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JGA Keeping Learners Safe Learner Welfare Guide

#CommittedToCareers Since 1991

The JGA Group | Learner’s Guide to Keeping Safe Visit www. jga-group.co.uk or call 020 8426 2666 to find out about our apprenticeship and vocational courses.


About Us The JGA Group is a well-established and fast growing career management, apprenticeship and training organisation. Our mission is to provide safe and high quality learning and career management. We have worked with industry experts to create a portfolio of skills development programmes for growing professional sectors. For over 30 years The JGA Group has provided high quality government-funded training and career services for employers and learners. We have excellent success and satisfaction rates, Ofsted “Good” rating and ESFA approval. “JGA has grown over 30 years from a back bedroom to a thriving family business, regularly winning awards through our focus on doing the right thing for learners and ensuring a return on investment for employers.”

Richard Goodwin Managing Director

our Journey

Award Winning High Quality Training Provision

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Apprenticeships, Training & Partnerships

Evolution, Innovation & Growth


Contents Safety

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23 24 ..................................................... 25 Behaviour and the Workplace Sustainability and Self Development ..................................................... 26 Health & Fitness

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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

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Safety Safeguarding As a learner with The JGA Group, you have a right to feel safe from: • • • • •

neglect, bullying or discrimination violence (at home, work or in learning) abuse, radicalisation, sexual exploitation substance misuse, gangs FGM or forced marriage.

These issues are often physical but abuse is increasingly frequently taking place online and this counts. You and your loved ones have the right to feel safe both off-line and on the internet. Britain is the sum of its people. Do you agree that our values are: • • • •

Democracy The rule of law Individual liberty and mutual respect Tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs?

Please reflect on these values and discuss them with your TutorAssessor. What impact do they have on your life and your community? If you do not feel safe please contact your Safeguarding Officer or jgasafeguarding@yahoo.co.uk or call Susan or Martin on 020 8426 2666. You will be treated with respect and privacy. Yasmin Alibhai-Brown and Rod Liddle debate British Values: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSRSypmC3OY

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Safeguarding in the workplace Safeguarding means protecting people’s health, wellbeing and human rights, and enabling them to live free from harm, abuse and neglect. It is usually applied in particular to the young and the vulnerable and aims to help those who feel unsafe in any way. Safeguarding is an issue which you should be discussing regularly with your Tutor-Assessor, every training provider has systems in place to ensure that you are protected – not just in education but at home and in work. Safeguarding always applies to The JGA Group’s Learners but in many settings such as care or working with young people it is also important for service users. Privacy, respect and confidentiality are at the heart of Safeguarding, so if you have any issues you feel you should talk about, then do contact the Safeguarding officer at your training provider or jgasafeguarding@yahoo.co.uk. Or call Susan or Martin on 020 8426 2666. You will be treated with respect and privacy. Alternatively you should contact the Social Care department at the appropriate local authority or the Care Quality Commission’s hotline: 03000 616161 (enquiries@cqc.org.uk)

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Prevent Prevent is Britain’s anti-radicalisation agenda. It was developed in response to the London bombings of 2005 and uses early intervention to encourage individuals and communities to challenge extremist and terrorist ideology and behaviour. It aims to equip us to recognise the early signs of potential radicalisation. Prevent aims to end all forms of extremism: right wing, left wing and religious. Each local authority has a lead for Prevent so if you have any inkling that someone you know may be in danger of being radicalised but certainly hasn’t done anything criminal then do phone your local authority and ask for the “Prevent Lead.” To find out more about anti-radicalisation please take this quiz which helps us all to understand how to identify a person who is ‘at risk,’ the actions we should take and the support which is available from local authorities: http://course.ncalt.com/Channel_General_ Awareness (Check!)

