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F R E E J a n u a r y 2 7, 2 0 1 6 / V o l u m e X X X V I I , N u m b e r 2 2 / O u r 4 3 r d Y e a r / O n l i n e @ I T H A C A . C O M

Followup

on Standoff

feds will look into conduct in Danby PAGE 3

Revolution Readiness Umi Selah speaks at IC PAGE 5

Silver Spring

Cornell Cinema brings series and talks PAGE 23

Pat Seaman and the

Timberframe Movement

Place

conscious

evocative Finger Lakes anthology PAGE 28

TKTK

Post & Beam Pot Shop new HOLT home Paleo delivery PAGE 13-22


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YOUR WELLNESS DESTINATION 2

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inside the house along with a woman (his wife, Melissa) and two children. Cady refused to come out and barricaded himself inside the residence. According to law enforcement, a firearm was discharged from inside the home at a law enforcement vehicle, and after a 60-hour standoff officers discovered that Cady was dead inside the house due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Local law enforcement came under criticism for certain tactics used during the standoff, including the use of the Rook, a type of armored vehicle used to remove the house’s walls. Melissa Cady also said sheriff ’s deputies threatened to call Child Protective Services if her husband did not surrender. The federal review will be totally

Endlessly Refining a Justice Dept. Will Food Truck Law Look at Danby Case

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second look at Ithaca’s food truck policies officially began on Monday, Jan. 25, with a reconvening of the City of Ithaca Board of Public Works’ street vending subcommittee at city hall. Kathy Servoss is on staff of the public works department. She gave a brief history of the city’s history with mobile vending, which began, she said, with Lou Zaharis in 1918, but little policy was formalized until January 2014 when the current permitting system was put into place. There were no applicants for vending spots in February 2014, but there are now six trucks using city streets with three more applying and want to park in Collegetown. The growing number of trucks have led to some complaints, some of which involve things like unauthorized tables and blocked sidewalks. Many questions have come from people involved in brick-andmortar restaurants, who have questioned whether trucks pay taxes and have valid permits. Nathan Lyman, attorney for Jason Fane’s Ithaca Renting, asked the city to do an analysis of fees paid by trucks versus property taxes from restaurants. “I would like to set the record straight,” Servoss said on Monday. “Vendors must register with the State of New York to obtain sales tax ID, to ensure taxes are paid. And they must register with a commissary kitchen to prepare their food.” Trucks currently pay for their parking at the on-street market rate of $1.50 per hour. Alderpersons Graham Kerslick (D-4th) and Cynthia Brock (D-1st) both referred to the issue raised by restaurant owners of a “level playing field” and questioned whether fees could be raised under any revised policy. Both Lyman and John Yengo of Ithaca Renting expressed displeasure that there was no public comment during the meeting. Servoss told them they could give public comment at the regular meeting of the board of public works later that afternoon. “We don’t want to take any more of your time up,” Yengo said. “You’re too busy.” There’s no announced timeline for any reworked food truck regulations, nor any scheduled date yet for another subcommittee meeting. – Josh Brokaw reporter@ithacatimes.com

VOL.X X XVIII / NO. 21 / January 27, 2016 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

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ompkins County residents may soon get some long-awaited answers regarding the standoff on Hornbrook Road in Danby that resulted in the death of David Cady, 36, a little over a year ago. At a meeting of the county legislature Jan. 19, it was announced that the U.S. Department of Justice recently gave written confirmation that it will provide technical assistance for an independent review of law enforcement’s action during the incident. The investigation is slated to begin around mid-March, said Deputy County Administrator Paula Younger. “The DOJ will be in contact with me shortly, but I suspect it will take roughly 60 days for them to be on the ground here and actively conducting their review,” Deputy County Administrator Paula Younger. (File photo)) Younger said. First on the list of people she thanked were Tompkins County Sheriff Ken Lansing and independent, Younger said. Even though the DOJ has been provided with Undersheriff Brian Robison. information related to the incident, “This has been something that came including the sheriff ’s department’s afterup, obviously, against a lot of controversy,” action report, “they made it very clear Lansing said. “There were questions to be they’re not putting a rubber stamp on asked about this event when it took place, anything,” she said. “They are coming in and understandably so.” with a fresh eye, as we have requested.” The string of events that led to the Younger said the process involved upcoming investigation began Dec. 30, 2014, when sheriff ’s department deputies attempted to execute a warrant at Cady’s continued on page 10 home. It was determined that he was

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▶ Tompkins Sales Tax Down in 2015, Recently, the NYS State Tax Department released 4th quarter 2015 sales tax data that show continued retail stagnation in most counties across the state. The fourth quarter data also allows for full year sales tax analysis, which is troubling when compared to 2014. In the 4th quarter of 2015, 31 counties, including Tompkins County, experienced negative growth in sales tax receipts when compared to the same time period in 2014. New York State also saw their share of sales tax receipts decline by 2.3 percent in the 4th

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quarter of 2015 compared to 2014. “This is most troubling because the fourth quarter includes holiday sales, which traditionally boost sales tax revenues across the board,” said New York State Association of Counties (NYSAC) President William Cherry, the Schoharie County Treasurer. In 2015, 12 counties collected less in sales tax revenue than they did in 2013. For 11 other counties, while not negative, they averaged less than 1% growth per year in sales tax receipts between 2013 and 2015. See nysac.org for more information. h e

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A step forward in county mental health care

Cult Films Abound ................... 23 Cornell Cinema hosts series and directors

NE W S & OPINION

Newsline . ............................... 3-7, 10, 12 Sports ................................................... 11

SPECIAL SEC T ION

Business Times . ............................ 13-22

ART S & E NTE RTAINME NT

Film . ...................................................... 24 Dining . ................................................. 25 Music . ................................................... 26 Music . ................................................... 27 Books .................................................... 28 TimesTable .................................... 30-33 HeadsUp . ............................................. 33 Classifieds..................................... 34-36 Cover Photo: Pat Seaman of Woodhouse Timberframe (Photos provided) Cover Design: Marshall Hopkins

ON THE W E B

Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 B i l l C h a i s s o n , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m G l y n i s H a r t , F i n g e r L a k e s M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 235 Ed ito r @Flcn .o rg J a i m e C o n e , W e b E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J o s h B r o k a w, S t a ff R e p o r t e r , x 225 R e p o r t e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C h r i s H a r r i n g t o n , E d i t o r i a l a s s i s t a n t , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Steve L aw r ence, Sports Columnist, Ste vespo rt sd u d e@gmai l .co m M i c h a e l N o c e l l a , F i n g e r L a k e s S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 236 Sp o rt s@Flcn .o rg M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r e c t o r / D e s i g n e r , x 226 P r o d u c t i o n @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m G e o r g i a C o l i c c h i o, A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 220 G e o r g i a @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J i m K i e r n a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 219 J k i e r n a n @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m A l e x i s C o l t o n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 221 A le x i s @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m S h a r o n D a v i s , Cy n d i B r o n g , x 211 A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Chris Eaton, Distribution J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m F r eel a n c e r s : Barbara Adams,Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Cassandra Palmyra, Arthur Whitman, and Bryan VanCampen. G u y s o n t h e g o : Rick Blaisell, Les Jinks.

T he ent i re c o ntents o f the Ithaca T i mes are c o p y r i ght © 2 0 1 6 , b y newsk i i nc .

All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $69 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i me s G a z e t t e : Tom Newton

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PHOTOGRAPHER

Behave: The Police Live Next Door

By Josh Brok aw

On a Sad winter day, where is your happy place?

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ne Ithaca Police Department officer is already living rent-free in West Village and another might soon join him in the apartment complex. IPD Chief John Barber told Common Council members on Wednesday, Jan. 20, that law enforcement, West Village residents, and representatives for Omni New York LLC, the owner of the housing complex, got together last October and decided officers living there “would be good for that particular neighborhood.” “[Omni] offered up several apartments to police officers, similar to one they run in New York City, where officers live at the complex and simply by fact of them being there you see crime diminish,” Barber said. Legal language for the “Officer Next Door” program was put before the City Administration committee to be sure that the program was ethicalóthat is, not in violation of state laws prohibiting publicly paid officials from taking gifts of more than $75, which might influence how they do their jobs. City attorney Ari Lavine told the committee that they needed to “draw a circle” on the map around an area where the program would be allowed. Lavine said

“The Sciencenter or a coffee shop.” —Caitlin Kline

“The steam room and jacuzzi at the gym.” —Jane Whiting

Chief John Barber (File photo)

that the requirement in the legislation that any apartment be paid for at no more than 50 percent of market value was “a little bit of an arbitrary line,” but intended to ensure landlords wouldn’t offer IPD places just to get them rented. Alderman George McGonigal (D-1st Ward) said he thought the proposal “was a gas” when it was first proposed. “I didn’t think an officer would want to live there,” McGonigal said. Barber said the local response has been good, so far, to the program. “Simply having an officer there may decrease calls for service, decrease calls for loitering,” the chief said. He was clear, though, that any officers living there are

not expected, nor even allowed, to be on 24-hour duty. Unless it’s a “life and death situation,” IPD policy is that an off-duty officer is supposed to call police if they see something, like any other citizen, Barber said. “There’s no real expectation,” Barber said of any officers who might join the program. “We just want them to embed themselves in the community and try to make it better.” Omni New York LLC has provided two grants since 2013 totaling $24,000 to the IPD for additional policing in West Village, but Barber has said that nearly half of the money has gone unused; IPD cannot mandate officers work overtime, and the department has been understaffed. The company, which includes managing partner and former American League Most Valuable Player Mo Vaughn, purchased West Village in March 2008 using low-income tax credits. There are 235 units at West Village, which currently has a 10 percent vacancy rate, according to Barber. The City Administration committee unanimously passed the measure, and Common Council will vote on the Officer Next Door program at their Feb. 3 meeting. An earlier version of this story appeared on ithaca.com on Jan. 20 under the headline ‘Officer Next Door’ for West Village. – Josh Brokaw reporter@ithacatimes.com

Local Media

Some Go Away, Others Restructure

“I go hide in Autumn Leaves.” —Lecil James

S “We’re OK with this winter. It’s not that bad.” —Shay and S.A.S.

“The ski hill at Greek Peak.” ­—Wendy Weichert

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ince the mass media came into existence in the 19th century, rapid changes have been the name of the game for those who put out printed matter—especially since television, and now the Internet, have made ours a culture where true reading comprehension is increasingly rare. Even here in welleducated Tompkins County, competing with cat videos and craigslist is tough on any given outlet and tougher on its scribes. Some recent changes in the local media landscape include the end of Tompkins Weekly, which Jim Graney and Heidi Lieb-Graney started in 2006. The free print weekly put out its last edition on Nov. 30, a couple of months after the Graneys—who still operate Ithaca Child, a free quarterly—sold the paper to Dan Bruffney. Graney said in an email that his mother passing and Heidi’s recovery from a summer 2015 auto accident “led us to decide this September to sell the business

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The daily newspaper turned 200 years old last year, which was accompanied by restructuring. (Photo: Cassandra Palmyra)

and for me to retire.” “At this point, I need the time more than the additional money; and so we sold the paper to Dan,” Graney wrote in early December. “While we are sorry to learn that he has decided to close down, we can only wish none of these tragedies had occurred and that we could still be focusing on the paper.” Over at the Ithaca Journal, longtime editor Bruce Estes and sports editor Tom Fleischman took advantage of the most recent wave of buyouts from parent company Gannett, with their departure announced at the end of October 2015. Other area employees to take retirement,

2016

from a Southern Tier management group that includes the Binghamton Press and Sun-Bulletin and Elmira Star-Gazette, were former Journal assistant managing editor Dave Bohrer and marketing manager Tony Valenta. Attempts to reach Estes and other former Journal staff were unsuccessful. According to an August 2015 letter from Gannett CEO Bob Dickey announcing the “Early Retirement Opportunity Program,” published by media blogger Jim Romenesko, the continued on page 7


N R ace R elations

Getting Ready for The Revolution

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ith the return of students to campus, talks and events in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. have moved up to the campuses on East and South hills. On Wednesday, Feb. 3, at 4:45 p.m. in Sage Chapel, #BlackLivesMatter founders Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi will speak for the Cornell United Religious Work annual MLK Jr. Commemorative Lecture. And on Monday, Jan. 25, Ithaca College hosted Umi Selah, founder of the nonviolent activist organization Dream Defenders, for a talk as part of their MLK Celebration. In about an hour of remarks, Selah shared stories of growing up “in the murder capital of the murder capital of the murder capital,” Chicago’s West Englewood neighborhood, with a father who supported four kids by selling books he bought at thrift stores. Selah, whose birth name is Phillip Agnew, matriculated at Florida A&M University, where he was elected to student government positions. Selah said he had a political awakening when a mentor showed him footage of 14-year-old Martin Lee Anderson’s beating by guards at a juvenile boot camp. “When I watched someone die, the world I thought existed, that I had carefully crafted and curated to fit my image of what life was, shook a little bit,” Selah said. “My mentor was looking at us

Tompkins County

Dwelling on the TPP At the Legislature

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t the Jan. 19 meeting of the Tompkins County Legislature, the board passed a resolution calling upon U.S. Congress to reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). The resolution states that the new trade agreement was negotiated among the United States and 12 or more Pacific Rim countries by the U.S. Trade Representative—an office in the Executive branch—in secret, without consultation with U.S. elected officials but “in consultation with many transitional corporations that will benefit from its rules.” Last April the legislature opposed the fast-tracking of the TPP agreement. Now that the text of the TPP has been made public, the legislature held its stance and

