Personal Representative. DATED this ________ day of August, 2012. JOHN D. BOWERS Bowers Law Firm PC P.O. Box 1550 Afton, WY 83110 Telephone (307) 885-1000 john@thebowersfirm.com Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT TO CONTRACTOR FOR SPRING CREEK ISD WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS (2011) Notice is hereby given that the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District has accepted, as completed according to the plans, specifications and rules governing the same, the work performed under that contract dated September 14, 2011, between the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District, a Wyoming special district located in Teton County, and Westwood Curtis Construction, Inc., the Contractor; that work under said contract, known as the Spring Creek ISD Water System Improvements (2011), is complete, and the Contractor is entitled to final payment. Notice is further given that subsequent to the forty-first (41st) day after the first publication of this notice, to wit, September 25, 2012, Spring Creek ISD will pay to said Contractor the full amount under the contract. Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT TO CONTRACTOR FOR TETON VILLAGE SEWER MAIN REPLACEMENT (2012) Notice is hereby given that the Teton Village Water and Sewer District has accepted, as completed according to the plans, specifications and rules governing the same, the work performed under that contract dated April 5, 2012, between the Teton Village Water and Sewer District, a Wyoming special district located in Teton County, and Westwood Curtis Construction, Inc., the Contractor; that work under said contract, known as the Teton Village Sewer Main Replacement (2012), is complete, and the Contractor is entitled to final payment. Notice is further given that subsequent to the forty-first (41st) day after the first publication of this notice, to wit, September 25, 2012, Teton Village Water and Sewer District will pay to said Contractor the full amount under the contract. Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT TO CONTRACTOR FOR SPRING CREEK WATER SCADA SYSTEM Notice is hereby given that the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District has accepted, as completed according to the plans, specifications and rules governing the same, the work performed under that contract dated May 17, 2011, between the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District, a Wyoming special district located in Teton County, and WETCO Inc., the Contractor; that work under said contract, known as the Spring Creek Water SCADA System, is complete, and the Contractor is entitled to final payment. Notice is further given that subsequent to the forty-first (41st) day after the first publication of this notice, to wit, September 25, 2012, Spring Creek ISD will pay to said Contractor the full amount under the contract. Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT TO CONTRACTOR FOR SPRING CREEK ISD METER INSTALLATION CONTRACT (2011) Notice is hereby given that the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District has accepted, as completed according to the plans, specifications and rules governing the same, the work performed under that contract dated February 14, 2012, between the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District, a Wyoming special district located in Teton County, and Plumbing Anytime, Inc., the Contractor; that work under said contract, known as the Spring Creek ISD Meter Installation Contract (2011), is complete, and the Contractor is entitled to final payment. Notice is further given that subsequent to the forty-first (41st) day after the first publication of this notice, to wit, September

