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Florid

[ your town, your magazine ]

down to earth

delRay’s FaRming Families

HaPPy BiRTHday THe liBRaRy TuRns 100

march/april

2013

Plus: savoR THe avenue:

FloRida’s longesT dining TaBle

aM ag azi n

ea sso

aw ard

2w01 inn 2 er

ciati on


Florida’s fabulous new Blowout Salons

TM

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contents [ march/april 2013 ] 30

[ your town - your magazine ]

26

52

editor’s letter [ 12 ]

the library turns 100 [ 52 ]

on the avenue [ 15 ]

down on the farm [ 60 ]

We take a moment to celebrate Delray’s books and farmers—and a few other springtime marvels. By Marie Speed

More blow-and-go salons, the library turns 100, a cold beer at the Blue Anchor, a gazillion festivals and much, much more to kick off springtime in Delray. By Bill Citara, ChelSea Greenwood & John thoMaSon

style [ 26 ]

Color saturates spring accessories; here’s a preview. photoGraphy By aaron BriStol

The Delray Library, once a project of the Ladies Improvement Association, marks a milestone of making one community richer. By riCh pollaCk

Delray’s agricultural legacy spawns a new generation of farm-to-table believers. By eMily Minor

business [ 74 ]

The Delray Camera Shop is a historic independent business with a fan base all its own. By riCh pollaCk

dine [ 30 ]

out & about [ 76 ]

play [ 32 ]

dining guide [ 83 ]

Papa’s Tapas shows how less can be more—with a classic Spanish accent. By Bill Citara

Go west, young man (and woman) and saddle up that pony for a local ride in the woods. By riCh pollaCk

up close [ 34 ]

Meet a developer who went down home and a golfer with a collection for the ages. By John thoMaSon 4

delray beach magazine

On The COver Jimmy Alderman of Alderman Farms PhoTo By AAron BrISToL

Check out who’s out on the town and other notes from the Delray social whirl. By CaSSie Morien

Delray’s only review-driven dining guide

my turn [ 96 ]

The author addresses the recurring problem of spring fever. By John Shuff

24


AUTO, MOTORCYCLE, BOAT, UMBRELLA & MORE

Serving all of South Florida

With over 100 locations state-wide, we insure over half a million customers and have been serving Floridians like you since 1991. DelrayBeach.GreatFlorida.com 142 SE 6th Ave, Suite B Delray Beach, FL 33483 DelrayBeach@GreatFlorida.com Each office is independently owned and operated.


[m a g a z i n e]

group editor-in-chief

marie speed

Home Decor Lighting Gifts & Collectibles Unique Jewelry Coral Creations

editor

kevin kaminski

assistant editor

john thomason

web editor

cassie morien video editor

Join us every 3rd Thursday of the month

jen stone

senior art director

Refreshments & Entertainment from 5-9 p.m.

lori pierino

art director

kathleen ross

Debbie Brookes 212 S. Federal Hwy., Boynton Beach 561.315.5717 路 beachcomberart.com

photographer

aaron bristol

production manager

adrienne acton

production assistant

lisa law

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contributing writers

bill citara, chelsea greenwood, emily j. minor, rich pollack, john shuff

contributing photographers

cristina morgado

senior integrated media sales manager

georgette evans, georgette@bocamag.com account manager

allison albaijes, allison@bocamag.com national account manager

carey mckearnan, carey@bocamag.com director of special publications

bruce klein jr., brucek@bocamag.com

special projects manager

gail eagle, gail@bocamag.com

JES publishing

561/997-8683 (ph); 561/997-8909 (fax) www.bocamag.com

editor@bocamag.com (editorial)

Delray Beach magazine is published six times a year by JES Publishing. The entire contents of Delray Beach magazine is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. Delray Beach magazine accepts no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts and/ or photographs and assumes no liability for products or services advertised herein. Delray Beach magazine reserves the right to edit, rewrite or refuse material and is not responsible for products. Please refer to corporate masthead.

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1/22/13 12:58 PM7 delray beach magazine


ServiceS directory Delray Beach magazine is published six times a year, with December/January, February, March/April, May/June, July/August/September and October/November issues. If you have any questions or comments regarding our magazine, call us at 561/997-8683. We’d love to hear from you.

[ subscription, copy purchasing and distribution ]

For any changes or questions regarding your subscription or to purchase back issues, call our subscription services manager David Shuff at 877/553-5363. To inquire about distribution points, ask for circulation director David Brooks at the same number.

Look what’s landed in Palm Beach!

hours: Tuesday - saTurday 10am - 5Pm

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[ advertising resources ]

Take advantage of Delray Beach’s prime advertising space—put your ad dollars to work in the premier publication of South Florida. For more information, contact Candace Rojas (candace@bocamag.com).

[ custom publishing ]

Create a magazine tailored to fit the needs and character of your business/organization. Ideal for promotions, special events, introduction of new services and/or locations, etc. Contact Marie Speed (editor@bocamag.com).

[ story queries/web queries ]

Delray Beach magazine values the concerns and interests of our readers. Story queries for the print version of Delray Beach should be submitted by e-mail to Marie Speed (editor@bocamag.com) or Kevin Kaminski (kevin@bocamag.com). Submit information/queries regarding our website to Marie Speed (editor@bocamag. com). We try to respond to all queries; but due to the large volume that we receive, this may not be possible.

[ letters ]

For an

exceptional Shopping experience!

204 e. atlantic ave Delray Beach, Fl 33444 Monday-Wed 10-9pm thurs-Sat 10am-11pm Sunday 11-6pm •

561.272.6654

1185 third St. So. naples, Fl 34102 239.643.8900

Your thoughts and comments are important to us. All letters to the editor may be edited for style, grammar and length. We reserve the right to withhold any letters deemed inappropriate for publication. Send letters to the address listed below, or to Marie Speed (editor@ bocamag.com).

[ calendar ]

Mashpee commons cape cod, Ma 02649 508.477.3900

Where to go, what to do and see in Delray Beach. Please submit information regarding fundraisers, art openings, plays, readings, concerts, dance or other performances to editor Marie Speed (editor@bocamag.com). Deadline for entries in an upcoming calendar section is three months before publication (e.g., to list an event in July/ August, submit info by April 20).

[ dining guide ]

Our independent reviews of restaurants in Delray Beach. A fine, reliable resource for residents and tourists. For more information, contact Marie Speed.

[ out & about ]

A photo collage of social gatherings and events in Delray Beach. All photos submitted should be clearly identified and accompanied by a brief description of the event (who, what, where, when); photos will not be returned. E-mail images to people@bocamag.com. Or mail photos to: “Out & About” Delray Beach magazine 5455 N. Federal Highway, Suite M Boca Raton, FL 33487

www.uniqueboutiquejewelry.com

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Indulge in your own private paradise. Escape the everyday and reconnect. Crane’s BeachHouse Hotel in scenic Delray Beach is a luxury boutique resort nestled in a lush tropical setting. A perfect place to unwind... a romantic, tranquil, festive, luxurious, Key West-style environment just steps from the Atlantic Ocean. Stroll Delray Beach’s Atlantic Avenue for an endless variety of posh shops, galleries and restaurants.

No shoes... No shirt... No worries. A warm and friendly staff offers impeccable service − from arranging dinner and spa reservations to sharing insider tips. Our expertise assures that weddings, corporate events, private parties and family reunions, are truly a memorable experience.

www.cranesbeachhouse.com 561-278-1700 866-372-7263 82 Gleason Street Delray Beach, Florida 33483 Find us on Facebook at facebook.com/cbhhotel


[ events ] Letters & More A chef tips her toque

I picked up a copy of your July/August issue while visiting Delray Beach and truly enjoyed the issue. I lived and worked in Delray Beach as a chef at the Pineapple Grille, and Delray has always been one of my favorite spots. Your magazine’s stories and articles have kept the focus on a city that is vibrant and hip. I hope to return in a few months and can’t wait to visit some of the new dining spots and the old ones that hold so many awesome memories. Thanks for a great magazine! Freda Gore Caribbean Culinary Tours & Vacations

Don’t-Miss events BocA BAcchAnAL

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WhAt: This festive weekend brings together world-class chefs and vintners offering their finest specialties. Proceeds benefit the Boca Raton Historical Society. Where: Bacchus Bash, Friday, March 22 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club, is an extravaganza of food and wine, presented by 14 chefs and prized vintners; the Vintner Dinners, Saturday, March 23, will be held in six stunning local private residences; the Bacchanal’s Grand Tasting is an alfresco luncheon by-the-bite on the tented green at Mizner Park Amphitheater presented by 30 local chefs and restaurants. When: March 22 to 24 contAct: Boca Raton Historical Society, 561/395-6766, ext. 101

crohn’s AnD coLitis founDAtion Luncheon

WhAt: The cocktail reception, silent auction and luncheon program honors the coach of the Florida Panthers, Kevin Dineen, and his wife, Annie, with proceeds to benefit the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation. Where: Boca Raton Resort & Club, 501 E. Camino Real, Boca Raton When: March 11, 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. contAct: Amanda Niklaus, 561/2182929, aniklaus@ccfa.org

festivAL of the Arts BocA

WhAt: Ten days of culture and world-class talent, presented by The Schmidt Family 1 10nomad_dbm0313.indd delray beach magazine

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Centre for the Arts, will take the stage at the Mizner Park Amphitheater and the Cultural Arts Center. This arts extravaganza featuring internationally acclaimed musicians and orchestras, singers and literary giants is unparalleled in South Florida. Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater and the Cultural Arts Center, Mizner Park, Boca Raton When: March 7 through March 16 contact: 561/368-844

Savor the avenue

What: This fifth annual award-winning epicurean event transforms a five-block stretch of Atlantic Avenue into the longest dining table, seating more than 1,000 guests and serving four-course dinners paired with four select wines from 20 of downtown Delray’s fine-dining restaurants. The event is presented by Delray Beach and Boca Raton magazines and the Delray Beach Downtown Development Authority. Where: Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach When: Thursday, March 28 contact: 561/243-1077

South county yMca Prayer BreakfaSt

What: A morning event of “fellowship and fun” benefiting the South County YMCA and featuring keynote speaker Shannon Miller, the most decorated gymnast in American history. The event also honors noted philanthropist Countess Henrietta de Hoernle. When: Tuesday, March 12, 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Where: Boca Raton Resort & Club, Boca Raton contact: Georgia Rose, 561/237-0944

Colony Hotel.indd 1 thecolonyhotel_dbmso11.indd thecolonyhotel_dbmmj12.indd 1

Make sure to sign up on our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter for the latest Delrayrelated news and events. 

march/april

Sign up today! e-newsletter

Drop us a line!

Delray Beach wants to hear from you! Please direct all mail to editor@bocamag.com or send to Delray Beach magazine, 5455 N. Federal Highway, Suite M, Boca Raton, FL 33487.

9/20/10 4:31 7/27/11 1/17/13 10:42 1:06 PM PM AM

Weekly dining, shopping + entertainment picks from the editors of bocamag.com thescoop_brm1112.indd 1

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[ editor’s letter ]

By Marie Speed

farms, books & the good life in delray T his issue has features on two of my favorite things in life: food and books. Our roundup of some of the area’s farm families highlights the farming legacy of greater Delray Beach, but it also shows its evolution in response to the contemporary emphasis on natural foods, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). In the old days, everything was farm-to-table; after several generations of mega-farms and processed and genetically engineered foods, it’s nice to see that people are electing to go back to basics—real food, locally sourced. And it’s all here, in our own backyard. So go to our farmers markets, visit Bedner’s, join a CSA farm. Take advantage of living in the land of plenty. And the same goes for our library—a community treasure celebrating 100 years this April. There is nothing I like better than a good bookstore or a library. I like the smell of books, the stacks, the quiet; I still pine for the Dewey Decimal System. From my early Babar and Little Women and The Borrowers era to my Nancy Drew days to now, when I have more books than brains, I think reading is the ticket to everything, the big portal, the human power outlet. I can’t talk about it without sounding like Frasier Crane, so suffice to say I am a book nerd, and I love our library. Here’s to its 100 years of opening more than a few windows to the world. We have lots more in this issue, and we hope you enjoy it as we slip into our big springtime season. We’ll see you next time.

5 (MORE) things i lOvE abOut DElRay bEach: 1. Parmesan cheese crisps from Old School Bakery 2. Rick Jankee 3. Watching the George Bush Bridge open 4. The carnival at St. Vincent Ferrer 5. The people who come around to take the coconuts off your palm trees

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MOBILE BOCA RATON whERE to eat, whAT to do, hOw to get there

LocaL Review

Use any smartphone for instant access to Boca Raton magazine’s independent reviews of the best restaurants.

SeaRch in StyLe Looking for a place to dine is made easy with different search categories to help you.

Get theRe faSt Really hungry? geo location finds restaurants nearest to you. Call and make a reservation directly from the app.

the LateSt

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inside: • hot list • cheers • calendar • great finds

[ 16 ] [ 20 ] [ 22 ] [ 24 ]

on the avenue News aNd Notes from delray beach

Spring Fever

Springtime haS alwayS been big in Delray—and this season is no exception with the likes of Delray affair, Savor the avenue, hatsume Fair, the Delray library’s 100th birthday, St. patrick’s Day and much more. if someone dreamed up an event, you can bet it’s happening here. add in some new dining spots, a few great little shops (like Sequin, pictured, on atlantic avenue) and a spirited crowd at The blue anchor, and we’ve got you started on the right foot as we slide into spring. cutline

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delray beach magazine

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on the avenue hot list

March-April Madness

New shiny stuff, how to roll your own, foodie finds, a birthday bash & some seasonal affairs to remember. By chelsea greenwood cloud 10

Hair affair

The latest blow-dry bar to pop up in our corner of paradise is Cloud 10, the brainchild of Jodi Dery, a licensed massage therapist. After noticing the growing trend of such establishments— where you can get a shampoo and a blowout quickly and affordably—Dery toured the country, visiting 23 different salons from coast to coast. She combines the lessons from that trip, as well as her lifelong love of hair styling, in Cloud 10, which boasts $40 blowouts and the motto: “No coloring, no cutting. Just wash, dry and beautify.” Guests also can enjoy a makeup salon, complimentary drinks and iPads at every station. And if you need some reading material while getting your hair done, check out Dery’s highly popular e-book series, Life with Siri, about using the iPhone program. (Worthing Place, 32 S.E. Second Ave., cloud10florida.com)

New Nibbles

Sunshine Square in east Boynton Beach just got even brighter. The formerly floundering plaza, which has been revamped and relandscaped, recently debuted a brand-new Publix and a Panera Bread. Now, its latest openings include Smashburger and Tijuana Flats. Both are national chains but little-seen in this part of the county. At Smashburger, each of its signature sandwiches begins as a meatball of 100-percent certified Angus beef that’s never been frozen. Then it’s “smashed to order” on the grill, which “caramelizes the beef, creating a sear that locks in the juices,” according to the company. If you’re still hungry, walk next door for some Tex-Mex fare at the colorful and funky Tijuana Flats, where the delicious burritos and enchiladas are even better with hot sauce: Choose from 15 different pumps! (Woolbright Road and South Federal Highway, Boynton Beach, smashburger.com, tijuanaflats.com) 16

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All thAt Glitters

You may have noticed that a hip new shop recently moved into the former Ora Sorensen Gallery space at the corner of Fifth and Atlantic. It’s Sequin, a Manhattan-based chain with a single-minded focus: jewelry. Specifically, costume jewelry, ranging from bowls upon bowls full of its signature enamel bangles to designer collaborations with the likes of Badgley Mischka—and the price points are equally diverse. The stylish store has a blue-and-silver aesthetic, which creates a clean backdrop for the vignettes of on-trend necklaces, earrings, bracelets and more. (445 E. Atlantic Ave., 561/243-9373, sequin-nyc.com)

CentenniAl soiree

Put on your party hat—the Delray Beach Public Library is celebrating 100 years with a Birthday Bash on April 11 (see page 52). Starting at 6:30 p.m., guests can tour the building, which will be transformed into a “walk down memory lane,” featuring period characters in costume, live entertainment and plenty of food and drink. Tickets are $100 (appropriately). The party continues April 13 with a Family Day at the library from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., including author events, contests, music, storytelling, face painting and more. (100 W. Atlantic Ave., 561/2660775, delraylibrary.org)

sushi 101 If your monthly sushi budget is out of control (those spicy tuna rolls really add up!), then take a lesson at the Morikami’s Oki Education Center in the Basics of Sushi. On March 17 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Plantation sushi chef Mitsutoshi Sekita will teach students sushi-making techniques, as well as the food’s cultural background and tasting tips. Participants should bring their own knives, cutting boards, aprons and dish towels; the rest will be provided. The cost is $70, and advance registration is required. (4000 Morikami Park Road, 561/495-0233, morikami.org)

march/april

delray beach magazine

17


on the avenue hot list

erin, Go braGh!

For a twist on tradition, celebrate St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) at Slainte Irish Pub + Kitchen, which has a new chef, a new menu and recently renovated interiors. The party starts at 7:30 a.m. (with a full Irish breakfast, no less) and goes until 2 a.m., sprawling across the parking lot at Renaissance Commons Plaza. Slainte will host four outside bars, two grilling stations, live entertainment (including bagpipers), drink specials and more. There’s no cover charge; with more than a thousand people expected to attend, get there early! (1500 Gateway Blvd., Boynton Beach, 561/742-4190, slaintepubs.com)

lunch bulletin

For all the dieters, vegetarians and Ladies Who Lunch out there, we have your latest salad fix. For a time, we passed right by Caffe Martier, because the small bistro only has outdoor seating, and, from the name, we figured it would have a carbo-heavy French menu (think croissants, croque-monsieur, cheese plates). Boy, were we wrong. The selection is much more diverse—and the salad offerings are incroyable! More than a dozen choices include mouthwatering ingredients like goat cheese, off-the-bone turkey breast, tuna, Brie, pine nuts and pear. A great spin on a classic is the Slim Caesar, which is served with low-fat Caesar dressing; add grilled chicken, and it still comes in under $10. Your taste buds and waistline will thank us! (411 E. Atlantic Ave.,  561/450-6169,  caffemartierdelray. com)

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Please join us to celebrate The Delray Beach Public Library’s

100 Birthday th

Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 6:30 PM Cocktails · Dinner-By-the Bite · Live Music For more information visit our website at www.delraylibrary.org or call 561.266.0775


on the avenue cheers

lee harrison raises a pint.

blue anchor pub This English pub has a loyal Delray following—and a few high spirits from the other side.