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and saying ‘What are you all going to do?’” Selah helped to organize the Student Coalition for Justice in Tallahassee, a group that staged an April 2006 two-day sit-in at then-Gov. Jeb Bush’s waiting room, demanding that Bush return from a trip to Iraq to deal with the Anderson case. After college, Selah said he “sold pills” for four years, with his focus more on making money than anything else. “I wanted to prove to the world you can grow up black and poor, and make something of yourself,” Selah said. Eventually, between an incident in Charlotte when he was arrested for trespassing while at a outdoor café with friends, and the Trayvon Martin Umi Selah (Photo: Vimeo) shooting in 2012, Selah said the “golden handcuffs” of working for the man had to come off. He co-founded Dream Defenders in 2012, which calls for the end of international war and America’s police state through nonviolent action. Selah said that Dr. King “warned us about materialism,” that it would “doom any movement.” “We can’t just limit racism and hope that capitalism will go away,” Selah said. “We all benefit from the American empire. This is the single most violent country the world has ever seen. It’s not just violent because it’s racist. There’s a ravenous

hunger for the resources, the land, of people the world over.” While social media has its uses in activism, Selah warned the crowd of overstating its efficacy and its potential isolating effects. “People at coffee houses and clubs, everywhere, are locked into an everexpanding universe in the palm of your hand,” Selah said. “If we believe one person with hundreds of thousands of followers or one organization with one action is going to lead us to liberation, we are doomed.” The “onslaught of the pictures, of the videos,” of state violence, Selah said, “is bombarding our ability for empathy.” “I dare any of you to tell me you haven’t scrolled past a video of someone being beat because you saw it already or heard about it.” Selah, who’s 30 years old, said that his generation and that of the students in the room grew up believing “you could literally do whatever you wanted.” The realization that “in this country you must do as you’re told” is what has young people rebelling against the idea of putting your head down to get ahead, Selah said. “We need people on the ground every day, staying committed to local communities, building grassroots power. We need to build the population to be ready for revolution in our grandkids’ generation.” Selah concluded his remarks by leading the crowd in a chant written in Tallahassee. “Power,” the crowd repeated after him. “Transformation. And miracles. I want it. I need it. I got to have it right now.” – Josh Brokaw reporter@ithacatimes.com

passed the new Legislator Will Burbank resolution with (D-Ithaca). “What we a vote of 11-3. have is democracy at Legislators Peter the most basic level. It Stein (D-Ithaca), is literally one of the Jim Dennis last forums where the (D-Ulysses), public can come out and Mike Sigler and speak to legislators. (R-Lansing) They have three voted no. minutes to speak to Dennis all of us, and we get to pointed out speak about the issues that President of the day.” Obama supports “I think there’s Legislator Will Burbank (File photo) the TPP. Dennis a huge disconnect himself said, between what’s “I’m going to happening in vote on this one, and the reason is—there everybody’s normal lives and where are people in the room here who would these decisions are being made,” Burbank agree with me, I think—we get these added. “This is an issue that’s been largely resolutions before us and almost no one ignored by the media. If you Google TPP cares about them except the people who you’ll find precious little reporting on it.” bring them, and clearly they don’t listen He argued that “this, I believe, will have to us at the state legislature. We pass them significant impact on us in ways we don’t until we’re blue in the face. I want us to not fully comprehend.” do this quite as much as we’re doing it.” “I don’t think this is inconsequential continued on page 10 or irreverent to what we do,” responded T

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Ups&Downs ▶ The Waltons give Cornell some $$, The Walmart Foundation and the U.S. Conference of Mayors announced Cornell University as one of this year’s U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund grant recipients for the school’s no-waste apparel design and production process that utilizes post-consumer textile waste. Cornell University will receive nearly $150,000. The 2016 round of grants are focused on innovations in textile manufacturing processes. If you care to respond to something in this column, or publish your own grievances or plaudits, e-mail editor@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “Ups & Downs.”

Heard&Seen ▶ New Dean at IC School of Humanities and Sciences. Vincent Wang has served since 2012 as associate dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Richmond in Virginia. He will begin his new position in Ithaca this summer. Wang succeeds Leslie Lewis, who left the college in June to accept the position of provost and vice president of academic affairs at Goucher College. Associate dean Michael Richardson has been serving as the school’s interim dean. ▶ Top Stories on the Ithaca Times website for the week of Jan. 20-26 include: 1) Ovid Barbershop Gets New Life 2) Makeover for Classic Haunt Rulloff’s 3) Newfield BOE Approves $18 Million Renovation for Schools 4) The Inlet at Work: When Ithaca had a working waterfront 5) Collecting Bricks as a Key to the Past For these stories and more, visit our website at www.ithaca.com.

question OF THE WEEK

L ast Week ’s Q uestion: Do you support the existence of charter schools ?

58 percent of respondents answered “yes” and 42 percent answered “no”

Are the resources available for mental health care adequate in this county? Please respond at ithaca.com.

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Guestopinion

IthacaNotes

No Armchair Quarterbacks P olitics makes strange bedfellows all right, but what’s really weird is when those folks don’t even wonder why they’re in bed together. The passage by the Tompkins County Legislature of a resolution calling on the U.S. Congress to reject the Trans-Pacific Trade Partnership (TPP) last week was argued for by Legislator Will Burbank (D-Ithaca). The resolution passed 11-3, with Mike Sigler (R-Lansing), Jim Dennis (D-Ulysses), and Peter Stein (D-Ithaca) voting against. Bravo to all three of them for standing up to this sort of thing: there are any number of pressing local issues—like the subject of this week’s cover story: improving local treatment programs for the mentally ill— on which the legislature’s time could have been better spent. The resolution itself is half-baked, contradictory and poorly researched. Trade deals in the past, according to the resolution, have “advanced an agenda that undermines human rights, environmental protection, the public interest and threatens democracy at all levels of government.” Chief among the arguments against TPP is that it’s “just like NAFTA”. Meanwhile, the resolution notes that the company that proposed the Keystone XL pipeline, opposes TPP because—are you ready?—it violates key provisions of NAFTA. According to the pro-federalist, pro-free markets magazine The New American, the TPP threatens United States sovereignty by insisting on verifiable compliance with labor and

environmental standards: “The TPP ... would, if adopted, steadily strip away our national sovereignty, allowing the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the United Nations, as well as regional tribunals and regulatory bodies created by these agreements, to override our local, state, and federal laws.” (W. Jasper, The New American, April 14, 2014) This is weird. On the one hand, we have Congressman Tom Reed (R-Elmira) and his challenger John Plumb stepping into each other’s shoes to take swipes at the TPP, and new-to-the-left Move to Amend organizer Victor Tiffany (who “bills himself as a Free Trade supporter,” see Ithaca Times, April 2, 2015) opposing the agreement because it reminds them of those sovereignty-threatening organizations the UN and the WTO. On the other hand, we have dyed-in-thewool progressives like Dooley Kiefer (D-Cayuga Heights) and Will Burbank (D-Ithaca) opposing it because it reminds them of NAFTA and will undermine human rights and labor laws. Frankly, it’s not clear to us whether any of these folks have actually read the document. Only Peter Stein (D-Ithaca) seems to have done so, and he voted against this resolution. The Tompkins County resolution states that the TPP was negotiated “in secret.” How one would get a trade deal of this magnitude off the ground with full public access to every memo, before the thing has even been written, passes continued on page 7

Our Kind of Star By St e ph e n P. Bu r k e

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emory and research indicate that, despite a long, worldwide career, David Bowie never played Ithaca. Early on, in 1974, he played nearby, in Rochester. It might have dissuaded him from ever coming close again. He got busted there. It was the first arrest of his life. Police and four members of the vice squad invaded his downtown hotel room after a show at the Rochester War Memorial. They found some marijuana, but more significantly, they found Bowie, a 20-year old local woman, and Iggy Pop, in the same room. That mix was no doubt illegal in Rochester ‘74, even without the drugs. Chances are Bowie could have come to Ithaca sometime and been safe—I’m not aware of any show biz star ever being busted here—but maybe he didn’t want to take that chance. That era coincided with my first stint in Ithaca, as an undergraduate at Cornell, and I was certainly aware of Bowie. I worked for the Cornell Concert Commission and was interested in rock music. I liked what music of his I knew (the radio hits, mostly). I didn’t really care one way or another about his androgyny and calculated otherworldliness, although I certainly recognized his uniqueness and social impact. I remember being pleasantly surprised by his popularity even among the most squarely knuckleheaded in my (gendersegregated) freshman dorm. You would hear Diamond Dogs blasting on stereos on Friday afternoons right along with Springsteen, Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead, and other music meant more for the t-shirted than sequined. I was in high school in Manhattan when the gay rights movement was developing, after the Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village, and Bowie’s persona and themes seemed a natural part of that development to me. For many, however—

further away, I guess—his image and music were fledgling sights and sounds of a revolution. Donna Acquavella works with the Civic Ensemble theater group in Ithaca. She grew up in central New Jersey. She said, “I was 12 years old when I first heard Ziggy Stardust. Growing up in an Italian-Irish, Roman Catholic family, individuality wasn’t particularly fostered. Learning about David Bowie and his alter ego, I was encouraged to say convention be damned, I’m going to be who I am. “Bowie made a huge impact on me as a queer woman planning on theater as a career. “Everything the public saw of his life was meticulously crafted. He was a performer right up until his death.” Nicholas Hill is a host of Nonesuch on WVBR on Sundays. On Sunday, Jan. 10, with the startling news of Bowie’s death that morning, Hill played the final song on Bowie’s final album (Blackstar, released just two days prior) twice in succession midshow, then a third time to close. It was spontaneous, Hill said. “I had no idea which or how much Bowie I would be playing that day,” he says. ‘I never even know what my first song will be when I start. “I believe Bowie selected his audience, and sought them out. His audience has grown in unusual ways. Blackstar is a work that deserves to be heard far and wide. “The final song is such a powerful piece. Very positive, and very mournful. Much like the feeling you might imagine your fans would want to immerse themselves in—if, say, you passed away two days after it was first heard.” The bust in Rochester was the real world, but not one Bowie would have. He imagined and created a different one—for himself and scant others, at first, but finally for millions. Blackstar is currently the bestselling record in the United States. •

YourOPINIONS

The New Root Mission

Recently New Roots made an official request to the Charter School Institute to lower our enrollment from 200 to 160 students. This number more closely reflects where our enrollment is currently and where we want it to be. This past Tuesday, we decided not to attend a public hearing regarding the charter modification. We were under no legal obligation to attend. I’m done with fighting off criticism from a small handful of extremely vocal Ithaca City School District Board Members and three angry, hateful, shortsighted community members. We simply have 6

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more positive things to pour our energy into. Here’s a short list: our annual Alumni College Life Panel, our Winter Open House, our student council elections, our after school academic support program, our track team which took second place at an invitational at Cornell last week, our delegation that attended the State of the State of Climate Change March and Rally in Albany, our upcoming public event called, The Power of Project-Based Learning, our seniors who are working so hard to get their college applications in on continued on page 7


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buyouts will allow the chain to continue “providing exceptional, engaging content tailored to our readers’ interests and tastes. We also will continue to lead with digital, rapidly seizing the many opportunities presented by new and emerging technologies. And, importantly, we are working hard on ways to reinvest in our employees and the culture here we offer at Gannett.” The Gannett package, according to a Romenesko source, included two weeks pay per year of service for those with 25 years or more in with the company, with a cap of one year of salary. With the departure of Estes and Fleischman, the Journal ended 2015, its 200th year of publication, with three full-time reporters on the ground here in Ithaca, and one editor, Lois Wilson, splitting her time between Elmira and the office on State Street. In 2000, nine reporters was considered “fully staffed” at the Journal, according to an employee there at the time. The area’s youngest news outlet, the online-only Ithaca Voice, also saw a major change recently, when founding editor Jeff Stein announced on Jan. 15 he was leaving to take a position with vox.com, a Washington, D.C.- based “explainer” news site. Advertising director Mike Blaney will take over the executive director role for the nonprofit, and Jolene Almendarez, crime and courts reporter there since May 2015, will take over the managing editor position. “I really miss Ithaca, and I hope it welcomes me back,” Stein said via phone from D.C. “I wanted to transfer into writing about national politics and couldn’t really do it from Ithaca. I’m optimistic the Voice will thrive, and probably do better without me.” Here at the Ithaca Times and Finger Lakes Community Newspapers, our most recent staffing change was in November, when we welcomed Jaime Cone on board to replace Keri Blakinger, after the latter left for the New York Daily News. Cone recently graduated with a master’s from the Arthur Carter Institute of Journalism at New York University, and she was previously a staff reporter for the Brattleboro Reformer (Vermont). Cone reports on Tompkins County government; manages our website, ithaca.com; and writes news and features for the Candor Chronicle, Newfield News, and Random Harvest Weekly (Spencer-Van Etten).

understanding. The fact that the details were worked out behind closed doors doesn’t make this a “secret” agreement. On Nov. 5, 2015, we got an email from President Obama—“info@ mail. whitehouse.gov”—that’s not exactly a hard link to find—inviting perusal of the whole document, and providing links to the complete text. The TPP can’t be ratified by fiat. Congress has to approve it. It is available to anyone who wishes to read it. However, neither the opponents on the right or the left seem inclined to actually quote the thing: articles on Public Citizen, Ralph Nader’s site, describe the pernicious effects of the TPP without providing links or footnotes to back up their claims. For instance, the “Labor” chapter in the TPP requires that all parties to the document “adopt and maintain in their laws and practices the fundamental labor rights as recognized by the International Labor Organization (ILO), including freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining; elimination of forced labor, abolition of child labor, and the elimination of employment discrimination.” All signatories are further required to have laws governing minimum wages, hours of work, and occupational safety and health. President Obama writes: “The TPP includes the strongest labor standards in history … it also includes the strongest environmental commitments in history, requiring countries in one of the most biologically diverse areas on Earth to crack down on illegal wildlife trafficking, illegal logging, and illegal fishing. These standards are at the core of the agreement and are fully enforceable —which means we can bring trade sanctions against countries that don’t step up their game …” In other words, the President is pushing the trade agreement in order to enforce labor and environmental standards that were not included in NAFTA. Among the list of things NAFTA did not do, that the TPP would do: protect against overfishing; combat illegal logging; combat illegal wildlife trafficking; provide trade sanctions for environmental violations; require anti-corruption and transparency measures; protect a free and open internet; simplify export rules for small businesses, and provide sanctions for violations of labor laws. The right doesn’t like it because the TPP represents the globalization of labor and environmental standards. The left doesn’t like it because it represents globalization, period. But the TPP means to change the rules of globalization. Obama writes, “TPP rewrites ‘the rules of the road’ for the 21st century. If we don’t do it, countries like China will.” It’s not NAFTA, but the county legislators haven’t done enough homework on it to know that. Nor should they; they should pay attention to county issues.

time, our Caregiver Action Committee that is working to bring Civic Ensemble to our school to do some theatre of the oppressed, yes, Theatre of the Oppressed – stop Oppressing us Ithaca City School District and let us do our job! High school is not one size fits all. Our students are incredible individuals who had the insight or a series of unfortunate experiences in their district schools to know that they needed a smaller, more inclusive, creative school community with more hands-on, projectbased learning. We are a mission driven school with a focus on sustainability education and social justice. We are a school of choice. Every one of our students chose to come to New Roots over their district school. We love our students and we will fight to keep our school open. Want to know why our test scores and graduation rates were low? New Roots is in its 7th year. When a regional charter school opens its doors and for the first time students from area districts have an alternative for public education you tend to get a flood of students who have been failed by their district schools. Can you imagine what it takes to help an incoming junior prepare for graduation when they are coming in with gaps in their education, learning needs that were never met and a not so positive opinion of education as a whole? But we do it every day! Our floodwaters are subsiding and our test scores and graduation rates are rising. We are seeing more and more families enrolling their students because they believe that what we offer is what their student needs to thrive socially and to succeed academically. Our teachers and staff get paid less than they would in a district school but the reward is in the relationships we develop with students and their families and our community as we forge a new path that redefines what public education can offer our youth.

