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English MAGAZINE FOR THE ONLINE FLIGHT SIMULATION COMMUNITY

Ground School for

Pilots & ATC True Story of

IVAO Academy Focus on Germany and Brazil

All about TO/GA by Mike Ray

APRIL 2008 Issue: 02

12 freeware tips

VIRTUAL SKY IS THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF IVAO


training

CONTENTS FIG. 1 - DME ARC BASICS An exercise for student pilots

events of ivaor AeroSoft’s The Lukla Air Bridge Event It is the start of the Mount Everest climbing season and at least 7 expeditions and tons of equipment are waiting in the hangars of the Kathmandu airport but unfortu nately Lukla airport has been closed for the last 21 solid days because of clouds and high Winds . The Met office just announced that there could be a 6 hour weather window and the small turbines are flying in from all over the region to make best use of the available time. As the small turbine transporters are flying into the area to make some serious money (of course price per ton is now as high as the mountains are), complex discussions are going on with the two controllers at Lukla. There are only six stands on the airport and as we all know getting to and from the airport is a rather complex task. Although weather should be clear there will still be strong winds to make it even more complex."

DME ARC BASICS

SECTION

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IAF = INITIAL APPROACH A DME ARC is an approach procedure which consists of performing an arc at a constant distance from a DME (Distance Measuring Equipment) facility until reaching the final approach course.

FIX

Be aware: *not more than 6 aircraft* are allowed to occupy a parking position at Lukla and *no one is allowed* to have a longer block time than *15 minutes*.

All ARCs will have an initial fix (Initial Since Lukla has no IFR approach you have to fly VFR and Approach Fix = IAF) which will be about 2 maneuver through high terrain and clouds showing up behind the next peak. nautical miles from the arc radius to help initiate a turn onto the arc. It is strongly recommended to use Aerosofts Lukla

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For our first event, we have a challenging task for you. Complete as many flights as possible between Kathmandu (VNKT) to Lukla (VNLK). The more flights you successfully complete, the better are your chances to win the Aerosoft prize. All inbound flights to Lukla and all completed outbound flights from Lukla are counted. If you desire you could also fly your helicopter from Lukla airport to Mt. Everest Base Camp and back again.

The local facilities may or may not provide final approach guidance. In the!example shown on Fig.1 below, the VOR provides a final approach course.

scenery!!!

DME ARCs are usually designed to be flown at a maximum indicated speed of 200 or 210

However, it is advisable to initiate a turn with a standard rate bank angle (see next paragraph) at a distance equal to Arc Radius + 1% of Ground Speed."

Knots. In order to help beginners, we have chosen to fly at a rather low speed (160 kts) and a pretty fair distance from the DME facility (13 nm). Once the student pilot has become familiar with the procedure, he will also learn to!fly at a higher speed or a shorter distance

Aerosoft offers a grand prize to all those who complete the most successful number of flights, the prizes are as follows: 1st place: 10 Aerosoft products of your choice 2nd place: 9 Aerosoft products of your choice 3rd place: 8 Aerosoft products of your choice

10th place: 1 Aerosoft product of your choice.

Distance VORDME-IAF = Arc Radius + 1% of Ground Speed

IVAO EXCLUSIVE

Your best opportunity to prove yourself between the highest mountains on earth. More information on this event visit http://www.ivao.aero/events

- Example 1 (= our exercise for beginners, Fig. 1) : Arc Radius = 13 nm / Ground Speed = 160 Kts => Distance from the VORDME to the IAF = 13 + 1.6 = 14.6 nm. - Example 2 : Arc Radius = 11 / Speed = 230 Kts => Distance from the VORDME to the IAF = 11 + 2.3 = 13.3. !

FREEWARE ZONE 1

lorem ipsum dolor met set quam nunc parum 2007

12 FREEWARE UNDER REVIEW

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DIVISION FOCUS Interview with Alain!Debrouwer The President talks

INSPIRE

by Vybhava Srinivasan

In the flight simulation community Alain Debrouwer, is one such person who probably needs no introduction. He is a well respected personality in the online flight simulation community. Alain has been with IVAO for about 8 years and is also currently serving as the President of IVAO. I had an opportunity to interview him and get to know him better. Alain! is married with Sofie, he has two daughters, Tess and Sarah. He and his

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family live in Zonnebeke, Due to an increase in ex Belgium. Alain passed his pense in real world flying, and ATCs who use our network for training River, purposes and FL. also bring last in the PPL at Cristal year Alain resigned professionalism in the network. During this course, he also from these positions. He is Today in our division we are seeing more received the high perform- currently maintaining a low and more members that have trained ance and complex rating with us on the basics of aviation,profile. have a renewed passion for a single enginediscovered in aviation, and are chasing a dream to have a landplane. Beside aviation, Alain is succesful also does photography and career in aviation in Back in Belgium, Alain flew is a member of IPSC club. real world. at the EBKT regional airport as a hobby pilot. Alain wasOur staff team have a FISO (flight informationundertaken a lot of service officer) at the EBKTprojects The brazilian pilots and to controllers are know to be improve an our division, a few examples airport and also airport very friendly, and we have great pleasure in inviting our adjunct commander for the foreign pilots at our a) "ATC Groups" by ATC Operations airports! Today we are not same airport. Department, they have formed a group of members that love to control. This group has their own website and also

b) "Virtual Flying Club" by Flight Operations Department, this group organizes instructors to provide training

only a big division, but over time have proved that we are a great place to learn, share knowledge and make new friends, we take pride in following the "Spirit of IVAO"

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Come and fly in Brazil, and have a great time!!! For more information http://br.ivao.aero

STORY OF AN ATC

MIKE RAY TO/GA THE TAKE OFF PHASE

INSIGHT IVAO ACADEMY

IVAO TRIBUNE GRAN CANARIA FLY-IN RFE ZURICH VIDEO CONTEST WINNERS

04 P05 P08 P18 P


Editorial Vybhava Srinivasan IVAO Public Relations Manager editor@ivao.aero

IVAO Virtual Sky April 2008

Dear Friends,

Publisher: International Virtual Aviation Organisation Chief Editor: Vybhava Srinivasan

Thank you very much for downloading the second IVAO Virtual Sky Issue. A little bit of statistics, before we start o!. Our first issue had a little over 25,000 downloads for which we owe our sincere thanks to all our avid readers. We have received several e"mails and forum posts congratulating us on the outstanding issue. We are glad that you all liked it and found it informative. It is our constant endeavor to improve the contents of the magazine. We have now included an improved section on training and we hope you will all find it useful. On a trial basis we will be launching of the second issue of this magazine in three more languages viz., French, German and Spanish. Our idea is to reach out to as many interested members of our flight simulation commu" nity, without language posing any barriers.

Assistant Editor: Yigit Yildrim Layout and Design: Yigit Yildrim Website: www.ivao.aero/publrelat/ General Mail: editor@ivao.aero Cover Screenshot: Nicholas Chung Wing Chong Background Images: Vlad Gerasimov www.vladstudio.com French & Spanish Translation: Alexandre Balaguer G e r m a n Tr a n s l a t i o n : Ro b e r t Gottwald Logo Design : Robert Gottwald

Both bouquets and brickbats on this issue are equally welcome. We also look forward to articles that our readers would like to contribute to future issues of this magazine.

Disclaimer: Any information, suggestions or illustrations published in this magazine are exclusively for use with computer flight simulation.

With this, let me sign o!. Sit back and enjoy your journey through the April 2008 issue.

All views expressed in this magazine are the views of the respective authors. The publisher does not accept any responsibility for those views.

Thank you all for the patient wait to savor this issue and see you all again in July 2008. Vybhava Srinivasan Chief Editor

Copyright# No n e o f t h e i n f o r m a t i o n i n t h i s magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior permission from the publisher.


INSPIRE Gareth Richardson, a United Kingdom Air Traffic Controller, started his simulation career at the age of 12 with FS2000. During late 2004, he joined IVAO and took a keen interest in the controlling side of the simulation. At the age of 18, he successfully graduated from the College of Air Traffic Control in the UK and began to train as an approach controller for London Heathrow airport whilst continuing to fly and control on IVAO.