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West London Business Awards Best Education & Training Provider 2019

West London Business Awards Apprentice of the Year 2019 and 2018


Online safety | Facebook There are so many opportunities to be ‘unsafe’ on line that we really wonder how to manage! It is easy, in the heat of the moment, to give out your address or phone number, or to tell people about your next party… Let’s just say that not only you will be affected by all these misdemeanours, but those you live with may be as well, together with outsiders, even the police, so don’t do it. You are in charge, so take control! If you are using Facebook you can review your profile and who can see the contents. If you choose Public, then consider who may read your post. Viewers may include employers and potential future employers (who will Google you when you apply for a job). The best indication is the grandparent test – before you post, consider, would you be happy for your grandparents to see the update? There are lots of issues around internet safety, this is just the beginning. Try these resources for help managing the openness of your Facebook profile

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Are you following the Health & Safety Rules? Although your employer has the final responsibility for your Health and Safety while you are at work, you have a part to play as well! For instance, are you following to the letter the training you have received on using any equipment provided by your employer? If you are taking short cuts, not recognised by your employer, DON’T! Secondly, are you taking reasonable care of your own and other people’s health and safety? Some students I know, working “on the Post” one Christmas many years ago were flinging postbags around. The bags are heavy and they hit and injured someone! Thirdly, are you taking responsibility for your own and your colleagues’ health and safety? Don’t say to yourself and others “Oh that’s not my problem” because if something goes wrong then it really can be your problem. Finally, be prepared to tell somebody in authority if you see risks or issues at work or believe that inadequate precautions are putting people’s Health and Safety at risk. Right (and the law) is on your side, so do tell! Here is information about your right to be consulted on health & safety matters: http://www.hse.gov.uk/involvement/index.htm What causes accidents? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBf6BTX1bmM

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Your Employer’s H&S Responsibilities Here are some of the things which all employers should do: 1. Decide what could harm you in your job, and make sure it is not happening 2. Tell you who is responsible for controlling the risks you take so that you do not get hurt 3. Consult and work with you and your health and safety representatives to protect everyone from harm in the workplace 4. Give you the health and safety training you need for your job – free 5. Provide you with equipment and protective clothing – free 6. Provide toilets, washing facilities and drinking water 7. Provide first aid facilities 8. Report major accidents and fatalities by phone and other injuries, diseases and incidents on line 9. He or she must have adequate insurance and display a copy of the certificate 10. Work with other employers or contractors sharing the workplace to ensure that health and safety measures are in place. Find out more about employer’s responsibility for health and safety from the Health & Safety Executive website http://www.hse.gov. uk/workers/employers.htm.

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Fire, Fire! If you ever get caught-up in a fire at work, would you know what to do and where to go? • • • •

Where is the place of safety? Would you know how to get there? Which door to go through? Would you hang around looking for your coat?

Smart people are those who do not stop, but make a beeline for the door. Who know which door to take to escape the fire. Who know who is in charge and who to follow. Who know how to account for everybody. Who know who the fire warden and fire Marshalls are, who know which fire extinguishers to use and what colour they are. Who, if there is time, put through a 999 call to notify the fire brigade where you are. If, however, you do not have time for any of that, everyone should get out of the building as quickly, calmly as possible and not return until given permission. But what about at home, or if you are caring? Here are some resources to discuss with your Tutor-Assessor: http://www.london-fire.gov.uk/EscapingFromAFire.asp http://www.london-fire.gov.uk/SafetyAtWork.asp

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West London Business Awards Best Education & Training Provider 2019

West London Business Awards Apprentice of the Year 2019 and 2018


Health & Fitness Finding Time to Exercise! Exercise – do you do sufficient? Me neither, though I’ve always known that I should! Every day I come straight out of the front door, into the car and drive to work. This winter I took two tumbles, breaking first my pelvis and then, my patella (knee cap to you and me). Now my knee has improved, the physio tells me to do exercises several times a day. The big issue is always how to make time to do my exercises. NHS Livewell has exercise regimes suitable for us all, 10 minute a day workouts, exercises to do at your desk, ways to lose weight, tidbits about sports and fitness advice, and of course exercises to improve balance. Ada Gibson is a 92 year old who swims 60 lengths of a 20 metre pool – she did not learn to swim until she was 75! If she can do it, so can you and I! Check out NHS Livewell right now and don’t forget to discuss what you find with your Tutor-Assessor! http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/fitness/Pages/Fitnesshome.aspx http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/pages/adagibson.aspx