– Josh Brokaw reporter@ithacatimes.com

ourCorrections In the calendar of last week’s Winter Times we inadvertently listed the appearance of the Freiberg Baroque Orchestra at Bailey as taking place on Feb. 8 at 3 p.m. The concert is, in fact, on Feb. 28 at 8 p.m.

– Glynis Hart, managing editor, Finger Lakes Community Newspapers. T

– Rebecca Day Cutter, New Roots Charter School community learning and outreach coordinator

New Diet Journey

I’m getting closer to making the decision regarding my meat consumption in an effort to do my little bit for the planet, so I have been working on a food plan that will fit my food budget. Black beans and rice, over polenta, bean burgers, soups, tacos, salad with quinoa, and my all time favorite, black beans with a fried egg. I’m having such fun researching at Autumn Leaves. I found a great book with a variety of low cost, healthy vegetarian fare, including several recipes for polenta—next week’s project. Watching Michael Pollan on PBS last month was just the boost I needed. “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” Sounds a bit familiar to me. Jane Brody (educated right here at Cornell) has been my food guru since her Good Food Book. Much of what she says is very similar to h e

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Pollan’s conclusions, so I have these two outstanding food experts to help me on this journey. I have checked out all the stores within walking distance to my apartment to compare prices and I was pleasantly surprised by what I discovered. I realize how fortunate I am to have the interest, time and energy to do this research and planning, so I hope to share it with those who don’t. A good chunk of my work over the years has been with individuals and families living on a very limited budget. They have been my best teachers, and I thank them. I’m confident that in the very near future I will have a food plan that will work for me, but I will never give up my bacon grease!! – Sandy Ferreira, Ithaca Ferreira’s letter is a follow-up to her contribution to Readers’ Writes (Dec. 30 issue). She has promised to keep us apprised of her dietary explorations.

The End of Jabberwock?

To whom it may or may not concern. This is about the Jabberwock. We came to town in 1998 we shared many good times in this town. We created community. People consider the Jabberwock represented a big part of Ithaca and that Ithaca was Jabberwock. We made meals and shared with everyone in the community, as well as gave deals to everyone in the community, as well as created a wonderful atmosphere for everyone to come and hang out. And then came the construction. The construction lasted for a good three years or more Jabberwock consistently took out loans to see if they could stay afloat through these hard times. Not $0.01 was given to us to help us with our rent. We were in a five-year lease, and our rent got raised three times during the construction, so we were paying $5,000 a month and having 0 people want to walk in front of us because of the sledgehammers. We also had inventory falling off of our shelves and breaking. Not one cent of compensation is going to be coming to us from anyone as far as I know Finally after three years we can no longer pay any money and our loans full up. Our debts soar high, so we moved to a small spot next to the State Theater. Of course that did not work to be in a very small spot where people can no longer walk around and create a great atmosphere for people to play the instruments and then buy them. So we cannot make any money in the new location and now Jabberwock is leaving town. We were definitely worth $300,000 only four years ago and now it is worth nothing. Please let me know if there’s anyone I can contact to help me so that Jaberwock does not have to leave for good. Thank you possibly for any concern out there please share this with anyone that you think will care Sincerely – Arden Russo, owner of Jabberwock, Ithaca (createbeauty42@gmail.com) -

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Getting Access

New mental health money to shorten time to treatment

By Jaime Cone and Bill Chaisson

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n Jan. 19, the Tompkins County Legislature voted unanimously to approve the acceptance of the $700,000 grant to fund the Open Access program at the county mental services clinic on East Green Street. “This is important,” said Michael Lane, legislature chair. “It’s a big grant. It helps provide even better services in our mental services health department, and I think there’s some pretty exciting work being done there to bring this forward.” The Tompkins County Mental Health Department has been awarded a three-year grant by the New York State Department of Health and Office of Mental Health to support the department’s Open Access Program, begun on a pilot basis in 2014. The grant, awarded under the State’s Vital Access Provider (VAP) program, will provide initial funding for three new positions at the mental health department to provide coordination, support, and management of the open access/intake process, with the new staff working together as a monitoring and tracking team for the program, and the professional staff also providing direct service. Acceptance of the grant, creation of the three new grant-funded positions, and allocation of first-year funding of more than $300,000 was recommended by the county legislature’s Health and Human Services Committee on Jan. 7.

What Is Open Access?

“I’m no expert in this,” said Legislator Peter Stein, chair of the committee, “But I’ve seen this whole business that’s been going on for several years about the Medicare redesign, and there seems to 8

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be, as near as I can tell, a movement that the government has done to increase the quality of the medical care we have and at the same time decrease the cost of it. That’s one of those things that people talk about a lot, and it’s not easy in general to do both of those at the same time, but this is one of those examples that sounds like it.” “Basically, Stein said, “New York State is giving us a significant amount of money to do better that part of mental health where someone arrives at the mental

“We support anything that

will speed up wait times. We’re fortunate to have a county mental health clinic and mental health ward in the hospital ... Some counties don’t even have a hospital.” —Lee-Ellen Marvin, Executive Director, Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services

health [clinic] with a problem and needs help, and to make sure that the mental health department is organized such a way as to get that person to the right place in the shortest amount of time. And it’s believed, and the argument is made, that while that will cost more money because there are more staff people there, it’s saving us more money than it costs because of the efficiency of the care that’s being provided. So I think this is a good thing, and it’s costing us nothing, and I think we certainly ought to pass it.” In 2014, the Open Access pilot program started essentially as a walkin-based intake process, said Frank a n u a r y

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Kruppa, Tompkins County Mental Health Commissioner. “If someone decides they need care from our clinic, they can come in and we have staff available to see them through the intake process, which means meeting with a social worker and then assigning them to a clinician.” Kruppa explained that the mental health department had been doing that work for two years with existing staff, but it took them away from their normal work, which is seeing patients for scheduled, ongoing appointments. The pilot program is designed to shorten the length of time between the request for services and the actual intake. Prior to Open Access, people would have to make appointments that were oftentimes weeks out, Kruppa said. “Folks would make an appointment and wouldn’t come,” he said, “and there are a limited number of appointment available, so they had to wait for weeks to be seen. We felt like it wasn’t the best way to go about providing services for folks.”

The Pilot Program

The Open Access initiative was initiated on a pilot basis in 2014 to address long waiting periods for new Mental Health clients to participate in intake and assessment for ongoing services, enabling them to walk in during scheduled open hours during the week and receive intake for services when they needed them most. The State’s VAP program assists healthcare entities within the state improve facility financial viability, meet community service needs, improve quality of care, increase health equity for populations at risk, and provide operating assistance for redesign of organizations’ healthcare delivery systems to assist in financial stability.

2016

Though Open Access saw about 150 clients last year and 200 the year before, the demand was unpredictable. The employees had to block out between three and four hours of their day to be on stand-by, but on some days they would be very busy and on others nobody would walk in seeking services at all. “It was an inefficient use of the clinicians’ time,” Kruppa said, and it wasn’t cost-effective to have employees pulled away from scheduled appointments. With the grant, the employees can go back to their normal jobs and the pilot program conducted in 2014 and 2015 will continue with the hiring of three new employees who will step into their positions. Financial breakdown of grant funds as listed in the resolution passed at the Jan. 19 legislature meeting are as follows: psychiatric social worker, $61,448; mental health nurse, $55,865; casework assistant, $42,653; fringe, $90,381; Telephone, $300
training, $600
computer equipment $5,400; and professional services administration and overhead, $46,232. The new Open Access team will consist of a mental health nurse, a psychiatric social worker, and casework assistant. The last, Kruppa said, will fulfill a vital role by doing the actual intake of patients and the follow-up afterward. After the initial appointment, the team will follow up with every person who walks through the door to make sure he or she attends their first scheduled appointment with their newly assigned regular clinician. They will call the person if they miss the appointment and reschedule if need be. “We really want to make sure that when there’s someone who is interested in receiving services, we get them connected with their clinician,” Kruppa said. “What we want to avoid are those times when


someone comes in for intake and we don’t see them again.”

Funding It When the State Money Ends

The challenge is to be able to continue Open Access indefinitely after the threeyear grant ends. “The goal is have them be self-sustaining, revenue-wise, not just by the revenue they generate by doing the intake work but by making the other clinicians more efficient,” Kruppa said of the new employees. Over the course of the grant period, he told the county Health and Human Services Committee, the program will be monitored against established performance standards, with the intent that it will be self-sustaining by the time the grant ends as of the first quarter of 2018. One of the deliverables of the grant is that the department will be reporting on its progress. “It’s not going to be up to us saying that it’s successful at the end,” Kruppa said. “The grant requires us to show we’re making progress, and hopefully if we achieve the goals that are set, we’ll be able to show how [the new positions] are self sustaining.” Open Access is located at 201 E. Green St., in the county mental health clinic, just down the road from the Tompkins County Public Library. It is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m to 2 p.m., but Kruppa said that with the grant he’s hoping the program can extend its hours. Most people who come in seeking care do so on their own accord. “People do just walk in,” Kruppa said. “We don’t take appointments for intake, so generally if someone calls ahead we say, ‘Come on down and we’ll fit you in.’ If it’s super busy we might suggest they come another day, but it is a walk-in system.” The mental health program has social workers, nurses, and psychiatrists on staff ready to field a wide range of mental health issues. “Anyone who feels like they’re having an issue, we encourage them to come down and speak with us,” Kruppa said, and if for any reason the staff doesn’t feel like it’s equipped to handle the issue, there are community resources that [the Department of] Mental Health is closely connected with and can refer the patient to. “The VAP grant provides the mental health department an opportunity to fine tune our Open Access intake process, which will not only provide a better client experience, but allow our providers to more effectively use their time with scheduled clients,” director Kruppa said. The mental health department will bill Open Access patients’ health insurance like any other medical care provider, or if the patient is paying out of pocket, the staff will look into the patient’s eligibility to be charged on a sliding scale, Kruppa said, adding that another reason why the department saves money by hiring three new employees is that when the pilot program staff return to their regular

positions they will be able to see more clients. Generally the intake process through Vital Care takes up to an hour and a half while regularly scheduled, billable, ongoing appointments typically last 45 minutes. If the clinic has more staff available for those regular appointments, that means they can see more people and therefore generate more revenue for the department. Now that the legislature has approved the grant, Kruppa said the department would begin recruiting immediately to fill the positions as soon as possible.

Why Open Access Is Needed

We checked with two mental health providers in Tompkins County to see whether the two year pilot program for Open Access was making a difference in the numbers of people with mental health problems that they see. We called the Tompkins County jail because many of the mentally ill are brought there after being charged with a variety of crimes. We also contacted the Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services; they refer their callers to the crisis line to either Family and Children’s Services and to the county mental health clinic. Capt. Ray Bunce is the officer in charge at the county jail. “We haven’t seen any benefit,” he said. “There’s been no decrease that I can see in [the number of mentally ill inmates], although that isn’t a statistic that we keep.” Bunce had not been informed of the Open Access pilot program, but was glad to hear of its existence. “We need all the help we can get,” he said. On Jan. 12 Bunce met with Dr. John Bezirganian, a psychiatrist at county mental health who serves as a liaison to the jail. This was the annual medical meeting and Bunce used the occasion to try to get more access to mental health services. At present a social worker visits the jail for two hours each week. “It would be optimal,” said Bunce, “if we could have someone there everyday. Cortland [County jail] has a forensic social worker assigned to their building. I think they’re there 40 hours a week.” Lee-Ellen Marvin has been the executive director of Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services since 2011 and has been with the organization in other capacities since 2008. She had not heard of the Open Access pilot program either. She said there had been a steady decline in the number of callers to their crisis hotline, but she felt that it was due to a decline in the number of people who knew about it because of decline of funding for advertising. “But we’ve also noticed,” she said, “an increase in the severity of the problems of the people who do call.” “We support anything to speed up wait T

times,” she said of Open Access. “We’re fortunate to have a county health clinic and a mental health wing at the medical center. We’re lucky to have those resources; some counties don’t even have a hospital.” Marvin suggested that there was a long way to go before adequate mental health services were available in Tompkins

C o u n t y M e n ta l H e a lt h c e n t e r o n G r e e n S t r e e t ; C a p t. R ay B u n c e at t h e c o u n t y j a i l ; a n d L e e - E l l e n M a rv i n at Su icide pr ev en tion a n d Cr isis S e rv i c e s ( F i l e P h o t o s)

Department, which may sound like an ER, but the public should think about the Open Access program as the equivalent of urgent care. The casework assistant will be handling most of the intakes for the entire department, including people being discharged from the hospital or people on probation, not just those coming in through the Open Access program. Since November the department has been renovating its entrance, which should be complete in early April, Doling said. The new entrance will have reception desks and a waiting area where in the past there was only an elevator and a reception desk for one of mental health’s programs to greet people when they walked in the door. They hope the new entryway will make it more welcoming. “We want someone who doesn’t know where they’re going to be able to come in and have someone say, ‘Sure, no problem’ and be able to direct them to the right place,” she said. •

County. The Suicide Prevention and Crisis Services hotline is, Marvin said, “for good solid listening. For some that’s enough. People figure out things as they speak. Sometimes they decide they should see a therapist.” At that point the hotline staff provides referrals to the Mental Health Clinic or Family & Children’s Services.. Marvin said that there were not enough local caregivers and that some people waited six to eight weeks before seeing a therapist. She had heard that Chemung and Steuben counties, which have combined services, had made a “massive commitment” to shorten wait times. Their staff, she said, had committed to working overtime and even the patients pitched in by agreeing to be seen less often. • • • Basically the staff is there doing triage, said Betsy Doling, fiscal officer for the Tompkins County Mental Health h e

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Several members of the public spoke in favor of the resolution. “The TPP is about the future—a future many of us will not see,” said Joe Wilson of Dryden. “That makes the TPP more about our children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, and the world we give them to live in after we’re gone.” “We know that the TPP is like NAFTA [North American Free Trade Agreement], only more so. We know the history of NAFTA is job cuts, stagnant wages, reduced worker safety, runaway manufacturing, and environmental degradation,” Wilson said. Burbank originally brought forward

the resolution, and the revised, votedupon version of it was submitted by Legislator Dooley Kiefer (D-Cayuga Heights). The resolution says that U.S. trade deals for the past 25 years have been corporate-driven, incorporating rules that skew benefits to economic elites, resulting in working families bearing the brunt of such policies. “The disproportionate voice of powerful United States,” it reads, “and multinational global corporations in the formation of U.S. ‘free trade’ agreements has advanced an agenda that undermines human rights, environmental protection, and the public interest, and threatens democracy at all levels of government,” said the resolution, to quote just a small portion of it.