Story of an ATC

by Gareth Richardson

When I was young, a number of different career opportunities excited me. I went through a phase of wanting to be a racing car driver and an astronaut! I started to have a keen interest in aviation from about the age of 11 when my Grandfather would tell me stories about his time in the Royal Air Force as an aircraft engineer. At the age of 12, I discovered Flight Simulator 2000 and used to sit for hours playing it on my computer that only had an 8mb graphics card inside! I thought 2 frames per second was quite normal at the time! At this point, I decided that I wanted to become a pilot. In late 2004, a friend of mine told me about a network where people fly online under air traffic control called IVAO. It sounded really exciting so I decided to join. I have never looked back since. At first, I only flew. After several months, the ATC side of IVAO started to interest me so I decided to give it a go and really enjoyed it! I still prefered the flying though. By the age of 16, I started to look into how I could become a pilot. I went along to a Royal Air Force careers office but decided that military flying wasn't something that I really wanted to do. I looked at routes into commercial flying but realised that the cost to fund yourself through these programs was just too much. A little disheartened, I realised that my dream of flying was just about out of my reach. I continued to fly online, but controlling started to take over my life. It was like a drug - I had to keep doing it. I would sit for hours reading ATC documents and manuals trying to further my understanding about ATC. In Summer of 2005, the UK division staff realised that I had a keen interest and very good understanding in ATC and so was appointed as the ATC Operations Coordinator of the division, a role which I still hold today. From that day on, I realised that ATC was a passion of

mine and something that I really wanted to do for real. I did some research about becoming an ATCO in the UK, and during the summer of 2006 I sent off an application form to NATS The main Air Traffic Service Provider in the UK. I didn't expect to get any response so was very suprised when I was invited to the first round of testing. Choosing applicants to train as ATCO's is a very rigorous process involving lots of tests and interviews. Stage 1 of my application involved lots of different tests such as maths and personal development style tests. I passed stage 1 and was invited to stage 2 which involved computer tests, 2 interviews and teamwork games. I came away from that day thinking I had blown it. A few days later I got a phone call saying that I was successful and that as long as I passed a medical, I would be training to become a real world Air Traffic Controller! I couldn't believe it. In late September 2006, I started my training at the NATS College of Air Traffic Control in Bournemouth, England. After a 3 month introductory course which I passed, I was chosen out of 45 people to be one of the 5 who would go on to train as an Approach controller, the discipline that I had wanted. I was very lucky. After another 3 months of hard work, I graduated from the college with my Student Air Traffic Control Licence. This licence allowed me to train out in the real world under the supervision of a qualified instructor. It was amazing how much the knowledge and experience I had gathered from IVAO had helped me through this initial stage of training. Lots of subjects that were taught to me I already had basic knowledge in - I was just missing the finer details. I am not saying that I learned everything from IVAO, far from it, but certainly, without IVAO, I don't think I would have succeeded. I am now currently training as an approach controller for one of the busiest airports in the world, London Heathrow. I talk to real pilots flying real aircraft through the real skies - I still have to pinch myself every morning when I wake up! Hopefully, by the end of 2008, I will be fully qualified and will be able to operate without someone sitting next to me helping me out. I have almost reached my goal - You could too. How many of you come home from work everyday and say that you love your job and wouldn't change it for the world? Not many I imagine.

Gareth Richardson GB-DIR & IVAO-AOM


FAQ “ H o w d o I m a k e it g o ? ” F R E Q U E N T LY A S K E D Q U E S TIO N S ? ? ? ? ? ANOTHER BORING LECTURE by Captain Mike Ray

I get a ton of e-mails from frustrated simmers, sitting at the end of some runway with their engines running, C D U/F M C/M C D U all set up and the airplane re ady to go fly ... but they don’t know how to make the airplane “TA K E O F F”. The answer lies in a system referred to as “Take-Off and G o Around” mode of the auto-throttles system. Pilots call it T O G A.

T H E TA K E-O F F P H A S E

exacerbated by the radically different approaches to similar operations between aircraft developers. It seems each major airliner designer had their own way of doing the same thing. In this article, we will focus our discussion only to the Boeing and Airbus systems and see if we can somehow get a handle on just how to get our marvelous new GLASS airliner simulation to “GO”.

HIS T O RY L E S S O N A long time ago, “Thrust levers” were called “Throttles” and Pilots or Flight Engineers actually set the take-off power manually using their hands. They would consult thick books filled with charts and tables over-flowing with data. In those days, a TOGA would be something the ancient Greeks wore to a Fraternity party and the concept of “Auto-Throttles” mysteriously moving or setting the thrust on their own would belong in a science fiction “ghost” story. Today, however, the “Glass” cockpit environment includes features only dreamed of by old aviators like myself ... and the fabulous TO/GA is right there at the top of the list.

© MIKE RAY 2008 All artwork and content is the sole property of Mike Ray

Since it is a fact that Simmers are constantly discovering stuff that they don’t know and they are an extremely inquisitive bunch; they want to know everything they can about every detail of flying some of the world’s most complicated machinery. And I feel their frustrations. It is virtually impossible for a brand new flight sim enthusiast to excitedly tear open the colorfully decorated box containing the very latest sim program, install a modern airliner simulation with a glass cockpit onto their MSFX and try to make it work without some basic understanding of the concepts behind the systems. Simmers want to know things that take professional Airline Pilots years to understand and master ... and simmers want to know it all NOW!!! The Simmers problem is further

T OGA UH H H H... W H ERE I S T H E G O BUT T O N ?

T O G A is a b o ut th e A U T O-T H R O T T L E S The first airplane I flew with auto-throttles was the DC-10. The system was really wonderful and allowed two major advancements for the crews. First, it allowed for lower approach minimums, and secondly, it relieved the crews from making constant throttle adjustments during cruise. If you can imagine a 12 hour flight over water where you constantly were tweaking the throttles to maintain the Mach. B-O-R-I-N-G! So hidden and mysterious systems imbedded in the heart of the engine and controlling computers constantly monitor data and ensure that some heavy handed airline pilot won’t screw up and exceed a limit or damage an engine. On the Boeing airplanes, they call this computer the EEC (Electronic Engine Control) and on the Airbus it is the FADEC (Full Authority Digital Engine Control). For the sake of this rather simple discussion, we will assume that each of these computerized brains are the same. We will refer to this system in a simplified overview way as the “auto-thrust”. The Auto-thrust has many modes of operation, and pilots “think” they are operating the engines when they move the thrust levers ... but in reality, it is the little hidden computers that make it all work. Oh sure, pilots can select modes of operation by

setting up the MCP and the CDU or MCDU with the result that the engines perform tasks that are desired ... such as TOGA; but they no longer move levers that pull cables attached to carburetors. Right here is where it gets a little complicated for simmers, since both Boeing and Airbus engineers decided that they would develop some quite unique operating protocols for each of their systems. By that I mean the TOGA commands operate differently for each airplane type. And further, each of the simulation developers had to add to the complexity since they had no “real” thrust levers quadrants with all the buttons and levers available for the simmer to push and pull. These things had to be simulated using the QWERTY KEYBOARD. Even further confusing complexity is added to the equation by Boeing and Airbus ... because they both have different ideas about how the TOGA should work. So ... this article is here to help you kinda sort out all this stuff and (hopefully) make it all work for you. Lets try to make the simple ... well, complicated.


T O/G A IS T H E M O S T P O W E R F U L C O N T R O L O N A N AIR LIN E R! ... N O W J U S T W H E R E IS T H E B U T T O N, L E V E R, S WIT C H, C O N T R O L th at turn s it o n ? I can only guess that the majority of Flight Simmers have either never heard of TOGA or don’t know enuff about it to use it. And yet it is a basic and fundamental control that is used in regular airline operations constantly. Incorporating TOGA into your flight sim routine is simply a matter of achieving a basic understanding of the system and then becoming used to using it in game-play. Since Flight Simmers love to fly whole bunches of different airplanes ... never reaching proficiency in any of them; so it seems logical to divide the TOGA description into two basic camps: Boeing and Airbus. Now listen ... I am going to tell you up front, that it is patently impossible for me to describe EVERY nuance and operational

difference in all these TOGA systems, so don’t take from this article that there are only TWO TOGA systems out there. This is just to give you a taste for the two major paradigms in Airline flying. For our discussion, we are going to look at the Boeing 747-400 (Specifically the PMDG modeling) and the Airbus A320 (Specifically the Wilco A320 Series1). Every other sim package you fly will have subtle and bewildering differences. I will direct my discussion to the “real” airplane where possible, and to operation of the Flight Sim where that is applicable. So, go to the bathroom, get a cup of coffee, put on your thinking hat ... and let’s begin.