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What does your diet do for you? Have you heard of the Eatwell plate? It is the proportion of different types of food that the NHS recommends that we should all have in our diets. As long as you are over two years old and don’t have specific health-related dietary issues, the Eatwell plate is for you! What the Eatwell Plate says is: • • • • •

Plenty of fruit and vegetables Plenty of potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy foods Some milk and dairy foods Some meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein Just a small amount of food and drink that is high in fat or sugar.

Most of us know now about our “5 a day” (fruit and veg) and that sugary drinks are bad for us (they might even be taxed soon), but find out more about Eatwell from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/ Pages/eatwell-plate.aspx and at your next review discuss diet and health with your Tutor Assessor. Just a thought!

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Brain Training Diet, exercise and brain training may help keep the mind ‘sharp’ finds a Finnish study of more than 1,200 people, reported on the NHS Choices website. The evidence shows that a combination of a healthy diet, exercise and brain training may help stave off mental decline in the elderly. After two years the half of the participants who followed the healthy regime had brain function 25% higher than those who did not. For a part of the test called “executive functioning” (the brain’s ability to organise and regulate thought processes), scores among those who followed the regime were 83% higher than those who didn’t. Most experts agree that a healthy diet, exercise and an active social life with plenty of interests may help reduce the risk of dementia. You can find out more about diet from http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/ Pages/Livewellhub.aspx but have you considered downloading a brain training app on your smartphone? Check out your provider’s app store.

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Are women better at football than men? Have you ever thought about it? It’s becoming increasingly popular, and the World Cup played in Canada, is currently on our TV screens. Top women players can now earn £50,000 per year! Many girls join their local women’s teams because their brothers play. Then they go on to play football for its own sake. A Danish university experiment with a group of women playing football for one hour 2 days per week found that the health, selfesteem and coordination of the football players greatly increased, and that the players were more likely to support diversity as a result. Would you like to get involved in football? The Women’s FA has lots of ways we can take part in football as players, coaching staff, officials or volunteers, can you benefit from healthy, outdoor exercise? The JGA Group supports Ruislip Rangers, the biggest youth football club in Middlesex with forty one teams, twenty five percent of members are girls – it’s not quite equality yet – but it’s getting there. Check out the opportunities for you at: http://www.thefa.com/ womens-girls-football

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West London Business Awards Best Education & Training Provider 2019

West London Business Awards Apprentice of the Year 2019 and 2018

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Are you a Yoga fanatic! This summer’s International Day of Yoga demonstrated how useful Yoga can be in helping people to stay calm and reflect before they act as well as physical benefits such as balance and flexibility. At this event, held in India, thousands of people, including the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, showed off their yoga abilities, working altogether to instructions given by one instructor with a microphone! However, you don’t have to go to India to pick-up a Yoga class, they are advertised everywhere. Unlike some sports, there are no barriers, and people everywhere can take part at every level. Yoga helps us to forge new global partnerships and to respect each other. If you haven’t considered yoga before, it could be worth trying! Here is what the NHS has to say about yoga and some places to find out more. http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/nhs-fitness-studio/pages/welcome-tonhs-fitness-studio.aspx http://www.nhs.uk/video/pages/try-something-new-yoga.aspx

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Equal Opportunities, Divesity & Inclusion The Many Versions of Equal Opportunities We can look at Equal Opportunities from all sorts of angles – age, disability, gender, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sexual orientation, pregnancy and maternity, marriage and civil partnership. Sometimes these are obvious by sight (such as a wheel chair use) and sometimes less so (like sexual orientation). But how we act should not discriminate, for example being overweight is not good for the health of the person concerned, but does it make a difference as to whether they can do the job? If they can, and there are no other barriers to their size (such as small gangways on aircraft) then they deserve to be able to get on and do it and to receive their colleagues’ full support. Be careful not to pre-judge others’ reactions. I was once involved in talking to managers when we stressed that everyone should be consulted about going away for a few days. We thought that they had all ‘got the message,’ when one of the managers suddenly said “Oh, she wouldn’t want to go away because she’s got children!” Always try and be aware of your colleagues’ needs and whether there are tools to help them. Remember, we are all in a minority in some way, so please treat others as you would have them treat you.