T

hey say the newspaper business can drive a good man to drink. It drove Lee Harrison to open a pub. After spending half his adult life in the ink-stained wretch trade in the U.K. and U.S., the 66-year-old Englishman decided it was time to do something different, to open a proper British pub in Delray Beach, the city where he lived and had come to love. “Journalists are sort of brought up to be 20

delray beach magazine

By Bill Citar a

Blue anChor PuB

804 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561/272-7272 boozers,” Harrison says. “At least in my day we were. We spent a lot of time interviewing people in pubs; pubs are part of a journalist’s life. So it was an obvious step.”

The part of Harrison’s life before that obvious step, before he opened the Lion & Eagle in Boca and then the Blue Anchor, began in his 20s as a newspaper reporter in London. From there he was picked to come to “the Colonies” as a reporter for the National Enquirer, then owned by founder Generoso Pope, whose paper was certainly tabloid-y but not the “all celebrities, all the time” vehicle it is today. He freelanced for the Enquirer with a side job march/april


GHOST STORIES

march/april

Anchor opened to the delight of lovers of Guinness, fish-n-chips and the camaraderie of a real old-fashioned pub. It wasn’t just the bits of wood and metal and glass that made the journey from London to New York to Delray Beach. The Blue Anchor also came with its very own ghost—one Bertha Starkey, a young woman said to have been stabbed to death at the bar by her jealous husband (see sidebar). But outside of a few mischievous pranks, she seemed good-humored enough, perhaps as the result of the good humor of the Blue Anchor’s owner, staff and clientele. Which, Harrison notes, is what makes the Blue Anchor, well ... the Blue Anchor. “It’s the people, really,” he says. “There’s a lot of laughter in this pub. Everybody’s having fun. That’s what an English pub is all about.”

Classic fish and chips

aaron bristol

as medical editor of Woman’s World magazine until 1989. He then signed on as editor of the National Examiner, where he stayed for six years before finally leaving the world of print for good. During his last fling in the news biz he dipped his toe in the Guinness of proper British pubbery, buying the Bocabased Lion & Eagle English Pub (with a partner) in 1992, which he operated until selling it off five years later. It was after departing the Examiner—“I was fired,” he states candidly—that Harrison decided to “gamble” on a “deserted” street in downtown Delray being just the place for an authentic English pub of his own making. Atlantic Avenue wasn’t much in 1996; even current mainstay 32 East had yet to open. But Harrison believed in the city’s plans for the area and found a building at the corner of Atlantic and Palm Square with three shops that could be converted into the watering hole of his dreams. Actually, better than his dreams, because the building’s landlord had a genuine British pub—or rather, the pieces of one—stored in a New York warehouse. The original Blue Anchor was built in 1864 on London’s Chancery Lane by the William Younger Brewery. During its 100plus years of existence, it saw a clientele as varied as Winston Churchill and Elizabeth Stride, whose claim to fame was as one of many victims of Jack the Ripper. In the 20th century, the Blue Anchor itself was a victim, torn down to make room for a parking lot but then shipped to New York to await rebirth as a pub in Manhattan. Harrison “jumped at the chance” to transport the old Anchor to Delray, where a customer of the Lion & Eagle who happened to be in the construction trades took on the tedious and difficult business of reassembling the oak and stained-glass façade and creating a new Blue Anchor. It took 10 months— “too bloody long,” Harrison says with a smile in his voice—but in October the

EvEryonE probably has told spooky ghost stories around a campfire, but Lee Harrison has some real ones. The ghost of Bertha Starkey was said to have haunted the Blue Anchor since 1888; her loud footsteps and wailing frightened employees even then. Her spirit apparently emigrated to the U.S. with the pub; six months after the Blue Anchor opened in its new Delray home weird things started happening. Harrison recounts a couple: “One night after we closed, all the candles on the tables went out. Every one of them on all the tables. Five seconds later they all came back to life. We had an incident in the kitchen. A very large pan was on a hook. The pan came up over the hook and down on a cook’s head. We had to take him outside; he was very confused. And he didn’t come back.” Luckily for the Anchor’s cooks (and diners), no one else has been bonked by a heavy pan. In fact, Bertha hasn’t been seen or heard in the past year. Harrison says that’s because every night at 10 o’clock—the time Starkey was supposedly killed—the staff rings a bell to commemorate her death.

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on the avenue calendar

march/april events EvEnt

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W h at

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“The Foreigner”

Through March 17

This award-winning two-act comedy by playwright Larry Shue, set in a fishing lodge in rural Georgia, centers on the relationship between a staff sergeant and an unusually shy, silent Englishman who finds himself privy to all manner of secrets.

Lake Worth Playhouse

561/586-6410

Delray Art League exhibition

Through March 31

Now in its 47th year, the Delray Art League, with its 250-plus membership, will display some of its finest oils, watercolors, acrylics, sculptures and photographs in this multimedia exhibition.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

“The Seagate Hotel & Spa World of Golf: The Gary Wiren Collection”

Through April 21

Wiren, a renowned golf instructor and Palm Beach resident, showcases his one-of-a-kind, interactive collection of golf memorabilia, from antique balls and clubs to golf-related LPs, comic books and jewelry.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

Elaine Page

March 4–5

The so-called “First Lady of Musical Theater,” Page has performed everywhere from the White House to Sydney and Beijing in an illustrious career, and her Broadway credits include “Evita” and “Cats.” Part of the Crest Theatre’s 2013 cabaret series.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

“Tap, the Show”

March 8–10

A theatrical celebration of tap dancing, exploring the pageantry of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers to today’s street performers, with Big Band, world music and pop-rock explored in between.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

Rose Max and Ramatis

March 9

This award-winning Brazilian vocalist cut her teeth in the nightclub-heavy Rio de Janeiro scene, where she mastered the styles of bossa nova, samba, and Latin jazz. Her concerts today are complemented by the intricate music of Brazilian acoustic guitarist Ramatis.

Arts Garage

561/450-6357

Artists in the Park

March 9-10 and 23–24 and April 13–14, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Fine art will be sold and exhibited at this free seasonal fair series sponsored by the Delray Beach Art League.

Veterans Park

561/843-2311

Jules Feiffer

March 14

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Village Voice cartoonist and screenwriter of “Carnal Knowledge,” Feiffer has made a career out of turning urban anxieties into witty and revealing commentary. Part of the Crest Theatre’s 2013 lecture series.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Party

March 15–16

For its 45th year, this annual downtown tradition has increased to a twoday event, complete with a traditional Celtic celebration on Friday night with Irish dancing, music, bagpipes, beer and corned beef.

Downtown Atlantic Avenue

561/279-0907

“Lungs”

March 15– April 12

A recent Best New Play award nominee, “Lungs” addresses the perils of conception in a world on the brink of annihilation. It follows a couple contemplating having a child in a time of global anxiety and political unrest. Produced by the Theatre at Arts Garage.

Arts Garage

561/450-6357

Lauren Mitchell Band

March 16

Florida singer Lauren Mitchell is known for her galvanizing vocal style, backed by veteran rock and blues artists, in concerts intended to create a spiritual experience for her audiences.

Arts Garage

561/450-6357

Linda Eder

March 18–19

Eder was nominated for a Drama Desk Award for her role in “Jekyll & Hyde” on Broadway, and her eclectic repertoire spans Broadway, standards, pop, country and jazz. Part of the Crest Theatre’s 2013 cabaret series.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

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EvEnt

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Twilight Bike Festival

March 22–24

Advertised as “Mardi Gras meets the Tour de France,” this second annual race will feature hundreds of cyclists, professional and amateur alike, whizzing through Delray Beach at speeds of 35 mph. There also will be parties, a vendor village and children’s activities.

Downtown Delray Beach

561/869-4916

“Biloxi Blues”

March 22–24

The Montana Repertory Theatre brings its touring production of Neil Simon’s 25th Broadway play, which focuses on the antics of a soldier who navigates basic military training to serve in World War II.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

“The Last Romance”

March 22– April 7

This new comedy from Joe Pietro, author of “I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change,” charts the unlikely relationship between two senior citizens who meet in a dog park in Hoboken.

Delray Beach Playhouse

561/272-1281

Betty Fox Band

March 23

A veteran blues act from the Tampa/St. Petersburg area, Betty Fox will bring her robust vocals to Delray Beach, joined by the salty backbeats of drummer Aaron Fowler, bassist Matt Walker and guitarist Josh Nelms.

Arts Garage

561/450-6357

Byron Stripling

March 26

Often compared to Louis Armstrong, Stripling began playing trumpet as a child prodigy in his musical family in Atlanta, and he has shared stages with jazz greats and pop orchestras, including the Boston Pops.

Arts Garage

561/450-6357

Savor the Avenue

March 28

More than a dozen restaurants will present top food and drink pairings on the longest dining table in Florida. Entering its sixth successful year, Savor the Avenue is sponsored by Delray Beach magazine.

Downtown Atlantic Avenue, from Swinton to Fifth avenues

561/243-1077

Shakespeare at the Pavilion

March 28–30 and April 4–6

Known for its fast-paced, inventive takes on theatrical classics, Take Heed Theatre Company will stage a free production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” with just five actors playing all of the roles.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

Terri White

April 1–2

This accomplished singer and actress’ lengthy Broadway and offBroadway résumé includes roles in “Follies,” “Chicago,” “Barnum,” “Nunsense” and “Finian’s Rainbow.” Part of the Crest Theatre’s 2013 cabaret series.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

“Anything Goes!”

April 1–10

A musical celebration of the life and career of Cole Porter, featuring indelible musical-theater favorites like “Night and Day,” “Let’s Do It” and “From This Moment On.”

Delray Beach Playhouse

561/272-1281

Delray Affair

April 5–7

More than 600 artists’ booths, children’s activities, food, music and family fun highlight the most popular outdoor arts and crafts festival in Palm Beach County, now in its 51st year.

Downtown Atlantic Avenue

561/279-0907

South Florida Symphony Orchestra

April 9

The orchestra will welcome renowned cellist Zuill Bailey, who will perform Elgar’s “Cello Concerto” in a program that also includes Brahms’ “Symphony No. 2” and Schubert’s “Rosamunde Overture.”

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

954/522-8445

Darren McGrady

April 11

The author of “Eating Royally,” this celebrated chef from the Royal Palace will share stories of his 15 years in the kitchen of Queen Elizabeth, Princess Diana and the Royal Family. Part of the Crest Theatre’s 2013 lecture series.

Center for the Arts at Old School Square

561/243-7922

Ed Calle

April 13

This saxophonist has appeared on Grammy-winning albums by Frank Sinatra, Arturo Sandoval and Jon Secada, with a diversity that encompasses bebop, pop, and contemporary and Latin jazz.

Arts Garage

561/450-6357

Linda Eder, the Twilight Bike Festival, Byron Stripling, “Biloxi Blues” and Darren McGrady march/april

delray beach magazine

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on the avenue great finds

tile style

[A]

Mix tiles and textures in your home with these stunning mosaic pieces .

[B]

[A]

By Cassie Morien Find the corresponding tiles at these Delray businesses. A E lEmEnts & surfacEs,

B C

200 N.E .Second Ave., 561/278-8100 Just tilE & marblE, 241 N. Congress Ave., 561/272-4900 t amiami tilE, 1085 S.W. 15th Ave., 561/272-8453

[A]

[A]

[B]

[B]

[A]

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[A] [A] [A]

[C]

[A]

[A]

[A]

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[ style ]

Vintage Reign Weekender, $495, from Style & Wine; beaded belt, $48, Jen Scoz Chrysoprase necklace, $395, from House of Zen Dali; No Headache blue visor, $12, from South Ocean Beach Shop; Gianvito Rossi pump, $540, from Rinaldi Shoes

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march/april


Gianvito Rossi navy pump, $540, Giuseppe Zanotti red slingback, $640, Valentino Garavani blush heel, $685, all from Rinaldi Shoes

Hot Wheels

Spring accessories are bold, bright and saturated with fresh colors. PhotograPhy by aaron bristol

march/april

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Masha Archer yellow necklace, $2,275, from Martier; Gianvito Rossi yellow shoe, $985, from Rinaldi Shoes; Vintage Reign clutch, $215, from Style & Wine; Sun-nSand hat, $34, from South Ocean Beach Shop

House of Zen Dali, 424 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 561/330-3436, jenscoz.com Martier, 411 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 561/278-7790, martierusa.com soutH ocean BeacH sHop, 28 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, 561/278-3336 style & Wine, 44 S.E. Second Ave., Delray Beach, 561/330-3777, styleandwine.com rinalDi sHoes, 16950 Jog Road,  Delray Beach, 561/499-7373 march/april


[ style ]

Styled by: Jenna DeBrino for Hot Pink Style, HotPinkStyling.BlogSPot.com Art director: katHleen roSS march/april

Chanel Culture, $250, Mario Testino photography book, $125, Lula book, $16.99, The Bikini Book, $34.95, all from Style & Wine; K. Keith red hat, $34, South Ocean Beach Shop; Gianvito Rossi salmon pump, $540, Valentino red bag, $875, both from Rinaldi Shoes delray beach magazine

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[ dine ]

By Bill Citar a

the house sangria

papa’s tapas

A sunny little Spanish favorite opens in Pineapple Grove.

W

alk into Papa’s Tapas on an otherwise quiet midweek night and even then you’ll probably find the place is hoppin’. Waiters bearing plates of food bustle back and forth across the small but surprisingly stylish dining room, weaving through the narrow pathways separating tiny tables. Diners bend towards each other over those tables, their conversations rising and falling between bites, an endless crescendo and diminuendo of furious buzzing. In the kitchen, partially visible to the dining room, the crew of four cooks moves with quick, practiced efficiency. On a busy night they can do more than 150 “covers,” no easy task when each table is ordering multiple small plates, each demanding several minutes 30

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of the cooks’ precious time. In the middle of the kitchen crush, overseeing and working “the line” as he has for more than 40 years, is “Papa,” aka Cristobol Parra, a 70-year-old culinary veteran whose energy and stamina can leave people decades younger breathless. Open only a few months, with no advertising and no PR—nothing but word of mouth —Papa Parra’s downtown Delray restaurant (601 N. Congress, 561/266-0599) is already a hit. Of course, it helps that its previous west Delray incarnation as Papa’s Café, opened in 2008, was a hit too. In fact, Parra says the move across I-95 has brought in a younger clientele, while still keeping “70 to 80 percent” of his original customers, giving him the chance to add more tapas to a more Spanish-centric menu. Born in the Spanish port city of Alicante, Parra came by his interest in all things culi-

nary naturally. “My mother was one of the first female chefs of her time,” he says. “I’ve loved cooking since I was a little boy; by the time I was 11 or 12 years old I had already done a lot of cooking.” He kept at it as an adult, eschewing formal culinary training for the “old-fashioned” method of learning on the job. In 1959 Parra moved to the U.S., cooking in several Spanish restaurants in New York and then Providence, R.I. He repeated that process after he and his wife and family moved to Miami in the 1970s, until by the next decade he was able to open a pair of restaurants of his own. Over the past several years he’s seen Americans’ growing knowledge and appreciation of his native cuisine. “Lately, people know a lot more [about Spanish cookery], especially tapas. Everybody knows tapas. march/april


GAMBAS AL AJILLO

Cristobol “PaPa” Parra, PaPa’s taPas

aaron bristol

Cristobol Parra

I don’t have to introduce that much; they know a lot now.” They know enough to make dishes like gambas al ajillo and chorizo al Jerez some of the most popular items on Papa’s menu; they know Papa well enough to make his own creations, like grilled shrimp and basa (a Southeast Asian fish) with salsa verde, best-sellers too. And why “Papa?” Well, with five daughters and one son ... you figure it out. All but one of Parra’s brood work at the restaurant, both front and back of the house. Daughter Annie did the striking, chic-on-abudget design, playing one cool blue-gray wall against another done in vivid crimson, arranging cream-colored banquettes and zebrastripe and black leather chairs on the nicely restored terrazzo floor. But in a business increasingly dominated march/april

by well-funded, corporate-backed restaurants with plenty of resources and staffing, running a small, family-oriented restaurant is a demanding and sometimes exhausting way to make a living. “It takes more energy for us, to please the customers,” Parra says. “The big restaurants, they have managers, they have a lot of people. For us, only the servers and a couple people in the kitchen aren’t family.” And at 70, when most people are either retired or on the verge of retiring, where does he find that energy? He laughs. “Believe me, I find it somewhere. I’ve been very energetic all my life. I cannot stop right now, though. I have to do it at least one more year and then I want to take it a little easier. I have to. But I’m not going to stop completely. If I stop I think I’ll die.”

10 medium shrimp, peeled and deveined, tail left on Juice of half a lemon 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 to 6 cloves garlic, sliced Pinch red pepper Splash white wine Salt and pepper to taste Marinate shrimp in lemon juice for a few minutes while heating up oil in skillet. Add shrimp and saute for 30 seconds, then add garlic and pepper and sauté 1 minute more or until shrimp are cooked through. Add white wine, salt and pepper, sauté 30 seconds more and serve.

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[ play ]

By Rich Pollack

horsing around

Put on those jeans, saddle up, and enjoy the great outdoors.