“ W H AT IS T O/G A ? ”

TA K E O F F

TO/GA stands for “Take-Off and Go-Around. So, during a typical flight we can say that there are possibly two times that we will use the TOGA feature: 1. Take-off, and if required 2. Go -Around. For today’s discussion we are going to talk ONLY about the take-off mode.

TA K E-O F F M O D E

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Generally speaking, once we have completed the MCDU (Airbus) setup steps, we will have armed the TOGA system for operation. Specifically, for example, in the Airbus set-up, when we select a V2 value on the PERF-TAKEOFF page of the MCDU one of the things that is competed is the ARMING OF TOGA. At least one flight director must be on and one thrust lever be placed in the TO/GA detent to select the Airbus TO/GA mode.

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“ H O W D O W E A RM T H E T O G A O N T H E B O EIN G s ? ”

The Boeing TOGA system is armed when the FIRST FLIGHT DIRECTOR is turned on. Then when you select TOGA by pushing a TOGA switch on the thrust control quadrant with the airspeed less than 50 Knots, the thrust will go to a take-off setting.

NOTE!

If th e T O/G A is n ot s ele cte d b y th e tim e th e airpla n e is p a s sin g 50 K n ots ... it is lo c k e d o ut a n d c a n n ot b e s et u ntil th e airpla n e is clim bin g o ut of 400 fe et.

BIG P R O B L E M: If during the take-off roll, you should delay too much and not select the TO/GA actuator until after the airplane has reached 50 Knots (some airplanes have slightly different rolling speed requirements ... we will simplify and say 50 kts) then whatever thrust setting you have on the engines will remain and the take-off thrust WIL L N O T B E A U T O M ATIC A L LY S E T ! This means you may not realize that you do not have enough thrust to get airborne ... and wind up in the gully or the canal off the end of the runway.

© MIKE RAY 2008

You may not know this or have even thought about it, but in airline flying for both types of airplanes (Boeing and Airbus) ...every take-off is made “manually”. By that I mean, you don’t take-off with the auto-pilot ON and operating. Now some explanation is due here. There are some modes of advanced airplanes such as the Boeing 777 that has some capability for low visibility take-offs using auto-pilot, but that is not a part of this discussion. For the sake of this article, we will say that all takeoffs are made WIT H O U T T H E U S E O F T H E A U T O-PIL O T . So for take-off ... the TOGA is a only a FLIGHT DIRECTOR mode. That means in order to get the TOGA to work during take-off, - At least one flight director MUST be turned on, and therefore the commands for the TOGA airspeed are pitch related and displayed on the PFD for the PIL O T to respond to. - and, of course, we have to have the TOGA system turned ARMED.

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V1


Yeah, yeah, yeah ... that’s all well and good ... but how does a flight simmer select the TO/GA and make it set the take-off power for the simulation?

HERE IS THE BOTTOM LINE FOR SIMMERS ...

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4 WAY S T O T U R N O N T H E T O/G A!!! The computer keyboard is referred to as the “QWERTY” because the first 6 keys spell QWERTY. Microsoft has supplied us with a multitude of QWERTY commands to accomplish many of our flight oriented tasks. The Microsoft (general) command to select the TO/GA is: C R T L+ S HIF T + G . But, sad to say, that may not work on your particular simulation. For example, on the PMDG series, they have their own set of commands. S HIF T + TA B + M works on the 747-400 and they have further complicated the matter by using other commands for other of their products and so forth. Look at your simulation-manual for the proper QWERTY commands.

1: QWERTY

2: SECRET SPOT THE FAMOUS MCP S C R E W!

A/P E N G A G E C

Each simulator developer has designated some “secret” hot spots on their displays that can be selected using the mouse. I will point out the famous “SCREW” on the PMDG 747-400. Other developers have followed their lead, and it looks as if this “SCREW” may become the de-facto TO/GA selector. On the Level D 767, they use the same MCP command as the real airplane ... depress the N1 or E P R button. IA S/M A C H

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When using the 3Dvirtual cockpit option, a simmer pilot may actually use the mouse to “select” the TOGA switch on the thrust lever control quagrant. This option is available only in some sims; but since not all of them have a complete 3D Virtual suite of operating switches, I DON”T recommend this procedure. It requires that you take your attention away from flying the airplane during a critical phase of flight.

4: AIRBUS ONLY

On the “real” airplane AND the simulations also, moving the thrust levers to the full forward or T O G A position will engage the TOGA mode. Moving the thrust levers can be by QWERTY commands, but I have had limited success using the Microsoft F-4 key. I can get the thrust levers to go full power, but the T O G A/S R S won’t indicate. You don’t want to take-off without the S R S (Speed Reference System). Once selected, the thrust should go to the selected take-off setting and the appropriate FLIGHT MODE ANNUNCIATIONS should appear on the PFD. Those FMA indications are: Whatever technique you use, the next thing is top determine that the TOGA was actually selected. That will require looking at the PFD (Primary Flight Display). Along the top of the instrument is the FMA (Flight Mode Annunciator). L O O K AT T H E P F D B E F O R E Y O U S TA RT Y O U R TA K E-O F F R O L L. O n c e s ele cte d, th e thru st le v ers s h o uld g o to TA K E-O F F p o w er. If y o u g et a w arnin g h orn g oin g ‘ B E E P - B E E P- B E E P- B E E P ”; it is lik ely y o u still h a v e th e B R A K E S S E T. P u s h th e Q W E RT Y “.” a n d th e b e e pin g s h o uld sto p a n d th e airpla n e s h o uld start to m o v e.

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MD A On the 80 Boeing airplanes: C R S 178 100 1678 3 30 0 3 30 0 Once airborne and using the TOGA mode, the Flight Director will give pitch GS 0 29.89 IN 7 18 1 9 2 commands to maintain of V2 + 10 for a normal “all-engines 6 1 an airspeed 0 1 2 MA G 1 1 5 163 2 operating” airplane. 14 At about 50 feet, LNAV engages if armed, and VNAV will set engine thrust as required after reaching VNAV engagement altitude (usually about 800 feet). On the 747-400, when flaps are selected to 5 degrees, the FMC will reduce the engine power to CLIMB POWER setting. TOGA automatically shuts off when any another pitch or roll mode selected.

© MIKE RAY 2008

© MIKE RAY 2008

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On the Airbug airplanes: .538 3000 Once airborne and using the TOGA mode, the Flight Director will give 115 29.92 pitch commands to maintain an airspeed of V2 + 10 forQ NaH normal” allSTD engines operating” airplane. When the airplane reaches the ACCEL LEVEL that has been set in the MCDU (default setting is something like 1500 feet110AGL), the FMA prompts the pilot to move the thrust levers to CL mode by indicating a flashing CL on the FMA. The pilot must physically and MANUALLY move the thrust levers to the CL detent in order to engage the autothrust component of the thrust lever operating system.

So, I have managed to make the situation about as complex and difficult as I can... now it is up to you to go out and EVERY TIME you make a take-off USE the TO/GA. Get familiar with it, observe what it does ... Fly like a “real” pilot. Happy Simming, Captain Mike Visit my website www.utem.com

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Q&A

INSIGHT

IVAO academy, a stepping stone in an IVAO-tailored training system Already for a very long time, it has been the wish of some long standing IVAO Senior Staf f members to have the IPACK updated, expanded and adapted to IVAO-level. Some steps in that direction were already made in the past. We are very proud to a n n o u n c e i n t h i s I VA O MAGAZINE that another big step has been made: The IPACK is closed and the IVAO ACADEMY is online. The I-Pack disappeared? What happened to it? A major update of the IVAO instruction pack "IPACK" started about a year ago. Meanwhile, the development of what is now called the IVAO ACADEMY was started. This IVAO ACADEMY is designed around a whole new concept on a newly designed website. The old IPACK information was first reviewed and prepared to be moved to that new website later on. This was a very time consuming process that got finalized at the end of February. So, the I-Pack content didn't just disappear, it got "recycled" into the IVAO ACADEMY. But there is more... More? Can you tell us? While reviewing the available training material and while looking for new information to fill in the gaps, more thoughts came up. The available training material does not stand on its own. It is part of a whole training system. A training system? This sounds very realistic! The IVAO IPACK/ACADEMY team came to the following conclusions: IVAO should aim for a dual system, whereby its minimum requirements are based on flying and controlling all together without disturbing the other participants (too much). For the pilot: Be able to understand what ATC wants you to do and be able to do what they say, but whether you land your aircraft with the correct flap setting or with no flaps at all, with the correct speeds or not, all that is of lesser importance, as long as you do as ATS says, can land your plane and vacate the runway.