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Diversity Makes the World Go Round! If we were all the same the world would be a very boring place! Diversity, though, isn’t just different hair colours; it may reflect our differing heritage, backgrounds, sexual preferences, the differences in our families and the way in which we were brought-up. Diversity is often reflected in the amounts we are paid - men still sometimes earn more than women, for example. We say that we should all be treated equally, but what do you do when men and women do different jobs yet have the same qualifications? Perhaps the man is doing a job which requires more physical strength, whilst the woman is serving dinners to school children. What do you do then regarding pay? The woman is cajoling and using guile, the man is using physical strength. Can you treat them equally, pay wise? These issues are also explored in the film Made in Dagenham. Britain is a country with traditions of upholding people’s rights, valuing diversity and challenging intolerance and the Equality and Human Rights Commission aims to build on this through being a catalyst for change and improvement on equality and human rights. To find out more about your rights check out the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s website.

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Accepting Challenges and embracing mistakes! How can you accept a challenge, you might have only just started a job, or a course, or an Apprenticeship? Well, you can! First of all, consider what you’ve done at school, at home or on the sports field (either formally or informally) or in other parts of your life. If you think hard enough, there will be bound to be things you’ve done and other people have not, starting an Apprenticeship for example, so you can accept a challenge. You do not have to accept a challenge or an opportunity exactly as it is put to you, try making your own rules, for example. “I’ll make a short speech, but it should not be longer than 2 minutes.” When you are asked whether you will accept a challenge or an opportunity, don’t spend hours agonising before saying “yes” as they will have asked someone else by then. Say ‘yes’ immediately and then start planning. We all have to start somewhere and no one minds mistakes so long as they are honestly made. The first time you do anything will probably the hardest, after that, it gets easier. For more tips check out “7 must dos to help you get on” http://www. jga-group.com/free-resources/ Good Luck!

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Attitude! Your attitude to your job is key to your career success. I know a chap who, when offered a job, said that he would have to take a few days to think it over. The offer was withdrawn? (It’s true, I saw his letter!) The same goes for doing the job. Being seen, to be willing goes a very long way. Even if you don’t know all of the answers being willing and keen to find out really works. Try taking steps to find the answers. The worst thing to do is to say that you will do something and then not bother, so please don’t say it if you can’t go through with it. Make an effort to be seen to be enthusiastic. If you are keen on the job, show it! Enthusiasm is catching so even if, at the moment you are not particularly keen, approaching it in an enthusiastic way can result in your becoming more interested. When you consider your future always factor in the value of the qualification or apprenticeship on which you are working – having qualifications can open career and other doors which would otherwise remain closed so don’t do anything rash until you have finished it! Check out the Power of Enthusiasm: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=4I5J4P0XaPA

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Behaviour at Work The way you behave at work is important. It is a question of good manners and treating everyone else as we would like to be treated. You still have to remember to be on time, to say ‘Hello’ and ‘Goodbye’ to people and all the other things you have been taught. However, you don’t have to stand up when anyone comes into the room and, in most work places; you can call everyone by their first names. Different cultures demand very different behaviour. If we were in the Netherlands we would shake hands with everyone in a room even if they are colleagues who meet every day, whereas the British tend to give a simple nod or wave each time we meet! People will treat you well, if you treat them well. If you are late, ensure that everyone who matters knows when you arrive. Do you know how another culture behaves in the workplace? Try discussing the issue with your Tutor-Assessor. You might come from a different culture or might work with those who do so try to understand and adapt, or help them, to do so. For more tips about how to behave at work do check out “7 Must Dos to help you get on” http://www.jga-group.com/free-resources/