The resolution points to NAFTA as an example and includes a clause stating that “TransCanada, the company that proposed the Keystone XL oil pipeline, announced that it is filing two lawsuits challenging the legality of President [Barack] Obama’s November decision denying the pipelines its border-crossing permit … and also that it will file a separate petition under NAFTA for violating four separate NAFTA clauses and asking the United States be required to pay not only the approximate $3 billion TransCanada has already ‘invested’ in the pipeline but also an additional approximate $15 billion of lost future earnings.” – Jaime Cone southreporter@ithacatimes.com

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Tompkins County

Defining What a Hotel Is in Tompkins County

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t their Jan. 12 Tompkins County Legislature passed a local law amending the definition of “hotel” in the 1989 Tompkins County Hotel Room Occupancy Tax Law. The original wording defined a hotel as a “building or portion thereof which is regularly used and kept open as such for the lodging of guests,” but according to the resolution, differing interpretations of “regularly used and kept open as such” have created certain challenges in equitably enforcing the law, especially in light of the growth of online rental platforms. The board voted to use the word “facility” rather than “building” because using the term “building” in the definition of hotel may or may not include “glamping,” also known as glamorous camping, a relatively new kind of tourist facility. The amendments to the law also include taking out Jim Dennis, still chair the phrase “regularly used and kept open as of the budget such,” to update the law committee. to respond to changes in the local lodging market which have occurred since the current room tax law was first adopted. In other legislature business, legislature chair Mike Lane (D-Dryden) announced the 2016 organizational structure and leadership appointments. The number of standing committees will decrease from seven to six: Budget, Capital, and Personnel; Facilities and Infrastructure; Government Operations; Health and Human Services; and Public Safety will remain, but the former Economic Development Committee and the Planning, Energy, and Environmental Quality Committee are now replaced by a new combined committee—the Planning, Economic Development, Energy, and Environmental Quality Committee. Dennis will continue as chair of the Budget Committee, Dave McKenna (R-Newfield) will remain chair of Facilities and Infrastructure, and legislature vice chair Dan Klein (D-Caroline) will stay chair of Government Operations. McKenna will continue to chair the Broadband Subcommittee, under Government Operations. In a couple changes in leadership, Leslyn McBeanClairborne (D-Ithaca) will be chair of Health and Human Services, with former chair Peter Stein moving over to Public Safety. – Jaime Cone southreporter@ithacatimes.com


the glass six inches in front of a fan’s face, she remarked that the fan was likely very grateful for that half-inch of protection. Cornell and Dartmouth played a scoreless first period, and I was pleased that the Zamboni gave my companion a few more moments of entertainment. The visitors put in two quick goals off

sports

It’s Like Field Hockey, Dad Taking your daughter to Lynah Rink By Ste ve L aw re nc e 3

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n our way to my 11 year-old daughter’s first Cornell men’s hockey game, I decided to start at the most basic of levels. “Okay,” I said, “let me explain how the game of hockey is played. It’s kind of like a soccer game, and teammates work together to get it in the goal, but it’s a puck, not a ball.” I got one of those looks. “Dad, I play field hockey, remember? I’m thinking it’s more like that than soccer.” Oh, yeah … We arrived and took our seats, and I tried to explain the unique nature of the Lynah Faithful. I told her, “When the other team is being introduced, the fans will read newspapers. This conveys their utter disinterest in the opposing players.” That made her smile. I continued, “When the goalie lets a goal in, the crowd will point at him and say, ‘It’s all your fault! It’s all your fault!’ Then, they will point at him again and say, ‘Sieve, Sieve, Sieve!’” She replied, “What’s a sieve?” I told her, and she said, “That’s mean. If we did that in my softball games, we’d be taken out of the game.”

At that point, the fans threw the newspapers onto the ice, and she looked puzzled. She asked, “Will someone make them pick them up?” I said, “No, and if we come back tomorrow, we will see them throw a few hundred dead fish onto the ice.” “That’s gross. And it’s stupid.” Mitch Gillam’s 17 saves were not enough. (Photo: Cornell Photographic) Anyone who knows an 11-year-old is aware that they are easily bored, rebounds early in the second period, and it and two national anthems was one and a seemed that the Big Red—and the fans— half too many. When the puck dropped, never recovered from the frustration of however, my three-sport daughter was seeing things go from good to bad so full-on amazed at the speed and power on display. After a high-decibel check into the quickly. The Red would lose 3-0 (the third boards that left the Plexiglass waving for goal being an empty-netter), and things a few seconds, she conveyed her disbelief would not get any better on Saturday, as that players were allowed to drive one Harvard scored two early goals and skated another into the boards. When an errant to a 6-2 win. It was another frustrating 100-miles-per-hour slap shot caromed off

night for the Big Red, as no team prefers to play catch-up, and the hosts were forced to do so for five of the six periods over the weekend. Their winless streak now at four, Cornell will try to right the ship next weekend in the North Country, taking on Clarkson and St. Lawrence. Before the Dartmouth game, we had spent some time talking with Bill Gillam, whose son, Mitch, is Cornell’s goalkeeper. When goal number two squibbled past Mitch into the goal, my daughter kept a close eye on Mr. Gillam, wondering what he might do if anyone called his son a sieve. It didn’t happen. In spite of the “Lynah Faithful nature” and the final score, Cornell has picked up a new fan. She can’t wait to go back. • • • The Blind Side was a 2009 Hollywood production in which Sandra Bullock won wide praise for depicting Leigh Anne Tuohy, the woman who, along with her husband Sean, took in a young man named Michael Oher, helping him have a stable enough life to pursue his dream of playing in the NFL. Oher has been quoted as saying he does not like the movie, and that many people have formed preconceived opinions of him based on the film, but I am guessing he likes the fact that he will join his Carolina Panthers teammates in California on Feb. 7 for Super Bowl 50. The Tuohys were on the field with Michael after the Panthers routed the Arizona Cardinals, and I am among the millions that love that story. •

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request but suggested the county look into funding that may be available through the Community Oriented Police Services [COPS] office. That request had to come not from Tompkins County but from the sheriff ’s department, and it was also signed by Ithaca Police Chief John Barber and Danby Town Supervisor Fredric “Ric” Dietrich. “I extended thanks to Chief Barber because,” Younger said, “although the request didn’t come from the city, the Ithaca Police Department and their SWAT unit and other specialty areas were directly involved as another supporting law agency, so it’s good to have chief Barber’s support behind the scenes with this request.” Younger added that words like “closure” and “heal” are used too often

Danbyfollowup contin u ed from page 3

filling out a technical assistance application, which is similar to a grant. “The difference is that rather than the recipient getting a grant to go out and spend the money for the help, the request is for the actual help itself. They have to find the experts and plan the approach and all of that, so the government is actually spending the money on our behalf,” Younger explained. It’s been eight and a half months since Tompkins County first began applying for assistance. Originally Younger applied for help from the U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance, which did not grant the

in tragic situations, but she hopes the investigation will help the community come to terms with what happened. “I can’t put myself in the place of the family members, but I hope this provides some comfort in knowing that an independent, non-biased entity has given this a fresh-eye review and given honest feedback about what happened,” she said. “I know there are people who have real concerns about the way law enforcement approached this, and it’s really unfortunate, but sometimes things have to happen the way they happen, even if they don’t look good or feel good. We want to make sure we did things the proper way, and if not we want to see concrete recommendations in how we can demonstrate improvement along the way.” Younger said she did not receive any

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pushback from the sheriff ’s department when it came to seeking the independent review, and she believes law enforcement has attempted to be as transparent as possible. “In some earlier conversations with the COPS office, one of the first things they noted was the fact that the sheriff ’s office in concert with the Ithaca police prepared its own after-action report, which is not standard operating procedure,” she said. “I think that is an example of how the sheriff feels about this.” Lansing said that he would like to see the investigators take a deeper look into all the agencies that were involved and how they worked together, including probation and social services. “It will be interesting,” Lansing said. “They’re going to go back to when Cady first got into criminal justice system, and they had stated in their last conversation with me before making their decision to come back here that they were going to go back to the beginning, and I said, ‘That’s good.’ I’d like to look at the whole picture of how this developed into what it was, and I think that’s only fair to everybody.” I’m looking forward to them coming in and shining light on this, if there’s anything to shine light on,” he said. Dietrich also hopes the review will look further back to the months leading up to the standoff. He said it’s hard for him to believe that Cady was difficult for law enforcement to track down given that he was active in public town meetings as a partner in a contentious auto shop venture, and he thinks it may be helpful to look at Cady’s criminal history to see how the situation between Cady and law enforcement escalated. After the standoff the town had several public meetings where residents brainstormed a list of questions to take to the county. Some of them were answered and some were not, Dietrich said, but he’d like to see the unanswered ones addressed. “It’s about communication and interagency collaboration, and in this instance there was a complete breakdown of all that,” he said. “I think the county is really blessed that people are willing to spend the time and energy trying to make Tompkins County a safer place for all of us.” “The incident was questionable,” he said. “We ought to put some of those questions to bed.” The town was affected in ways that probably wouldn’t occur to most people, he added. The incident occurred right on New Year’s Eve and continued into the first week in January, a busy time for town employees. “They closed half of our town,” he said. “We had highway trucks out that couldn’t even get to our highway department. We weren’t allowed to get into the offices and access our computers. If we had some knowledge that it was going to blow up this way, we would have taken our trucks to Caroline or Newfield. We’ll see if they think those are important issues or not.” “I’ve done what I can and pushed it as hard as I can and stayed with it and tried to do what my residents are asking of me,” Dietrich added. “Now we have to see what happens.” – Jaime Cone southreporter@flcn.org


Building Homes to Last For Centuries Timberframe houses are energy-efficient and use less wood than conventional construction By Bi l l Ch a i s s o n

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oodhouse is not a timberframe homebuilder. “We are a designer and materials supplier,” said Pat Seaman, the company’s sole owner since 2011. “Local contractors install our product. You don’t need any specialized skills. We have technical representatives on site for about five days. They oversee laying out the grid for the floor system, guide them in putting up the frame, and get them started on the panels.” In some senses the Woodhouse approach harkens back to the “kit” or “mill-cut” houses of the early 20th century, when companies like Sears, Montgomery Ward, and Bennett Homes (of North Tonawanda, New York) issued catalogs of designs and then shipped the house in pieces to the customer (usually by railroad car). However, those were all balloon construction homes, while the Woodhouse houses hearken back to an earlier construction method: post and beam. Based in Mansfield, Pennsylvania, Woodhouse was founded in 1979. The original owner operated and grew the company until 2004, when Seaman bought into the company. He had had a career in industry and had moved around quite a bit. But he had been brought up near Taughannock Falls State Park and, in a refrain often heard locally, thought this area would be a good place to bring up his own children. “Buying the company enabled me to move back to this area,” he said. “I had been kind of involved in the building trade my whole life, because my father always had a project going and my early homes had all been fixer-uppers, so I like that piece of it. “But also, this is an incredibly beautiful product,” Seaman continued. “It’s green and it’s socially responsible. The way these homes are built reduces the use of fossil fuels.”