For ATC, be able to provide at least the basic services. That’s “Track One”. What if I want it “As real as it gets”? For those who want more (and more :) ), there is enough to obtain. They may become realistic virtual pilots or ATC by continuing their training and add to their knowledge. For them there is or should be made available sufficient material and/or references to do so. In addition they could be rewarded for their higher level with an additional bonus to show that they are a "plus" and thus (more) advanced. In the same way, differentiate certain airfield ATC positions by allocating a "star" to indicate that a position rating is required (at certain hours?) to fight the phenomena of so-called exam tourism. That’s “Track Two”. How deep do you intend to go into a subject? Providing theoretical information on IVAO like in the IVAO ACADEMY, we think three basic requirements have to be applied: 1. Relevance: explain only what is (absolutely) necessary on IVAO from a practical point of view 2. Simplicity: keep those explanations short and easy to understand 3. Correctness: no interpretations or assumptions, but only information from reliable and verified sources. Setting up this new concept is a huge task. How do you intend to do it? Probably few of you realize that since IVAO became an NPO, the setup of the IVAO ACADEMY is an important milestone. Choices that are made now will determine the looks and feel of the entire IVAO organisation in the future. IVAO is growing steadily year by year and we will have to rely on an efficient team of skilled co-workers to master the challenges that lay ahead. Every department needs to operate as a well-oiled machine and should be able to adapt swiftly. Good communication,

teamwork, a clear policy and well defined strategies are crucial to make it so! The IVAO ACADEMY is only a step stone in an entire program that aims to improve realism, achieve a good standard level and motivate people to progress steadily by keeping the learning curve as shallow as possible. Say, I have a nice document, screenshot or good material that I think may fit in the Academy. Could I have it in there? Sure! The responsible Senior members of the IVAO Staff and the Division TA’s now have the possibility to break with the past and join forces all together, share their visions and develop and try out a new training system. But also any other IVAOmember, who has a good idea, will be able to contribute to the development of the IVAO ACADEMY. Here and now is that opportunity awaiting and therefore we should not miss it now! This is all very serious business, isn’t it? Let’s not forget that we are all here together because of this hobby. Re g a r d l e s s o f o u r b a c k g r o u n d , motivations, culture and… the specific deeper interest each of us may or could have here, the main goal is one happy IVAO community all together on the IVAO Network. Therefore, as members of the IVAO ACADEMY team, we are more than convinced that the first stone of this new IVAO Training building can be put there soon, enabling us to move through these virtual IVAO skies guided by adequately trained Pilots and ATC. Presented to you by the IVAO IPACK/ ACADEMY team:

Jean-Luc Courtois IVAO-ACTL real life ATC, On-the-Job Training Instructor

Bob van der Flier, IVAO-ACATL pensioned EUROCONTROL ATC, founder and honorary member of the Eurocontrol Guild of Air Traffic Services (EGATS)

http://academy.ivao.aero/


training

FIG. 1 - DME ARC BASICS An exercise for student pilots

DME ARC BASICS

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IAF = INITIAL APPROACH A DME ARC is an approach procedure which consists of performing an arc at a constant distance from a DME (Distance Measuring Equipment) facility until reaching the final approach course. The local facilities may or may not provide final approach guidance. In the!example shown on Fig.1 above, the VOR provides a final approach course. DME ARCs are usually designed to be flown at a maximum indicated speed of 200 or 210 Knots. In order to help beginners, we have chosen to fly at a rather low speed (160 kts) and a pretty fair distance from the DME facility (13 nm). Once the student pilot has become familiar with the procedure, he will also learn to!fly at a higher speed or a shorter

FIX All ARCs will have an initial fix (Initial Approach Fix = IAF) which will be about 2 nautical miles from the arc radius to help initiate a turn onto the arc. However, it is advisable to initiate a turn with a standard rate bank angle (see next paragraph) at a distance equal to Arc Radius + 1% of Ground Speed."

distance Distance VORDME-IAF = Arc Radius + 1% of Ground Speed Pic. 1!- APPROACHING THE IAF Nice weather, isn't it?

- Example 1 (= our exercise for beginners, Fig. 1) : Arc Radius = 13 nm / Ground Speed = 160 Kts => Distance from the VORDME to the IAF = 13 + 1.6 = 14.6 nm. - Example 2 : Arc Radius = 11 / Speed = 230 Kts => Distance from the VORDME to the IAF = 11 + 2.3 = 13.3. !

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Pic. 2!- TURNING AT THE IAF BANK ANGLE / STANDARD RATE TURN lnitiate a turn with a bank angle equal to what will give a "Standard Rate Turn" (= 3° per second = 90° in 30 seconds).

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Bank angle = TAS/10 + 7 Example 1 : TAS = 160 Knots => Bank angle = 16 + 7 = 23° Example 2 : TAS = 180 Knots => Bank angle = 18 + 7 = 25°

DME ARC BASICS An exercise for student pilots

ROLL OUT Start the turn with a bank of at

Pic. 3 - RMI ABEAM TO THE WING TIP Crossing Radial 030° / OBS Set on QDM 210°

least 20° then adjust the bank as required to roll out with the RMI (Radio Magnetic Indicator ) abeam the wing tip

3 Pic. 4 - CROSSING RADIAL 040° This is a 13 DME ARC. It was initiated at Radial 360°. We are crossing Radial 040°. The distance we have flown is approximately 2.26 nm!x 4 = 9 nm.

DISTANCE

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It is important to know the distance flown on the ARC. A good thumb rule for an 11 DME Arc is : every 10° of radials crossed is approx 2 nautical miles. It will not vary much as most Arcs are 11 to 13 DME. - Example 1 : Arc Radius = 10 DME => 10° Arc = 1.74 nm => 90° Arc = 15.7 nm - Example 2 : Arc Radius = 11 DME => 10° Arc = 1.91 nm => 90° Arc = 17.2 nm - Example 3 : Arc Radius = 13 DME => 10° Arc = 2.26 nm => 90° Arc = 20.4 nm


stay inside the arc Remember in winds or even while drifting on an Arc : try to stay inside the Arc, as it is easier to correct when you are inside the Arc than outside. The reason is simple : outside the Arc, you have to fly more distance.

Pic. 5 - 6 - 7 The following!pictures look like "level flight". Yet... Have a close look at the RMI and the OBS. Is there a difference?

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ALMOST LEVEL FLIGHT Once established on an Arc, remember hardly any bank angle is required to maintain the Arc. Even at 200 Knots indicated, the bank angle is about 3°. At 160 odd Knots, it will be barely 1° or 2°. Almost level flight. !

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DME ARC BASICS An exercise for student pilots "

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6 Yes, there was a difference ! Pic 5 = We were crossing Radial 050°. Pic 6 = We were crossing Radial 060°. Pic 7 = We were crossing Radial 070°.

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zooming advised


*Pic. 8 - CROSSING THE LEAD RADIAL About to fly across the LEAD RADIAL = R-120째 on Fig. 1 (above).

THE LEAD RADIAL When the Arc is about to finish, that is - LEAD you on the Final Approach Course, you will fly across the LEAD RADIAL.

8 *LEAVING THE ARC On crossing the LEAD RADIAL, leave the Arc and

*Pic. 9 Leaving the ARC and intercepting the Final Approach Course (30째 intercept angle). Hey, I was a bit too slow, using both RMI and OBS methods! I'll have to make a correction!

intercept the Final Approach Course at an approximately

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30째 intercept angle.

Pic. 10 - LAND! Runway in sight! Uh! About time too!

FINAL APPROACH I can understand you are glad to be free at last. Yet don't forget to lower your gear : 3!green lights are better than 1 brown coffin!

