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J A SO N WU A R C H I T EC T UR E PO R T F O L I O W I NT E R 2 0 1 8


JASON WU jasonzhuoyuwu@gmail.com

linkedin.com/in/jasonzhuoyuwu

issuu.com/jasonzhuoyuwu

LANGUAGES English Cantonese Mandarin

HONOURS 9/2015 President’s Scholarship of Distinction University of Waterloo 6/2015 Alumni James Raymond McCall Scholarship Western Technical-Commercial School 6/2015 Judy Wilson Memorial Award Scantex Graphics Services 6/2015 University of Toronto National Book Award Western Technical-Commercial School 6/2015 Peter Cram Memorial Scholarship Western Technical-Commercial School 6/2015 Principal’s Award for Student Leadership Ontario Principals’ Council 6/2015 Senior Art Award Western Technical-Commercial School 6/2015 Valedictorian Award, Class of 2015 Western Technical-Commercial School 6/2011 Valedictorian Award, Class of 2011 Kent Senior Public School 6/2009 Valedictorian Award, Class of 2009 Dovercourt Junior Public School

HELLO My name is JASON WU and I am currently YEAR a third year undergraduate student at the University of Waterloo in Canada. Architecture is a practice which I see as the study of the old; inspired by social, economic, and political forces; and the creation of the new; fueling the betterment of built and organized human societies as we progress into an ever-changing future. This portfolio is a collection of select works from my first two years in architecture school, as well as from internships and personal projects relating to design. I hope it demonstrates my passion for architecture, as well as my proficiency in its representation and my interest in learning more about the discipline.


YEAR 2014

EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE

EXTRA-CURRICULARS

Western TechnicalCommercial School

Altius Architecture Inc.

Chinatown Business Improvement Area

Toronto, Ontario 9/2011 - 6/2015 Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM) in Arts and Culture Percentage - 95.0

Toronto, Ontario 1/2014 - 5/2014 Architectural Assistant

Toronto, Ontario 7/2012 - 10/2014 Volunteer Coordinator

Yearbook Committee

2015

Western Technical-Commercial School 10/2014 - 6/2015 Art Director

University of Waterloo School of Architecture

Cambridge, Ontario 9/2015 - present Candidate for Honours Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS), Co-op GPA - 3.7

2016

Genealogical Research

Toronto, Ontario / Guangdong, China 5/2016 - present Freelance Researcher

2017

Stantec Architecture Ltd. Toronto, Ontario 1/2017 - 4/2017 Co-op Student

Design Eight Five Two Hong Kong 9/2017 - 12/2017 Designer

2018

PROGRAMS

SKILLS

INTERESTS

Adobe PhotoShop

Digital Drafting

Urbanization

Adobe Illustrator

3D Modeling

Conservation

Adobe InDesign

Rendering

Landscape Architecture

Rhinoceros 5

Diagramming/Analysis

History

V-Ray for Rhino

Hand Drafting

Cartography

Autodesk Revit

Translationing

Graphic Design

AutoCAD

Digital Fabrication

Technology

Maxwell Render

Construction Detailing

Hydrology

Houdini

Interior Designing

Topography

Grasshopper

Furniture Designing

Anthropology


A RCHITECTUR E

B OAT H AU S

8

L A K EC L I F F C H R O N I C L ES

14

V ER T I CA L V I L L AG E

18

INTER NS HIPS

24

PUBLICATIONS

26

PER SON A L WOR KS

28


BOATH AUS August 2017 | Landscape Architecture | 2B Design Studio Description

Rising water levels have become increasingly problematic around Lake Ontario in recent years, often causing the temporary closure of lakefront parks and other public areas throughout the spring months. Hard embankments that line the human-designated rim of Lake Ontario fail to resist moisture once the body of water has reached the limit while also failing to allow the residents of Toronto to experience the lake at an intimate level. The response is a reimagination of Ontario Place, at the foreground of the lakefront and neglected for a number of years, in its floating oasis nature. Soft and dynamic embankments are introduced to create moments of aquatic experiences with varying permeability and saturation while adapting to changing water levels. The experience of the meadow botanics and alternative circulation paths that line the terraces is shaped completely by what the lake allows to be accessible. The vision for this project is to introduce the growing population of Toronto, often restricted from interacting with their bounding harbour, to the recreational and experiential possibilities that arise when the solid line between what is land and what is water is deconstructed through the use of monolithic materials and repetitive elements.


N

0

Docks/Slips

Rinks

2m

5km

10km


M AS S I N G

A XO N O M E T R I C

E XISTING

R O O FS

CUT + FILL

T E R R AC ES

ST R U CT U R E

SOFFITS

SLIPS

BUILDINGS

R O O FS

L A N D S CA P E + I N T E R I O R S


C

B

D

N

0

A

S I T E PL A N

9

9 8

8

7

13

7

5

4

6

18

12

17

18 16

19

10

1 14

20 2

11 22

15 3

21

0

5m

10m

1 Cafe 2 Patio 3 Terraces 4 Skate Rental 5 Locker Room 6 Cafe Storage 7 Storage 8 Washrooms 9 Showers 10 Bridge To Lakeshore Blvd.