Kitchen in a Woodhouse home. (Photo provided)

There are five sources of timber for the wood that goes into a Woodhouse home. They source eastern white pine from the northern Adirondacks; southern “yellow pine” (longleaf pine) from the Eastern Shore of Maryland (“It’s inexpensive and sustainable,” he said of the plantation grown trees); Douglas fir from Oregon; and red and white oak from southwestern Pennsylvania and southeastern Ohio. The idea of providing homes for people for a living appealed to Seaman in a way that his previous career had not. “In the industrial world we got really excited by concepts,” he said, “but who really gets excited about buying a hydraulic pump?”

operations to minimize problems before they occurred. “We sell our homes and commercial structures nationally,” said Seaman, “and we do so through both our own regional project managers—located in New York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Michigan, and Colorado—and through independent selling partners who form a Woodhouse distribution network across the country. We also have a good presence on the Internet through our website— timberframe1.com—and in the industry trade publications, Timber Home Living

In contrast, he said, people get really excited about buying a place where they will spend years of their lives. Seven years after buying into Woodhouse, Seaman bought out the founder. He had been bringing business practices learned in the course of his earlier career to the marketing and building of timberframe homes. He systematically developed a distribution network for Woodhouse designs and he modified production operations. His overall goal was to move from taking corrective action to taking preventative action. Rather than responding well when things went wrong, he changed

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HOLT: A West End Home Architecture firm excited by resurgence of the neighborhood By Josh Brokaw

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fter 30-plus years on Aurora Street, by the end of March HOLT Architects will be moving their operations to a new location on West State Street. HOLT will own their new headquarters at 619 W. State St., a building which once was Cramer’s Auto Parts, and most recently housed Renovus Solar. According to HOLT president Graham Gillespie, once renovations to the building are complete, the architects’ office will be a space that meets net-zero energy requirements, with enough power generated by photovoltaic solar panels on the roof to offset the needs of the office. “It’s a simple block building, so we’re adding some insulation and doing other technological improvements,” Gillespie said. “We’re putting in an all-electric climate control system.” HOLT is working with Taitem Engineering on improving the building’s external packaging and with Renovus for the rooftop solar panels. The new office will mean all of HOLT’s approximately 30 employees will

be located on one floor, whereas they are split up between two floors at the moment. The office will be laid out in a way that encourages collaboration, “with lots of natural light and glass,” according to HOLT marketing manager Maria Livingston. “There will be more casual touchdown spaces,” Livingston said, “and all of the conference rooms will be technology enabled for videoconferencing. It makes a difference when you’re working remotely, where the camera is in a room, for example.” HOLT moved into its current space at 217 N. Aurora St. in 1984. The “Crescent House” was built in 1916 as a silent movie theatre, and was converted into a dance hall in the 1920s. After some Depressionera years of abandonment, the building was bought by Ithaca College in 1946 and made into a gymnasium, then, after IC moved onto South Hill, was made into the “Night Court” rock club, a regular advertiser of 50 cent drinks in the Ithaca New Times. Finding a location that HOLT

could own led them to West State Street, State. They have a small, second office in Gillespie said. Though the location is a Syracuse, and as they continue to expand bit further from the downtown core, they their clientele in a market HOLT wants to consider it an extension of downtown. continue putting local architects on those Gillespie said he is excited about the projects. “resurgence” in the West End. “Higher education and health care “Everything is happening in the State have always been our core competencies, Street corridor,” Gillespie said. “We’ll have and that’s going to continue,” Gillespie showers in the office now, so everyone said. “In different corners of the state, will be able to take advantage of the some community-based projects have recreational opportunities in that area, really taken off. We’re going to continue with the gym, the kayaking, the trails.” our focus on attracting architects to Compared to their current offices, Ithaca, and having Syracuse architects for the new space will be a slight expansion, in terms of pure square footage, from about 6,500 to about Rendering of new office on West Buffalo Street. (Photo:HOLT Architects) 7,000. HOLT added nine new people in the past year and are Syracuse clients. There’s the potential for in something of a “recruitment push,” Buffalo and Rochester to happen, too.” Livingston said. Prominent local HOLT projects “Architects who are coming out of include Ithaca College’s Robert Tallman school, they’re the labor pool,” Gillespie Rowing Center on the Cayuga Inlet and said. Selling professionals just coming the Peggy Ryan Williams Center, the into the field, adept with the latest renovation of Olin Library at Cornell, and technologies, on Ithaca’s charms is part the Gateway Commons, Seneca Way, and of HOLT’s strategy. So is continuing Breckenridge Place in downtown Ithaca. § to expand their reach across New York

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The Right Combination

Clay School Fills Role of Old “Pot Shop”

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New South Hill facility invites potters in to learn and to work By Michael Nocella

For Your Home, Auto, Business

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early five years ago, Cornell University—despite public outcry—shut down its ceramics studio, commonly known as “the pot shop”, to create more space for other student activities. The controversial decision impacted not only Cornell ceramics’ students, but also others of the same ilk in the Ithaca community, as the pot shop was open to the public as well. Looking to fill that void, local artist Julia Dean opened The Clay School in September. Located on the South Hill Business Campus in Suite 28, Dean has molded a 2,000-square foot space into a newer, bigger and better pot shop for Ithacans to enjoy. “We were able to tap into a small community of people,” she explained, “who were using the same sort of studio at Cornell. About four years ago, there was a teaching room like this for the community Julia Dean (right) inspects a pot. (Photo: Michael Nocella) in Willard Straight Hall. It was called the Pot Shop. I’m pretty sure that started back in the 1950s. The word on the street is that people where they could conceivably be class, intermediate/advanced wheel Ezra Cornell’s mom was a potter. But four class, after-school class for children, mentored by. So that’s the community years ago, they took that room away. There element of the business that we’re really specific workshops and two-hour “try-it” was a group of people that were really workshop. Scheduling and registration trying to encourage.” upset about that loss. So that left a void. I information for all of those can be found “I did not stumble on this space,” kept in touch with those people. Once they Dean said. “I was actively looking for at clayschoolithaca.com. lost some steam, I decided ‘Hey, this is Both Dean and manager Bri something like this for two years. The my thing. I’m so passionate about making Richardson spoke to why Ithacans should biggest challenge of opening this business this happen here. I don’t come see what all the fuss about ceramic is have to be the one who all about. does it, but if no one else “I think our society is really is going to do it, I will.’ It embracing ways to enrich our mental was ridiculous that a town health and reducing stress, and balancing this creative and art-loving out our work lives. And I have never seen would not have something anything more capable of capturing your like this.” brain than this medium. It’s really magical. For Dean, however, The cool thing about what we’re doing it was not as simple as here is … clay is a long process. It gets snapping her fingers and fired [in the kiln] multiple times before it’s stumbling on the perfect done. It’s also not the easiest thing to do space to fulfill her vision to learn how to use the wheel. Our classes to bring an all-inclusive our seven weeks, but you don’t have to ceramics space to Ithaca. jump right into those. We have a try-it-out “The Clay School is workshop where you can just come in and a community ceramics sit down with an instructor, and it can be teaching studio,” Dean Firing pots in the community kiln. (Photo: Michael Nocella) just a one-time thing if you want it to be. explained. “It’s also a place If you chose to join a class, the cost of that where individuals can rent workshop will be applied to your class.” out their own workspace. We offer classes Added Richardson: “I think art is very was finding the right space. In Ithaca, for all ages and all levels. Right now, therapeutic no matter which medium you it’s very hard to find the combination we’re generally focused on the wheel. We chose. I think clay is very special because of everything we needed. We needed a do have plans for other techniques like you lose yourself in it. People who come loading dock for the clay. We needed hand-building. We’ll also offer specialty here are addicted to it. I would tell people parking. That’s huge in Ithaca. We needed workshops for things like making teapots. to find an affordable rent and those things. who try it to be patient with it, because For children’s classes, we offer after school sometimes it’s very frustrating to work So it took a while to find this. Once I classes and in-home classes. We’re also so hard on something. And clay is very came here, I saw everything was basically going to have summer camps and school delicate; it can break while you’re moving already in place. It just felt right.” break camps. And then we do night classes it from one spot to another. So I would say As for what exactly The Clay School for those that are 13 years and older. definitely try it out because it’s a magical has to offer, the menu is robust. There That gives us the chance to put [younger experience, but also be patient with the art is a seven-week sessions for a beginner/ students] with potentially 70-year-old form.” § intermediate wheel class, all-level wheel T

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Deliver the Paleo Goods

Burn a lot of calories by working out? Get healthy food brought to you. By Michael Nocella

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meats, nuts and berries. Believers hold that these types of food promote more activity, a healthier lifestyle and more mindful caloric intake. CrossFit Pallas owner Eamon Coyne spoke highly of the Grok’s Rx Kitchen meals being delivered to his gym, and noted that there are between eight to 12 subscribers in his gym, all of whom have given “rave reviews.” “I have tried the meals, yes,” he said. “It’s very good. It’s Paleo friendly. I tend to find for me—with my activity level— adding a little bit more carbohydrates is necessary. As far as giving out welldesigned, well-prepared meals, I think it’s definitely the best in the area for this kind of diet. “The Paleo lifestyle,” Coyne continued, “has been shown to reduce weight gain in the initial phase—when someone first goes into it. So it’s a good way to start controlling portion size and what you’re putting into your body. It makes you a little bit more aware. It focuses on eating fat and complex proteins as fuel as opposed to sugars and fewer carbohydrates. For someone with a base activity level, which can be described as

hen Jalapeno’s Mexican Grill, located at 2 East Main St., Dryden, closed in 2015, the vacancy was filled by Grubbi Groks BBXQ and Grok’s Rx Kitchen. Brothers Sean O’Brien and Chris O’Brien, along with their friend, Tess Guckenheimer, own the new establishment. The two-pronged business hopes to appeal to local taste buds all of types. “One half of the business is barbecue. That’s Grubbi Groks BBQ,” Guckenheimer explained. “The other half of the business is a gluten-free, Paleo inspired meal subscription program. We call that Grok’s Rx Kitchen. So the storefront is the barbecue, and the meals we drop off to a few different locations for people to go pick up. They get two on Monday, and two on Wednesday. If they sign up for the six meals, they get two more on Friday. We take them to designated locations in Ithaca, such as CrossFit Pallas, Black Irish Athletics, and CrossFit of Ithaca.” For those unfamiliar with the Paleo diet, or Paleolithic diet, it is known as a “fad diet” based on the foods that some believe Paleolithic humans survived on:

someone who has 10 hours of activity time, it provides enough nutrients to sustain that level.” If the Paleo-style diet isn’t your thing, perhaps the other half of the Grok’s Rx Kitchen business—Grubbi Groks BBQ—will be. “Sean has a professional chef background,” Guckenheimer said. “He used to be at Willow in Ithaca. Chris owns the Lincoln Street Diner in Ithaca. I started working for Sean at Ithaca Crossfit Pallas owner Tim Paulson with Tess Gluckenheimer. (Photo: Michael Nocella) Bakery. That’s how we met. About a year or so ago, Sean and I started “Sean use to eat at Jalapeno’s all the to talk about the meal time, ” she added. “I use to get take out subscription part of this business. We from there as well. We remembered it started with that and grew from there. We always being clean, fresh food. It was were using Chris’s diner as our kitchen, delicious. Sean knew the owners pretty but that was getting tight. So we were well. We were looking for a place in Ithaca, looking for a place of our own, and Chris but the space we were looking at, we wanted to expand and do some barbecue, would have had to build the kitchen.” § so we all teamed up. We found this place, and it just turned out to be a great fit.”

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2016


Business Briefs New Attorney at Tompkins Financial

Alyssa H. Fontaine will join Tompkins Financial Corporation as Executive Vice President and General Counsel effective January 1, 2016. “Alyssa has worked on many legal projects for Tompkins Financial during the last several years,” said Steve Romaine, Tompkins’ President and CEO. “She has demonstrated her ability to provide sound legal advice combined with a strong business sense. She will be a welcome addition to the senior leadership team of our Company.” Currently a partner with Harris Beach PLLC, Fontaine is a member of the firm’s Corporate Practice Group and serves on the Financial Institutions and Capital Markets Industry Team. She focuses on corporate transactional work, bank Alyssa Fontaine regulatory compliance and securities matters. Her experience in mergers and acquisitions includes identifying appropriate deal structures for public and private clients, assisting in the negotiation of deal terms and drafting deal agreements. She is a graduate of Cornell Law School and Brown University, and lives in Ithaca, New York with her husband and two children. Fontaine is a recipient of the “40 under Forty” award from the CNY Business Journal, and she was also named a Super Lawyers Rising Star for 2015. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Ithaca Community Childcare Center (IC3). Ed Hooks of Harris Beach has served as Tompkins’ General Counsel since 1992. He will retire at the end of this year. “We are grateful to Ed for his dedication to serving our company during more than two decades of strong growth from a single bank entity to a corporation with four banks, an insurance agency and a wealth management affiliate,” Romaine said.

Tompkins Insurance Acquisition in Batavia

Tompkins Financial Corporation has announced the acquisition of Shepard, Maxwell & Hale Insurance by Tompkins Insurance Agencies, Inc., an affiliate of the financial corporation. The acquisition was effective January 1, 2016. “We are happy to continue to grow our business in Batavia and serve our neighbors through this expansion,” said David

S. Boyce, President and CEO of Tompkins Insurance. The change is a win-win for customers, said Boyce. “In addition to continuing to receive personal attention from local insurance professionals who place a high value on customer service, customers will have “one stop shopping” access to the comprehensive array of financial solutions offered by our affiliation with Tompkins Bank of Castile and Tompkins Financial Advisors.” “This acquisition is consistent with the growth strategy we have for our company,” said Steve Romaine, Tompkins Financial Corporation president and CEO. “It is a positive move that enhances our ability to further grow our business in Batavia and western New York and offer the value-added products and services of the Tompkins Financial family,” he said.

Chamber Awards at Annual Dinner

The newly re-branded “Cayuga Wellness Center,” home to Island Fitness, Rasa Spa, and the Cayuga Center for Healthy Living. (Photo provided)

The Ithaca/Tompkins County Chamber of Commerce is pleased to recognize the winners of Entrepreneur of the Year, Non-Profit of the Year, Distinguished Business of the Year and Howard Cogan Tourism Awards. The winners will be presented with these awards at the Chamber Annual Dinner on Jan. 28 at Ithaca College’s Emerson suites from 5:30 to 9 p.m. The Entrepreneur of the Year Award will be given to Bobby Frisch of Ithaca by Firelight/Firelight Camps. Since being installed in early 2014, the glamp-site has become a regional attraction, and has earned accolades and commendation from numerous sources, including Vogue, The Wall Street Journal, WireMag, Self, and Martha Stewart. Non-Profit of the Year will be awarded to the Community Foundation of Tompkins County. Celebrating its 15th anniversary this year, the Community Foundation of Tompkins County enables ordinary people to be philanthropists. Distinguished Business of the Year will be awarded to Renovus for expanding the possibilities of solar energy and being a company leader in sustainable business practices. The Howard Cogan Award, given in the name of the creator of the “Ithaca is Gorges” slogan, is designed to recognize leaders in the community that have helped to create programs and tourism related product that strengthen our reputation as a vibrant and unique destination. This year, the award is presented to Darlynne Overbaugh for Wizarding Weekend.