D

The paddock at Tradewinds Park Stables

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elores Rangel has always loved horses. “They really fascinate me,” she says. A Delray Beach resident, Rangel also loves to ride, but the cost of boarding and caring for a horse has kept her from owning one. That hasn’t stopped her, however, from going on leisurely trail rides, often with her children and young grandchildren. Decades ago, Rangel and husband Gabino discovered the stables at Tradewinds Park in Coconut Creek, and they’ve been making a point to ride there as much as possible ever since. “Riding on the trails at Tradewinds Park is so peaceful, soothing and relaxing,” she says. “It’s just so therapeutic to go riding there.” For folks like Rangel, who love to ride, Palm Beach and Broward counties offer a wide variety of equestrian opportunities, often just a short drive from home. Two facilities west of Delray Beach, Sunshine Meadows Equestrian Village and the Delray Equestrian Center, offer a full range of riding opportunities, including lessons. The Jim Brandon Equestrian Center in Palm Beach County’s Okeeheelee Park South is the perfect place to take your horse if you’re interested in trail rides through wooded areas or riding in rings. “We have over eight miles of pristine trails,” says Linda Wirtz, the equestrian center manager. “You can come and spend the day and ride one of the most beautiful trails in Florida.” While the Jim Brandon Center offers lots of riding opportunities, including two open riding rings and a lunge ring, it does not provide horses to the public. Okeeheelee Park is one of several Palm Beach County parks with equesmarch/april


Genevieve Cook with one of the trail horses

Where to go horseback riding in south Florida Tradewinds Park sTables at Tradewinds Park in Coconut Creek, with 30 horses available, offers onehour guided trail rides for riders of all skill levels. Contact the barn at 954/357-8720 or visit broward.org/ parks and click on “Things to Do.” Jim brandon equesTrian CenTer in Okeeheelee Park South, west of West Palm Beach, offers extensive trails and a variety of riding opportunities. Horses are not provided and are not available for rentals or leasing. Call 561/966-7090 or visit pbcgov.com/ parks/equestrian/jimbrandon. equestrian trails, but all of the parks require riders to bring horses. Other Palm Beach County Parks with equestrian trails include: • West Delray Regional Park, at the western end of Atlantic Avenue, which includes 1.3 miles of trails • Loxahatchee Groves Park on Southern Boulevard in Loxahatchee, with a mile-long scenic trail • Riverbend Park in Jupiter on Indiantown Road, west of Florida’s Turnpike, with seven miles of trails • Dyer Park, west of West Palm Beach, which offers three miles of scenic trails For those without a horse who want to enjoy a leisurely ride, the Tradewinds Park Stables offers one-hour guided rides through more than 30 different trails in the sprawling Broward County Park just off Florida’s Turnpike at Sample Road. The rides, according to the stable’s Genevieve Cook, are available for $30 to riders of march/april

all levels, even beginners who have never been on a horse. “We put you on a horse to match your riding level,” she says, adding that the county’s barn has a herd of 30 horses ranging in size and temperament. The park also has weekend pony rides for younger riders. “The stable and the trails are a breath of fresh air right in the middle of everything,” Cook said. “The rides are very relaxing.” For those looking for riding lessons or open area rides, the 170-acre Sunshine Meadows Equestrian Village, west of Delray Beach, is home to several stables that share the facility, according to Mike Blann, manager at Sunshine Meadows. Among them is Carriage Hills Stables, which has 10 to 12 horses and specializes in lessons and training. Owner Jane Fennessey says horses from her stables are available for leasing to riders who first have to demonstrate their ability to ride.

sunshine meadows equesTrian Village, west of Delray Beach, is home to several stables that offer a variety of equestrian activities, including lessons and open rides on horses stabled there. Call 561/495-1455 or visit sunshinemeadows441.com. delray equesTrian CenTer, west of Delray Beach, offers a full range of equestrian activities from lessons to trail rides. Call 561/495-4701 or visit delrayequestriancenter.com. “We work with people who come to us,” Fennessey said. “Our job is to help you achieve your riding goals.” For families like the Rangels of Delray Beach, the goal can be as simple as taking a relaxing trail ride. “We’ve been riding at Tradewinds Park for years,” Delores Rangel says. “It’s just a great way to enjoy a Saturday morning with the family.” delray beach magazine

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[ up close ]

by John Thomason

w

scott porten The award-winning Chamber director has gone from

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hat does a homebuilder do when a housing bubble bursts and home values plummet? Riding out the crisis, changing businesses, going into debt or bankruptcy, or early retirement would be four possibilities. Drinking oneself into oblivion, while tempting, would be the least advisable option. Scott Porten, the Delray Beach homebuilder behind Porten Companies, found the best way of all to turn the real estate lemon into lemonade: He became a professional community volunteer. The Washington, D.C. native and Emory University business graduate moved to Delray to develop homes in 1985. He quickly established a lucrative niche brand, focusing on multifamily residences in a predominantly single-family market. He developed enduring luxury condos and townhouses like City Walk, the Estuary and Harbour House. Then came the bubble. “It became clear that we were headed for something,” says Porten, 50. “The last acquisition I did was in 2006, and then in ’08, I basically sold my largest land holdings. I needed something to keep me busy. Quite frankly, this town had done a lot for me. I have my home here, and I made a lot of money here; I thought it was time to give back to the community.” In the wake of the housing bubble, Porten shifted his career to community service. In 2008, he joined the board of directors for Old School Square, then the Site Plan Review and Appearance board. In 2010, he became the Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce’s Governmental Affairs committee chairman, a role for which he recently won Director of the Year at the Chamber’s 22nd annual Luminary Gala. “Scott has brought the Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce a clear focus for the future,” says Kimberly Camejo, chairman of the board for the Chamber. “His business knowledge has assisted in the growth of the Governmental Affairs committee.” 34

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One of the innovations Porten pushed forward was his transformation of moribund government affairs meetings into a speaker-based format that brought the community together to hear from guests like Mary McCarty, the inspector general, the tax assessor, the supervisor of elections and other governmental power players. “On my second or third meeting, I found myself one of two people sitting at the meeting,” he recalls. “We had to rebuild that program. Now we have between 20 to 40 people at every meeting. It’s become a very vital thing, and it’s been great for me, because I’ve had the opportunity to do some public speaking, which is frankly outside my comfort level. So it was a real growth opportunity.” In addition, Porten has moved up the ranks to chairman at Old School Square, and he was instrumental in the organization’s name change to the Center for the Arts at Old School Square last fall. He helped the Center for the Arts obtain a liquor license, increased its education programming, brought more youthful content into the Crest Theatre and launched an enormously popular series of free outdoor concerts on Friday nights. Although his company isn’t building new homes, Porten’s various causes—he’s also on the Visions 2020 Committee, which projects a vision for Delray’s future, as well as on the Delray Economic Leaders Political Action Committee—equate to something like full-time work, and he often arrives home late. But when he’s not servicing his community, the husband and father of two can be found playing basketball at the gym or cheering on his kids’ soccer games. “I tend to be a very committed volunteer,” he says. “I treat [my service organizations] like a job and in many respects maybe even more seriously, because it’s not just my family that suffers if I don’t do a good job. “My personal goal is to feel like I was part of the process. I’d like to be able to have some influence over the environment I’m raising my children in.”

aaron bristol

building community homes to building communities.

march/april


When he’s not serving his community, the husband and father of two can be found playing basketball at the gym or cheering on his kids’ soccer games. march/april

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[ up close ]

by John Thomason

a

gary wiren One of the country’s most-acclaimed golf instructors brings his personal museum to Delray Beach.

aaron bristol

A

mong the many YouTube videos posted by Dr. Gary Wiren, one stands out for its title: “Why Hookers Hook.” The video has nothing to do with a sociological inquiry into the world’s oldest profession; rather, it’s about why duffers hook their golf shots. But before studying this other form of hooking, Wiren cheekily opens the video with a bit of history about the origins of the term “hooker,” referring to the legend that Civil War general Joseph Hooker enjoyed his own parade of well-organized prostitutes called “Hooker’s Second Army.” For Wiren, golf and history are inseparable, tangled in an astounding collection of memorabilia and art, antiques and souvenirs that places him somewhere between curator, historian and hoarder. Starting in 1958 when he was given an autographed Walter Hagen biography, the 77-year-old North Palm Beach resident has amassed some 2,500 books, 3,000 golf clubs, 2,000 balls and 5,000 postcards— numbers that only scratch the surface of his 50-year collecting quest. Highlights from Wiren’s collection are on display through April 21 at the Cornell Museum of Art at Delray Beach Center for the Arts, where countless balls, clubs, tees, books, album covers, dolls, sculptures, paintings and other ephemera sprawl across four galleries and two stairwells. There’s a small putting green for visitors to practice swings

GOLF ODDITIES

SOme Of the itemS On DiSplay at the COrnell muSeum’S “Gary Wiren COlleCtiOn” inCluDe: • Grip molds formed by star golfers • Primitive clubs dating from 943 aD in China • A record of “Golf Waltzes,” complete with an audio sample • The first trademarked “Pickemup” putter that retrieved golf balls

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on antique clubs, a 14-karat gold and diamond bracelet bearing the word “SHANK” and a video of Fred Astaire dancing himself dizzy before smashing a few perfect drives. There’s a novelty putter made out of snakeskin and a pneumatic ball that has a tendency to explode in midair. History is ever-present, from the rise in women’s golf paraphernalia correlating with civil rights advances to the game’s role in World War II—a swastika-bearing medal from the German Golf Union and an image of golfers playing in a POW camp. “As you walk around the exhibition, it’s not just about golf. It’s about the eras of the past 60 or 70 years,” says Gloria Rejune Adams, director of the Cornell Museum of Art. “It takes you back to presidents and celebrities; it has an appeal to everyone. I don’t play golf; the only thing I know is that Tiger Woods plays golf. And when I went to see [the collection] originally, I thought, ‘OK, I’ll take a look at it.’ But it was quite unique, and it caught my interest as an artist and historian.” Dressed for the links, in red plus-four trousers, tie, dress shirt, golf knickers and Hogan hat—selections from some 21 pairs of pants, 74 ties and 21 pairs of stockings in his voluminous closet—Wiren expounded on his collection during a recent private tour at the Cornell. “I say it’s the most unique exhibit in the history of the United States,” says Wiren, currently the senior director of instruction for Trump Golf properties. “I don’t say it’s the largest, most expensive, or greatest ... I say it’s the most unique, meaning that if you go to the Golf Museum, the Golf House or the World Golf Hall of Fame, you’re going to see great things up there, and great players. But you

won’t see a lot of these things in here. They’d never think of putting them up.” Wiren’s knowledge as a collector is buttressed by a teaching résumé longer than a John Daly drive. The University of Michigan graduate has written 13 books, appeared in just as many videos, taught golf in 34 countries, and been inducted into six halls of fame. He is currently ranked the 16th best golf instructor in America by Golf Digest. “[Gary] is a teacher,” says his wife, Ione, whom he met while pursuing his degree in Michigan. “He loves to learn, and he loves to share what he knows. That’s the essence of Gary. So he’s sharing this collection.” march/april


FROM BIRDIES to BLACK JACK GO FROM 18 TO A FULL HOUSE

GOLF CLASSIC & CASINO NIGHT

APRIL 19, 2013 VIA MIZNER COUNTRY CLUB

Help us continue to drive the community foreward through support of our initiatives that aid in hunger, child welfare and non-profit support

TO PURCHASE TICKETS AND FOR SPONSORSHIP INFO Visit www.jlbr.org/golf I Call 561-620-2553 I E-mail golf@jlbr.org www.facebook.com/JLBRGOLF

The Casino gaming tables are provided for entertainment purposes only by Casino Party Nights Florida Inc., tel. 813-389-7122. All Donations and proceeds go the The Junior League of Boca Raton. The Junior League of Boca Raton qualifies as a charitable organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. A copy of the official registration, no. CH2459, and financial information may be obtained from the division of consumer services by calling toll free 1-800-435-7352 within the state. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the state.


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insider advertising • promotions • events

take tHe StreSS out of Spring

Put the spring back in your step with health and wellness. Bella Reina Spa has designed a new De-Stress, Relax & Renew program to alleviate your worries and boost your energy levels. Never before has stress played such an intricate role in your health and physical well-being. 815 george Bush Blvd., Delray Beach 561/404-7670 BellareinaSpa.com

Horan capital management

Investors historically make the wrong investment decisions at the wrong times for the wrong reasons. Break the cycle of bad investment decisions and start the new year off right: Get the advice you need. Call Patrick Horan at 561/350-1410 to discuss “Intelligent Investing for the 21st Century”—a proven strategy based on the investment principles of Warren Buffet and Benjamin Graham. 6111 Via Venetia n., Delray Beach 561/350-1410 • horancm.com

experience tHe atlantic grille— WHere Dining HaS a Style all itS oWn

BalSHi mD Derma-ceuticalS

The flavor of Delray comes alive on the Avenue at The Atlantic Grille, home to a 450-gallon aquarium of tranquil moon jellyfish and a 2,500-gallon shark tank. Experience The Atlantic Grille’s new menu, emphasizing local seafood and produce. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Enjoy brunch on Saturday and Sunday. 1000 e. atlantic ave., Delray Beach 561/665-4900 theatlanticgrille.com

Tom Balshi, M.D., dermatologist and cosmeceutical designer, has founded a cutting-edge combination of scientific discovery and natural ingredients to create the finest skin-care products available. Rescue your eyes with “SOOTHE,” the Intense Repair Eye Cream. Balshi MD brings you the foremost thinking in scientific skin care technology to relieve puffiness, remedy dark circles under the eyes and soothe sensitive undereye wrinkles. 2605 W. atlantic ave., Delray Beach 561/272-6000 southflderm.com

Visit bocamag.com/events for more information.


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Avenue ~Reserve Your Seat~ Thursday, March 28, 2013 Guests can select from prix fixe menus accompanied by adult-beverage pairings from more than a dozen restaurants. Choose which menu appeases your palette, and make your reservation today! Join hundreds of other guests seated at Florida’s longest dining table, right down the middle of famed Atlantic Avenue! For more information on this event, visit bocamag.com or downtowndelraybeach.com or call 561/243-1077. First come, first serve!

Sponsored By:

We ask that you savor responsibly.


event Details Where & When

Location: Downtown Delray Beach on East Atlantic Avenue from Swinton Avenue to East Fifth Avenue (U.S. 1) Date: Thursday, March 28, 2013 Rain Date: Friday, March 29, 2013 Time: 5:30–9:00 p.m. Event Charity: The Office Depot Foundation, which strives to make a positive impact on children, families and communities (www.officedepotfoundation.org). Restaurants will donate $5 for every reservation made at the event (estimated 1,000 reservations).

reserve Your seat

Review the restaurant prix fixe menus within this section to make your dining selection. Contact the restaurant of choice to make your dining reservation. Seating is limited. Guests must be 21 or older. Last day to reserve seating is Thursday, March 21, 2013. Menus also available online at bocamag.com and downtowndelraybeach.com.

hoW to CheCk in

Arrive the evening of March 28 and make your way to the restaurant location on East Atlantic Avenue. Each restaurants’ tables will be set near their physical location. Check in with the host/hostess to receive your Savor the Avenue bracelet. Show the bracelet to receive a complimentary cocktail at your restaurant at 5:30 p.m.

shopping

Downtown Delray Beach invites you to arrive early and explore the city’s vibrant, charming downtown, an area filled with unique boutiques and galleries! Meet the beautiful shopkeepers that make this a one-of-a-kind destination.

greet, toast & Dine!

5:30–6:15 p.m.—After checking in, enjoy a complimentary drink during the welcome reception provided by each participating restaurant. Locate your seats at Florida’s longest dining table, and prepare to enjoy a beautiful night! 6:00 p.m.—Seating begins. 6:15 p.m.—Welcome comments, Grand Toast, Table Decor Contest Winner announcement, raffle drawing 6:30–9:00 p.m.—Four-course dinner to be served with donated custom adult-beverage pairings Attire—Downtown Delray Beach evening casual

parking

Public parking lots and garage parking are available, as well as some valet locations. Atlantic Avenue will be closed during the event. Side streets will remain open for vehicle access. Visit downtowndelraybeach. com/parking for additional parking information. Old School Square Parking Garage: Northeast First Street and Northeast First Avenue ($5.00 for the evening) Robert Federspiel Garage: Southeast First Aveune

more information

Savor the Night Hotel Packages available at The Sundy House and The Colony Hotel and Cabana Club. Call the Downtown Development Authority at 561/243-1077 or visit downtowndelraybeach.com.

Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.


32 East

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32 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-276-7868 / 32east.com

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Fantastic food, sophisticated design, a full-service bar and a prime location combine to make 32 East one of South Florida’s top restaurants. Award-winning chef Nick Morfogen presents a fresh approach to his innovative contemporary American style.

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1} Welcome Drink: American 75: Tito’s handcrafted Texas vodka, lemon juice, California “Champagne” & Pontano Farm mint 2} Grand Toast: Zonin Prosecco, Brut, NV Italy 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Crispy Fanny Bay oyster, pan-seared diver scallop & Gulf shrimp on English pea puree Drink: Davis Bynum, Russian River Valley, Chardonnay, 2010 5}

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4} Appetizer: Torchio pasta in borolo braised beef short rib ragu with wilted greens & melting fontina Drink: Fattoria il Casolare, San Lorenzo, Italy, Sangiovese/Montepulciano, 2011 5} Entrée: Wood-grilled Colorado lamb rack & broccolini on truffle potato puree with pearl onion wine sauce Drink: Marques de Casa Concha, Peumo, Chile, Carménère, 2009 6} Dessert: Valrhona chocolate mousse cake with port wine berry reduction Drink: Housemade crème de menthe grasshopper

50 ocEan

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50 S. Ocean Blvd. / 561-278-3364 / 50ocean.com

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Breathtaking ocean views await you at Delray Beach’s only second-floor restaurant and bar overlooking the beach. Ignite your culinary imagination with island-inspired creations presented by a knowledgeable four-star staff.

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1} Welcome Drink: Cucumber Breeze: Bacardi Superior Rum, fresh-squeezed lime and pineapple juices, seltzer 4}

2} Grand Toast: La Marca Prosecco, Italy 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Lobster lemon drop: Maine lobster tail, cucumber citrus salad, lemon vodka essence & candied ginger Drink: Ecco Domani Pinot Grigio, Italy

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4} Appetizer: Artisan cheese & charcutrie board: imported & domestic cheeses, house-cured meats & seafood Drink: La Crema Pinot Noir, Monterey 5} Entrée: Shrimp Lyonnaise: Madagascar prawn, smoked potato puree; or braised short rib: orzotto, truffle mousse Drink: Kaiken, Malbec, Mendoza, Argentena 6} Dessert: Truffle garden: assorted handmade truffles & confections, sweet soil, edible flora & fawna Drink: Schloss-Vollrads, Riesling, Kabinett, Rheingau, Germany Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.


buddha sky bar

1} Welcome Drink: Tozai Typhoon (Junmai sake) 4}

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217 E. Atlantic Ave. #3 / 561-450-7557 / buddhaskybar.com

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Buddha Garden, an extension of Buddha Sky Bar, is an Asian concept with design and cuisine influences rooted in Chinese and Japanese interpretations. Asian accents complement the authenticity of the cuisine featuring dim sum, sushi, & wok selections from our “ from-scratch” kitchen, plus Delray Beach’s first Binchotan charcoal grill.