10 Contributed by Georges-Guy Lourdeaux, CEO of Indianair VA and Kunal Kapoor, real world pilot and an Indianair member . INDIANAIR is a group of!virtual airlines (VAs) in IVAO. Copyright for this article is owned by INDIANAIR. Please do not reproduce or publish the whole or part of the article without prior approval from the authors.


training

Flight Plan, ATC and The Chain Flight Plan

by Bob (PATCO) van der Flier

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Air Traffic Services, in short ATS, are services to the pilots to guide them from the moment they plan to start their engines until they switch them off again. In between many things happen and by itself it is not one service, but there are different ones. Each of them has it own specialization. These services make extensive use of computers which are most of the time connected to each other via networks. Note: Be advised that all terms and abbreviations used here are explained in full in the IVAO ACADEMY. Don’t hesitate to have a look there. http://academy.ivao.aero From the IVAO ACADEMY we see that there are three different ATS services: Air Traffic Control (ATC), Flight Information Service (FIS) and Alerting Service. In various countries in the world there may be another division of tasks and each Service could comprise different sub-services. For Air Traffic Control it consists of Aerodrome Control Service, Approach Control Service and Area Control Service. Actually there is even another important Service to be mentioned here, which is in fact part of Air Traffic Control in the broader sense: Air Traffic Flow Management, in short Flow Control. This Service takes care of a proper regulation of all the traffic flows by allocating departure slot times to avoid system overloads. Simply said: To avoid traffic jams. All those services have to work very closely together to make a smooth flight for the pilots and an easy transfer from the one service to the next one. To assist them, there are the ATS computer systems.

A very important tool for ATC to provide a smooth flight is the Flight Plan. It contains all information about the planned flight which the Air Traffic Services need to know. Callsign, type of aircraft, departure and destination airfields, requested route and altitude, speed and duration of flight, equipment and number of persons on board. And this list is not even complete. All that information has to be filled in into the flight plan and is sent well before the flight to the ATS units concerned. All of them for the whole flight. Actually, this flight plan information is dead information. It is only a planning and many things could change, before and during the flight. Why is this plan dead or not active for the moment? Because some very essential elements are still missing. Those are: The squawk, the actual time of departure (ATD) and the cleared flight level. By inserting those three elements a Flight Plan comes to life and can be used by all the Services involved as an active plan.

The planning When a flight plan has been sent to all the Air Traffic Services, it will be made available to all the units involved in this flight. Within those units it will go to the positions that will deal with it. Example: The pilot files a flight plan from A to B. At airfield A there is DEL, GND, TWR, APP. At airfield B there is APP and TWR. Total 6 positions will receive that flight plan. But there is more. In between A and B there is the Area Control (ACC) with two different sectors. So, these two sectors also receive the flight plan. Now let’s have a closer look at the use and purpose of the flight plan.

Purpose and use At airfield A the DEL will have the flight plan available when the pilot makes his first call. DEL will see from the flight plan what the planned route and destination is, so he will know what clearance to give. This clearance will include the necessary Standard Instrument Departure route (SID). That is the route between the departure runway and the SID point, where the aircraft will leave the APP Terminal Area and will further work with the Area Control (ACC). In other words, this simple clearance given by DEL has a greater effect further down the stream of the flight. Therefore the DEL controller has to be very accurate when he provides the flight plan clearance. E.g. if the approved SID would be wrong, the

aircraft may end up at the wrong side of the Terminal Area. Another important point to look at is the planned or requested flight level (RFL). While cruising at a flight level we have to respect the semi-circular rule and in some areas this is not standard E-W but N-S orientated. If aircraft fly into a so-called RVSM area, they have to use the 1000ft separation instead of the standard 2000ft, which for certain levels will change the direction of flight. They will fly actually on the opposite level! If not correctly filed, it could be disturbing for the en-route controller and for the pilot to correct these flight levels while en-route and in the air. But as well to explain the reason, while the pilot is in flight. It would be much better if the DEL/GND (or TWR controller) could do this while giving the flight plan clearance. So, although the DEL position is quite often seen as the beginning of the ATC career in IVAO, or as the easiest position available, in fact it has a very important function in the chain.

Plan and Time It is interesting to realise that one could make a time planning of the sequence of events just from the Flight Plan. Let me explain. Take it that start-up and push-back takes 5 minutes, taxi from the aircraft’s gate to the holding point takes 4 minutes. 5 + 4 = 9. In 9 minutes after the clearance delivery, the aircraft could be waiting at the holding point for departure. Interesting information if flow control has to be applied and the aircraft need to be have a slot time for departure. Next phase of the flight is from departure to the moment that the aircraft will be transferred between the APP and ACC. If the total flying time from take-off towards the SID point will take 8 minutes, we could calculate now that it takes 9 + 8 = 17 minutes from clearance delivery to the SID point.


Next, if there is a country border, let’s say 60 nm after the SID point, where the aircraft will be transferred to the controller in the next country, we could easily calculate the estimated time for that border point. Say the speed of the climbing aircraft is 240 kts, that is 240 nm per hour or 240/60 = 4 nm per minute. Than we know these 60 nm will take 60/4 = 15 minutes flying time. Thus 8 + 15 = 23 minutes after departure the aircraft will leave the country and has passed the border. Actually, in the past, when there was no radar yet, it was done this way. Still now, when there is no radar, it is used and we call it procedural control. Control based on procedures. You may realise now as well that filling in the correct speed in the flight plan is very important. The examples here above are all based on the speed known from that flight plan.

Speed is time Interesting information, that speed. Very much for the software developers, because ATS systems communicate with each other. For part of this communication they need to know what the aircraft will do (=flight plan) and how long it will take (speed = time). As an IVAO controller you use IvAc with that little window called “In/Out”. It says in there exactly when you may expect your next aircraft for the selected airfields and what type of aircraft it is. How do they do this? It is all taken from and calculated based on the live flight plan information. Airborne time plus estimate elapse time = landing time.

Correlation Looking at the radar one could see the little blips that represent the position of the aircraft. In fact these little blips are made by the radar system. They only represent the position information of an aircraft like the radar antenna sees it some where moving in the airspace. Still we don't know which aircraft that is. Like in real life, in IVAO the actual radar position of the aircraft is linked with the known flight plan information. That linking means in fact that the flight plan information will be connected to the radar positional information. We call it correlation. In other words, when you look at the radar picture, and you see the radar blip with the little dots behind it, you see a label connected to the blip. That label contains a lot of information, which is partly taken from the flight plan. First of all the callsign, the destination, type of aircraft and you will see the planned or cleared flight level. Especially that requested flight level is very important for ATC, because that is the altitude where he has to bring the aircraft in the first phase of its flight.

Flight plan interpretation

Activation

That sounds very complicated. Well, in reality indeed, it is not always that easy.

We have seen now how time calculation and therewith position forecast can be done, if we have a correct flight plan. Earlier we said that a flight plan is dead and could be made alive.

Take this example. Look at the position of the aircraft on your radar. Read the information and imagine where he is going and what he is doing. That label is a general and short presentation of in fact the essential information for that first moment. All the further details are shown in the flight plan, which could be seen in the flight strip.

Actually, there are many more actions triggered as from that moment a flight plan comes alive. Some of them we will see further down here.

Interesting statement and done on purpose. I repeat: a level band between 287 and 370 and the next 40 nm direction SW. Let me explain. The aircraft is passing FL287 on the climb to FL370. Flight plan says in the label B757. Average B757 climbs at this altitude plus or minus 1500 ft per minute. Still 8000ft to go, thus 8000/1500=5 mins flying time. The speed according the flight plan is 500 knots. A bit fast, but okay. 500 kts is around (500/60) 8 nm per minute. 5 mins x 8nm=40nm to go until it will be at FL370. In this way you see how flight plan goes together with the radar blip. You see the sense of correlation. You see the way of ATC working and thinking, realizing what the “picture” is.

From one sector to the next one While the aircraft moves through the sky, it moves from the one controlled area or zone into the next one. We saw that earlier already with our time calculations for departure flights.

As soon as an aircraft calls on the frequency, a controller has to have a look at the flight plan. It tells him all he needs to know to immediately understand what this aircraft has in mind. Many things are going through the mind of a controller at that time, because he only read some printed information, but in reality he has to translate this into control planning information.

How to bring it alive? By inserting the three missing elements: Squawk, actual time of departure (ATD) and cleared flight level (CFL). The moment we insert the actual departure time, the clock starts ticking and the system starts making its calculations and …. we could see in our “In/Out” box when that aircraft should arrive.