United Way Awards Community Grants

United Way of Tompkins County (UWTC) recently made community investments of $65,197. These grant funds will support agencies and programs that

help people meet their immediate, basic needs while empowering lasting change by strengthening the three building blocks for a good life: education, income, and health. The fall grant cycle included three grants that were open to all Tompkins County non-profits. Scott Keenan of Tompkins Trust Company, the UWTC Community Investment Committee Chair, presented funding recommendations to the Board of Directors for the 2015 Fall Hunger & Food Security Fund, totaling $38,422.00. Six of the sixteen members of the Youth and Philanthropy Council, Amy DeGaetano, Anna Danner, Emma Robison, Jamie Mullins, Merry Jones, Samson McKinley presented the $25,000 grant recommendations to the UWTC Board. United Way of Tompkins County helps eliminate barriers and create paths to greater self sufficiency. The Hunger & Food Security grant targets alleviating hunger and the student led grants, Youth & Philanthropy and Ithaca College, address the various outcomes to target the multifaceted demands of our community/

New Director at Schuyler Hospital

The boards of directors of Schuyler Hospital and the Cayuga Health System have named James B. Watson to the position of president of Schuyler Hospital and vice president of the Cayuga Health System. He is the current president and chief operating officer of the Arnot Health-Ira Davenport Memorial Hospital in Bath, NY. “We are extremely fortunate to have Jim join Schuyler Hospital and the Cayuga Health System,” says John Rudd, president and CEO of the Cayuga Health System. “He has extensive experience in the small hospital environment and he is highly respected in the field of health care administration. He brings an estabT

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lished track record of achievements in the development of successful affiliations and the integration of services among partner organizations. Jim has in-depth knowledge of both acute hospital care and the field of skilled nursing facilities, which make him ideally suited to take on this new role.” Under Watson’s leadership as chief executive officer, Ira Davenport Memorial Hospital developed a successful affiliation with Arnot Health, providing the residents of Steuben County with acute hospital care, outpatient services, and a 120-bed skilled nursing facility. In addition to 30 years of experience in health-care management, Watson holds an MBA James B. Watson in Health Services from Union College. He has served on the Hospital Association of New York State Board of Directors and was president of the Rochester Regional Healthcare Association from 2012-2015. Kyle Tuttle, chairman of the Board of Directors of Schuyler Hospital says the board is looking forward to working with Watson. “We are very pleased that Jim Watson is so knowledgeable about what it takes to run a successful community hospital. Under his leadership I’m confident that Schuyler Hospital will continue to thrive and grow to meet the special needs of our community.”

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and Log Home Living.” There are many differences between timberframe (post-and-beam) and conventional balloon construction. For one thing, the frame of the house is visible on the inside, and there are no studs; the walls are made of solid foam, making them highly energy efficient. (“It’s like living inside a beer cooler,” said Seaman, “cool in the summer and warm in the winter.) Also, a timberframe house uses less wood than a conventional home. Woodhouse homes are built to last for centuries. They come with a transferable (from owner to owner) lifetime warranty, and they need less maintenance than an ordinary home. Seaman compared them to half-timbered homes from the 15th century that you see still standing across Europe. There are two ways to approach owning a Woodhouse home. “We can either start with one of our pre-designed homes,” said Seaman, “or we can design completely from scratch. Currently our business is evenly split between the two approaches. “We design their homes,” Seaman continued, “or collaborate on design for a commercial structure where there is usually a third-party architect, using stateof-the-art CAD technology, including 3D modeling and virtual tours, and then supply a material package to their job site which includes the timber frame, structural insulated panels, which make up the walls and roof of the structure, windows and doors, and various special

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Exterior of Woodhouse design in Willow Creek. (Photo: provided)

fastening materials necessary to install the package. Woodhouse builds 30 to 50 homes per year. Timberframe homes only constitute one-tenth of one percent of the housing market, but, he said, it is growing. The popularity of log homes is declining,

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but more and more people are finding out about post-and-beam construction when they go looking for a log home. Woodhouse modifies its designs regionally for snow load, high winds, and seismic activity. They also can modify a design to conform to the regional vernacular style

to make the house blend in. Increasingly, Seaman said, his clients are asking that the timberframe construction be visible on the outside, so everyone can see that they are looking at something special. §


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ornell Cinema is back for another semester, and Ithaca’s film fanatics know what that means: dozens of films making their debut, classics, foreign films, experimental shorts, and the best “second-run” Hollywood films from last year. It also means concerts, parties, and special filmmakers and guests. It also means that Cornell Cinema’s Mary Fessenden gives us the details and sets the scene for 2016’s winter-spring semester. As usual, there’s no way to cover every flick, show, and event, so pick up a Cornell Cinema Flicksheet or go to cinema.cornell.edu to see the full schedule. Ithaca Times: Is there a film, event, or series this semester that you feel really represents what Cornell Cinema is meant to do? Mary Fessenden: A few things come to mind. Our “Invaders from Mars: Dispatches from the Red Planet” film series is a good example of our ability to put together a group of films that allow several different points of access to a particular topic—in this case, our collective fascination with Mars. I think a good thematic film series incorporates a variety of genres from several different decades to explore a topic, and this series works well along these lines as it includes the recent Hollywood film The Martian (2015), the cult anime film Cowboy Bebop: The Movie (2002), the classic 1950s Cold War film Invaders from Mars (1954), and the yet-to-be-released A Space Program (2016), a documentary about artist Tom Sachs’ handmade installation / performance piece Space Program 2.0: MARS. It’s fantastic, by the way! The highlight of the series will be a screening of the silent Soviet sci-fi classic Aelita: Queen of Mars (1924), which will be accompanied by an original score performed live by local musicians Anna Coogan and Tzar, and I’m very excited about it! The series is co-sponsored with the Cornell Mars Rover Project Team, a connection that’s also representative of how Cornell Cinema works—that is, teaming up with student organizations, campus programs and departments, and/or community groups to present our selections. IT: You’re offering up so many Ithaca premieres, I feel like we should start with them. MF: Well, our series “Docs about Musicians, Filmmakers, Artists, Actors and More”—quite a catch-all—features ten Ithaca premieres, films that would probably not be screened in Ithaca if not for Cornell Cinema. The first in that series begins tomorrow, the beautifully crafted The Winding Stream: the Carters, the Cashes, and the Course of Country

Music. Four of the premieres explore the work of distinctive filmmakers: Senegalese director Ousmane Sembène, stop-motion animators the Quay Brothers, Alfred Hitchcock, and the late Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman. Another celebrates the work of Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman, and we’ve paired it with one of her great films, Stromboli (1950). Other films in the series delve into the lives and work of several art world luminaries, including art collector Peggy Guggenheim and land artist Robert Smithson. We’re also premiering a number of films from around the world. This weekend we’re showing Brazil’s Boy and the World, a vibrantly animated, wordless film about a boy’s journey from the country to the city, and even though it’s showing as part of our IthaKid Film Festival, adults will also love it. It’s won awards

at festivals around the globe and was recently nominated for Best Animated Feature Oscar. Another Oscar nominee we’re premiering is Theeb, from Jordan, and it’s one of five titles competing for Best Foreign Language Film. It’s set in an Ottoman province during World War I and tells the story of a Bedouin boy and his older brother as they guide a British officer across the desert to a secret destination. It’s a classic adventure story and

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beautifully shot. We’ll also be premiering Iceland’s and Romania’s submissions to the Academy for Best Foreign Language film consideration (Rams and Aferim!). Neither made the final cut, but they were both strong contenders and tell unique, widescreen stories. I’m also excited by our focus on four female directors whose films tell stories about women’s struggles and breakthroughs around the world, and two of these are Ithaca premieres. Alice Rohrwacher’s The Wonders, winner of the Grand Prize at the

Clockwise from top: Matt Damon in “The Martian”. Jacir Eid Al-Hwietat in “Theeb”. The character Spike in “Cowboy Bebop: The Movie”. (Photos Provided)

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Arts&Entertainment

Cult Films Abound

2016 Cornell Cinema Preview

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Anomalisa, directed by Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson, playing at Cinemapolis; Boy and the World, written and directed by Alê Abreu, playing Saturday January 30 and Sunday January 31 at Cornell Cinema.

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ith the exception of one very complex aspect of its story, Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson’s Anomalisa could easily have been made as a low-budget indie. There’s very little about it that screams “stop-motion animation.” That’s why it’s so damn cool. The story as such is quite straightforward, with a lot of deadpan moments and weirdness stuffed into the cracks. An author of best-selling books on the hospitality industry (voice by David Thewlis) arrives in Cincinnati for one night to deliver a lecture. He’s married with a kid, but he seems constantly lost and yearning for a new love, a new connection. He can’t connect because—this is the complex bit—everyone he meets and sees sounds and looks exactly the same. (Tom Noonan plays everyone else.) From the hotel desk clerk and the bellboy to characters in an old movie on television, all become one collective drone. So when he hears Jennifer Jason Leigh’s voice, it’s fate. He can’t help but be drawn to her. They have an encounter, things get weird, and from there I will reveal nothing of the plot. Watching Anomalisa, I started getting a real Barton Fink feeling in the notion of a hotel as purgatory. It is amazing to watch such small, subtle inflections and details done in the same medium as the RankinBass television specials and Robot Chicken. Co-director Johnson worked on the latter show, and some of the oddball comedic timing does carry over. Plus, we get the first graphic puppet sex I’ve seen since Team America: World Police. You have to be in the right mood for Anomalisa. Sure, it’s an indulgence, and there’s no reason for it to exist as it does. It made me want to see other Kaufman

2016

A film still from Boy and the World (Photo Provided)

films like Being John Malkovich and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind done in a similar style. • • • Looking at the animation medium as a delivery device for family films, handdrawn ‘toons are the exception rather than the rule; almost every such film we see is done in CGI, and usually with a nice, expensive 3-D upgrade available for a higher ticket price. I say this with little sadness; since 3-D came back several years ago, I have only enjoyed it as an extra layer for animation, and until the latest Star Wars film, I had yet to see a live-action picture use 3-D in a way that felt necessary. Alê Abreu’s naïve, almost primitive hand-drawn feature Boy and the World swings the pendulum back in a big way. The story could not be simpler, and we get every nuance of it with minimal dialogue: a young child’s father leaves home to find work, and the kid slips like an evening breeze into a fantasia of his own imagination, encountering all manner of strange visions and a variety of off-the-wall characters who serve as makeshift father figures. Abreu uses scrawled simple shapes against a white background for much of the film, leaving lots of negative space. We see the whole vision through the eyes of the kid. The white space reminded me of Crockett Johnson’s Harold and the Purple Crayon children’s book series. Abreu’s spindly, almost Crayola style of animation feels like a melding of animator Don Hertzfeldt (It’s Such a Beautiful Day) with someone trying animation for the first time, maybe a folkie outsider artist like Howard Finster, who painted several of R.E.M.’s early album covers. There’s a simple majesty to Abreu’s moving, evolving shapes and patterns. Adventurous and thoughtful kids—and their parents—should really dig it. •


dining

Singing The Blues

Local staple Crossroads takes a few steps back By J FK Fi she r

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e’ve enjoyed many meals at Crossroads over the years, from juicy burgers at the bar to pleasant gatherings on the outside deck, sharing appetizers and hearty fare. Nearly six years after opening, much of the owners’ original vision is intact: Crossroads is a friendly restaurant serving generous portions at more than reasonable prices, and the food is good. But, surprisingly for such a talented chef with a thriving business, the food now is only just good enough. We ordered four entrees: chicken Parmesan rigatoni, fried haddock, mushroom asparagus risotto, and fried chicken. The risotto was the star of the show: roasted portabella mushrooms on rice with asparagus and white button mushrooms and a generous snowfall of grated Parmesan. The roasted portabella was evenly done, brought to the perfect point to bring out the full flavor without sacrificing the texture. Mushrooms can be casually done to rubber in the wrong hands, but we felt a genuine mushroom lover had prepared this dish. The risotto

was sinfully creamy and flavorful, and the asparagus and Parmesan balanced nicely. It was a feat for a meat-eaters’ restaurant, and a guarantee that you can take your vegetarian friends out to dinner here (if they eat dairy). However, the meat-eaters were less delighted. The several building blocks of the chicken Parmesan were each, in their way, a bit shaky. The chicken breast was not pounded thin, and—dare we say it—had the texture of poultry that has been injected with water. The crust was thick and tough; and the cheese was rubbery and bland. The dish lacked cohesion as well as flavor. The pasta accompanying the chicken was overcooked and swollen from sitting too long in a marinara sauce, which can best be described as bland. The fried chicken served with housemade sausage gravy and mashed potatoes was by far a better chicken dish. The cutlet was pounded thin and the panko crust was crisp. The flavorful gravy accented both the chicken and the delicious skinon smashed potatoes. Unfortunately the vegetable side that completed the dish was a

medley of watery frozen vegetables, a regrettable choice when steamed fresh broccoli or green beans would have a simple and satisfying alternative. The haddock came in a cornmeal based coating. For people who like that, it was done pretty well. The fish was cooked perfectly, not dried out but nice and moist, and the coleslaw that came with it was really good: not drowning in mayonnaise, but fresh and crispy. The fresh cut fries were crispy and good, tasting nicely of potato (which would seem to be a given, A meal for a happy customer at Crossroads (Photo JFK Fisher) but in many restaurants, is not). On past visits we have also enjoyed room was not full, but it seemed unclear the fresh cut sweet potato fries and the whose job it was to wait on us, so we sat, meatloaf, which is made in house and has a dry-mouthed, watching tables that came delicious gravy. in after we did enjoying their drinks and Although Crossroads doesn’t serve placing their orders. The delay was put right dessert, with some persuasion our with the chef ’s excellent signature salad delightful waitress confessed that the chef (crisp greens with Granny Smith apple, had recently produced a concoction of walnuts and Gorgonzola, with a delicious crisply fried tortilla triangles dusted with Dijon vinaigrette with snipped fresh dill), confectioner’s sugar and cinnamon, served on the house. with a mound of fresh whipped cream and It would only take a few tweaks to honey. A batch was prepared for us, which step up the overall quality of the food and we thoroughly enjoyed. Dipping the fried service to restore Crossroads to the exciting dough into the soft cream was fun and restaurant it was at its inception. For now, delicious. It was a perfect dessert for a table the chef seems content to serve satisfying, to share. serviceable comfort food in a casual, The waitstaff were all cheerful, friendly, friendly atmosphere. • and helpful (and often apologetic). The staff was in some disarray because of a catered Ithaca Times restaurant reviews are event elsewhere in the restaurant, so we based on unannounced, anonymous were served by four or five people. There visits. Reviews can be found at were three servers in sight and the dining ithaca.com/dining