20m

11 12 13

A

Skating Rink Stepped Seating Bridge To Atlantis

C

B

14 15 16 17 18 19

Boat House Boat Slips Boat Rental Office Meeting/Training Room Offices Boat Equipment Storage

20 21 22

D

Boat Storage Meadow Terraces Path To Rooftop Terraces


S ECT I O N S

S E C T I O N A- A

SECTION B-B

SECTION C-C

SECTION D-D

N 0

5m

10m

25m


M O D EL

ROOF

ST R U CT U R E

INTERIORS

E L E VAT I O N


L A K ECLIFF CHRONICLES Ongoing | Historical Documentation | Self-Initiated Description

“When I tell these stories, they tell me to shut up,� an 83-year-old cousin of my grandfather sighs. There is the lack of interest amongst younger generations to learn about their heritage and family history which has been passed down through the centuries by storytelling and in genealogical manuscripts. As the world moves into the Information Age, history must adapt to be told through new methods that will catch of the interest of the contemporary crowds who, in turn, will gain a fair understanding of the series of events that led our society to become what it exists as today. My ancestral village, Lakecliff, on the west banks at the top of the Fieldside River in Guangdong was shaped by inter-related socio-economic and political events throughout history, such as the Great Clearance, the Punti-Hakka Clan Wars, and the Cultural Revolution. The project uses architectural representation to give new life to old stories of the village and its rural environment.


那扶墟 FIELDSIDE MARKET

The name of the town has no meaning in Chinese due to it being a transliteration from the Baiyue language spoken by the natives of Guangdong. Geological changes allowed a large sea to empty and expose a rich plain which drew the first Han Chinese migrants to found a village in 1368. The name roughly translates to, “next to the rice fields.” Situated at the origin of the river and at the convergence of 4 counties, the lawless market flourished and dominated trade in the region, flaunting as many as 40 opium clubs and brothels at the turn of the 20th century.

上潭壁村 UPPER LAKECLIFF Founded in 1710 and sold to another family.

The migration was due to the bathing of boat people in the front of the village.

下潭壁村 LOWER LAKECLIFF

Related within 32 generations Non-related

日新公墓 TOMB OF RI XI

Related within 28 generations

樹壇 TREE ALTAR

Related within 18 generations

閘閣 VILL AGE GATE

Related within 11 generations

祖屋 ANCESTRAL HOME

Related within 9 generations

耀宗公祠 ANCESTRAL HALL OF YAO ZONG

Clan property

復興書室 REVIVAL STUDY HALL

With a plan just 3 degrees off of true east, it is evident that strict feng shui was used to design the new village established around 1860. The shape resembles a blue crab, which many villagers still owe their incomes to. Expansion is carried out in rows so that the quadrilateral shape is maintained.

Scale: 1:6000 1 square=1 ha


復 興 書 室 閘 閣 樹 壇 日 新 公 墓

REVIVAL STUDY HALL circa. 1860-

VILLAGE GATE 1947-1977

TREE ALTAR circa 1860-

TOMB OF RI XIN 1664-

A refugee, Ri Xin died of hypothermia. His 11-year-old son buried him across from where his grandson would found Lakecliff 50 years later.

The ability for the altar to exist through the Cultural Revolution symbolizes the respect that Cantonese people have for nature. Today it is finished with cement. A dog regularly takes shelter in the censer to the right of the altar.

Each able-bodied man was ordered to steal 20 bricks from the collapsed embankment across the river to build this gate. Today the gate no longer stands as it was demolished to allow vehicular access to the village plaza.

Named “Revival” as an auspicious blessing to the Wu clan that owned and operated it, the hall did not house studies nor academia. In actuality, this storefront was a resting place on market days for mechants that shared the family name. Today it is just one of the many reminders of the glory that Fieldside Market once saw. The roof has caved in, allowing shubbery inside and a palm tree on the lawn to grow freely.


耀 宗 公 祠

祖 屋

ANCESTRAL HALL OF YAO ZONG circa. 1860-1957

ANCESTRAL HOME circa. 1860-

This home once housed an ancestor and his five wives. The typology is typical in the Cantonese region; a hall opening into a skywell is flanked by two corridors and double-height rooms which utilize ladders for moving between floors.