25, 2012, Spring Creek ISD will pay to said Contractor the full amount under the contract. Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT TO CONTRACTOR FOR SPRING CREEK ISD METER PROCUREMENT CONTRACT (2011) Notice is hereby given that the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District has accepted, as completed according to the plans, specifications and rules governing the same, the work performed under that contract dated February 14, 2012, between the Spring Creek Improvement and Service District, a Wyoming special district located in Teton County, and HD Supply Waterworks., the Contractor; that furnishing of goods and special services under said contract, known as the Spring Creek ISD Meter Procurement Contract (2011), is complete, and the Contractor is entitled to final payment. Notice is further given that subsequent to the forty-first (41st) day after the first publication of this notice, to wit, September 25, 2012, Spring Creek ISD will pay to said Contractor the full amount under the contract. Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE 2 WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory note (“Note”) and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”). The Mortgage dated September 13, 2006, was executed and delivered by Salvatore N. Milazzo III and Kathryn H. Matt (“Mortgagor(s)”) to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender its successors and assigns, as security for the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded on September 15, 2006, at Reception No. 685106 in Book 638 at Page 63 in the records of the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, State of Wyoming; and WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS, Inc., CHL Mortgage Pass-Through Trust 2006-17, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-17 Assignment dated: February 28, 2012 Assignment recorded: March 7, 2012 Assignment recording information: at Reception No. 810278 in Book 803 at Page 401 All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, Wyoming. WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $473,379.05 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $436,000.00 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $31,824.47, plus other costs in the amount of $5,554.58, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS, Inc., CHL Mortgage Pass-Through Trust 2006-17, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-17, as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on September 6, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse located at 180 S. King St., Jackson, WY, Teton County, for application on the above-described amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being described as follows, towit: LOT 21 OF RAFTER J SUBDIVISION, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING, ACCORDING TO THAT PLAT RECORDED JANUARY 6, 1978 AS PLAT NO. 330. with an address of 1250 W Bull Rake Dr., Jackson, WY 83001. Together with all improvements thereon situate and all fixtures and appurtenances thereto. The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS, Inc., CHL Mortgage Pass-Through Trust 2006-17, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-17 By: Castle Stawiarski, LLC 330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202 Casper, WY 82609-0000 (307) 333 5379 Publish: 08/15, 08/22, 08/29, 09/05/12 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF WYOMING, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF TETON, NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DEBRA ANN HOFFMAN, Deceased.

Probate No.: 2876

NOTICE OF PROBATE

TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE You are hereby notified that on the 13th day of March, 2012, the Last Will and Testament of Decedent Debra Ann Hoffman was admitted to probate by the above named court, and David S. Hoffman was appointed personal representative thereof. Any action to set aside the Will shall be filed in the Court within three (3) months from the date of the first publication of this Notice, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the decedent or to her Estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned at Gonnella Adamson, PC, 575 South Willow Street, P.O. Box 1226, Jackson, WY 83001. Creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate are

required to file them in duplicate with the necessary vouchers in the Office of the Clerk of said Court, on or before three (3) months after the date of the first publication of this notice; and if such claims are not so filed, unless otherwise allowed or paid, they will be forever barred. DATED this 30th day of July, 2012. Stephen P. Adamson, Jr. Gonnella Adamson, PC 575 South Willow P.O. Box 1226 Jackson, Wyoming 83001 (307) 733-5890 – voice (307) 734-0544 – facsimile Publish: 08/08, 08/15, 08/22/12 FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE 4 WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory note (“Note”) and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”). The Mortgage dated March 29, 2007, was executed and delivered by Leigh D Copeland (“Mortgagor(s)”) to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for First Horizon Home Loan Corporation its successors and assigns, as security for the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded on March 30, 2007, at Reception No. 0698828 in Book 658 at Page 1-19 in the records of the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, State of Wyoming; and WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the holders of the Certificates, First Horizon Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series FHAMS 2007-FA3, by First Horizon Home Loans,a division of First Tennessee Bank National Association, Master Servicer, in its capacity as agent for the Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement Assignment dated: March 15, 2012 Assignment recorded: March 23, 2012 Assignment recording information: at Reception No. 0811098 in Book 804 at Page 397 All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, Wyoming. WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $412,440.28 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $386,818.55 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $25,621.73, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the holders of the Certificates, First Horizon Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series FHAMS 2007-FA3, by First Horizon Home Loans,a division of First Tennessee Bank National Association, Master Servicer, in its capacity as agent for the Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement, as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on September 4, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse located at 180 S. King St., Jackson, WY, Teton County, for application on the above-described amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being described as follows, to-wit: LOT 11 OF HORN ENTERPRISES FIRST ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF JACKSON, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE TETON COUNTY CLERK ON JUNE 10, 1977 AS PLAT NO. 314. with an address of 1200 Meadowlark Lane, Jackson, WY 83001. Together with all improvements thereon situate and all fixtures and appurtenances thereto. The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the holders of the Certificates, First Horizon Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series FHAMS 2007-FA3, by First Horizon Home Loans,a division of First Tennessee Bank National Association, Master Servicer, in its capacity as agent for the Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement By: Castle Stawiarski, LLC 330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202 Casper, WY 82609-0000 (307) 333 5379 Publish: 08/08, 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12 FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE 4 WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory note (“Note”) and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”). The Mortgage dated December 16, 2008, was executed and delivered by Howard J. Henderson (“Mortgagor(s)”) to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Bank of Jackson Hole its successors and assigns, as security for the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded on December 22, 2008, at Reception No. 743920 in Book 715 at Page 1 in the records of the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, State of Wyoming; and WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: Bank of America, N.A. Assignment dated: August 11, 2011 Assignment recorded: September 20, 2011 Assignment recording information: at Reception No. 801452 in Book 789 at Page 778 All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, Wyoming. WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become Continued on page 23


JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 23B

• Public Notices •

Continued from page 22 operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $545,031.57 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $491,018.92 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $44,943.86, plus other costs in the amount of $9,068.79, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE Bank of America, N.A., as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on August 30, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse NAll in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, Wyoming. WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $545,031.57 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $491,018.92 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $44,943.86, plus other costs in the amount of $9,068.79, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE Bank of America, N.A., as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on August 30, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse located at 180 S. King St., Jackson, WY, Teton County, for application on the abovedescribed amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being described as follows, to-wit: LOT 122 OF RAFTER J RANCH SUBDIVISION, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING, ACCORDING TO THAT PLAT RECORDED JANUARY 6, 1978 AS PLAT NO. 330.

March 19, 2008, was executed and delivered by Alyson E Smith (“Mortgagor(s)”) to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB its succesors and assigns, as security for the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded on March 24, 2008, at Reception No. 0725566 in Book 694 at Page 353-371 in the records of the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, State of Wyoming; and WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as follows: Assignee: M&T Bank Assignment dated: June 5, 2012 Assignment recorded: July 5, 2012 Assignment recording information: at Reception No. 0817545 in Book 813 at Page 309 All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, Wyoming. WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $426,455.98 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $416,404.65 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $10,029.33, plus other costs in the amount of $ 22.00, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; WHEREAS, The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE M&T Bank, as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on August 30, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse located at 180 S. King St., Jackson, WY, Teton County, for application on the abovedescribed amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being described as follows, to-wit: THE LAND DESCRIBED HEREINI SITUATED IN THE STATE OF WYOMING, COUNTY OF TETON, CITY OF WILSON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: UNIT 22-2-3 OF JACKSON HOLE RACQUET CLUB CONDOMINIUMS, WHEATGRASS BUILDING 22, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING, ACCORDING TO THAT PLAT RECORDED SEPTEMBER 19, 1978 AS PLAT NO. 350, AND FURTHER DEFINED AND DESCRIBED IN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN BOOK 34 OF PHOTO, PAGE 1 TO 50 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 75 OF PHOTO, PAGE 574 TO 587.

with an address of 1045 W Longhorn Drive, Jackson, WY 830019246.

with an address of 3548 N Lake Creek Unit 22 2 3, Wilson, WY 83014.

Together with all improvements thereon situate and all fixtures and appurtenances thereto.

Together with all improvements thereon situate and all fixtures and appurtenances thereto.