A controller looks at the blip and label and he will notice: Callsign, climbing from FL287 to FL370, heading for PIMOS, destination GCLP, type B757. Each element has a different meaning in the controller’s interpretation. e.g. climbing from 287 to 370 in a SW direction. Is there any traffic within, let's say the next 40 nm at a level within this altitude band?

Each next controller would like to know well in time, what he can expect at the border of his sector. In real life so-called “estimates” are passed from the one ATC position to the next. In the past this was done by telephone, nowadays with the help of computerized systems. It is all handled by the computer systems connected to each other. Remember? All units received the dead flight plan, which sits somewhere in the system waiting until it will be called alive. That is where the “estimate” comes in. In fact such an estimate message contains the three missing elements needed to activate the flight plan. The squawk, the estimated time for the border (in this case!) and the cleared or actual flight level. That estimate message will activate the flight plan at the next sector or unit and it comes alive.... That is the way it goes in real life. In IVAO our beautiful IvAc is not that far yet. But, I can tell you we are coming closer and closer, because the software developers are working hard.


The chain We saw until now, while the aircraft moves on from the one sector to the next, before entering, its flight plan comes alive to allow the next controller to see what he may expect. The ATC system is like a chain. Each unit is linked to the previous and next one around it. The ATC system works like a chain, from link to link. From DEL to GND to TWR to APP to ACC and back again. Aircraft are handed over from the one to the following controller. A transfer is made, not only by system input, but it means the responsibility for the control of that aircraft is transferred to the next controller. That is in real life. In IVAO, still the aircraft moves from one sector to another carrying its own flight plan. Our system is slightly different though. But there is another difference. In IVAO there is not always a chain of controllers to allow a continuous ‘chained’ control service. ATC comes and goes as it pleases them. Still the flight moves on, but …. the ATC service chain is being interrupted. Such interruption is done at the transfer to what we call UNICOM. “ATC service terminated, frequency change approved” and the pilot will select UNICOM to continue communication in text. After a while there may be again a controller on-line, who is ready to provide his service again. However, the chain was broken and now needs to be re-connected. Again an activation has to be done to ensure the proper handling of the aircraft and its flight plan, but as well to allow the system to continue the calculations and other things it does. That is where the “forced act” comes in. The controller will sent a “forced activation” message to the pilot. This is an invitation to tell that ATC is available again and that the pilot should hand-over himself from UNICOM to the frequency of this controller. But at the same time it is a message to the system to make alive the flight plan again (activation) starting at the moment the controller makes his “assume” control input. He accepts the responsibility to further control this aircraft. The flight plan is alive again, the links are connected again and the linked systems continue to work. Looking at all these points from this perspective, you will see that there is much more behind it all. Air Traffic Control is one of the services available for the pilots. Air Traffic Controllers work very closely together with their neighboring colleagues, like in a chain. Moving from the one link of the chain to next one is guided by ATC with the guidelines of the flight plan. So let it be a correct flight plan, seriously filled in with all the essential information to provide the pilot with the ATC service he expects and that the “chained’ controller will happily provide. Have fun.

Asked to provide some ATC related articles for our great magazine gave me a feeling of pleasure. I like to share my experience with you for the benefit not only of you the reader, but as well for you the user of the IVAO Network. My background is/was Area Control with Eurocontrol for over 28 years. I have always appreciated the challenges of the ATC job, but in addition the pleasure to provide more information about ATC in general and the specifics of the work of the Controller in particular. Don’t hesitate to approach us if you have any questions or idea’s on what and how to write here in this magazine. Bob (PATCO) van der Flier, IVAO-ACATL


events of ivaor AeroSoftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Lukla Air Bridge Event It is the start of the Mount Everest climbing season and at least 7 expeditions and tons of equipment are waiting in the hangars of the Kathmandu airport but unfortunately Lukla airport has been closed for the last 21 solid days because of clouds and high Winds . The Met office just announced that there could be a 6 hour weather window and the small turbines are flying in from all over the region to make best use of the available time. As the small turbine transporters are flying into the area to make some serious money (of course price per ton is now as high as the mountains are), complex discussions are going on with the two controllers at Lukla. There are only six stands on the airport and as we all know getting to and from the airport is a rather complex task. Although weather should be clear there will still be strong winds to make it even more complex." For our first event on April 19, 2008,, we have a challenging task for you. Complete as many flights as possible between Kathmandu (VNKT) to Lukla (VNLK). The more flights you successfully complete, the better are your chances to win the Aerosoft prize. All inbound flights to Lukla and all completed outbound flights from Lukla are counted. If you desire you could also fly your helicopter from Lukla airport to Mt. Everest Base Camp and back again. Be aware: *not more than 6 aircraft* are allowed to occupy a parking position at Lukla and *no one is allowed* to have a longer block time than *15 minutes*. Since Lukla has no IFR approach you have to fly VFR and maneuver through high terrain and clouds showing up behind the next peak. It is strongly recommended to use Aerosofts Lukla scenery!!! Aerosoft offers a grand prize to all those who complete the most successful number of flights, the prizes are as follows: 1st place: 10 Aerosoft products of your choice 2nd place: 9 Aerosoft products of your choice 3rd place: 8 Aerosoft products of your choice . . 10th place: 1 Aerosoft product of your choice. Your best opportunity to prove yourself between the highest mountains on earth. More information on this event visit http://www.ivao.aero/events


Real Flights Event #8 Mumbai - welcome to India

On May 17, 2008, from 15 Zulu onwards, India will host one of the biggest monthly events of IVAO, the Real Flight Event #8, in Mumbai. Mumbai Airport (ICAO: VABB) was chosen as the host division by the IVAO membership. With a great mix of short hops to long hauls, the event truly offers something for everyone. Mumbai airport is the busiest in India and South Asia. Recently the Mumbai-Delhi route has been ranked by Official Airline Guide (OAG) as the seventh busiest domestic route in the world based on the number of flights per week. In the last year, Mumbai airport handled 180,000 landings and takeoffs and over 20 million passengers, with a total of 13.56 million domestic air passengers and 6.73 million international passengers The popular Real Flights Events, now in its second year, is designed to reproduce real world movements at the host airport during the given time slot. Full Air Traffic Control services will be provided at the host airport as well as select nearby airfields and nearby FIRs in the Middle East, Thailand, to name a few. The Indian Division and IVAO Events Department invite you to join us for a flight in Indian airspace in April 2008. More information on this event visit http://www.ivao.aero/events


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IVAO TRIBUNE

Winning Screenshot for 2007 Jose Luis Bueno’s screenshot "Hercules C130 in Jerez Spain""was voted by IVAO members as "2007’s Best Desktop Calendar Screenshot". He was also awarded the coveted IVAO Creativity award, for this outstand# ing screenshot. If you have a screenshot that you would like to submit to participate in the IVAO’s 2008"Desktop Calendar Screenshot, please email to pram@ivao.aero.


For the first time the REAL AERO" CLUB DE GRAN CANARIA in collaboration of IVAO's Spanish Di" v i s i o n c o n d u c t e d # a # " Vi r t u" al#Event" on the February 23, 2008, at the premises of the Aeroclub lo" cated at#"EL BERRIEL " GCLB".

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The Spanish Division of IVAO organized "FLY IN GCLP/GCLB". During this event, the Spanish di" vision members were present to support all the VA's and ATC's pre" sent in Hangers of Aeroclub and others who logged in from their homes. Aeroclub provided Spanish Division w i t h i ts pre mis es "E L Berriel" GCLB" and also excellent support to celebrate this event.

Real Aeroclub de Gran Canaria - GCLB El Berriel - 23th of february of 2008 The Aeroclub o$ered 3 Aircraft's, %2 Single Engine & 1 Multi Engine&#to all#members who visited the prem" ises of the Aeroclub. These Air" craft's were flying the entire day. The Virtual Pilots and ATCs #got an overview of services that the Aeroclub o$ers to its members viz., Courses %PPL/IFR/etc..&, Events, Premises, etc.,

At the end of the event the Presi" dent of the Aeroclub handed over a souvenir to the IVAOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spanish Division. Ralph Henschen IVAO"TD/ES"ADIR

At#"EL BERRIEL " GCLB" you could fly nearly 365 days a year. From this Aerodrome few compa" nies operate#Sightseeing flights, Rescue Services, etc. Stefan, the Pi" lot of Islas Helicopters was so kind enough to explain the mechanics and aerodynamics of a#Rotorcraft to us.