The unlikely location, 15 kilometres upstream from the large cluster of descendent villages of the ancestor which this hall honours, was chosen for its proximity to the once thriving Fieldside Market. The flamboyant curved walls are said to resemble the crown of a government offical, representing the status of the honoured occupant. The south wing was used as a school for the village boys. The hall operated on docking charges collected from the river in front of the upper village and rent from several rowhouses in town. Today the hall no longer stands. Seeing the power of the Wu clan as a threat, the government disassembled the halls in 1957 and used the bricks for “backyard furnaces” during the Great Leap Forward, despite efforts by the Wu’s to stop the new leaders in charge of the demolition. Today, two segments of the two granite pillars from the entrance hall exist as outdoor seating in the lower village.

Today the rafters have collapsed above the north rooms. It is uninhabited other than by chickens that neighbours keep in the home. New village homes are no longer regulated by feng shui.

Scale: 1:200 Distance between lines=500mm


VER TICA L VILL AG E December 2016 | Mid-Rise Mixed-Use | 2A Design Studio Description

A village is one of the oldest human settlement types in history, found within a rural setting and often involves sustainable agricultural lifestyles and close relationships with extended family and neighbours. Vertical Village is a project that is designed to develop this historic settlement type in a contemporary urban setting by expanding the community and its programs in the vertical direction and utilizing the benefits of population density, public spaces and sustainable agriculture to tackle the Postfordist problematics of climate change, the turn away from public space and affordable housing. Vertical Village is a visionary, self-sustaining infill urban farm and farmers’ market cooperative that promotes sustainability, organic farming and eating local while addressing issues regarding urbanization and globalization. By involving the population with agricultural tasks and a unique grocery experience, the inefficiency of our wasteful and unsustainable food culture is brought to light, inspiring those who are involved to be more mindful of what goes into their mouths, where it comes from and alternative means of food production that can be incorporated into our lifestyles and architecture as it once did for the majority of humankind prior to the Industrial Revolution. The response in this project is aeroponics; an agricultural process with an absence of a growing medium and, instead, the employment of vertical steel planters supplied with nutrients and water vapour to bring greater efficiency to agriculture and decrease the growing urban population’s pressure on the diminishing rural population to provide. This extreme and overwhelming execution of vertical agriculture is inspired by the need for densified housing, which is crucial to the development of urban areas into the future, and goes to show that agriculture can exist efficiently, extensively and attractively in non-rural settings while the urban market further promotes the idea of multi-purpose architecture, accessible public spaces and self-sustaining communities.


N

M AS S I N G I N F LU EN C ES 0

100m

200m

PL A N S 500m

N

0

25m

SIT E

LANEWAY S

SI X T H F L O O R

PARKETT E S

RESIDENCE S

FIFTH FLOOR

YARDS

SHADING

SEC O N D F L O O R

PEDEST RIA NS

ST OREFRO NTS

F I R ST F L O O R B

A

B

A

GARDENING

PLAN OB L IQ U E

SUB L E V E L

50m

100m


N

N

N

N

E AST EL E VAT I O N 0

10m

20m

50m

S ECT I O N A-A 0

10m

20m

50m

W EST EL E VAT I O N 0

10m

20m

50m

S ECT I O N B - B 0

10m

20m

50m


PER S PECT I V E S ECT I O N at corridor looking south

PER S PECT I V E S ECT I O N at corridor looking east


T ECTO N I C M O D EL 1:200

M AS S I N G M O D EL 1:500


INTER NS HIPS

E VO LV1

Olivia Keung, Anwar Habib, Arshad Siddiqui (Design Development, Construction Drawings, Details, Promotional Materials)

S TA N T EC A R C H I T EC T U R E LT D. Winter 2017 | Toronto An established firm specializing in large scale, high profile projects; Stantec prides itself on creating spaces that engage the user and being a leader in incorporating new technologies into architecture.

CA LG A RY CA N C ER C EN T R E

Michael Moxam, Andrew Cole, Diego Morettin (DIALOG), Juan Portuese (DIALOG) (Design Development, Renderings)


F LO R I EN T R I S E

Norman Ung, Nam Songsombat (Schematic Design, Design Development, Construction Coordination, Materials, Renderings)

D ES I G N E I G H T FI V E T WO Fall 2017 | Hong Kong DEFT is a growing multi-disciplinary studio encompassing architecture, interior design, branding, and graphic design. Working on varying scales and programs, the work environment is dynamic and ever-changing.

G R A N D WAT ER F R O N T PL A Z A

Norman Ung, Ryan Lam, Nam Songsombat (Schematic Design, Design Development, Renderings)


PUBLICATIONS

2 014 -2 015 Y E A R B O O K June 2015 | Extra-Curricular What began as a proposal for a class project became a year-long responsibility. The goal of this project was to demonstrate simplicity in design to emphasize quality content; a turn away from the traditionally busy yearbook layouts with poorly-curated photographs. Although hard work, seeing the smiles on the students’ faces in June made all the overtime hours worthwhile.

This publication received the 2015 Judy Wilson Memorial Award from Scantex Graphics Services.