Bank of America, N.A. By: Castle Stawiarski, LLC 330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202 Casper, WY 826(307) 333 5379 Publish: 08/08, 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12

M&T Bank By: Castle Stawiarski, LLC 330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202 Casper, WY 82609-0000 (307) 333 5379 Publish: 08/08, 08/15, 08/22, 08/29/12

FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory note (“Note”) and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”). The Mortgage dated

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF WYOMING, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF TETON, NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN RE. THE NAME CHANGE OF:

Civil Action No.: 16185

ROSEMARY ELIZA TURQUIÉ PETITION OF NAME CHANGE

NOTICE OF

You are hereby notified that a Petition to Change Name has been filed on behalf of ROSEMARY ELIZA TURQUIÉ in the District Court in and for Teton County, Wyoming in File No.16185, the object and prayer of which is to change the name of the above-named person from ROSEMARY ELIZA TURQUIÉ to ROSEMARY ELIZA TURQUIÉ RESOR. Any objection must be filed with the Clerk of District Court, PO Box 4460, Jackson, Wyoming 83001 in writing, on or before 30 days after the last date of publication of this notice. DATED this 24th day of July, 2012. Deputy Clerk of District Court Publish: 08/01, 08/08, 08/15, 08/22/12 FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory note (“Note”) and real estate mortgage (“Mortgage”). The Mortgage dated March 10, 2003, was executed and delivered by Todd D. Bergstein (“Mortgagor(s)”) to First Interstate Bank, as security for the Note of the same date, and said Mortgage was recorded on March 17, 2003, at Reception No. 590972 in Book 495 at Page 351 in the records of the office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of Deeds in and for Teton County, State of Wyoming; and WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such suit or proceeding been instituted and the same discontinued; and WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served upon the record owner and the party in possession of the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to the commencement of this publication, and the amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of $170,983.59 which sum consists of the unpaid principal balance of $162,979.83 plus interest accrued to the date of the first publication of this notice in the amount of $6,262.46, plus other costs in the amount of $1,741.30, plus attorneys’ fees, costs expended, and accruing interest and late charges after the date of first publication of this notice of sale; The property being foreclosed upon WHEREAS, may be subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser should research the status of title before submitting a bid; NOW, THEREFORE First Interstate Bank, as the Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Teton County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for cash at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on August 23, 2012 at the front door of the Teton County Courthouse located at 180 S. King St., Jackson, WY, Teton County, for application on the above-described amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property being described as follows, to-wit: LOT 78, COTTONWOOD PARK, RANGEVIEW NEIGHBORHOOD PHASE TWO ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF JACKSON, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING, ACCORDING TO THAT PLAT FILED JULY 12, 1990 AS PLAT NO. 692. with an address of 3016 Alpine View Lane, Jackson, WY 83001. Together with all improvements thereon situate and all fixtures and appurtenances thereto. First Interstate Bank By: Castle Stawiarski, LLC 330 S. Walsh Drive, Ste. 202 Casper, WY 82609-0000 (307) 333 5379 Publish: 08/01, 08/08, 08/15, 08/22/12

LEARN the latest news in the real estate market browse through story archives community stats and neighborhood profiles real estate blogs

Y O U R G U I D E T O J A C K S O N H O L E R E A L E S TAT E


24B - JACKSON HOLE NEWS&GUIDE, Wednesday, August 22, 2012

307 733 6060 • info@jhrea.com www.jhrea.com 455 (B) West Broadway, Jackson, WY 83001

WE GIVE YOU MORE CHOICES

Magnificent Estate on the River

This stunning handcrafted log lodge is set on 13 private acres along the Snake River with expansive Grand and Teton Mountain Range views. The spectacular 6BR, 7464 sf residence has custom furnishings, a serene setting and an outdoor pool and spa. #12-1336. List price: $11,550,000. Contact Carol Linton at 307.699.1139.

Beautiful Cluster Home

A must-see! Surrounded by dedicated open space, overlooking a pond, with dramatic Teton views, this 4br 4.5 bath, 4748 square foot Teton Pines Cluster home is one of the nicest and most unique on the market. #12-1830 .List price: $1,995,000. Contact Graham4 at 307-690-0812.

Urban Mountain Living

New Condo in downtown Jackson. 1 bed, plus study, 2 bath, spacious rooms high end finishes and great southern exposure. No two units alike. Underground parking. Contact The NeVille Group at 307-734-9949, #10-397 $1,995,000. Chad Budge at 307-413-1364 or Dianne Budge at 307-413-1362.