2} Grand Toast: Whitehaven Sauvignon Blanc, New Zealand, 2012 3} Hors D’oeuvre: King Shu Mai (2): blue crab, lobster, shrimp, pork & asparagus Drink: Murrieta “The Whip” (White Blend), Livermoore Valley, 2011 4} Appetizer: Baked scallop (2): blue crab, Parmesan, yuzu, spicy aioli & tobiko

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Drink: Starmont, Napa Valley, 2010 5} Entrée: Truffle wasabi prime filet mignon: 6-ounce prime beef tenderloin with truffle oil & lobster mashed potatoes Drink: Paraduxx Z blend, Napa Valley, 2009 6} Dessert: Chocogoma: black goma sponge cake, milk chocolate custard, candied pecan, goma ice cream, chai tea bubbles Drink: Morimoto Hazelnut Beer, Rogue, Oregon

cabana el rey

1} Welcome Drink: Cedilla Acai Berry Sangria

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105 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-274-9090 / cabanarestaurant.com

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No need to go to South Beach for a “ fantastic” Nuevo Latino cuisine, “awesome mojitos” and a “ hot,” “always buzzing” scene.

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2} Grand Toast: Torreoria Cava, Spain 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Tapas Tasting Platter: coconut-crusted jumbo shrimp, skirt steak skewer, empanada & ceviche

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Drink: Xplorador Sauvignon Blanc 6}

4} Appetizer: Lobster Bisque or Cabana Salad: hearts of palm, queso blanco, tomato, red onion, black olive & black bean vinaigrette Drink: Xplorador Chardonnay Vibrant 5} Entrée: Churrasco: skirt steak marinated in garlic & fresh herbs or Mero Chileno: pan-seared Chilean sea bass Drink: Xplorador Carmenere 6} Dessert: Flan or tres leches Drink: Xplorador Moscato

Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.


caffé luna rosa

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1} Welcome Drink: Caffé Luna Rosa cocktail

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34 S. Ocean Blvd. / 561-274-8898, ext. 12 / caffelunarosa.com

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Caffé Luna Rosa is the Italian restaurant on the beach and the oldest Italian restaurant in Delray Beach. Caffé Luna Rosa offers an oceanview dining experience where great food and a great environment come together.

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2} Grand Toast: Champagne 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Sesame seared ahi tuna, julienne vegetable salad & citrus ponzu dipping sauce Drink: Foss Marai Prosecco D.O.C. Treviso 4} Appetizer: Pontano Farms arugula salad, honey-spiced pecans, roasted Bosc pears, imported Gorgonzola cheese Drink: San Pietro Sauvignon Blanc 5} Entrée: All-natural slow-roasted sliced beef filet,topped with Maine lobster & bernaise sauce, asparagus & roasted potatoes Drink: Nemesio Cabernet Sauvignon 6} Dessert: Housemade New York cheesecake with graham cracker cookie crust, fresh whipped cream & caramel sauce Drink: Chateau Villefranche Sauternes

city oyster & sushi bar

1} Welcome Drink: 44 North Huckleberry Vodka 3}

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2} Grand Toast: Jaume Serra, Cava Brut, Spain 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Assorted sushi Drink: Mohua, Sauvignon Blanc, New Zealand

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4} Appetizer: Grilled flatbread with pesto, roasted peppers, artichokes & goat cheese 6}

Drink: Tahuan, Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina 5} Entrée: Pan-seared bronzini, cannelini beans, spicy Italian sausage, tomatoes, fennel, escarole & EVOO Drink: Marqués De Cáceres Rioja Reserva, Spain 6} Dessert: Poached pear filled with mascarpone & port wine glaze Drink: Cupcake Vineyards, Moscato D’ Asti Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.

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213 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-272-0220 / cityoysterdelray.com

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This upscale venue follows the rules of hip dining: Great ambience, stylish surrounding and a terrific menu. The seafood arrives daily from local purveyors and fisheries in the Northeast.

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cut 432

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1} Welcome Drink: Oli-O: Death’s Door vodka, E.V.O.O., muddled orange, basil leaves, cane syrup

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432 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-272-9898 / cut432.com

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CUT 432 continues to please. It’s been five years since CUT 432 opened its glass doors and began to challenge the idea about what a steak house could and should be. It offers succulent cuts of beef, inventive dishes and a great wine list.

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2} Grand Toast: Naveran, Cava, Spain, 2010 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Sweet pea agnolotti with sautéed pea leaves & popcorn shoots Drink: Fernand Girard, Sancerre, Loire Valley, 2011 4} Appetizer: Maryland blue crab & Florida shrimp “Louis” cocktail with local avocado Drink: Byron, Chardonnay, Santa Maria Valley, 2010 5} Entrée: Beef Wellington, Harris Ranch filet mignon, braised savoy cabbage, truffled scallop potatoes & foie gras emulsion Drink: Bianchi, Petite Sirah, Paso Robles, 2008 6} Dessert: Chocolate brioche bread pudding soufflé with bourbon vanilla ice cream Drink: EOS, “Tears Of Dew,” Napa Valley, 2007

linda bean’s perfect maine

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200 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-276-2502 / lindabeansperfectmaine.com

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Delray’s newly remodeled quaint Maine restaurant serving trap-to-table meals. Guaranteed Maine seafood is pulled right from our wharves in Port Clyde, Maine assuring the best possible product. Our newly expanded menu also features a variety of items for non-seafood lovers for lunch and dinner dining.

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1} Welcome Drink: Maine Woods Sangria - Greystone Cellars California Merlot, balanced with woodsy scents and ripe fruit 2} Grand Toast: Sparkling White Sangria - tart carbonated combo Greystone Cellars Chardonnay & lightly sweet, elegant citrus 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Stuffed squash blossoms with smoked mussels, sweet corn and Swiss chard 5}

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Drink: Greystone Cellars Sauvignon Blanc - aromas of pear & citrus with bright acidity, Meyer lemon & a hint of white peach 4} Appetizer: Vegetable flatbread with goat cheese, roasted sweet potato, grilled onions & oven-crisped kale on toasted naan Drink: Greystone Cellars Sauvignon Blanc - aromas of pear & citrus with bright acidity, Meyer lemon & a hint of white peach 5} Entrée: Lobster risotto with vanilla butter; poached lobster tail atop creamy mushroom & asparagus risotto Drink: Greystone Cellars Chardonnay - apple, roasted nuts, stone fruit with bright citrus, rich butterscotch & guava aromas 6} Dessert: Warm blueberry crisp topped with chocolate granola, served with a side of sweet bay laurel ice cream Drink: Greystone Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon - vanilla, cream soda & blackberry aromas & loaded with sweet berry flavors Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.


max’s harvest

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Farm to fork; simple, sustainable, local fare.

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1} Welcome Drink: Watermelon Patch (ginger liquor, Svedka Clementine, fresh lemon juice)

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169 N.E. 2nd Ave. / 561-381-9970 / maxsharvest.com

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2} Grand Toast: Backyard Mango Bellini with Poema Cava 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Broward bocconcini, artisanal salumi, artichoke & spring vegetable giardiniera Drink: 2011 Hogwash Rose 4} Appetizer: 72-hour braised beef cheek, sweet corn ravioli, canaveral rock shrimp & micro arugula Drink: 2010 Banfi Chianti 5} Entrée: Palmetto Creek Farms porcetta, warm Swank Farms spigarella salad, pancetta vinaigrette & honeyed heirloom carrots Drink: 2009 Van Duzer Pinot Noir 6} Dessert: Valhrona caramelia-roasted banana bread pudding, Florida strawberry-vanilla gelato, Meyer rum anglaise Drink: 2011 Conundrum by Caymus Proprietary Blend

park tavern

1} Welcome Drink: French 85: apricot infused cognac, lemon essence, topped with sparkling wine 2} Grand Toast: Angry Orchard “Crisp Apple Cider” (Ohio) ABV 5 percent 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Smoked fish spread, local radish and crusty garlic bread Drink: Ommegang “Hennepin Saison” (New York) ABV 7.7 percent 4} Appetizer: 27-hour gumbo with Cajun-spiced pork belly & Key West pinks Drink: Oskar Blues “G’ Knight” (Colorado) ABV 8.7 percent 5} Entrée: Braised oxtail pot pie with forest mushrooms, celery root and cave-aged cheddar biscuit Drink: Bianchi, Petite Sirah, Paso Robles, 2008 6} Dessert: Bacon donuts dipped in dulce de leche with maple bacon ice cream Drink: Tap 357, Canadian Maple Rye Whiskey Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.

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32 S.E. 2nd Ave. / 561-265-5093 / parktaverndelray.com

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Park Tavern is a neighborhood restaurant offering seasonally inspired, farm-fresh comfort food with an intense focus on craft beers, seasonal cocktails, and small-production wines.


prime

1} Welcome Drink: Cucumber Martini

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110 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-865-5845 / primedelray.com

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Discover the age of decadence at PRIME, Delray’s first and only authentic prime supper club. This glamorous supper club, inspired by the 1940s, promotes dining as a social experience. The largest restaurant on Atlantic Avenue, PRIME, brings the best of land and sea to guests with spectacular yet affordable menu selections.

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2} Grand Toast: Cupcake Prosecco 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Chesapeake Bay crab cake: roast corn relish, sauce remoulade Drink: Darcie Kent Sauvignon Blanc 6}

4} Appetizer: Roast beet carpaccio: thin-sliced heirloom beets, arugula, capers, dijon creme Drink: Darcie Kent Chardonnay 5} Entrée: Harris Farms filet mignon: potato au gratin, asparagus, lobster bernaise Drink: Silver Oak Alexander Cabernet 6} Dessert: Prime dessert sampler: chocolate mousse, carrot cake, apple crumb, pecan pie Drink: Taylor Fladgate 10 Year Old Tawny Port

racks

fish house + oyster bar

1} Welcome Drink: Strawberry Fields 2} Grand Toast: Prosecco 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Mini lobster rolls with celery & old bay Drink: Sauvignon Blanc, Clifford Bay 4} Appetizer: Crab L00-ey with scallion, cucumber & egg Drink: Chardonnay, J. Drouhin 5} Entrée: Trout almondine with horseradish mash & apple butter Drink: Albarino, Martin Codax 6} Dessert: Nutty brownie with dark-chocolate sauce & caramel Drink: Taylor Fladgate 10-Year-Old Tawny Port Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.

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5 S.E. Second Ave. / 561-450-6718 / racksdelray.com

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A New England seafood house featuring Prohibition-style cocktails and Grand Central Oyster Bar-inspired steam kettles, RACKS Fish House + Oyster Bar features a unique, nouveau-nautical decor along with a responsibly sourced ocean-to-table menu that excites and inspires.

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32 S.E. Second Ave. / 561-274-7258 / salt7.com

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SALT 7 is the evolution of dining. Our concept presents Prime steaks, award-winning sushi and premium cocktails in a trendy upscale atmosphere. We pay attention to every detail to ensure your experience is remarkable from the moment you step into the restaurant.

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1} Welcome Drink: Worthington Watermelon Martini: Finalndia vodka infused with watermelon and cucumber 2} Grand Toast: Lamarca Prosecco 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Tuna poke: tuna tartare appetizer with scallions, onions & avocado in a citrus ponzu with fried plantains Drink: Darkhorse Chardonnay 5} 6}

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4} Appetizer: Seaweed salad: organic seaweed with shaved carrots and a cities ponzu in an edible bowl Drink: Starborough Sauvignon Blanc 5} Entrée: Prime 6-ounce filet with pan-seared jumbo sea scallops in white wine sauce with side of salted sautéed spinach Drink: Bridlewood Pinot Noir 6} Dessert: Greek tempura battered donut holes with honey drizzle and crushed pecans Drink: Bridlewood Pinot Noir

solita delray

25 N.E. Second Ave. / 561-899-0888 / solitaitalian.com

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Enjoy the tastes of SoLita, “South of Little Italy,” where our Italian-American recipes have been passed down for generations. We splurge on the freshest and finest hand-picked ingredients, and our tasty, made-to-order dishes will take you to an experience you can only get at our “ home.”

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1} Welcome Drink: Sexy Grapes: Kettle One vodka, muttled red grapes, lemon, lime, sour & splash of simple syrup 2} Grand Toast: Ruffino Prosecco 3} Hors D’oeuvre: “Old School” meatballs: SoLita’s house made meatballs with tomato basil sauce and ricotta cheese Drink: Kim Crawford Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc

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4} Appetizer: Eggplant stack: layered crispy eggplant with tomato, arugula, shaved Parmigiano, olive oil & aged balsamic drizzle Drink: Greg Norman Pinot Noir 5} Entrée: Veal Valdastano: procuitto & mozzarella, mushroom marsala sauce; or lobster Franchese: lemon butter sauce on spinach Drink: Estancia Cabernet Sauvignon 6} Dessert: Housemade bread pudding drizzled with walnuts and a warm Jack Daniel’s cinnamon sauce Drink: Ruffino Mosacto D’Asti Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.


sundy house

1} Welcome Drink: Mango Caipirinha

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106 S. Swinton Ave. / 561-272-5678 / sundyhouse.com

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With its magnificent views and superb culinary creations, dining at the Sundy House (a historic landmark) is an experience to be remembered. The renowned Sundy House restaurant features globally inspired fare under the direction of Executive Chef Lindsay Autry and an extensive wine list, to be savored indoors or al fresco.

2} Grand Toast: Veuve Du Vernay Brut Rosé 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Swank butter lettuce cups with confit chicken, shaved vegetable slaw & house hot sauce

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Drink: Champagne Delamotte Brut 4} Appetizer: Ricotta gnocchi “carbonara” with jamon serrano, pea tendrils, shiitake mushrooms 6}

Drink: Louis Michel & Fils Chablis Premier Cru “Vaillons” 5} Entrée: Grilled cobia with fiery tomato farrotto, wilting greens, scallion vinaigrette Drink: Mohua Pinot Noir, Central Otago, NZ 2009 6} Dessert: Lemon pound cake with whipped goat cheese, citrus salad Drink: Royal Tokaji “Mád Cuvée” 2009

The office

1} Welcome Drink: Pink Slip 2} Grand Toast: Champagne Domaine Ste. Michelle Brut 3} Hors D’oeuvre: House-made chicken shu-mai dumplings with ponzu sauce Drink: Chateau St. Michelle Chardonnay 4} Appetizer: Corvina ceviche Drink: Columbia Crest Sauvignon Blanc 5} Entrée: Free bird herbed chicken, confit purple potato, baby vegetables, natural jus Drink: Chateau St. Jean Pinot Noir 6} Dessert: Oreo cheesecake with fresh berries Drink: Bartenura Moscato Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.

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201 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-276-3600 / theofficedelray.com

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The Office is a modern American gastro pub, a charmed neighborhood watering hole that is comfortable and where the food is as important as the drink. Not quite a bar and not quite a restaurant, The Office is offering a casual-meets-refined atmosphere.

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1} Welcome Drink: Xante Bellini

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119 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-272-1944 / tramontidelray.com

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Tramonti Ristorante is the offspring of one of New York City’s most popular, successful and much loved Italian restaurants, located in Little Italy, “Angelo’s of Mulberry St.” Mr. Gino Silvestri, co-owner for over forty years, has now created Tramonti with his son Marco. We deliver outstanding and innovative cuisine using only the freshest ingredients.

2} Grand Toast: Rotari 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Meatballs in braciola sauce or eggplant scivé scivé or mozzarella, tomatoes & roasted peppers Drink: Coastal Vines Pinot Grigio 4} Appetizer: Gnocchi Sorrentina or rigatoni vodka Drink: Coastal Vines Pinot Grigio or Pinot Noir 5} Entrée: Veal Champagne or flounder Francese or chicken portobello Drink: Coastal Vines Pinot Grigio or Pinot Noir 6} Dessert: Cannoli or tiramisu or cheesecake Drink: Coastal Vines Pinot Grigio or Pinot Noir

tryst es

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1} Welcome Drink: Angel’s Envy “Mad Manhattan”

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4 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-921-0201 / trystdelray.com

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Tryst is a local restaurant with a neighborhood pub feeling. We offer lunch, dinner, happy hour and late-night bites. The menu is inspired by the rich bar culture of Europe, with an emphasis on seasonal, mostly local, farm-fresh ingredients.

2} Grand Toast: Domaine Carneros Blanc De Blanc 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Crispy chickpea-battered asparagus with caper aioli Drink: Domaine Carneros Blanc De Blanc 4} Appetizer: Duck confit & morel mushroom bruschetta, big leaf arugula with warm rosemary vinaigrette Drink: St. Bernardus Prior 8 Belgian Double 5} Entrée: Grilled filet mignon and skillet-seared bacon-wrapped scallop, fava bean creamed corn, pea tendrils with truffle oil Drink: Honig Cabernet Sauvignon 2010 6} Dessert: Toasted coconut cake with vanilla macerated berries and lemon anglaise Drink: Calera Late Harvest Viogner 2007 Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.


union

1} Welcome Drink: Cucumber Watermelon Pinnacle vodka mojito

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8 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-330-4236 / uniondelray.com

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Union specializes in moderately priced Asian fusion dishes, unique rolls designed by a Nobu-trained sushi chef at the newly opened Candyfish Sushi and specialty cocktails. Union translates Japanese, Chinese, Thai and Korean flavors to the American palates in a fun and casual environment.

2} Grand Toast: Fiji Apple Sake 3} Hors D’oeuvre: Pan-seared Union crab cake with lemon garlic aioli Drink: Blackstone Merlot 4} Appetizer: Tuna sashimi salad with mixed greens, radish, plum tomatoes, micro greens with Candyfish vinaigrette Drink: Brancott Sauvignon Blanc 5} Entrée: Happy Boat: lobster, scallops & salmon delicately grilled with steamed vegetables & garlic pepper sauce Drink: Robert Mondavi Private Reserve Chardonnay 6} Dessert: Triple layer chocolate cake Drink: Cotton candy martini and peanut butter and jelly martini sampler

vic & angelo’s

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1} Welcome Drink: Angelo’s Bellini: Prosecco, peach purée & aperol

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2} Grand Toast: Prosecco Lunetta

Drink: The Crossings Sauvignon Blanc 4} Appetizer: Beet salad with Sicilian pistachio and ricotta salata 6}

Drink: Coppola Pinot Grigio Bianco 5} Entrée: Wood-grilled, fontina-crusted veal chop served with roasted cipollini and pancetta spinach Drink: Coppola Rosso 6} Dessert: Apple baked in phyllo with pear and pecan filling, topped with white truffle gelato and raspberry coulis Drink: Coppola Moscato Rosé

Price is Per Person and does not include tax or tiP. We ask that you savor resPonsibly.