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Behaviour at Work | Continued This time I want to address the issue of working together. We, at The JGA Group and our delivery partners are a team. We work together and sometimes we play together. Our aim is to do what is best for our learners, as we want them to excel. In doing this, we will be seen to excel. We are not a little island, only working for our own benefit and we do expect suitable forms of behaviour from our learners. We do our best for them, and we expect them to do their best for us! Inevitably there are differences and we all have to adapt sometimes. As well as our learners, you are also our customers, if you chose you can go elsewhere for your training. However once you have signed up we are also your customers and trust that you will play a constructive role in your education. Similarly your colleagues have a stake in your performance and can be thought of as internal customers (sometimes known as stakeholders). A recent study has found that rudeness and aggression in the workplace is contagious. We all exchange services, skills, advice on an hour by hour, day by day basis and making this a success is what makes our professional worlds go around! We are a team, always remember that! Aggression is contagious in the workplace: http://www.express.co.uk/ news/uk/591965/Rude-work-aggressive-behaviour-contagious

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Communication is All! Are you a good communicator? Communication is a key skill whether it is verbal, written or body language. We all prefer to communicate differently whether online, by phone, face to face or old school writing. In fact most qualifications have communication as a focus for at least one unit. I’ve often heard people comment that the best type of colleague isn’t the technical expert but the one who knows how to best communicate. If you identify gaps in your knowledge then don’t be afraid to tell people - the willingness to find out is a very important skill and no one minds imparting information! Try being proactive and share the information you have. By doing so, you are showing that identification with the organisation is very important to you. You understand that people are not little islands, working solely on their own. To be accepted by colleagues, use the word ‘we’ as much as you can and become familiar with the ways in which the organisation thinks and operates. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and always remember that there is no “I” in “Team!” For more tips about communication see “7 must dos to help you get on” at http://www.jga-group.com/free-resources/

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Discipline! How much do you know about your company’s disciplinary procedures? If your answer is ‘Not a lot’ then ask! Disciplinary offences divide into two main groups: • Those which are subject to internal disciplinary procedures (general misconduct) • Those which are subject to instant dismissal and perhaps expose you to legal consequences, such as violence and theft. There are a number of steps involved in a disciplinary procedure. Everyone should know their organisation’s disciplinary procedures so if in doubt then ask the human resources team or your manager. General misconduct involves persistent lateness, failure to use company resources correctly, failure to work in a cooperative manner with colleagues/management, failure to deal correctly with third parties on behalf of the company and breach of company procedures. It really just reflects societal expectations about workplace behaviour. A rule of thumb to avoid disciplinary issues is to treat the organisation as you would like it to treat you and communicate effectively. Why not find out more about discipline and grievance procedures? Try http://www.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=1364

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Is your Employer Mindful? Perhaps, like us, you have never heard of a Mindful Employer? Apparently, there are quite a few of these employers about. There are certainly a lot of people with mental health issues who are working and who would be greatly missed if they were not. But, they don’t tend to talk about their problems as it would single them out and possibly go against them, they feel. The big challenge is to put ourselves in colleague’s shoes and understand how best to support him or her. Many of these folks have had one bout of illness, perhaps a breakdown, which will never be repeated, others have recurring bouts, but it still does not mean that they cannot do a good job. It just means that we need people to be a bit more understanding just we all are with physical disability. Your local branch of MIND is a good starting point. Perhaps they can send someone along to talk about what they do? I’m certainly going to contact them. http://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/localminds/

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Information Advice & Guidance | IAG What do those three letters stand for, and are you using them yourself and for other people? First of all, what do they stand for? The answer is: Information, Advice, and Guidance. In other words, what you and I would probably call Careers Guidance. Some of you may have had some IAG at school, but we can never get enough of it, as things change all the time. Therefore, if you are 19 years old or older (there is no upper limit) you are entitled to free IAG on the phone or in person from the National Careers Service. Does this mean that we are encouraging you to leave your job? Of course not. Careers Guidance is about better understanding what is best for you and providing you with an action plan to achieve these goals. This could be continuing in your present career or planning a new one, being happy in your role or wanting a promotion! Even if you love what you are doing though you should think about the future. What qualifications will be necessary in five years to do your job? We all gain from understanding our options and capabilities. As a first step check out https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk

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Progressing Your Education Boris Johnson, Priminister, is adding his voice to those who advocate that young people should have more careers advice. He believes that all young people should have 100 hours of career guidance or work experience before they leave school. But how, you might ask, are apprentices going to get careers guidance? What about young people who chose to go to university, are they using the opportunities to visit their careers centre? Many don’t, and regret it after graduation when they have challenges starting a career! Whatever the answers to these questions, career guidance is accessible for those who have chosen to do apprenticeships, so do make sure that you take-up the offer. Contact your Tutor-Assessor to ask what facilities are available or contact the National Careers Service. Apprenticeships themselves offer wonderful progression opportunities, they can be taken at levels 2, 3 or 4 and can lead to a university education at a later point. Increasingly, this country needs skills and you are just the person to benefit from this need! To find out about Boris Johnson see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ education-33254142 For more about apprenticeship options see: https://www.gov.uk/topic/ further-education-skills/apprenticeships

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What’s the Point of Maths? We all need maths! Maths isn’t just about adding up numbers, it is a way of looking at problems. First break a problem down into lots of small parts, then solve each individual part, then put them back together and hey presto problem solved. But yes, numbers can be important too and we all know that maths helps with the little problems like having sufficient change for the bus but there are also big life changing decisions which we all need to make: can you afford a holiday? Which house or flat should you rent? Is it sensible to borrow money and what rate of interest is affordable? Should you buy payment protection insurance (PPI)? One of the best things about studying is that if you have passed your maths Functional Skills Level 1- then you are invited to study for Level 2, if you have level 2 then you should seriously consider GCSE maths. You may not have to pass in order to achieve your apprenticeship or other qualification but it is an opportunity to develop your abilities just that little bit further. Remember, we all need maths! Check out the first two minutes of this video https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=eU-GvztSaOw which puts it far better than I ever could. P.S To keep learning maths simply let your Tutor-Assessor know.

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Why I.T? Not everyone has to learn about IT, or as it is more commonly known in the training sector Information and Communications Technology (ICT). You won’t, for example, need ICT Functional Skills to pass a Health and Social Care intermediate apprenticeship – yet! The world is going with speed down a route towards technology. Even those who work in more “hands on” professions will have to work with increasing amounts of technology deployed to improve care, information or to reduce cost. Knowing your way around a computer is a major skill but perhaps what is most important is learning how not to be afraid. Those of us who can build confidence will have better opportunities for future success. The Goodwill Community Foundation (GCF) offers very small, free online basic computer courses starting right at the beginning with mouse and typing tutorials. It also covers the use of common programmes such as Microsoft Word, email and the internet. The GCF also teaches about internet safety so do go and see whether they have anything for you: http:// www.gcflearnfree.org/computers.

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What is the point of English? What is the point of being able to write English effectively? Well, you want people to understand what you are writing and to act upon it. If you have difficulties expressing yourself on paper (or screen), the reader will also have difficulty in understanding what you are saying. Now we come to speaking clearly. How many times have you stopped to ask someone the way and been thoroughly muddled by the jumble of directions? The answer is to ‘think before you speak.’ Try to plan what you are going to say before you say it. Otherwise, you are likely to put things in the wrong order, and the recipient receives mixed messages such as: ‘Oh, I forgot to mention that you have to go down Fore Street before you turn right, its third on the left, or is it second?’ Confused? So, whatever we are writing or saying, clarity is king. Gaining English language qualifications is an achievement we all need to develop ourselves. With JGA and our delivery partners we will always try to stretch you to make sure that you gain from improving your English. If you have any questions about what you should study then speak with your TutorAssessor. Here is the same logic in a comical way, a funny advert: https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=UKPSsz_kyCc

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The JGA Group Keeping Learners Safe Learner Welfare Guide  

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