Medical/Professional Office Space

Exceptional finish work defines this commercial building with residential unit. Medical/professional office spaces are 100% leased. Craftsman style quality finishes and design. South facing deck, roof top deck, balconies, lower storage, fitness room, onsite parking. #12-1891. $5,000,000. Contact Julie Bryan at 307-690-0205.

Gorgeous 100 Acre Ranchland

Stunning 100 acre property at the historic Jenkins Ranch just 10 minutes from town. Features mountain views, pastureland, mature forests, and fishable streams. Perfect as a gentleman’s ranch or family retreat, this ranch supports livestock and a lush habitat for wildlife. #10-3077. $9,950,000. Contact Graham4/ 307-690-0812.

JHREA.COM

Mountain Masterpiece!

This 5000 sf, 6 BR, 4 BA is a Mountain Masterpiece! On over 12 acres. Includes 3 rock fireplaces and many upgrades. Large Shop! A must see! # 12-992. List price: $950,000.00. Contact Laura Faye Jensen at 307-654-1817.

The Region’s Most Comprehensive Website

Mtn. Retreat, Views & Privacy

This alpine retreat has a private setting on 29 acres with views of 2 mtn. ranges. Home has 2,488 sf with fireplace, vaulted ceiling, hot tub and detached workshop. All improvements are in very good condition. #12-1061. $675,000. Melissa Harrison 307- 690-0086.

Tin Cup Pass Recreational Ranch

Gorgeous 320 acre parcel at the top of Tin Cup Pass. Property is covered in stands of aspens, conifers and wide open meadows. Sweeping 360 views of the Caribou Range from this elevated parcel. Adjacent to public land. Multiple springs. Adjacent 720 acres also available. $1,200.00/acre. Paul Kelly at 307-690-7057 or Ian Sinclair at 307-690-1383.

Private Lot in Stilson Ranch This private building site in Stilson Ranch is on a quiet cul-de-sac with 360-degree views. Equi-distant between Teton Village and the Town of Jackson, it is ideal for the active owner. Immediately adjacent to bike path; underground electricity, and Aspen Sewer are available. $799,000. #11-532. Contact Bomber Bryan 307-690-2295.

In Town Views and Convenience

Incredible Snow King views from this 5BR 3B home yet just minutes from the town square. Spacious rooms, including formal living room, kitchen/dining and large game room. Enjoy living minutes from library, pathways and restaurants. #12-1341. $585,000. Contact Nancy Martino at 307-690-1022 .

Custom Home in Hoback Ranches

1,500 sq. ft. home on 10 acres in Hoback Ranches. Nestled among Aspen & Fir trees with stunning views of the Wind River Range, this property features 1 bed, 1 bath with a spacious loft. Immediate National Forrest & Hoback River access; only minutes from the Snake & Green Rivers. #11-1614. $340,000. J-J Real Estate 307-732-7486

Teton Village in the Summer

The Teton Club is currently the best deal at the Village with ski passes or Teton Pines memberships while in residence. This 2 bedroom unit package has 2 weeks: 1 summer and 1 spring. Take a look at this and many other packages to fit your needs: #11-632. List Price: $10,000. Aaron Adams at 690-9301.

 global affiliate of the year 2011

Christie’s International Real Estate 455 (B) Broadway 80 West Broadway 270 W. Pearl Jackson, WY 83001

3275 W. McCollister Drive Teton Village, WY 83025

181 US Hwy 89 PO Box 3225 Alpine, WY 83128 307 654 7575  tel

235 S. Main PO Box 846 Thayne, WY 83127 307 883 7575  tel

65 S Main St Driggs, ID 83422 208 354 7325   tel 240581

Jackson Hole News&Guide Valley 8/22/12  

Valley section of the August 22, 2012 edition of the Jackson Hole News&Guide