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3} Hors D’oeuvre: Colossal white shrimp toast, white wine, fresh lemon, peas, toasted garlic with micro greens

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290 E. Atlantic Ave. / 561-278-9570 / vicandangelos.com

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Vic & Angelo’s Grand Italian Coal Oven Enoteca features big-city Italian dining in the heart of South Florida. Our menu items are inspired by a desire to transform the American approach to fine Italian dining into a memorable experience that pays homage to the authentic culinary traditions of Italy.

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Healthy Appetites‌ Healthy Communities The independent, non-profit Office Depot Foundation is proud to be the charitable beneficiary of the Fifth Annual Savor the Avenue in Delray Beach. Your generous support helps us make a difference to children, families and communities in South Florida and around the world.

Thank you for joining us at Florida’s Longest Dining Table once again this year! www.officedepot foundation.org Facebook: www.facebook.com/officedepot foundation Twitter: @officedepot fndn


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What started as a 40-book collection is now one of Delray’s most prized institutions. By Rich Pollack

The Library Turns

hey were the movers and shakers of their time, early pioneers whose mark on Delray Beach is indelible, yet whose story is often just a footnote to the town’s history. Back when Teddy Roosevelt was in the White House and before Flagler’s railroad stretched to Key West, when Delray numbered fewer than 900 people, the Ladies Improvement Association was taking up where the men of the town had left off. While their husbands were out exploring, building churches or working the fields, women such as

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Mary Cason and Mary Sterling were setting their sights on niceties such as paved streets and culture. “The women hungered for amenities,” says Dottie Patterson, a retired archivist for the Delray Beach Historical Society. “They built the sidewalks and got the shell rock for Atlantic Avenue because they were tired of having their long skirts dragging in the dirt.” Of all the accomplishments of the Ladies Improvement Association—which included building a home what would become the Delray Beach Woman’s Club—few have had the impact of launching the town’s first library in 1913.

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Library All-Stars

Over the course of its 100-year history, there have been hundreds of Delray Beach residents who have been instrumental in the success of the Delray Beach Public Library. Here are just a few who have made memorable contributions—and continue to show their support.

Bob Currie

A well-respected architect, Bob Currie has been on the Delray Beach Public Library’s board for almost 15 years and is currently its vice president. Currie played an important role in the transition from the old library on Southeast Fourth Avenue to the new location at 100 W. Atlantic Avenue, serving as chairman of the building committee. While he didn’t design the new building, you’ll find his fingerprints all over it.

“One of the best things we did for the library was choosing to put it in its current location. It invites you into town, and it’s a happy place to be.”

—Bob Currie

Scott and Mary McOwen

A veterinarian in town for decades, Scott McOwen still has a way with animals, and it’s not unusual to find him at the library with children’s librarian Dr. Lynda Hunter showing off a baby possum or a raccoon or snakes he found in his yard to a group of wide-eyed youngsters. Mary McOwen served on the library’s board of directors for many years.

“The library is a place where people can come to study and learn new things. The people there are very dedicated and always there to help.”

—Scott McOwen

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Starting with 40 women who each contributed a book, the Delray Beach Public Library has evolved over the years, growing from its original location on Atlantic Avenue next to the old Arcade Tap Room to a larger facility on Southeast Fourth Avenue and then in 2006 to its current spot at 100 W. Atlantic Avenue. As it changed locations and grew, the library added thousands of books—and eventually computers—and began offering a wide variety of programs ranging from lectures on popular topics to programs to help residents find a job. Yet the library never strayed from the original vision shared by 40 women a century ago. “Yes, we’ve grown, but the library is still a place where the community can meet,” says Alan Kornblau, the library’s current director. “It’s still predicated on service and on providing something that people want and need.” If there is one legacy from the Delray Ladies Improvement Association that has served the library especially well, it is that of independence. Unlike all but one other public library in Florida, the Delray Beach Public Library is not a department within the city nor is it government-owned or -operated. Instead, it is run by a not-for-profit organization, the Delray Beach Public Library Association Inc., and governed by a board of directors made up of community leaders. “The independent board sets policy,” says John Callahan, former director, who is now the director of the Palm Beach County Library Association. “But anyone can be a voting member of the Library Association.”

Clockwise: Ladies Improvement Association; children’s programs over the years; an early craft sale to benefit the library; story hour

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Library All-Stars (cont.) John and Patsy Burke

Recruited to the library’s board almost 14 years ago because of his marketing expertise, John Burke now serves as president of the library’s board of directors. He and his wife, Patsy, are serving as honorary chairs for the library’s Centennial Birthday Bash on April 11. A strategist with a focus on long-term financial strength, John Burke believes the board has a responsibility to help prepare the library for the next 100 years.

“Delray Beach has been very good to me, so I felt compelled to give back to the community. I just feel fortunate that I was asked to be on the board of the library, and I’m proud to be a part of it.”

– John Burke

Linda Gunn and Joann Haros

Linda Gunn and Joann Haros are the co-chairs of the Delray Beach Public Library’s yearlong centennial celebration. Gunn, the daughter of a librarian, sees the library as an important element in the community and believes that through a wide range of events, the Centennial Committee can bring even more people to the library. As president of the Delray Beach Woman’s Club, Haros sees a special connection to the library, founded by the club’s earliest members.

“Being a member of the Woman’s Club, I feel the library is a part of our heritage, and it’s important for us to continue supporting the library and volunteering as much as possible.”

— Joann Haros

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A true community-operated organization, the Delray Beach Library has always been a central gathering place within the city. There are those who remember the early years, when the little library on Atlantic Avenue took up the bottom floor of the building while the upstairs served as a meeting room for the Woman’s Club. They recall comfortable wicker furniture and a small but adequate assortment of books. “I remember going to that library as a kid,” says longtime Delray Beach resident Roy Simon. “It was a pretty popular place.” That collection was built in large part under the watchful eye of Marcia Jacobs, the first librarian and wife of one of the town’s early mayors. In 1935, the Delray Beach Public Library Association was established, to help the library keep up with the city’s growth.

“They raised money like crazy,” Simon says. By the 1940s, it became apparent that the library, with close to 1,000 books and more than 9,000 members, needed more space. A committee eventually would select the site on Southeast Fourth Avenue for the location of the new facility. Among those who contributed to the new library during an intense fundraising effort was Nancy Astor, better known to the public as Lady Astor, a winter visitor to Delray Beach who donated $100 to the cause. Also supporting the effort were the nationally known cartoonists who wintered in Delray Beach, including Herb Roth, whose artwork was used on all the fundraising material. Opened in 1950, the new library, just like its predecessor, quickly became a gathering place, especially for some of the teenage boys in town who went there because they knew

Library Programs

The Delray Beach Public Library offers a wide variety of programs for children, teens and adults of all ages. Here are some of the more popular programs: Tales for Tadpole: The library’s children’s area offers the “Mommy and Me” program for moms of children from newborns to 2 years old. In addition to providing an opportunity for mothers to spend fun time with other moms and little ones, the program also helps parents pick up some of the finer points of reading to their kids. Homework Help: With the help of volunteers—many retired teachers—the library provides children with homework help Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays after school. Children taking part in the program not only get help with their schoolwork; they also learn how to better use all the resources the library has to offer. empowermenT Zone: On Tuesdays and Thursdays the library opens its technology center to people who may need help using computers to find a job or access government services. Volunteers are often available to assist visitors with job searches and polishing resumes. lifelong learning CommuniTy insTiTuTe: In addition to a variety of programs for adults featuring guest lecturers and authors, the library is home to the Lifelong Learning Community Institute, which offers an extensive selection of classes on topics ranging from classical music to studies of cinema, politics and, of course, books. in addiTion: The library also offers many other programs, particularly for children, including story time, craft hours, puppet shows, a science club and much more for young people to enjoy. “The programs we do in the children’s department may be our most important service that we provide to the community,” says library director Alan Kornblau.

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Library All-Stars (cont.) Pat Canning

A longtime Delray Beach resident whose husband, Vince, ran the successful downtown Vince Canning Shoes, Pat Canning was a volunteer the library staff could count on to help out whenever she was needed, especially in the children’s book section. During one of the old library’s many expansions, Pat helped with moving books. She also was one of the people tapped when it came to coordinating the children’s area in the current library.

“Our library does so much for the next generation, and many children have gotten their start reading there. It’s always been a very friendly and welcoming place.”

—Pat Canning

Kathy Perper

At 97 years old, Kathy Perper still makes it a point to get to the Delray Beach Public Library whenever she can. A volunteer at the library for 38 years, Kathy helped out where she could, often checking in participants at one of the library’s many special events. Financial support in the memory of her husband, Howard Perper, helped the library establish its technology center.

“We have such a diverse group of people living in our community, and the library serves them all.”

– Kathy Perper

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The Big 100 Birthday Bash

When the Delray Beach Public Library celebrates its 100th birthday on April 11 with a Centennial Birthday Bash, it will be celebrating more than just the history of the library. “It’s really a celebration of our town,” says Nancy Dockerty, a member of the library’s board of directors and volunteer chair of the birthday bash. “The library truly is there for everyone in our community.” Those who attend the event, which will take place on a Thursday night beginning at 6:30 p.m., will see history come Nancy Dockerty alive as they stroll past the library’s volumes. In one section, guests are likely to see people wearing clothes that were popular about the time the library was first created in 1913. They’ll hear music from that era and they’ll also have a chance to see displays of some of the best-selling books of that time and learn a little about the authors. In another area of the library, guests might learn a little bit more about the preWorld War II era and hear big-band sounds, while tunes made popular by the Beatles and fashions you’d find on Twiggy will highlight another area. The $100-per-person event will also feature cocktails and “dinner by the bite,” with food of the era being served in each of the designated areas. There will be a red carpet to welcome guests and, of course, a huge birthday cake. As a special touch, the library will be providing free admission to the event to anyone aged 100 or older. In addition to the bash, there will also be a free community-wide celebration on Saturday, April 13, with a focus on family fun. The event, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., will kick off with a kids and dogs parade around the library building (with pups decked out for the special occasion) as well as music, stories by “Centennial Sue” and a tea ceremony presented by the staff of the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens. Co-chaired by Deborah Dowd and David Ranzor, the community event will also feature local dance troupes and of course ice cream and other frozen treats. To find out more about either event, call the library at 561/266-0194.

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that’s where the girls were. “There wasn’t a lot to do around here in the 1950s,” recalls Scott McOwen, a local veterinarian who is still involved with the library. Over the years, the library on Fourth Avenue continued to expand to meet the growing population. A two-story addition was built in 1968, another in 1975 and another in 1985. By the late 1990s, library leaders recognized that a decision on the future of the library would have to be made. “We had a good library, but it was clear that the number of volumes we had needed to be three times the size, and we needed a place to put them,” said Terry Pfeil, then a member of the library’s board and a driving force behind raising private funds for the construction of the library on West Atlantic Avenue. Several locations were considered, but Pfeil says many board members felt strongly that moving the library west of Swinton Avenue would send a positive signal that the earliest goals of the Library Association would be honored, which were to make it accessible “to all residents of Delray Beach.” “Today, it’s very gratifying to walk into the library and see how vibrant it is,” she said. “I don’t think it could be that way in any other location.” The new library on West Atlantic Avenue, which opened in 2006, is a far cry from the one created by the Ladies Improvement Association. Today, the 40-book collection has grown to a circulation of close to 300,000 and there are programs and technology available that the ladies who got things done in the 1920s and ’30s could never have dreamed possible. Yet one thing that has stayed constant through the ages is the commitment to creating a central gathering place for learning. delray beach magazine

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Meet a few of your neighbors—who are helping grow your food. Each farm is different in its own wonderful way. The family operation with the impressive retail operation. The tiny place in the shadows of progress that caters mostly to South Florida chefs. The multigenerational mega-operation, the hydroponic field-to-table business venture, the flower farm that started amid a midlife reinvention. And they’re all right here in Palm Beach County. We might be known for our beaches and our shopping and our propensity to throw bad elections, but drive just 10 minutes west, past the freeways and all the great shopping, and there it is: a world of agriculture. Indeed, farming is a $2 billion business in Palm Beach County and accounts for 37 percent of the land use.  So join us as we venture out. Close your eyes. See the fields. Smell the fresh dirt. Try hard enough, and you might even spy an otter in a canal. Our local farmers toil, day in and day out, to bring us the finest and the freshest. For this, we are grateful. By Emily J. minor • photography By aaron Bristol

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Steve Bedner from Bedner’s in Boynton Beach

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Nancy Roe

Boynton Beach owners: Father aNd soN, Jim aldermaN aNd Jimmy aldermaN Jr.

Boynton Beach ProPrietors: NaNcy aNd charlie roe f you’re looking for an easy way to make money, this isn’t it. With just a half-dozen farmhands—if that—Nancy Roe and her husband, Charlie, run a small farm in the shadows of a South Florida country club development, selling their fresh produce to well-known chefs and members of a growing CSA co-op. There’s no retail operation. There’s no farm stand out on State Road 441. “What we do is really pretty inefficient,” she says. But it’s working—at least for now.  At Green Cay Produce, the Roes lease about 10 acres from Ted and Trudy Winsberg, who came to Palm Beach County in the late 1950s and started farming this peculiar Florida land. Today, the place still has its quirks. The plots are often a tad weedy. Sometimes a new plant breed doesn’t actually sprout into action. But the Roes are old-time agriculturists and plant researchers, and together they raise wonderful things like a killer Brazilian eggplant, Brussels sprouts—which they sell right on the stalk—and Tuscan 62

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kale, so good for chip-making they can’t keep it around. Prominent Florida chefs swear by this produce, and trek to Green Cay for spinach, radishes, broccoli, cauliflower or whatever is ready for market, often fiddling with their recipes to make way for what looks good that day. CSA customers are always getting a special surprise in their boxes. Adding a bit of bucolic wonder to all this hard work are the Winsbergs, still living in the old Florida cracker house they moved into 50-plus years ago, having sold 170 acres to Palm Beach County 15 years ago with the caveat that the land would be restored to wetland condition. Every morning, Ted rides his bike to that park, Green Cay Nature Center on Hagen Ranch Road, and walks the boardwalks that now cut through the land he once worked. “This is all possible because of Ted and Trudy,” Nancy says. But Winsberg shrugs that off. “I’m retired,” he says. “She does all the work now.”

lderman Farms is a family affair. “My dad came to South Florida after attending the University of Florida,” says Jimmy Alderman Jr., a fifth-generation Floridian. “He used to sell fertilizer.” From there, Jim Alderman started a popular U-pick farm in Riviera Beach. Then, sensing change even back then, he started growing specialty items—things like basil, cilantro, arugula, dill. All well before anyone else was into things like curled parsley. “(Dad) got out of the retail and into the wholesale markets,” says Jimmy Jr. Today, the father-son team operates four different farms totaling about 1,000 acres. Two of the four properties grow just organic. “We started with about 150 acres, and our idea was to grow beans and corn organically,” says Jimmy Jr. “It grew into something completely different.” Indeed, the Aldermans are now one of the biggest growers of organic produce in the United States, packing and shipping out of their main Boynton Beach plant to retailers as far away as Canada. “We had no idea, to be perfectly honest,” he says. “What organic teaches us is to go back to the ways they used to do it a long time ago and grow a tomato the way your grandfather used to grow a tomato. “That’s what organic is, really.” That, and a whole lot of rules and regulations. The Alderman’s organic farms are in Wellington and Loxahatchee, and a third is in the works in Indiantown. The traditional farms operate in Delray Beach and Boynton Beach. And everything is separate. The family, which employs as many as 300 people during high harvest time, uses one fleet of tractors and trucks for their organic produce and another for the conventional products. But international competition is tough on American farmers, who are faced with higher grow standards, he says. “Mexican farmers are using the USDA organic label and shipping it here and, in my opinion, they shouldn’t be able to do that,” says Alderman, who says the inspection process in Mexico is virtually nonexistent. Still, the Aldermans are starting to break into some Florida grocery chains, which is a huge accomplishment and something smaller farmers simply can’t do. “Our orders might be just 20 boxes, two times a week,” he says. “You’re never going to make any money doing that. But we do it and hope that one day it will pay off.” After all, Jimmy Alderman has two young kids, who love the farm. But he has other ideas. “Hopefully,” he says, “they’ll become doctors.”

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Jimmy Alderman

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Steve and Marie Bedner inside their retail store

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Boynton Beach Owners: several generatiOns Of the arthur Bedner family an a family farming business survive on just cucumbers and peppers, year after year after year? Not really. And that’s why Bedner’s has grown into what it is today. Perhaps the most creative granddaddy of Palm Beach County farming operations, Bedner’s has a unique retail side that has grown by leaps and bounds, mostly out of necessity. Faced with the knowledge that the family had to step up business and marketing if they wanted to compete with commercial grocers, Marie Bedner said they began to branch out about five years ago, adding the large farm store, hayrides, birthday parties and farm tours. Today their retail shop is full of specialty items, everything from homemade salad dressings to organic eggs and fresh-squeezed juices. But it’s the Bedner produce that keeps the market going strong. So how did this operation get its start? Grandpa, of course. In the early 1950s, Arthur Bedner and his new bride, Henrietta, moved from Bridgeville, Pa., to Palm Beach County with the dream of starting a new life in Florida farming. The farm officially took root—get it?—in 1960 and today is run by Arthur’s three sons and several of his grandchildren. Marie married into the operation but handles all the marketing. So why the retail shop? Aren’t their commercial sales enough? “We always had a garden of our own,” she says. “We’d take our corn or whatever to the doctor’s office or give it to friends, and everyone was always like, ‘Where can I buy this?’” Next thing you know, she was worrying about things like NAFTA and root rot and whether Florida’s agriculture commissioner was going to help them get more fresh Florida produce in the public schools. (He has.) Today the family owns 1,500 acres, some of the land as far north as Jupiter, and grows hundreds of species, everything from romaine lettuce, peppers, cucumbers, yellow squash, zucchini, white corn and green beans to spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, strawberries and tomatoes. The farm’s U-Pick market is only open during certain seasons, so you’ll need to call if you want to pick strawberries or tomatoes. Interested in having a birthday party or family gathering? The Bedners will churn you up some homemade ice cream—and they’ll let the wheels on the tractor do the cranking. “There really isn’t anybody else like us,” Marie says. To that we say, amen.