那扶乡舆图

磨山顶

金长坑

上湾村 介廠村

竹角村

纸扇排

那东场 各脚村

侧塘村

山塘村

五味村

龙岗村 老廖村

容村 新来张 新村

山谷脑

老雷村 百足牙

新安村 李伯龙 分界石 茭笋塘

鹅斗村

沙湾村

将军山

武松山

铜锣潭

马江村

将军山

灰窑村

南华村

那村

南雄村

三田村

振兴村

花冲村

横洲海

马山

那南村

林村

河滩

南昌村

石联村

老温村

八角村

老叶村

横朗村

海陆村

汉河村

仁安村

长边村

安明村

沙潮村

尖岗山

竹山

渡头门

南平里

榕树村

淡水龙 南塘村

渡头门山

江潮里

大达村

汶水村

老黄村

老侯村

廠下村

大田村

莲塘村

胡村

东风村

榕溪村 宋村

麦村 那中村

陈屋村

高楼仔

横墩村

硬步村

九龙陂

老关村

高楼村

菠萝树

陈村

坭桥村

圆山仔

三夹河

月山村

吉庆村

八角台

高咀村

和兴村

稔坪村

老朱村

朝阳村

那阳村

廖屋村

那北村

中城村

右厢村

那扶乡 那扶河 潭壁村 那扶墟

蓝田村

猫林村

康山村

龙安里

园岭村

南昌村

凤鸣村

鬼冷迳

婆龙村

新蓝田

丹竹水库

梁坑顶

半天卡天

三角平

网山

龙眼坑

十七世 遇字辈

遇宏

十八世 永字辈

永达

永贵

永绍

妣梁氏 康熙三 年随父 从大湖 走界至 那扶乡 张父就 地埋葬 后复界 回大湖

清庠生 妣黄氏 无子嗣 葬尘洞

清贡生 妣谭氏 牛栏村 开族人

国学生 妣陈氏 东碧村 开族人

十九世 光字辈

光进

二十世 玉字辈

玉华

庶长子 妣廖氏 续陈氏 妣郑氏

廿一世 赐字辈

赐喧

赐焕

妣刘氏 续陈氏

赐洇

赐醒

赐理

廿二世 振字辈

振伦

振詠

妣廖氏

振裧

乃 振礻 � 振祥

妣陈氏

振禧

振祚

振禧

妣冯氏

振作

妣陈氏

廿三世 运字辈

游运

运安

过嗣二 叔赐珚

斌运

华运

妣巫氏

就运

利运

讳毛

讳进 妣谭氏

讳连好

振〇

运胜

运添

振〇

妣容氏

妣陈氏

振德

妣梁氏

吴 氏 族 谱 � �

Being born and raised in Canada, I could not help but wonder about the ancestral heritage that I felt I had been lacking experience in my whole life, which included the traditional values of lineage and genealogy. Upon my first trip to China, however, I realized that a majority of my modern relatives were just as ill-informed as I was in what I expected to be an important aspect of Chinese personal history. Fortunately, I was introduced to an extended granduncle who kept a small book of the genealogy of my ancestral village written in the early 20th century. My freetime now consists of digitizing the century-old records and drafting drawings of my poorly-mapped native county in hopes of documenting as much fading knowledge of my roots as possible.

清武生 妣 氏 � 续陈氏

赐璋

妣梁氏

Ongoing | Self-Initiated

玉杨

良玉

玉乔

庶次子 妣陈氏

W U G E N E A LO GY O F L A K EC L I FF V I L L AG E

徒司�

吴氏宗图 ��

十六世 日字辈

日新 妣梁氏 康熙三 年携子 从大湖 走界至 那扶乡 草芽朗 泥鳅垅 在大雨 中病故

永缵 讳国选 号士成 妣张氏 续 氏 � 庶罗氏 潭壁村 开族人

光运

徒司�


PER SON A L WOR KS

CA R N I VA L

December 2017 | Hong Kong | Nikon D750

FI R E D R AG O N

October 2017 | Hong Kong | Nikon D750

HEARN

June 2016 | Toronto | Nikon D5200

PORTL ANDS

June 2016 | Toronto | Nikon D5200


G A LT P O ST O F FI C E

June 2017 | Cambridge | Ink + Watercolours

C H RYS A N T H EM U M S

November 2015 | Cambridge | Sumi Ink + Watercolours

R ED VA L L E Y M A R K E T

May 2016 | Kaiping | Ink + Watercolours


T H A N K YO U for taking the time to view and consider my portfolio. Have a phenomenal day!


H O U S I N G T Y P O LO G I E S GUANGDONG + TORONTO FEBRUARY 2018

Profile for Jason Wu

(OUTDATED) Jason Wu Architecture Portfolio Winter 2018  

(OUTDATED) Jason Wu Architecture Portfolio Winter 2018  

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