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music

Bron-Y-Aur Stomp

The American Led Zeppelin visits The State By Br yan VanC ampe n

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Get The Led Out - The American Led Zeppelin @ The State

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and a kind of a form. We always do a sitdown acoustic part in the middle, and we usually open with a rousing opener. We found a couple of tunes that are fun openers that we didn’t expect to be. You’ll always get the big ones. You’re not going to come hear us and not hear “Stairway [to Heaven].” Even for people who are cursory fans, we want to give people something

was in junior high when I first heard Led Zeppelin, and I didn’t get it. I thought there was something off about the drums or something, and my friends sniggered at me. It wasn’t until college that someone played me Led Zeppelin III and I fell in love with the acoustic guitar-driven songs like “That’s The Way” and “Gallows Pole”. Even then, I didn’t realize that Jimmy Page was using open tunings, and if you wanted to play “That’s The Way” right, you had to learn that tuning and new chord shapes. Get The Led Out, playing at the State Theatre on Jan. 29, are six professional musicians who have made it their mission to bring the studio recordings of LZ to live audiences. This is not an impersonator act. I spoke to the group’s Andrew Lipke, a multi-instrumentalist, about his band’s mission statement and what it takes to bring an entire discography to life on stage. When I opened by asking about six guys playing the music of four guys, he had this to say: Andrew Lipke: What’s one of your favorite Led Zeppelin songs? Ithaca Times: “Tangerine.” AL: Okay, let’s take “Tangerine.” “Tangerine” has a 12-string, a sixstring acoustic and an electric on the record. So Jimmy Page played all three of those guitars, but live, obviously he didn’t play them all. They either did Guitarist Paul Hammond of Get The Led Out (Photo Provided) the electric guitar solo on an acoustic guitar, or they did the acoustic part on the electric guitar. To say that there that they can enjoy. But we’ll also always are four guys in the band, but due to do a deep cut, a more obscure tune, or a the art of overdubbing, there are many couple of them, actually. We don’t try to more instruments represented on the mimic a live show like Cleveland in 1971. recordings. Our goal is to represent those That’s what Dark Star does. We don’t try instruments in a live setting. You’d have to imitate any “live” anything. We’re 100% to have six hands to play all that. If you studio. wanted to recreate the Beatles’ “A Day in IT: So there’s no interest in dressing the Life”, you’d need four pianos for the up as Plant and Page and the rest of Led ending. Zeppelin? IT: My head started to spin when I AL: [laughs] No, it wouldn’t make any thought about how many guitars you’d sense to dress up, because there’s six of us. have to bring: a Danelectro, a Telecaster, Like, two of us are going to dress up like some Les Pauls, Martins and Gibsons…
 Jimmy Page? AL: Oh, yeah, We have all of those. IT: It took me a while to “get” Led I think it’s like 13,000 pounds of stuff. Zeppelin. We have three Teles, four Les Pauls, a AL: Yeah, when you pull the material Gibson double neck SG, a Melody Maker 12-string, an SG 12-string, a couple Strats, apart as much as we have, one of the a couple Martins, a Martin 12-string and a things you realize is that there’s this kind of strange voodoo magic that comes from couple mandolins. the fact that they left so much humanity IT: Is it like Dark Star Orchestra, in the music. They left tons of mistakes, where the set list is kept secret until the strange tunings, and they left strange note show? choices. There’s immediacy to it. • AL: Yeah, pretty much. It has a flow

Tickets available: online at CornellBigRed.com, phone 607-255-4247, or in person at the T h e I t By h a c a T i m e s / J a n u a r y 2 7 - F e b r u a r y 2 , 2 0 1 6 Cornell Athletic Ticket Office (Bartels Hall), M-F, from 10am – 5pm


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John Brown’s Body. Center Right in flannel and glasses, drummer Tommy Benedetti (Photo Provided)

music

Dub Me Crazy

Well seasoned band bends the spectrum wide By C hr i s tophe r J. Har r ing ton John Brown’s Body, Saturday, January 30, 8:00 p.m., The Haunt

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ne of coolest sections in Alan Moore’s epic comic book series Watchmen occurs during an interview with the highly-intellectual superhero Ozymandias, who responds to a reporter’s question regarding his musical interests: “I’ve heard some interesting new music from Jamaica … a sort of hybrid between electronic music and reggae. It’s a fascinating study in the new musical forms generated when a largely pre-technological culture is given access to modern recording techniques without the technological preconceptions that we’ve allowed to accumulate, limiting our vision. It’s called dub music. You’d like it, I’m sure.” John Brown’s Body [JBB], a roots, reggae, and dub band, with current and former members from right here in Ithaca, has been banging out these interstellar Jamaican sounds since 1995. That’s quite a haul for any band. Halfway through this journey, though, during an emotional and traumatic year, they almost threw in the towel. “It was a big situation in 2006. Our bassist, Scott Palmer, passed away from cancer, and the whole ship came to a sudden halt,” drummer and founding member Tommy Benedetti told me recently. “Many of the members of the band reflected on this experience and decided to move on. Elliot [Martin] and myself weren’t ready for that. We were

really digging the new sound and felt we had more to accomplish, and so we decided to soldier on.” Like a true natural transformation, JBB then preceded from one function into another, while respecting the internal structure that had been built the decade before. “JBB version two has developed a more edgier, progressive, and modern sound,” Benedetti said. “Originally we were heavily influenced by the ‘classic roots’ approach, inspired by Culture, Gladiators, The Upsetters—stuff like that. Kevin [Kinsella], our original guitarist and vocalist, gravitated towards that material. Our current sound steers more towards the UK ‘80s sound—Dennis Bovell, Aswad, Steel Pulse, Roots Radics, and Scientist. A lot of other influences like electronic and hip-hop have been introduced as well.” This natural transformation, an evolutionary step for a progressive artistic foundation, has seen a remarkably more dynamic, punk, and large-sounding wholeness come to fruition for the band. “I grew up a devout metal and rock fan, and I still listen to that stuff now,” Benedetti said. “Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, and Slayer were part of my regular appetite. When I went to Berklee College of Music, the doors were pretty much blown wide open. I was introduced to so much different and amazing music, stuff like John Coltrane and Burning Spear.” Benedettis has never stopped exploring new horizons. T

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Roots reggae, the form originally championed by the early version of JBB, is a somewhat more idealistic and limited form of reggae music, with only so much space to live within musically and artistically. Dub reggae is the extended progressive-notion of the sound, the post-punk rock of its form. It’s a futuristic sound where artists bend echo, reverb, panoramic delay … and minds. I like to compare it to time travel, and early artists like Scratch Lee Perry and King Tubby thought similarly, creating dub alter egos based on comic book and science-fiction characters. And although the sound can seem simplistic and repetitive to the uninitiated, it’s truly dynamic music—one that takes years to master. “You really have to know the building blocks of the form. Reggae and dub drumming is a very specific approach,” Benedetti mused. “It’s deceivingly simple, but it takes complete devotion. Over the years I’ve been able to expand on this form and be creative within the parameters. It’s a beautiful art.” Blasting JBB’s latest record Kings and Queens in Dub is like taking part in an intergalactic voyage. The sound is spherical, epic, and out-worldly. I can’t stop spinning the song “Paint The Sky Dub.” Its killer infusion of epic taste is wickedly compelling. I can picture Ozymandias jamming to it in his Antarctic retreat, contemplating his scheme to save the world via a deceptive, biologically-engineered creature explosion. There are no such tricks in JBB’s sound. It’s straight-up future music, harnessing powerful progressive and intellectual vibes. “The band is firing on all cylinders right now, and our sound is really huge,” Benedetti enthusiastically told me. “If you haven’t seen us for awhile, you’re in for a surprise.” • I

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books

The Poetics of Place

Local prose anthology shines a light on its stars By Ryan Ch ambe rl ain

Above: Local writer Diane Ackerman (Photo Provided)

From The Finger Lakes: A Prose Anthology, Edited by Rhian Ellis

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he writer,” according to Flannery O’Connor, “operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location.” There is a preference for place in her language:

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even that conceptual crossroads has coordinates. In From The Finger Lakes: A Prose Anthology, Rhian Ellis has compiled the works of some of our best regional writers, who are situated just there. And though her own work proves she’s familiar with that writerly “location,” she has expanded O’Connor’s definition to makers of anthologies.

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Place is somehow everywhere and nowhere in the collection, to build from historian Carol Kammen’s introduction, in which she calls this part of New York an “insular island.” The region, if it is an island, is like the lost Atlantis: our conception of it is conception alone. It exists as a curious state of mind—another ideated nation—with has a far reach. We go from the belles lettres on a wall of the old gun factory to a wry Roman sculpture, from the seemingly inured domesticity of a countertop cake mixer to Janis Joplin in a seedy New York bar, from a depression as cold and deep as the lakes between which treatment is sought to the Eden Diane Ackerman finds on their shores. The list of outright professional writers in the area is shockingly long, given the density of places like Ithaca and Trumansburg. Our better known include Ackerman, Alice Fulton, Brian Hall, Lamar Herrin, Minfong Ho, J. Robert Lennon, Alison Lurie, Jeanne Mackin, Kenneth McClane, James McConkey, Maureen McCoy, and the late Paul West. What may be more impressive is the number of people who also write, and very well—enough to make you wonder how exceptional they must be as the lawyers, carpenters, anthropologists, pastors, mathematicians, librarians, artists, and teachers that they are by day. Occasionally ties to the region are distant if not questionable: Jo Ann Beard lived here unhappily and so very briefly; Jason Brown was here for a two-year MFA over twenty years ago; Beth Lordan attended Cornell in the ‘80s. Their work is remarkable, but my worry—maybe a frivolous one—is that their inclusion was at the expense of a more deserving administrator/poet who still has her hillclimbing calves. The book includes memoir, fiction, essays, articles, prose poems, and an interview. Although the selection favors

2016

nonfiction in the number of pages given to it (memoir gets its own section and essays/articles theirs), there is a spirit of invention—pure newness—in every page’s vision. One of the clearest visions—given, especially, her subject matter—is in “Darkness Chases the Butterfly,” a memoir piece by local editor and journalist Glynis Hart. Difficult as it is to show the proper enthusiasm (writing about depression, here), I will say it is perfectly told. She guides through an upwardless mire in language direct and somehow crystalline. By the end, we are drenched in an endurable sadness, where before it was worse, thundering overhead. In fiction, all of which is some kind of nominee-grade, poet Alice Fulton tells the unsentimental, hyper-real, often funny story of a dead woman, Lou, whose sisters and niece argue over the dress she’ll wear for her funeral. She had made this dress, a colorful, unflattering thing. You find yourself in an odd position, envying the dead’s departure from every tight stitch the living force onto one another. Essays and articles are the most eclectic: Jeff Stein, the man behind The Ithaca Voice, takes down South Florida so thoroughly you’d never dream of leaving; Paul West (one of this reviewer’s favorite writers [all time]) ventriloquizes maybe the only other unventriloquizable Ithacan, Vladimir Nabokov; Amber Donofrio writes à la Anne Carson on so much more than moths; and David Guaspari makes birdwatching cool and funny in the old, unironic way only those actually devoted to something can. Ostensibly there is nothing linking these works. But there’s a chord you hear—it resists transcription—reading about the world from one place in it. I hope that, even if you don’t know a contributing writer, you pick up a copy for the writing alone, because it’s worth knowing you live in a place rich enough in thought that something like eternity runs boisterously through it. •


CornellCinema contin u ed from page 23

2014 Cannes Film Festival, is a lyrical film about a family of beekeepers living in the Tuscan countryside and focuses on the relationship between the patriarch of the family and his eldest daughter. Dukhtar (Daughter) was Pakistan’s submission to the Academy for Best Foreign Language film consideration in 2014, and it follows a mother and her young daughter as they flee their tribal home for the city of Lahore to avoid a child marriage, an issue the director was intent on drawing attention to, as was the case with the wonderful French/Turkish film Mustang, which we’re also showing. IT: A hallmark of Cornell Cinema is the visiting filmmakers and other film artists. Who’s coming to campus in the next few months? MF: Two Cornell alums, both women, will be returning to campus this spring. The first is Kathryn Schubert ’05, who studied philosophy at Cornell but has been working as an editor on independent films for the past several years, including Beasts of the Southern Wild and Only Lovers Left Alive. She’ll be here on March 4 to present Michael Almereyda’s most recent film, Experimenter, which she edited. The film is a fictionalized version of the “obedience experiments” conducted by social psychologist Stanley Milgram at Yale University in 1961, and it stars Peter Sarsgaard and Winona Ryder. In April we’ll host filmmaker Erin Espelie ’01, who studied molecular biology at Cornell but now works with digital media. She’ll present The Lanthanide Series, an experimental documentary about, among other things, rare earth elements—the lanthanides—including the environmental impact of their mining. But it’s more wide-ranging than that, reflecting on many things about contemporary life and using voiceover text by writers including Virginia Woolf and Rebecca Solnit. IT: Laurie Anderson seems to be having a bit of resurgence, and you’re showing a number of her most iconic pieces as a series. These films are hard to find. MF: Yes, we’ve crafted a special event, “An Evening with Laurie Anderson” (on screen, that is!), for Friday, Feb. 19, and

it includes a screening of Anderson’s wonderful new cine-essay Heart of a Dog, which will be followed by a wine/ beer reception, and then a screening of Anderson’s fabulous 1986 performance film Home of the Brave, which will be projected in a rare 35-mm film print from the Moving Image Archives at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. We had to get rights clearance to show the film directly from Laurie Anderson’s office, and they were a pleasure to work with. I think it will be a great night, and if people buy their ticket in advance, they’ll get both movies and the reception for just $20. IT: What is the “Internet Video Cat Festival?” MF: The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis came up with the idea several years ago and started touring their annual curated program a few years ago; Cornell Cinema presented the festival for the first time last year, and it was a huge success. This year’s program features a new selection of videos curated by Will Braden, the creator of the “Henri Le Chat Noir” videos, and it’s made up of 100 cat videos culled from nominations by the public in the categories of Comedy, Drama, Animated, Musical, Action, Vintage, and Documentary. It’s a very interactive event, and each venue that hosts the festival adds its own special activities and personalities. We’ll be providing a complimentary sequined cat mask for all our patrons, who will have a chance to participate in a cat trivia contest and win prizes. We’ll also invite patrons to submit pictures of their own cats in advance, and we’ll assemble them into an onscreen slide show. Cornell alum Leah Shafer, who teaches in the Media and Society Program at Hobart and William Smith College and has written about cat videos, will be our Mistress of Ceremonies, and she’ll be joined by Bruce Kornreich, Associate Director for Education and Outreach at the Cornell Feline Health Center, for the pre-show activities. It’s a great event for the whole family, and we’re expecting a large turnout, so patrons should arrive early for a good seat! IT: Tell me about this year’s “Elegant Winter Party.” It sounds really fun.