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Loxahatchee Owners: Darrin anD JODi swank ow did a Jewish girl from New York end up at the end of a dirt road in Loxahatchee, married to a farmer, raising three kids on 20 acres of farmland? Jodi Swank asks herself that. A lot. “We bought this right before 9-11,” says Jodi, a former highend travel agent. “The whole food movement was just taking off. We were in the right place at the right time, that’s for sure.” Combining their savings, Darrin Swank, who grew up in a family of farmers in rural Pennsylvania, and Jodi, the daughter of a kosher butcher, set out to grow beautiful, fresh produce via hydroponic grow beds. They start their plants from seed in the greenhouse, then move them to the shade houses, where a simple but sophisticated watering system nurtures things along. No pesticides. Darrin and Jodi Swank

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No herbicides. No fungicides.  The nutrient-enriched water is pumped underground up into the grow beds, then sprinkled into the plants via soaker hoses. The whole grow operation is pitched, so the water drains down and back into the nutrient tanks, where it’s used over and over. “It’s unique,” Darrin says. “We’re specialty growers and what we do is very, very high tech. We waste very little.” With Darrin running the farm—they actively plant about 10 of their 20 acres—and Jodi running the business and marketing, the couple has created a bit of a niche for themselves. They grow more than 260 varieties of produce including leaf lettuces, specialty greens, cooking greens, baby and full-size vegetables, edible flowers, herbs, tomatoes and micro greens and herbs. One of their biggest retail outlets is the West Palm Beach Green Market, which runs from fall until the end of April. They also offer their fresh produce—whatever is in season—to about five dozen families that are members of their Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) co-op. But, as any farmer will tell you, South Florida farming takes some ingenuity to make ends meet. So the Swanks recently started Swank Table, a field-to-table event that’s catching on like arugula at the White House. Once a month, they open their farm to prominent chefs, who cook up a feast using Swank produce and local farm products. The last one of the season is April 7, and the price is $150 each. “It’s fantastic,” Jodi says. “Everyone who comes out here just goes crazy.” And no one goes home hungry. Ever. march/april


Loxahatchee Owner: Laurie raid ometimes it takes a dead end to get you where you want to go, and that’s what happened with Royal Palm Beach resident Laurie Raid. Raid was doing what she’d been doing for years—that is, working on breeding peppers for local growers—when the economy took a dive and she found herself faced with this: What next? She hadn’t worked as a plant virologist for years. (Hey, mushrooms and geraniums get sick, too.) She didn’t really want to go back to school. What? This nature nut who is practically Mother Nature herself was supposed to go work in a classroom? So when a local farmer, a colleague, mentioned that nobody locally was growing decent flowers, Raid started thinking. Why not?  “I’d always loved flowers,” she says. And that’s how Laurie Raid came to be the proud and weary owner of a blossoming operation called Seed to Bloom, growing flowers on about four acres of rented land in Loxahatchee, and then taking them to market. Need a bridal bouquet of freshcut Florida flowers? An amazing display for the dining table in the home that you’re staging for an open house? A vase of something special for a Saturday dinner party? She’s your go-to girl. “If you didn’t love it, you wouldn’t do it,” Raid says. “When you’re out here in August moving horse manure, you gotta love it.” And while that sounds a little too literal for most of us, Raid is actually making a go of it. Sure, there have been some roadblocks. “I can’t compete with South America,” she says. “They’re cheap.” And while the South American growers are great about flying their flowers into Miami every day and trucking them up the coast, do they go march/april

Laurie Raid

to the Lake Worth Green Market every Saturday with cute little bundles of sunflowers, all tied up with tissue and ribbon? Are their zinnias and snapdragons and lisianthus flowers wrapped up with basil and dill so they smell extra nice? We think not. So, she’s soldiered on, through bad weather and tricky cash flow and hungry caterpillars. In just three short years, she’s already planting some vegetables and taking them to market. Just don’t expect her to take a day off this time of year. “There’s basketball March Madness and then there’s floral March Madness, where everything is just bloom, bloom, bloom,” she says. But she’s not complaining, really.  Mother Nature could have worse problems. delray beach magazine

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erer Photo by Wayne D. Sch

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F

irst, it was an All-American City—twice. Then the stakes got higher when Delray Beach was one of several small towns in the country up for Rand McNally’s “Most Fun Small Town in America,” a competition it won handily a few months ago. The national exposure that ensued came as no surprise to locals, snowbirds and longtime visitors who have known for years that Delray Beach was one of South Florida’s best-kept secrets for a great vacation. And, indeed, Delray has it all, from fine dining and gorgeous beaches to a vibrant downtown and fun hotels and resorts. There are museums, Segway tours, deep-sea fishing and kite boarding. There is golf and shark feedings and fashion shows and jazz. There are festivals, a 100-foot Christmas tree, farmers’ markets and Elvis. And it only gets better. Welcome to Destination Delray—the most fun small town in America and your perfect South Florida experience.

SpECiAl ADvERTiSiNg SECTioN


AttrActions & diversions

Visitor’s Guide

The Delray Center for the Arts at Old School Square is the town’s cultural center and includes: the Cornell Museum of Art and American Culture, the 323-seat Crest Theater and the outdoor Entertainment Pavilion. Corner of Atlantic and Swinton avenues.

The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum is the former home of the late Solomon D. Spady, who was the most prominent African-American educator and community leader in Delray Beach from 1922 to 1957. 170 N.W. Fifth Ave., 561/279-8883, spadymuseum.com Delray Yacht Cruises at Veterans Park in Delray Beach offers cruises down the Intracoastal waterway as well as private charters aboard the Lady Atlantic and Lady Delray. 801 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 561/243-0686, delraybeachcruises.com. The Sandoway House Nature Center is in a historic 1936 beachfront home on the National Register of Historic Places and preserved as a unique Nature Center. 142 S. Ocean, Delray Beach, 561/274-7263. The only museum in the United States devoted to Japanese culture, the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens features a 32,000-squarefoot building, as well as the one of the largest Japanese gardens of its kind. 4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach, 561/495-0233. A diving trip to the reefs off Delray Beach provides an up-close view of marine life, from small reef fish such as sergeant majors and angelfish to rays and an occasional barracuda. The “Delray Wreck” is just 150 yards off the south end of Delray’s public beach. The Scuba Center, 885 S.E. Sixth Ave., Delray Beach, 561/278-7020, scubadelray.com The Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 30 minutes west of Delray, covers about 145,000 acres in the northern Everglades and has walking and bike trails, canoeing, boating (there are three boat ramps), fishing, etc. 10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach, 561/732-3684, loxahatchee.fws.gov. Airboat Rides are offered at the refuge’s southern end through Loxahatchee Everglades Tours, 15490 Loxahatchee Road, Parkland, 800/683-5873. At the south end of Delray’s beach is Delray Beach Water Sports, renting all kinds of beach toys, from Hobie cats to kayaks. 401 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, 561/279-0008, delraybeachwatersports.com bocamag.com/delray

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Great Places to Stay crane’s BeachHouse Hotel & tiki Bar This intimate oasis has a laid-back, tropical vibe, complete with live music and quite an in-the-know scene at its Tiki Bar. [ 82 Gleason St., Delray Beach, 561/278-1700, cranesbeachhouse.com the colony Hotel & cabana club This historic resort hotel in the center of downtown Delray is home to the hotel’s famous "Porch Bar" overlooking vibrant Atlantic Avenue, and also has a charming private beach club with quaint, Old Florida Club atmosphere. [ 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 561/276-4123, thecolonyhotel.com delray Beach Marriott Right across A1A from the beach, this comfortably appointed hotel features the excellent Seacrest Grill and nightly entertainment in O’Grady’s Lounge. [ 10 N. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, 561/274-3200, delraybeachmarriott.com Historic Hartman House This little gem of a B&B is a historic landmark that recalls “an easier, gentler time,” while offering modern amenities like Wi-Fi and flat-screen TVs. [ 302 N.E. Seventh Ave., Delray Beach, 866/7872302, delraybeachbedandbreakfast.com the seagate Hotel and spa One of the newest properties in town, this luxury boutique hotel is perfectly situated between the beach and downtown, and it has a beach club. [ 1000 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 877/57-SEAGATE, theseagatehotel.com sundy House Famous for its lush tropical gardens and romantic atmosphere, Sundy House also has great dining and is close to all the Atlantic Avenue action. [ 106 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach, 561/272-5678, sundyhouse.com Wright By the sea This comfortable beachfront hotel is loaded with Old Florida charm, from its palm-shaded nooks to its observation deck on the ocean. A Delray favorite for generations. [ 1901 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, 561/278-3355, wbtsea.com

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For the most comprehensive and up to date special event information for Delray Beach go to

www.visitdelraybeach.org/annual-events


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St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Party 45th Annual Delray Beach

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Co-sponsored by

March 15 & 16, 2013 Downtown Delray Beach www.festivalmanagementgroup.com • 561-279-0907 Friday, March 15th

SiAmSA CELtiC CELEbrAtiOn (Delray Beach Center for the Arts pavilion)

A traditional Celtic Celebration with Irish dancing, live music, bag pipes, beer & corned beef Saturday, March 16th Pre-Post Event (11am – 7pm) (front lawn of Delray Beach Center for the Arts)

Featuring live music, full liquor bars, food, vendors and more!

Parade (2pm -4:30pm) Park Tavern’s “St. Patty’s in the Park” (11am – 11 pm) Live music, outdoor bars, food court and VIP Tent overlooking parade!

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p www.delrayaffair.com • 561-279-1380

A FREE three day arts & crafts show nicknamed The Greatest Arts & Crafts Show under the sun. The Delray Affair is spread over 10 blocks and three public parks in the picturesque seaside village of Delray Beach. Over 725 Artists & Crafters selected through a competitive selection processes. Additional entertainment with Street Performances at select locations throughout the event.


[ business roundup ]

By Rich Pollack

lights, camera, legacy Delray Camera Shop is one of the city’s classic independent businesses.

DElRay camERa shoP

186 N.E. Second Ave., Delray Beach 561/278-3331 “He asked me if I had a job. When I said no, he said ‘Come in on Monday,’” Reich says. “I never really had a plan. I just showed up for work, and here I am.” Today, you’ll still find Reich behind the counter of Delray Camera Shop, which hasn’t changed much in the more than 50 years it’s 74

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hris Reich never planned on owning a camera shop. In fact, if he’d had his way 45 years ago, chances are he’d be an adventurer or racing motorcycles for a living. But fate, and a storeowner named Dick Healy, intervened one day in 1968 when Reich first walked into the old Delray Camera Shop to get a college ID photo taken.

been just off the corner of Pineapple Grove Way and Northeast Second Street. Small, dimly lit and crammed with cameras, binoculars and accessories, the shop is a throwback to the camera shops of years gone by, when you could walk in, talk to the owner and get good advice on what equipment to purchase and, most importantly, how best to use it. Packed with personalities—including Reich, who has owned it since 1986—Delray Camera Shop has served generations of local residents over the years and evolved as a gathering place for photographers of all skill levels. In an era when small independent camera

shops are falling by the wayside—victims of big-box stores and websites that can offer customers discounts and sales tax breaks—Delray Camera Shop remains a Delray landmark. It has succeeded and survived, in part because of an extensive inventory of cameras and accessories you won’t find at Walmart, bolstered by strong relationships built up over the years. “Everybody here loves photography,” Reich says. “We all want to share our knowledge with our customers and help them get better pictures. It’s been that way since day one.” Since the Palm Beach Photographic Centre, once right down the street in Pineapple Grove, march/april


Delray Chamber Hosts 51st Annual Delray Affair

The Delray Camera team: John Petford, Jim Ward, Chris Reich and Jim Greene

moved to West Palm Beach a couple of years ago, Delray Camera has become the sole independent camera store in Delray Beach. Known as a local dealer of Nikon, Leica, Olympus and Fuji equipment, the store draws customers from as far south as Miami and as far north as Martin and St. Lucie counties. “I know I could save a couple of bucks by ordering equipment online, or buying it at a

At Delray Camera Shop, it’s not unusual for Reich, or his veteran team of Jim Greene and Jim Ward, to spend an hour or two with customers helping them find the right camera and teaching them how to use it. “We have generations of families that just keep coming back,” Reich says. While the outside of the shop hasn’t changed much, some aspects of the business

“People always ask us, ‘What takes the best pictures?’” Reich says. “The answer is always the same. It’s the person behind the camera.” big-box store,” says professional photographer and longtime customer, Jerry Lower. “But I love a local business where you can walk in, hold a new lens or camera body in your hands, and learn a few things before you buy.” There’s another factor that draws customers like Lower to the store. “The guys at Delray Camera are not only knowledgeable about the equipment they sell and service, they are also fun to talk with,” he says. “They’re comfortable dealing with a working professional one minute and an aspiring amateur the next.” march/april

have. For example, in the new digital age, the shop no longer processes large quantities of film, but it makes prints instead from media cards and discs; it also converts prints to digital images. “A lot of customers trust us with their old pictures,” Reich says. Reich also added a studio in the back of the store so customers can come in to get studio shots, and he beefed up the inventory of binoculars. “Every year we get busier and busier,” Reich says.

The Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce once again will stage one of the city’s signature events, the popular Delray Affair. This year, the largest arts and crafts festival in the Southeastern United States will come a little early, taking place April 5–7 in downtown Delray Beach. Called the “Greatest Show Under the Sun,” Delray Affair stretches for 12 blocks and includes more than 600 exhibitors from around the world. Last year, the Delray Affair attracted artists and crafters from 12 countries and 30 states, each offering something special and unique. Visitors also will find great food— from conch fritters and sweet potato pie to hot dogs and other treats—and outstanding entertainment. The show takes place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. the Friday and Saturday after Easter and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

Chamber Inducts New Board Chairman

The greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce is welcoming a new board chairman, Francisco Perez-Azua. A local architect and real-estate agent with a background in economic development, Perez-Azua follows past chair Kimberly Camejo of City National Bank. Other members of the chamber’s 2013 executive committee include Scott Porten, chair elect; Charles F. Cannone, vice chair of finance; Dan Castrillon, vice chair of special events; Brian Cheslack, vice chair of legal; Kelli Freeman, vice chair of programs; Kurt Lehmann, vice chair of membership; Connor Lynch, vice chair, of government affairs; Donna Sloan, vice chair of communications; and Gregg Weiss, vice chair of economic development.

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dinner in the sky

About the event: Delray Beach diners were treated to one of the most unusual dining experiences in the world, when Dinner in the Sky hoisted 22 hungry patrons 180 feet into the air. The special meal, hosted by the Delray Beach Marketing Cooperative and presented by Lamborghini Palm Beach, was only the third Dining in the Sky event held in the United States. The sold-out, sky-high seating (thanks to a giant crane) featured a multicourse dinner from Caffé Luna Rosa, and Candyfish by Union. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Doreen Zic-Hock and John Hock Jose Morazán, Amparo Morazán and Ken Milordis Kristin and Oblix Hans Wan Ki Ho, Johanna Jablon, and Tara Noll Kevin Killough and Alexia Roquette

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10-10-10 party

About the event: More than 400 guests attended Delray’s own Crane’s BeachHouse Hotel and Tiki Bar for the establishment’s “10-10-10 Win-Win-Win Birthday Party.” The exciting event celebrated the hotel’s 10th birthday, and showcased 10 popular restaurants and 10 local nonprofit organizations. By popular vote of party attendees, Prime Delray was voted “Best Bite on the Ave,” and Take Heed Theatre was awarded a $500 donation. Guests also enjoyed performances from DYMiN and the Atlantic High School jazz band and drum line. [ 1 ] Back row: Christopher Hyde, Marlon Harris, Johnny Stokes, Sarah George, Ashley Mileschkowsky and Gary McClellan; Front Row: Jill Abbey, Tara Barrett, Cathy Balestriere, Christine Therien, DYMiN and Manny Quizhpi [ 2 ] Sean Egiziano, Taylor Townsend, Irene Arrogranti, Johndavid Hensley and Amy Gallahue [ 3 ] Nancy Weissman and Dayna Kreitzer [ 4 ] Kristopher Ferranti and the Atlantic High School Jazz Band [ 5 ] Zoe Fromer

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[ out & about ] veteran’s success

About the event: Veteran’s Pathway to Business Success raised $100,000 at their first fundraiser, a dinner cruise aboard the Lady Atlantic in Delray Beach. The nonprofit, all-volunteer organization awards monetary grants with no fees, interest or payback attached, to Florida veterans of the Iraq or Afghanistan wars. Veteran Fred Pollino was the first recipient. [ 1 ] Maj. Gen. Joseph J. Taluto, Jerry Kramer and Fred Pollino [ 2 ] Steve and Lidia Antal [ 3 ] Herb Romanow, JoAnne Goldberg and Judy Romanow 1

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form meets fashion

About the event: Guests enjoyed a night of mingling, delicious appetizers and high fashion at Sklar Furnishings during their “Form Meets Fashion” event. Attendees were able to stroll through the luxury showroom, while viewing fashion styles from Barbara Katz and listening to live jazz. Proceeds from the event benefited Hospice of Palm Beach County Foundation. Boca Raton magazine was a proud sponsor of this event.

[ 4 ] Amy Cohen and Cynthia Sandler [ 5 ] Ken Reichle and Barbara Lambourghini

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sips for soccer and lacrosse

About the event: The Delray Beach Athletic Club held “Sips for Soccer & Lacrosse� at SoLita Italian Restaurant & the Parlor Lounge to celebrate 35 years of sports youth programming. The night paid tribute to the volunteer coaches of the organization. Guests enjoyed complimentary drinks and appetizers. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

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Brian Johnson, Kevin Finneran and Scott Silver Elissa Masler with Candy George Daniella Coy with Ronald Browne Jackie Ritter and Nicole Morone Kurt Lehmann, Brian Thompson, Candace Rojas and Joan Lingmerth

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a night for sight

About the event: South Florida patrons of “A Night for Sight,� a benefit for Schepens Eye Research Institute, were honored at a floating cocktail reception and silent auction aboard a beautiful yacht in Palm Beach. Guests were able to tour the 201-foot vessel, and sample delicacies, while bidding on a variety of art, jewels and keepsakes. The reception served as the kickoff for the main event held at The Breakers. [ 1 ] Laurie Silvers and Mitch Rubenstein [ 2 ] Monika Preston, Beth Broberg, Cherie Toufanian [ 3 ] Kathryn and Leo Vecellio [ 4 ] Tara Tobin and Annie Falk [ 5 ] Rachel Docekal and Drew Rothermel 5

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2013 SuperSTAR Spectacular Gala wednesday, april 10, 2013 at

Join us at 6:00pm for an evening of superhero proportions Witness daring performances by our STAR heroes and artwork to stun the senses For sponsorship or tickets, please contact

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ggenovese@milagrocenter.org 561-279-2970


Celebrating our 11th Annual Wine & Food Weekend!