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Real Flight Event Zurich Feb. 24, 2008 2

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3 On Sunday the 24th of February, the Swiss division had the pleasure to host the 7th edition of the well"known IVAO Real Flight Event Series at Zu" rich Airport. A total of more than 350 flights were proposed with more than 20 profes" sional ATCs servicing throughout the day. Zurich Kloten is the major airport of Switzerland, with 3 runways, and surrounded by a nice mountain land" scape.

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The bids for IVAO RFE #7 were posted by end 2007, and the competition was hard, especially in front of the Amsterdam Schi" phol candidature. When we finally had the pleasure of being selected for this RFE by the IVAO community, we real" ized that the preparation of the bid was nothing compared to the preparation of the event itself: three weeks to finalize the schedules, flight plans, pilot brief" ing, ATC briefing and conference callsâ&#x20AC;Ś all to make sure that eve" rything would run as smooth as possible.

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Fortunately, before the IVAO RFE, the members of Swiss Divi" sion had an opportunity to train themselves in October 2007 in a "private" RFE in Geneva. This made sure our controllers were ready for the new 10"hour"event in Zurich, from 12Z to 22Z.

On 24th February precisely at 12:00Z, the event was launched. The first incoming and departing aircrafts were bang on time, as the legendary Swiss clock, which was a big relief.

The scheduled flights were de" signed almost to the full capacity of Zurich Kloten airport. Never" theless, the amount of non scheduled traffic that partici" pated in this event resulted in high delays during the peak hours.

Some pilots still remember hold" ing for 30 minutes or more before proceeding to the final approach. Further, some misty weather conditions added to the already existing tension.


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We hope all the participants, pilots and control" lers, enjoyed the afternoon in the Swiss Alps, and the IVAO Swiss Division thanks all of you for your support.

6 Picture Credits by Order: N.Pursiainen F.Macario P.Pernia F.Macario H.Cordes F.Stoze

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Special Thanks to; Filippo Recco IVAO-CH Director Pierre Neads IVAO-CH Event Coordinator


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Joint Winners of Video Contest

In December 2007, we released details about a video contest where members could design and create videos which could promote IVAO to the outside world. It was a close competition and 2 di"erent vid# eos were picked as they equally best portrayed the "Spirit of IVAO". Congratulations to Camiel Galjee and Tommy Vierimaa for their stunning videos! They have both been awarded the IVAO Creativity Award for their e"orts. We must say a big thank you to everyone else who submitted a video # They were all wonderful! All o$cial IVAO presentation videos, including videos by the contest winners, can be viewed on our youtube channel. Press the "Subscribe" button for full access.


DIVISION FOCUS IVAO BRAZIL IVAO's Brazil Division commenced around June,2000. This was a time when the division's traffic was almost zero, while the number of members were only about 200. A year later, there was a major transformation, the brazilian division was gaining popularity as one of the great divisons of IVAO, with

and ATCs who use our network for training purposes and also bring in the professionalism in the network. Today in our division we are seeing more and more members that have trained with us on the basics of aviation, have discovered a renewed passion in aviation, and are chasing a dream to have a succesful career in aviation in real world.

about 1500 members. Today, Brazil is proud to be one of the biggest divisions of IVAO, with almost 9.000 members including about 2.700 active members. The number of members continues to increase by the day. It's been our objective to maintain a high level of realism in the simulation. It has also been a challenge, on which our 20 member staff team are working on day in and day out. In the Division, We have great interaction with members involved in aviation in the of real world ; We have many real pilots

Our staff team have undertaken a lot of projects to improve our division, a few examples are : a) "ATC Groups" by ATC Operations Department, they have formed a group of members that love to control. This group has their own website and also organise events; and b) "Virtual Flying Club" by Flight Operations Department, this group organizes instructors to provide training at specific airfields.

The brazilian pilots and controllers are know to be very friendly, and we have great pleasure in inviting our foreign pilots at our airports! Today we are not only a big division, but over time have proved that we are a great place to learn, share knowledge and make new friends, we take pride in following the "Spirit of IVAO"

Come and fly in Brazil, and have a great time!!! For more information http://br.ivao.aero


Division Tours Our division also offers frequent events which witness large volume of traffic and also backed up by quality air traffic control. The division also has some challenging tours, a few of them are:

VFR Brazil Tour The VFR Brazil Tour 2007 was a complex project, here all Brazilian airports were been analyzed, and the most interesting ones were chosen! This Tour will remain active during 2008, so, what you waiting for? Start this tour to fly around our incredible country!

DIVISION FOCUS BR & DE

Pilot Skills Tour 2008 / March 2008 A Challenge in the Air! This tour will test your pilot skills on various types of aircrafts, exploring varied areas of aviation! From an agriculture pilot to a airliner pilot, passing by military, General Aviation, Cargo, Air Taxi, and much more. Enjoy the custom scenery exclusively made for this tour! Each leg has its proper requirements and restrictions, and the pilots that complete the 12 legs of this tour will be rewarded with new IVAO Award "Pilot Skills".


IVAO GERMANY With a total of over 8500 registered members, more than 2200 of them being active, IVAO-DE is one of IVAO's largest divisions. Also a reason why we have some of the best ATC coverage and flights almost anytime and not only during events and our weekly online day (Tuesday evening, 1900-2200 local time).

Training For our division members, we offer variety of training possibilities: Individual practical training for pilots and controllers Group training sessions for either IFR procedures, VFR procedures, GND/TWR tasks, and APP tasks. Monthly 'newbie day', which is an opportunity for new members to ask our division staff anything they want to know on a dedicated Teamspeak channel. Additionally, a lot of information is available for self-study on our training websites.

DIVISON FOCUS

Member Support

BR & DE

For a better and quicker email support, all emails sent via our contact form on the websites as well as those sent to specific support email addresses are collected in a webbased support system. This makes sure that support requests are directed to the correct staff member and minimizes the response times.

Website Our web services include the access of all IVAO members to: All important charts for civil aerodromes within Germany. The charts are published on www.charts.ivao.de . Continuously updating the routes from/to German airports in the IVAO route database (http://www.ivao.aero/ db/route), which is accessible through the websites or through IvAe. This enables every pilot to have an up-todate route for his intended flight at hand within a few seconds.


Tours/ Events We offer a host of interesting tours around Germany: An IFR tour, a VFR tour, a tour specifically designed for helicopter flights, and a Special Operations tour.

The legs of the VFR tour include the completion of certain tasks, e.g. following rivers, overflying certain islands, to make it more interesting for the pilots and to emphasise visual navigation.

Finally

Flying the helicopter tour you'll face similar tasks, and the SO tour requires you to be able to fly not only military procedures correctly,

It goes without saying that pilots from other

but also to fly both helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

countries are also welcome to fly in Germany, and to also participate our division tours and

Furthermore, we are working on a pilot skills division tour which will be published lateron this year.

events. All necessary information can be found on our

The division also offers number of events, which attract large traffic and these events are fully staffed with some of the networks finest

division websites â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or simply ask us! Hope to see you in German skies soon!

air traffic controllers. For more information visit http://de.ivao.aero/


IVAO EXCLUSIVE

Interview with Alain!Debrouwer The President talks by Vybhava Srinivasan

In the flight simulation community Alain Debrouwer, is one such person who probably needs no introduction. He is a well respected personality in the online flight simulation community. Alain has been with IVAO for about 8 years and is also currently serving as the President of IVAO. I had an opportunity to interview him and get to know him better. Alain! is married with Sofie, he has two daughters, Tess and Sarah. He and his

family live in Zonnebeke, Belgium. Alain passed his PPL at Cristal River, FL. During this course, he also received the high performance and complex rating for a single engine landplane.

Due to an increase in expense in real world flying, last year Alain resigned from these positions. He is currently maintaining a low profile.

Beside aviation, Alain is also does photography and Back in Belgium, Alain flew is a member of IPSC club. at the EBKT regional airport as a hobby pilot. Alain was a FISO (flight information service officer) at the EBKT airport and also an airport adjunct commander for the same airport.