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through the event’s world-class weekend of The Bacchus Bash, Vintner Dinners and The Grand Tasting.

Benefiting

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dining guide Your resource for Greater DelraY beach’s finest restaurants

review

50 OCEAN

50 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, 561/278-3364

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march/april

if You Go Price ranGe: Entreés $23–$39 creDit carDs: All major cards hours: Lunch Mon.–Sat. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Dinner Sun.–Thurs. 5–10 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 5–11 p.m. Brunch Sunday 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

Beef carpaccio

a room With a VieW When you’ve got killer views of the beach and Atlantic Ocean your decor issues are pretty much solved. Still, the redo of the old Upper Deck space is a nice one. It’s now enclosed by floor-to-ceiling windows with a backlit blue quartz bar, cozy lounge area with comfy sofas and overstuffed chairs off to one side, and a semiprivate wine room. The lights are low and the noise level reasonable. If you’re looking for more action, the covered wraparound deck overlooks the nightly party scene at adjacent SandBar, another member of the Boston’s family. The choice is between you and your eardrums.

CriSTiNA MOrgADO

hanging a no-tablecloth restaurant into a white-tablecloth restaurant is not quite so difficult as turning lead into gold or campaign promises into reality. But it’s not exactly chopped foie gras either. So you’ve got to give the folks at Boston’s on the Beach credit for a well-executed remake of the top floor of their formerly über-casual beachfront restaurant—now, a white-tableclothfriendly space more attuned to fine dining than to burgers, Jägermeister shots, TV sports and music loud enough to make your ears bleed. The menu is inventive enough to be intriguing yet not so much as to frighten animals and small children. Duck confit egg rolls are a fun way to consume shards of rich, velvety quacker, though they’d be better if the julienne veggies packed with them were crisp rather than mushy—or if the “spicy currant chutney” packed real heat. Lobster bisque was a skilled knockoff of a classic—smooth and creamy, with admirable lobster intensity and floating a slightly soggy but still appreciated lobster fritter. Fried Ipswich clam bellies were more than just something to drag through an excellent Key lime tartar sauce. Tender and delicate, the plump little nuggets released a blast of clammy goodness with every bite. Potato-crusted grouper nailed the spud-n-seafood thing. If the fish was just the tiniest bit overcooked, its golden potato crust, surprisingly subtle roasted garlic-thyme cream sauce and truffled cauliflower puree with the texture of molten silk made up for it. A trio of feather-light beignets could make up for anything, up to and including original sin. Like cinnamon-dusted puffs of fried air, they dissolve in your mouth, leaving behind traces of chunky blueberry compote and nutty dulce de leche cream. If you could eat the view from 50 Ocean, it would taste this good. —Bill Citara

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[ dining guide ] Dining Key $ Inexpensive: under $17 $$ Moderate: $18 to $35 $$$ Expensive: $36 to $50 $$$$ Very expensive: $50+ delray beach 32 east—32 E. Atlantic Ave. contemporary american. At a time when chefs and restaurants seem to be constantly shouting their own praises, Nick Morfogen and 32 East go quietly about their way of serving thoughtfully conceived, finely crafted dishes with a minimum of fuss and artifice. The menu changes daily, but recent examples of Morfogen’s culinary expertise include plump scallops given an elegant bouillabaisse treatment and fork-tender venison with a terrific Asiago-fig risotto. When the food is this good, you don’t need to shout. • Dinner daily. 561/276-7868. $$$ 75 main—270 E. Atlantic Ave. contemporary american. After a bit of rocky start, this Atlantic

Avenue sibling of Zach Erdem’s celebrity magnet Southampton parent is the equal of any restaurant in town, thanks mostly to the work of chef-turnedrestaurant doctor Mark Militello. The food here is less about breaking new culinary ground than being really delicious, and whether grilled artichoke with frothy lemon beurre blanc, immaculately fresh tuna tartare, salmon with a subtly tart-sweet balsamic-honey glaze or luscious rum-infused budino, it is. Lunch and dinner daily. • 561/243-7975. $$$

atlantic grille—1000 E. Atlantic Ave. Seafoodcontemporary american. This posh restaurant in the luxurious Seagate Hotel & Spa mines quality ingredients for maximum flavor. A light, chunky gazpacho with soothing cucumber cream is perfect warm-weather dining, and though braised short ribs with mashed potatoes is heartier fare, it’s hard to resist the gum-tender meat ringed by a silken potato purée. The butterscotch-white chocolate bread pudding with rum crème anglaise (an occasional special) is pure wickedness. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/665-4900. $$

brulé bistro—200 N.E. Second Ave., Suite 109. american. This cozy Pineapple Grove restaurant has small tables as well as less formal seating, a market

32 East

counter and a wall of very good wines. It has the ambience of an intimate neighborhood bistro (you can take out gourmet meals as well) with the culinary IQ of a very fine restaurant. It is local Delray at its best, with entrées like Snake River Kobe flank au poivre to Maine lobster bisque with fennel pollen to veal scalloppini. This may be your catcher’s mitt for great downtown dining when you can’t decide where to go. • Lunch and dinner Mon.–Sat. 561/274-2046. $$

buddha sky bar—217 E. Atlantic Ave. Pan asian. Don’t miss a meal at this stylish Asia-meetsindustrial chic spot with a view of the Delray skyline. Chinese-influenced dim sum is inspired, while rock shrimp tempura and Wagyu tenderloin skewers with twin chimichurri sauces touch the heart and the taste buds. Veggie fried rice is exemplary thanks to the kitchen’s application of wok chi. • Dinner Wed.–Sun. 561/450-7557. $$

burgerfi—6 S. Ocean Blvd. american. The burger at this snappy oceanfront bistro—all-natural Black Angus beef—is A big hit, whether a single “All the Way” burger (American cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle and “secret sauce”) or the $10 Ultimate Cheeseburger, which adds the same garnishes to a pair of ground brisket burgers, plus Swiss and blue cheeses. You can customize your burger too, choosing from a roster of free add-ons like mayo, relish and grilled onions, and from a list of “premium” toppings. There is also a selection of hot dogs (try the Wagyu version) and there are wines and craft beers too, plus frozen custards in all manner of guises. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/278-9590. $ cabana el rey—105 E. Atlantic Ave. cuban tropical. Little Havana is alive and well in Delray Beach. The menu is a palette-pleasing travelogue. Mariquitas (fried banana chips) are a tasty way to start your meal. For dinner, seafood paella is a winner, with mussels, shrimp, conch, octopus, scallops and clams. And the churrasco is terrific. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/274-9090. $$

caffé luna rosa—34 S. Ocean Blvd. Italian.

cristina Morgado

This favorite is always lively, and alfresco dining is the preferred mode. Entrée choices are enticing, but we went with the penne alla vodka with pancetta, tomato and basil. Also delicious was the costoletta di vitello, a center-cut 14-ounce veal chop lightly breaded and served either Milanese or parmigiana. For dessert, you can’t go wrong with the cheesecake imported from the Carnegie Deli. • Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 561/274-9404. $$

casa di pepe—189 N.E. Second Ave. Italian. A welcoming staff, familiar Italian dishes done right and moderate prices define this cozy spot with a spacious outdoor patio. Two could share the fist-sized 84

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[ dining guide ] a Delray favorite. The straightforward menu focuses on entrées, especially the famed Allen Brothers beef; choose from numerous cuts and preparations—and add a lobster tail for good measure. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/265-0122. $$

DIG

cristina Morgado

gol! the taste of brazil—411 E. Atlantic Ave. Steak house. The classic churrascaria formula— grilled meats, served until you can’t eat another bite—is done efficiently and quite satisfyingly. Start off at the well-provisioned salad bar, which offers more than three dozen preludes to meat eating, among them well-made calamari and ham salads, rounds of smoky eggplant, and rich and delightfully old-fashioned four-cheese chicken. Meats with a bit of fat are the best choices, especially the garlicky sirloin, slices of medium-rare flank steak and hugely flavorful beef ribs. • Dinner daily. 561/272-6565. $$

meatball with fresh-tasting tomato sauce and dollop of milky basil, before moving on to house-made linguine with clams, tender veal Francese and one of the best versions of tiramisu this side of Veneto. • Dinner Mon.–Sat. 561/279-7371. $$

city oyster—213 E. Atlantic Ave. Seafood. This stylish mainstay of Big Time Restaurant Group serves up reasonably priced seafood that never disappoints, such as crab-stuffed shrimp with jalapeño cheddar grits, bacon, shiitake mushrooms and warm vinaigrette. • Lunch Mon.–Sun. Dinner nightly. Outdoor dining. 561/272-0220. $$

cut 432—432 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Steak house. Hipper decor, a more casual vibe and an inventive take on steak-house favorites make this sleek restaurant just different enough to be interesting. Starters such as ceviche (prepared Peruvian style) and ultrarich oysters Rockefeller are first-rate, while the wet-aged beef is appropriately tender and tasty. • Dinner daily. 561/272-9898. $$$

d’angelo trattoria—9 S.E. Seventh Ave. Italian. Don’t go expecting all the tired old “Italian” culinary clichés at Angelo Elia’s wickedly stylish trattoria. Instead, open your palate to more authentic and exciting Roman-style cuisine, like roasted veal bone marrow with brisk caper-parsley pesto, creamy-dreamy

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burrata with roasted fava beans and watercress salad, the classic tonnarelli cacio e pepe (“cheese and pepper”) and the best gelato this side of a real Roman trattoria. • Dinner daily. 561/330-1237. $$

deck 84—840 E. Atlantic Ave. Contemporary American. Burt Rapoport’s ode to laid-back tropical dining is like a day at the beach without getting sand between your toes. Though the restaurant is casual, the kitchen takes its food seriously, whether the steallar flatbreads, the thick and juicy 10-ounce special blend burger or homey apple cobbler. And the waterfront location just seems to make everything taste better. • Lunch Mon.–Fri. Brunch Sat.–Sun. Dinner daily. 561/665-8484. $

dig—5199 W. Atlantic Ave. Contemporary American. Proprietor Robert Greenfield has turned the former Greenfield’s restaurant into organichealthy-sustainable DIG (“Doing It Green”). Luckily, diners don’t have to suffer in pursuit of gastronomic rectitude with dishes like plump pan-seared diver scallops with pineapple-mango salsa, and luscious chocolate mousse cake. The four different greens mixes at the salad bar are crisp and pristinely fresh. • Lunch Mon.–Sat. Dinner daily. 561/638-0500. $$ fifth avenue grill—821 S. Federal Highway. American. Since 1989, this upscale tavern has been

greek bistro—1832 S. Federal Highway. Greek. If you care more about well-prepared, generously portioned and fairly priced food than Opa!-shouting waiters, you’ll love this modest little restaurant. Flaky, overstuffed spanikopita and miraculously light and delicate beef meatballs should be at the top of your appetizer list, and though entrées don’t always reach those heights, both a long-braised lamb shank and grilled whole snapper are certainly satisfying. And the baklava is great. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/266-8976. $ henry’s—16850 Jog Road. American. This casual, unpretentious restaurant from Burt Rapoport in the west part of town never fails to delight diners. Expect attentive service and crisp execution of everything— from meat loaf, burgers and fried chicken to flatbreads and hefty composed salads. • Lunch Mon.–Sat. Dinner nightly. 561/638-1949. $$

house of siam—25 N.E. Second Ave. Thai. The normally riotous flavors of Thai cuisine are muted at this charming, family-friendly spot, but that seems to suit diners just fine. Dishes, well-prepared and generously portioned, include steamed chicken and shrimp dumplings with sweet soy dipping sauce and crisp-fried duck breast in a very mild red curry sauce. • Lunch Mon.–Fri. Dinner daily. 561/330-9191. $$

il girasole—1911 S. Federal Highway. Northern Italian. This South Florida classic is not trendy, but it offers a level of comfort and consistency that has been bringing people back for 30 years. The food is fine hearty Italian, with excellent service. Try the veal Kristy or the frogs legs. • Dinner Tues.–Sun. 561/272-3566. $$ j&j seafood bar & grill—634 E. Atlantic Ave. Seafood. This local favorite on the Avenue—owned by John Hutchinson (also the chef) and wife Tina—serves march/april


From local farms to you.

Local. Sustainable. Simple.

Dinner | Daily

Brunch | Saturday & Sunday

Pineapple Grove, Delray Beach | 561.381.9970 | maxsharvest.com


[ dining guide ] this eclectic gastropub, unless your office sports red leather and cowhide chairs, more than two dozen craft beers on tap and a menu that flits from burgers and fries to mussels. Don’t miss the restaurant’s winning take on the thick, juicy Prime beef burger and simply wicked maple-frosted donuts with bacon bits and two dipping sauces. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/276-3600. $$

Sundy House

prime—110 E. Atlantic Ave. Steak/Seafood. Prime is aptly named for its heart of the action location, classy neo-supper club decor, extensive wine list and roster of designer steaks. Starters and desserts fare better than entrées, especially plump, crabby Maryland-style crab cakes and indecently luscious chocolate bread pudding. Service is a strong suit too, so with a bit of work this good-looking restaurant will fully live up to its name. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/865-5845. $$$

up everything from burgers and wraps to a menu brimming with seafood options. Don’t forget to inquire about the stunning array of 10 specials—every night. • Lunch and dinner Tues.–Sun. 561/272-3390. $$

jimmy’s bistro—9 S. Swinton Ave. Eclectic. Look up “cozy” and “charming” in the dictionary, and you’ll see a picture of Jimmy Mills’ tiny restaurant. Jimmy’s cheerily unpretentious atmosphere applies to the eclectic menu, which flits from China to Italy to New Orleans at will. Best bets are a lovely salad of ripe tomatoes and fresh, milky house-made mozzarella; a rich, elegant version of lusty Cajun etouffee; and caramelized bananas in puff pastry with silken vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce. • Dinner daily. 561/865-5774. $$ la cigale—253 S.E. Fifth Ave. Mediterranean. It’s a pleasure watching the professionals here at work. That extends to the kitchen, which turns out gently updated and classically oriented dishes notable for the quality of their ingredients and careful preparation. Sweetbreads in chanterelle cream sauce are simply glorious; a barely grilled artichoke with mustardy remoulade is gloriously simple. And watching your server skillfully debone a whole (and impeccably fresh) Dover sole is almost as satisfying as eating it. • Dinner Mon.–Sat. 561/265-0600. $$

lemongrass bistro—420 E. Atlantic Ave. Pan-Asian. Casually hip ambience, friendly service, moderate prices and a blend of sushi and nouveau pan88

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Asian fare make this original Lemongrass and its three younger siblings some of the most popular eateries around. The quality of its seafood and care in its preparation are what gives Lemongrass its edge, as evidenced by impeccably fresh salmon, tuna and yellowtail sushi. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/278-5050. $

max’s harvest—169 N.E. Second Ave. Contemporary American. Restaurateur Dennis Max, instrumental in bringing the chef and ingredientdriven ethos of California cuisine to South Florida in the 1980s, is again at the forefront of the fresh, local, seasonal culinary movement. Max’s Harvest soars with dishes like plump Cedar Key clams with housemade tasso, savory bourbon-maple glazed pork belly, and crispy-skinned wild sockeye salmon with yuzutruffle vinaigrette. The made-to-order donuts are pure decadence. • Dinner daily. 561/381-9970. $$

old calypso—900 E. Atlantic Ave. Island. The restaurant is airy and wide-open, but the draw is the Intracoastal view. A popular happy hour takes place at the center bar, and during Sunday brunch, music is added. The food is reliable and consistent, from a rich roasted-corn and crabmeat chowder to real fried green tomatoes to crispy fried lobster tails. • Brunch Sun. Lunch and dinner daily. Outdoor dining. 561/279-2300. $$

the office—201 E. Atlantic Ave. Contemporary American. It’s a safe bet that your office is nothing like

scuola vecchia—522 E. Atlantic Ave. Neopolitan pizza. They like to say they make the “best pizza under the sun” and, well, we just have to agree. This bright new pizza and wine place makes a certified and serious Neopolitan pizza—according to standards set forth by The Associazone Pizzaliola Napolentani (APN). That means light flavorful dough, spanking fresh imported ingredients—and about as far away as you can get from the American smeary cheesy greasy version. Try the Kesté pizza: imported fresh bufula mozzarella, cherry tomatoes, proscuitto di Parma, rucala, shaved gran cru, extra virgin olive oil and basil. Pair that with a nice vino and you are transported to a pizzeria in Naples. In short: This is a don’t-miss Delray dining experence. Go now. • Lunch and dinner Tues.–Sun. 561/865-5923. $ sundy house—106 S. Swinton Ave. Contemporary American. Everyone knows about the spectacular garden, home to hundreds of species of exotic plants. But the comforting-contemporary food deserves notice too, realized in such dishes as expertly fried calamari with zesty Moroccanstyle aioli; savory rack of lamb crusted with herbs, mustard and horseradish; and pistachio-crusted salmon with marinated fennel, artichoke, sherry wine and a citrus gastrique served with black rice. Portions are enormous, so bring your appetite. • Lunch Tues.–Sat. Brunch Sun. Dinner Tues.–Sun. 561/272-5678. $$

tramonti—119 E. Atlantic Ave. Italian. With its roots in New York’s Angelo’s of Mulberry Street, this venue is always packed. Homemade stuffed manicotti is aromatic and glorious. Tramonti’s platter for two, containing fillet marsala, veal cutlet with prosciutto, fried zucchini and potato croquettes, is terrific. • Lunch Mon.–Sat. Dinner nightly. Outdoor dining. 561/272-1944. $$ march/april


Restaurant & Lounge

Dine

Drink

Dance

It’s a new day at 75 Main. New menu. New management. Attentive service and eclectic food. Enjoy fine dining in our inviting restaurant or getup and dance in our comfortably chic lounge. Delight in our late night tapas menu. You’re invited to experience the fusion of Southampton warmth and South Florida cool.