IVAOEXCLUSIVE Alain Debrouwer

Vybhav: What was your first experience with aviation?

from left to right Bart, Kenny and Filip

Alain: I think when I was about 5 years old when I received my first flight at the EBFN military airport where my grandfather was an officer.

the evening of the relaese of IvAc

Vybhav: Do you recollect the first copy of flight simulation that you owned? What was your experience like? Alain: That’s already some time ago, it was FS 5.1 and my knowledge of aviation was low. I remember very good the time I spend to find out how an ILS is working -) Vybhav: You have been involved with online flight simulation for a long time. How much has online flight simulation changed? Where do you see this heading? Alain: From my first FS to the one I am using now ( FS9, FSX ) it’s a change like night and day. This together with my real life experience, I am happy to see day by day simulation is inching closer to reality. Online Voice communication with ATC, network flying, scenery of your local airport, highly detailed airplanes, etc … makes FS almost a must for all aviation enthusiastic persons. Vybhav: President of IVAO! Wow, that’s some responsibility. What is the best part of your job?

Alain: The best part of my position is an opportunity to meet various members online. People from various cultures are here together because we share a common passion. I have had made some fantastic online friends and also occasion to meet them in real life. Vybhav: What has been your happiest moment during the last 8 years with IVAO? Alain: There are many such happy and memorable moments. For instance: the last business trip to the “DevCon 2007” in Seattle along with Kenny. It was a fantastic experience to meet Aces Team and other big shots from the Flight Simulation world.

On the marked of Bologna, Italy

My tenure as the training director of IVAO was another great moment; this was when IVAO was desperately looking for anATC client, at this time IVAO was struggling with outdated Pro-controller. Also around the same time I met up with Filip and Kenny at the Belgium Lan Party. Soon we became good friends. Kenny and Filip worked

together brainstorming on the ATC client. Finally one day, Filip brought me draft copy of the whole idea. Believe me it was an incredible feeling. Subsequently, I took it to the then IVAO-DIR, Gus. After executive approval work began after a few months developing Bart Devriendt also joined the developers team. After almost a year, the client was ready for release. It was based on systems from eurocontrol, amsterdam radar, belgocontrol, etc., This was also a great moment for me for having been so closely involved in a development that had then redefined IVAO in the flight simulation community. Another fantastic moment was the start to setup the NPO , it was a challenge that started some years ago during a meeting in Belgium. And the most important thing that IVAO give's me great friends. It doesn’t matter which religions, colors, etc... as we're all here for the same passion.


IVAOEXCLUSIVE Alain Debrouwer

Vybhav: How do you strike a balance between work, hobby and family? It seems that you have a couple of hours more ….. lol. Alain: A big kiss to my wife and children !! Almost 80% of my free time goes to IVAO. Vybhav: Which aircraft do you fly Alain? Alain: Mostly, I fly the PMDG 736, LevelD 763 and other general aviation planes like BE20, PC12, C182, C56X, etc… Vybhav: Which is your favorite route you love to fly over and over again?

Vybhav: Do you like to fly online or be a controller online? Which would you prefer? Alain: It depends; I prefer to be a pilot. But during events or busy evenings you’ll see me often as EBBR tower. Vybhav: Did you read the first issue of ‘Virtual Sky’? What do you think about the magazine? Alain: It’s a fantastic idea to bring a magazine like this related to the IVAO network. I’m already looking forward for the second edition. Vybhav: Many thanks for the interview. It was a pleasure to hear your views.

Alain: EBBR-GCLP-EBBR Alain: It was a pleasure to answer your questions

On the jump seat from a RJ1H from Brussels to Bologna

!

! ! in Eurodisney Paris from left to right Gustavo, Alain, Filip & Erwin


FREEWARE ZONE Every issue in this section we will hunt down the hottest downloads available in the flight simulation community. We also take this opportunity to salute these freeware developers, who devote their time and e!orts in creating some awesome add"ons, available to us for FREE. Vybhava Srinivasan

Preview LGTS Thessaloniki International Airport 'Mecedonia' FS2004, X-Plane Aircrafts Filenames: gap_lgts_2006.zip Authors: Mihalis Triantafyllou, Yiannis Dermitzakis, Greek Airport Project Source: http://www.greekairportsproject.gr/index.html Greek Airports Project presents the 10th scenery within the first year of scenery creation that concerns the Greek Airports and the first scenery for 2006. The International Airport of Thessaloniki â&#x20AC;&#x153;MACEDONIA" is the second largest airport in Greece.

Project Tupolev Tu-154m FS2004, X-Plane Aircrafts Filenames: PT Tu-154m Authors: Pro Team Source: http://www.fs-proteam.com/index.html Project Tupolev has released its long awaited Tupolev Tu-154M. Explore the outstanding visual model details of this fast and reliable airliner, accurate 2D panels in normal, widescreen and multimonitor version and a system depth down to a completely new flight engineer panel.


FU24-950 series Fletcher FSX Aircrafts Filenames: fu24walt.zip Authors: Deane Baunton Source: http://library.avsim.net The Fletcher was designed specifically for low level aerial topdressing operations in New Zealand. Package includes fully animated and detailed virtual cockpit, topdressing effects and various paint schemes.

Europe Forest Scenery X-Plane Utilities Filenames: Europe V9 Authors: Andras Fabian Source: http://www.alpilotx.de With X-Plane 9 came some exciting new features, but also a new Global Scenery - with native forests included - which made it necessary to re-cut the complete Europe Forests scenery

TS Noise Utilities Filenames: TSnoise Authors: TeamSpeak Source: http://old.punkr.de/files/TN1.0.4.zip If you want to make your multi-player 'radio contact' more realistic (when using TeamSpeak), then you should have a look at this little add-on called TSNoise. It adds mike clicks and radio static the sound

TS Info Utilities Filenames: TS-Info Authors: TeamSpeak Source: http://bafio.altervista.org/tsinfo.htm IvAcCapture is an utility that shows who is talking on TeamSpeak channel without having to switch out from IvAc Radar screen.

EKRK-Copenhagen Airport Roskilde UPDATE for DAN-VFR Scenery FS2004 Scenery Filenames: ekrkdan.zip Authors: Jens Peter Bruun-Hansen Source: http://www.avsim.com/ This is an UPDATE to EKRK-Copenhagen Airport Roskilde made after satelite pictures making the aerodrome layout very precise and blending beautifully into the landscape. This update has been modified specialy for use with the DAN-VFR Danish VFR Scenery. If you dont have the previous updates og EKRK,dont bother this edition will update your scenery completely, but will require installation of original EKRK-Roskilde scenery.


Zurich Freeware FS2004 Scenery Filenames: FreeZ v0.5 FS9 Authors: Freez Source: http://lszh.aviation-art.ch/index.php After the brilliant Zürich payware scenery product from FSDreamteam and after the recent RFE there is now an excellent freeware.

Delta Air Lines Boeing 777-200LR AI Aircraft Filenames: ai772lrdal.zip Authors: Hernan Anibarro Source: http://www.avsim.com/ Delta Air Lines B777-200LR, Reg. N701DN, newly delivered to Delta to begin new operations to Shanghai. Textures only to be used with The Fruit Stand B777-200LR for AI Traffic.

NZNP- New Plymouth Airport, New Zealand FS2004 Aircraft Filenames: new_plymouth_airport_nznp.zip Authors: Lawrie Roache Source: http://www.avsim.com/ New Plymouth, a medium sized domestic airport in the Taranaki district, on the central west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. The airport is nestled below the foothills of Mount Taranaki (Mount Egmont), a dormant volcano.

What a Wonderfull World – Parts 1,2,3 FSX Scenery Filenames: www_demo_part1.zip Authors: Aimé Leclercq Source: http://www.avsim.com/ WWW is a set of summer ground textures mountain and rockies ehancement for FSX. In this demo version, your have summer rock and mountain textures.

Relive Kai Tak Experience for Free FS2004 Scenery Filenames: 9dragon1.zip to 9dragon5.zip Authors: Milehigh Productions Source: http://www.avsim.com/ Milehigh Productions allows you to relive Hong Kong International Airport (Kai Tak VHHX) in your FS2004, as it was in the 1990's. This package includes a custom autogen and approximately 800 square miles of photo real terrain day and night textures. Not to forget the IGS 'Checkerboard' Approach.

F R E E WA R E Z O N E


Virtual Sky - 2nd issue  

IVAO Virtual Sky magazine - 2nd issue - APR2008

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