75maindelray.com 270 E. Atlantic Avenue Downtown Delray Beach

www.facebook.com/75MainDelray

561-243-7975

www.twitter.com/75MainDelray


[ dining guide ] Union

fried sweet and crispy, or a perfectly grilled piece of mahi or bouillabaisse overflowing with tender fish. Don’t miss one of the best Key lime pies around. • Lunch and dinner daily, Sunday brunch. 561/737-8822. $$

sushi simon—1614 S. Federal Highway. Japanese/sushi. Local sushi-philes jam the long, narrow dining room for a taste of such impeccable nigirizushi as hamachi and uni (only on Thursdays), as well as more elaborate dishes like the sublime snowy snapper Morimoto and opulent tuna tartare. Creative and more elaborate rolls are a specialty. This is arguably some of the best sushi in Palm Beach County. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/731-1819. $$ LAkE worth

aaron bristol

couco pazzo—915-917 Lake Ave. Italian. Despite

tryst—4 E. Atlantic Ave. Eclectic. It’s tough to beat this hotspot with the lovely outdoor patio, well-chosen selection of artisan beers and not-the-usual-suspect wines, and an eclectic “gastropub” menu of small and large plates. Try the crisp-fried rock shrimp with chipotle-mayonnaise sauce. • Lunch Mon.–Fri. Dinner nightly. 561/921-0201. $$

union—8 E. Atlantic Ave. Pan-Asian. To form a more perfect union this downtown purveyor of “Asian comfort food” has brought in wackymaki expert Candyfish Gourmet Sushi as a sort of restaurant-within-a-restaurant. Union dishes like salt-and-pepper calamari, pot stickers with panang curry sauce and “volcano” chicken wings are well-prepared if overly sweet. Candyfish’s sushi rolls blend all manner of fish and shellfish with cream cheese, fruits and veggies, and sauces in a riot of different combinations. Dinner Tues.–Sat. 561/330-4236. $$ vic & angelo’s—290 E. Atlantic Ave. Italian. God is in the details at this upscale trattoria, and He doesn’t miss much, including stellar service and an outstanding wine menu. Ingredients like Buffalo mozzarella, house-made pastas and San Marzano tomatoes are first-rate, and execution is spot on. Try the “Old School” meatball to start, the whole-wheat tagliatelle with garlic and chili-infused olive oil and the perfectly cooked veal chop. Portions are substantial. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/278-9570. $$$

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boynton bEAch bar louie—1500 Gateway Blvd. Eclectic. Attempting to split the difference between happening bar and American café, Bar Louie mostly succeeds, offering burgers, pizzas, fish tacos and a variety of salads, all at moderate prices and in truly daunting portions. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/853-0090. $

china dumpling—1899-5 N. Congress Ave. chinese. The dim sum basket is an absolute must-try. A choice of signature steamed dumplings are likewise spot on. The steak kew is delicious, and the clay pot casseroles are mighty enticing. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/737-2782. $ little house—480 E. Ocean Ave. contemporary American. There are lots of big flavors coming out of Chrissie Benoit’s Little House. But size as well as culinary boundaries haven’t really mattered to Wolfgang Puck alum Benoit. She cheerfully casts them aside to turn out such disparate dishes as a rich, cheesy savory bread pudding, plush India butter chicken that would be a hit in New Delhi, slowroasted pulled pork sandwich with smoky chipotle cole slaw, and pineapple upside-down cake that may be the best you’ve ever tasted. • Lunch and dinner Tues.–Sat. Sun. brunch. 561/420-0573 $

prime catch—700 E. Woolbright Road. Seafood. Simple pleasures soar—full-belly clams,

the name, there’s nothing crazy about the cooking at this homey eatery. It’s the hearty, soul-satisfying Italian cuisine we’ve all come to know and love. Spaghetti Bolognese is a fine version of a Northern Italian classic; house-smoked mozzarella—breaded, fried and presented with a tangy tomato-basil fondue—is equally tasty. • Dinner nightly. (Tues.–Sun. during summer). 561/585-0320. $$

paradiso ristorante—625 Lucerne Ave. Italian. A Tomasz Rut mural dominates the main dining room, and there is also a pasticceria and bar for gelato and espresso. Chef Angelo Romano offers a modern Italian menu. The Mediterranean sea bass branzino is definitely a must-try. Plus, the wine list is a veritable tome. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/547-2500. $$$ safire asian fusion—817 Lake Ave. PanAsian. This stylish little restaurant offers food that gently marries East and West, plus a roster of more traditional Thai dishes and inventive sushi rolls. Menu standouts include tempura-fried rock shrimp or calamari cloaked with a lush-fiery “spicy cream sauce.” Expect neighborly service and reasonable prices. • Lunch Tues.–Fri. Dinner Tues.–Sun. 561/588-7768. $ LAntAnA the station house—233 Lantana Road. Seafood. If you’re hungry for Maine lobster, plucked live out of giant tanks and cooked to order, this modest replica of a 1920s train station is the place to go. Lobsters come in all sizes (up to 8 pounds) and are so reasonably priced that getting a taste of one without reservations is highly unlikely. • Dinner nightly. 561/547-9487. (Other location: 1544 S.E. Third Court, Deerfield Beach, 954/420-9314) $$$ march/april


n s i e! lt su su is re xt ne

Best Dining Entertainment?

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2013 readers' Choice awards


c, healthy & delicious! OrganiOrganic American comfort food prepared with robust bravado by one of South Florida’s most talented chefs. Get ready to enjoy South Florida’s healthiest dining alternative. • fresh-made soups, breads, sandwiches & salads

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[ dining guide ] PALM BEACH bice—313 Worth Ave. Italian. Bice continues to hold the title of favorite spot on the island for the seeand-be-seen crowd. The venerable restaurant offers a marvelous array of risottos and fresh pastas and classic dishes like veal chop Milanese, sautéed chicken breast and stuffed rack of lamb. The wine list features great vintages. • Lunch and dinner daily. Outdoor dining. 561/835-1600. $$$

buccan—350 S. County Road. Contemporary American. Casual elegance of Palm Beach meets modern culinary sensibilities of Miami at the first independent restaurant by chef Clay Conley. The design offers both intimate and energetic dining areas, while the menu is by turn familiar (wood-grilled burgers) and more adventurous (truffled steak tartare with crispy egg yolk, squid ink orrechiette). But they’re all good. Dinner daily. 561/833-3450. $$ café boulud—The Brazilian Court, 301 Austra-

The Green Gourmet • 16950 Jog Road, Delray Beach 561-455-2466 • thegreengourmetdelray.net greengourmet_dbm0213.indd 1

1/22/13 1:12 PM

Specializing in the fabulous flavors of Italy. Selections include delicious risottos, succulent fresh fish entrées, osso bucco, roasted lamb, prime meats, delectable homemade desserts as well as exotic fare like duck, octopus, Maine lobster, numerous homemade stuffed ravioli and pasta, roasted whole Bronzini (Mediterranean Seabass).

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café l’europe—331 S. County Road. Current international. A Palm Beach standard, the café has long been known for its peerless beauty, the piano player, the chilled martinis and the delicious Champagne and caviar bar. Try one of its sophisticated classics like Wiener schnitzel with herbed spaetzle, grilled veal chop and flavorful pastas. • Lunch Tues.– Fri. Dinner nightly (closed Mon. during summer). 561/655-4020. $$$ cha cha’s—150 Worth Ave. Latin/Tapas. A variety

HAPPY HOUR 4:00-6:30 pm

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lian Ave. French with American flair. This hotel restaurant gives Palm Beach a taste of Daniel Boulud’s world-class cuisine inspired by his four muses. The chef oversees a menu encompassing classics, simple fare, seasonal offerings and dishes from around the world. Dining is in the courtyard (not available during summer), the elegant lounge or the sophisticated dining room. • Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 561/6556060. $$$

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of small plates, from Mexican tacos and Argentine empanadas to Spanish potatoes make up the menu of this elegant yet casual pan-Latin eatery. Though not every dish is successful, the best ones—crusty-creamy papas bravas, savory shrimp and scallion crêpe, buttery cauliflower and fennel gratin, and indecently luscious dulce de leche pot du crème—will make your taste buds do a happy dance. • Dinner Mon.–Sat. 561/8338800. $$

chez jean-pierre—132 N. County Road. French. Sumptuous cuisine, attentive servers and a see-and-beseen crowd are hallmarks of one of the island’s premier restaurants. Indulgences include scrambled eggs with caviar and the Dover sole meunière filleted tableside. march/april


When your waiter suggests profiterolles au chocolat or hazelnut soufflé, say, mais oui! • Dinner Mon.–Sat. 561/833-1171. $$$

cucina dell’ arte—257 Royal Poinciana Way. Italian. The wide range of items on the menu and the great quality of Cucina’s cuisine, combined with its fine service, ensures a fun place for a casual yet delectable meal—not to mention being a vantage point for spotting local celebs. • Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Outdoor dining. 561/655-0770. $$

echo—230A Sunrise Ave. Asian. The cuisine reverberates with the tastes of China, Thailand, Japan and Vietnam and is spec-ta-cu-lar. Crispy jumbo shrimp with soybean plum sauce is delectable, the Chinese hot and sour soup is unlike any other, and the Mongolian beef tenderloin is perfection. Sake list is also tops. This offsite property of The Breakers is managed with the same flawlessness as the resort. • Dinner nightly (during season). 561/802-4222. $$$

leopard lounge and restaurant—The Chesterfield Palm Beach, 363 Cocoanut Row.

American. This is British Colonial decadence at its finest. The restaurant offers excellent food in a glamorous and intimate club-like atmosphere. In fact, it’s advisable to make early reservations if a quiet dinner is the objective; the place becomes a late-night cocktail spot after 9. The menu is equally decadent. • Breakfast, lunch, tea and dinner daily. 561/659-5800. $$

nick & johnnie’s—207 Royal Poinciana Way. Contemporary American. Expect flavorful, moderately priced California-esque cuisine in a casual setting with affordable wines and young, energetic servers. Try the short-rib or jerk chicken quesadillas as appetizers, and don’t miss the four-cheese tortellini as a main course. • Lunch and dinner Mon.–Sat. Breakfast Sun. 561/655-3319. $$ renato’s—87 Via Mizner. Italian with continental flair. This most romantic hideaway is comfortably buzzing in season and quietly charming all year long with Italian classics and a Floridian twist—like the sautéed black grouper in a fresh tomato and pernod broth with fennel and black olives and the wildflower-honey-

glazed salmon fillet with crab and corn flan. • Lunch Mon.–Sat. Dinner nightly. 561/655-9752. $$$

the restaurant— Four Seasons Resort, 2800 South Ocean Blvd. Contemporary American. With a casual, yet refined ambience, The Restaurant is the premier dining venue at the Four Seasons Palm Beach. Savor fresh Atlantic seafood in a contemporary setting complemented by innovative cocktails. Don’t miss the mouthwatering dessert selections. Live entertainment is featured on Saturday nights. • Dinner Mon.–Sun. 561/533-3750. $$$$ ta-boó—2221 Worth Ave. American. This self-described “American bistro” is less typical “American” restaurant or classical French “bistro” than it is posh-casual refuge for the see-and-be-seen crowd in and around Palm Beach. The eclectic menu offers everything from roasted duck with orange blossom honey-ginger sauce to dry-aged steaks and an assortment of pizzas. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/835-3500. $$ trevini ristorante—290 Sunset Ave. Italian. Maître d’ Carla Minervini is your entrée to a warm

Design • Home Furnishings • Accessories Delray Beach 117 NE 5th Ave. • 561.278.0886 North Palm Beach 1400 Old Dixie Hwy. • 561.845.3250 West Palm Beach 1810 S. Dixie Hwy. • 561.249.6000 Westhampton Beach 83 Main Street • 631.288.0258 www.excentricities.com

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[ dining guide ] experience, complemented by a stately but comfortable room and excellent food. We love the crispy fillet of herb-crusted sole in a rich, buttery sauce and the veal scallopini in a lemon caper Chardonnay sauce. • Lunch Mon.–Sat. Dinner nightly. 561/833-3883. $$$

palm beach gardens cabo flats—11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave. mexican. Mexican cuisine often has more personas than Madonna. This highly stylized cantina adds another—that of California’s Chicano culture. All your favorite Mexican dishes are there, as well as enormous margaritas, but also niftier items like the terrific tuna ceviche in “tomatillo broth.” • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/624-0024. $

café chardonnay—4533 PGA Blvd. contemporary american. This longtime stalwart never rests on its laurels. Instead, it continues to dish finely crafted American/Continental fare with enough inventiveness to keep things interesting. The popular herb-andDijon-mustard rack of lamb, regular menu items like duck with Grand Marnier sauce, and always superlative specials reveal a kitchen with solid grounding in

culinary fundamentals. • Lunch Mon.–Fri. Dinner daily. 561/627-2662. $$

WellIngTOn pangea bistro—10140 W. Forest Hill Blvd. contemporary american. Add culinary influences from the tropics, Europe, Asia and Latin America to a trio of chefs from the Four Seasons Palm Beach, plus one Venezuelan designer-turned-restaurateur, and the result is this smartly modern bistro that’s bringing a real sense of gastronomic adventure to Wellington. Every dish sports an element that will tickle your taste buds, whether crunchy Asian slaw on ahi poke flatbread or beguiling lemongrass-kaffir lime vinaigrette with a slab of various blackened fish. • Lunch and dinner Mon.–Sat. (Dinner only during summer months) 561/793-9394. $$

WesT palm beach b.b. king’s blues club—550 S. Rosemary Ave. american. The restaurant at this club-dining spot won’t leave you singing the blues, but it will leave you wishing for more than a spoonful of the lusty flavors of its Southern/New Orleans cuisine. Punch up the flavors of

pan-fried catfish and shrimp with jambalaya sauce and chicken-fried chicken on a bed of mac ’n’ cheese, and you could let the good times roll. Buffalo wings, fried pickle chips and luscious banana bread pudding are good bets. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/420-8600. $

cabana las palmas—533 Clematis St. nuevo latino. This colorful restaurant is a treat for the palette and palate. Must-orders include mariquitas, thin, crispy plantain slices that are the irresistible Cuban answer to potato chips; cookbook-perfect ceviche of shrimp, octopus and calamari that shows how chili heat can be both fiery and subtle. • Lunch and dinner daily. 561/833-4773. $$

café centro—2409 N. Dixie Highway. Italian. There are many things to like about this modest little osteria—the unpretentious ambience, piano nightly after 7 p.m., the fine service, the robust portions and relatively modest prices. And, of course, the simple, satisfying Italian cuisine. The kitchen breathes new life into hoary old fried calamari, gives fettucine con pollo a surprisingly delicate herbed cream sauce, gilds snowy fillets of grouper with a soulful Livornese. • Lunch Mon.–Sat. Dinner daily. 561/514-4070. $$

Iris Marie McDonald

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[ my turn]

By John Shuff

spring fever It’s a time for optimism, for renewal, for commitment.

It’s spring fever. That is what the name of it is. And when you’ve got it, you want—oh, you don’t quite know what it is you do want, but it just fairly makes your heart ache, you want it so! —Mark Twain

A

s I edge up the age ladder I get more sentimental. Old songs from the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s make my eyes well up. Every photograph of my wife, my children, my parents, my brothers brings back moments indelibly etched in memory. Shows like “Dick Robinson’s American Standards by the Sea” (WPBI 90.7 on Sundays from 3 to 5 p.m.) are another way I find myself slipping back to the music and excitement of a gentler time. It seems that every specific era, even a day here and there, a moment— becomes an image awash in nostalgia, memories that measure my life with an easy tempo, like the steady comfort of a metronome. Everyone has a past, but it’s the passage of time that gives us the perspective to understand and value it. Our memories show us who we are and where we came from; they piece together life’s experiences and give our stories meaning. Spring is my favorite season, the time of year that always brings a smile to my face. When I remember all those springtimes from a lifetime ago, the metronome quickens, and I can see that my life has gone by far too quickly, as quickly as snow melting after a long winter. Spring will always be the college years in South Bend, Ind. with my girl, Margaret Mary Scanlan, now my wife of almost 50 years. In those days we walked everywhere—to movies, dinners, dances. No automobiles were allowed on the Notre Dame or St. Mary campuses, but distance didn’t feel like an obstacle back then; we were with one another and that was all that mattered. I can still see it clearly: the greening of campus yards with new grass, bright buds on the maples arching over the avenue, the two of us walking, holding hands, stealing a kiss now and then. When I left her at her dorm and headed back to the Notre Dame campus, the only thought in my mind was when I would see her again. Spring will always be hitchhiking home from high school from the bus stop two miles from home in the rural outskirts of Cincinnati. It was a long walk through the hills and open fields near our home off Section Road—just warm enough to take off your

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shirt, the air fresh and a little damp. I don’t remember what I thought about on those odysseys but it was probably the shifting daydreams most 16-year-olds have, part baseball, part escape from school, part mindless conjecture about tomorrow, the next day and the next. Spring will always be the smell of Mom’s pies cooling on the kitchen window pane, The author and his bride-to-be at the 1962 notre Dame Senior Prom or raking up the soggy leaves left under the melting snow. And it will be those images of my brothers carrying pile after pile of dark, damp leaves to a compost dump my dad used to fertilize his rose bushes. Spring will always be the smell of the first magnolia blossoms in my parents’ backyard. It will be hosing winter salt and road dirt off the car—and then turning the hose on my brothers. It will be hitchhiking home for spring break from Notre Dame to Cincinnati, the Indiana countryside waking up from a harsh, cold winter to greet the promise of another season. Spring will always be the memories of simple things, of new beginnings, of young love. This year, I want to remember all of that—and live it, too. I want this spring to be a season of renewal, of commitment to family, friends and community. I want to take some quality time to rethink things, to take control, to lead by example. In the final analysis, only we can find our way to a better tomorrow. Today, in this moment in time, it’s more important than ever to capture this mindset. It’s time to be optimistic, to move forward, to believe again. It is time to make new commitments, new memories—and to make them count. John and Margaret Mary Shuff are the founders of both Boca Raton and Delray Beach magazines.

march/april


new!

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Take a drive on the wild side. Introducing the all-new 2013 SL550. Test-drive it today at Mercedes-Benz of Delray.

1001 Linton Blvd. • Delray Beach • Just East of I-95 • 877-890-2433 • MBDelray.com Pictures are for illustration purposes only.© 1996-2012 AutoNation, Inc.


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