MF: It will be! The Willard Straight Memorial Room is a great place for a party, which we discovered last year, so we’re returning for a night of fun based on the fantastic new film, Dreams Rewired, which will screen in the background. The film offers a treasure trove of rare archival footage culled from hundreds of films from the 1880s through the 1930s that reveal early electronic media as you’ve

packaged for us by a company called Shorts International, and they take care of all the negotiations with the individual filmmakers and distributors. They even take care of adding a few additional animated titles to create a feature-length program when the five nominated titles fall short of that running time. IT: A few events combine film and music. Please tell us more about them.

Left: A scene from “”The Yellow Ticket”. RIght: Cornell Cinema’s Mary Fessenden (Photos Provided)

never seen it before. The cleverly compiled clips show early versions of phones, radios, and surveillance equipment— really surprising stuff. We’ll also have on display an exhibit of obsolete media technologies and early cinema devices for patrons to peruse before they take to the dance floor for a “Dance through the Decades” dance party! Patrons are encouraged to come in creative elegant attire and enjoy a cash bar, complimentary snacks & desserts, and more. As the date for the party approaches, March 19, there will be more info on our website, where patrons should buy tickets in advance for great savings. IT: The tradition continues with Cornell Cinema screening the year’s Oscar nominees for documentary, live action, and animated shorts, probably the leastseen films that are honored. I must say, I really loved Sanjay’s Super Team, a Pixar short that played with The Good Dinosaur, but I haven’t seen the others. How do you track these shorts down? MF: Luckily, these programs are

MF: In addition to Aelita, Queen of Mars, which I already mentioned, we’ll be presenting another silent film with a live original score on April 7, and we’ve assembled a large group of co-sponsors from both Cornell and the community to make it possible. We’ll be offering a free screening of The Yellow Ticket, made in 1918, in Sage Chapel, and it will be accompanied by Alicia Svigals, the world’s foremost klezmer fiddler and a founder of the Grammy-winning band Klezmatics. She’ll be joined by Marilyn Lerner on grand piano in performing Alicia’s original score. The film was made at the end of World War I, on the eve of the Russian revolution, and stars a young Pola Negri, who went on to become a star of the silent era. She plays an innocent Jewish woman from a Polish shtetl who is trying to study medicine in Tsarist Russia, but she is forced to lead a double life working in a brothel because of antiSemitic restrictions. I’ve heard the score, and it’s wonderful, so I know this will be a very memorable evening •

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Panek and the Blue Cats. Open Mic Night | 8:30 PM | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Signups start at 7:30pm.

2/02 Tuesday

Music

| Collegetown Bagels, East Hill Plaza, Ithaca | Jazz. Jen Cork and the Good Hope | 7:30 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Folk, Blues, Jazz.  Let’s Be Leonard, The Good Fruits | 10:00 PM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Progressive Rock, Funk, Rock, Psychedelic, Jam.  Moosewood Thursday Night Live | 8:00 PM-10:00 PM | Moosewood Restaurant, 215 N Cayuga St Ste 70, Ithaca | Local musicians. 

bars/clubs/cafés

1/27 Wednesday Djug Django | 6:00 PM-9:00 PM | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Live hot club jazz. Home On The Grange | 4:00 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | The Mighty Diamonds | 10:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Roots Rock Reggae. Jam Session | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM | Canaan Institute, 223 Canaan Rd, Brooktondale | The focus is instrumental contra dance tunes. www. cinst.org. i3º | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Live Jazz: A Jazz Trio Featuring Nicholas Walker, Greg Evans, and Nick Weiser

1/29 Friday Bad Alibi | 6:00 PM | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Classic Rock. Brookton Bridge | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM | Americana Vineyards, 4367 E Covert Rd, Interlaken | Folk Rock.  City Limits | 6:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Funk, Blues, Rock.  Contra and Square Dances | 8:00 PM | Great Room at Slow Lane, Comfort & Lieb Rds, Danby | Everyone welcome; you don’t need a partner. Dances are taught. Dances early in the evening introduce the basic figures.  Imperials EP Release, Take One Car, Red Sleigh Choir | 7:00 PM | Chanticleer Loft, 101 W State St, Ithaca | Indie Rock, Post Rock, Post Hardcore. Ithaca Underground Presents.  Jazz at the Bakery | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM | thaca Bakery, Triphammer Marketplace, 2555 N Triphammer, Ithaca | Jazz.  Pendleton and Burke | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Blues, Country.  Rebecca and the Soul Shakers | 9:00 PM | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | Blues, Rock, Soul, Psychedelic. 

1/28 Thursday Answer The Muse: Music Video Release Party | 7:00 PM | Cinemapolis, 120 E Green St, Ithaca | Music, Video Showing, Refreshments, Show starts at 7 p.m. Claire Byrne & Brian Vollmer | 7:00 PM | Ransom Steele Tavern, 552 Main St., Apalachin | Country, Bluegrass, Old-Time, Original Roots Music. Folk Night: The Better Barn Burning Bureau | 8:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Folk, Indie.  Head Band | 9:00 PM | Casita Del Polaris, 1201 N Tioga St, Ithaca | Funk, Jazz, Rock, Fusion, Progressive, Psychedelic.  Jazz Thursdays | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Scott Adams | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM | Heavily Brewing Company, 2471 Hayes Road, Montour Falls | Acoustic Rock, Classic Rock, Blues, Jazz. Thru Spectrums w/Julia Felice and the Whiskey Crisis | 9:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Funk, Rock, Soul.  Watts on Tap, Masterpiece | 8:00 PM | Ransom Steele Tavern, 552 Main St., Apalachin | Classic Rock Covers, Pop, Soul, Rock, R&B, Country. 

1/30 Saturday Dapper Dan with Cielle and All Sounds On | 9:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Folk, Blues, Rock. Jeff Love Band | 10:00 PM | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Funk, Soul, R&B, Blues, Rock.  John Brown’s Body | 8:00 PM | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Future Roots, Reggae, Dub.  Pollen | 10:00 PM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Indie Rock.  Telephone Party | 7:00 PM | Grist Iron Brewing Compnay, 4880 NYS Route 414, Burdett | Funk, Pop, Soul, Rock, Covers.  The Delta Mike Shaw Band | 8:00 PM | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | Blues, Rock, Acoustic.  The Purple Valley | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM | Heavily Brewing Company, 2471 Hayes Road, Montour Falls | Blues, Swing, Rock and Roll, Country.   The Sweats | 9:00 PM | Two Goats Brewing, 5027 State Rte 414, Burdett | Blues, Rock, Country.  The Zydeco Trail Riders | 9:00 PM | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Zydeco, Blues, Soul, R&B. 

1/31 Sunday Acoustic Open Mic Night | 9:00 PM-1:00 AM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Hosted by Technicolor Trailer Park. Blue Skies | 6:00 PM-10:00 PM | Maxie’s Supper Club & Oyster Bar, 635 W State St, Ithaca | Vintage Jazz, Blues, Strings Band. Bound For Glory: Phil Shapiro and Carrie Shore | 8:00 PM-11:00 PM | Anabel Taylor Hall, Cornell Univeristy, Ithaca | WVB’s Bound For Glory’s 49th Year. The season opens in honor of Phil’s 70th birthday - and Carrie’s 44th!  Americana, Folk, Blues, Old-Time.  Casey Max Duet | 12:00 PM-2:00 PM | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Brunch session.  Hot Biscuits | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM | Six Mile Creek Vineyard, 1551 Slaterville Rd, Ithaca | Singer/songwriter. Songs of James Taylor, Ry Cooder, The Beatles, John Prine, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, & many more. International Folk Dancing | 7:30 PM-9:30 PM | Kendal At Ithaca, 2230 N Triphammer Rd, Ithaca | Teaching and request dancing. No partners needed. Jerome Attardo | 12:00 PM-3:00 PM | Moosewood Restaurant, 215 N Cayuga St Ste 70, Ithaca | Classical Piano.  Milkweed | 4:00 PM-7:00 PM | Two Goats Brewing, 5027 State Rte 414, Burdett | Folk, Bluegrass, Straight Country & Blues.   Radio London | 4:00 PM-6:00 PM | Americana Vineyards, 4367 E Covert Rd, Interlaken | 50’s, 60’s, Rock, Blues, Pop, Soul, Covers. 

2/01 Monday Blue Mondays | 9:00 PM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | with Pete

I-Town Community Jazz Jam | 8:30 PM-11:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Hosted by Professor Greg Evans Intergenerational Traditional Irish Session | 6:30 PM-9:00 PM | Sacred Root Kava Lounge & Tea Bar, 139 W State St, Ithaca | Calling all fiddlers, whistlers, pipers, mandos, bodhran’s, and flute players. All Ages & Stages.

Saxophonist Alec Staples of the funk rock band Thru Spectrums. The Ithaca based band brings the funk to The Dock this Friday, 1/29 at 9:00 p.m. They play with the Whiskey Crisis. Bring your shades! (Photo Provided) concerts

1/28 Thursday Midday Music at Lincoln | 12:30 PM | Lincoln Hall Rm B20, Cornell, Ithaca | Merrill Garrity Quartet performs, with Paul Merrill, trumpet; Nick Weiser, piano; Peter Chwazik, bass; and Matt Garrity, drums. Features music for jazz quartet.

1/29 Friday

THE CFCU/GATEWAY COMMONS COMMUNITY SERIES PRESENTS

1/29 GET THE LED OUT 2/20 THE MOTH MAINSTAGE 2/28 JOAN BAEZ 3/5 GAELIC STORM 3/6 JUNGLE JACK HANNA 3/26 STEVEN WRIGHT 4/6 WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE MICHAEL C. ANTHONY 4/9 MAGICIAN JEFF MCBRIDE

MANY MORE SHOWS NOT LISTED HERE! STAY UP-TO-DATE AT DANSMALLSPRESENTS.COM

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SAT. FEBRUARY 6 •• 5PM ••

2016

Get The Led Out - The American Led Zeppelin | 8:00 PM | State Theater Of Ithaca, 107 W State St, Ithaca | The music of Led Zeppelin. Heavy Metal, Hard Rock, Blues, Psychedelic, Folk, Rock. Red Sun Rising, The New York Rock, Crows Cage, Sampere | 7:00 PM | Lost Horizon, 5863 Thompson Rd., DeWitt | Hard Rock, Rock, Heavy Metal.  Return-from-Tour Concert: Cornell University Chorus and Glee Club | 8:00 PM | Sage Chapel, Cornell, Ithaca | Robert Isaacs and Stephen Spinelli, conductors. Come hear the Chorus and Glee Club at their musical peak, having just returned from a three-week concert tour of Guatemala and Mexico.

Repertoire will include music for men’s, women’s, and mixed choirs from the 16th century to present day. Winter Village Bluegrass Festival | Friday 1/29 through SUnday 1/31 | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | This year we are focusing on young, progressive bluegrass bands – Front Country, the Lonely Heartstring Band, and the Molly Tuttle Band. We are pleased to welcome Winter Village’s favorite fiddler, Darol Anger and his partner Emy Phelps to the festival. Host band Paris Texas featuring Bobby

2/10 THE AKAE BEKA (WITH CRUCIAL REGGAE)

2/13 FREAKWATER

THE DOCK

1/30 JOHN BROWNS BODY 2/5 CABINET 2/12 MARTIN COURTNEY (OF REAL ESTATE) THE HAUNT

3/11 RICKIE LEE JONES • 5/12 MARTIN SEXTON

4/15 JAKE SHIMABUKURO

HANGAR THEATRE


and spirit to subsist and find a way to signal to Earth that he is alive. | 124 mins PG-13 | Boy & the World | A little boy goes on an adventurous quest in search of his father. | 80 mins PG | He Named Me Malala | A look at the events leading up to the Taliban’s attack on Pakistani schoolgirl, Malala Yousafzai, for speaking out on girls’ education followed by the aftermath, including her speech to the United Nations. | 88 mins PG-13 | Piled Higher and Deeper: Still in Grad School | A comedy about life (or the lack thereof) in Academia. Two young scientists (a Quantum Physicist and a Molecular Biologist) search for significance in the high stakes world of Academic research. | 80 mins NR |

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Henrie will be performing along with Finger Lakes favorites Aaron Lipp and Steve Selin and Too Blue (NYC Metro area), will also be returning.

1/30 Saturday

Rodney Regier’s copy of an 1824 Conrad Graf piano—plus Mozart’s Piano Concerto in A Major, K. 414, played on a Stein fortepiano with pedal board attachment built by Philip Belt and string quintet.

Annette Richards | 8:00 PM | Anabel Taylor Hall, Cornell Univeristy, Ithaca | University organist presents J. S. Bach and the Organists, with music by Buxtehude, Scheidemann, Kittel, Krebs, and J. S. Bach. Where There’s Smoke, There’s Dinner: Regi Carpenter with Pete Dodge | 7:30 PM | Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts, Congress at McLallen St, Trumansburg | An evening of stories and music for adults. Accompanying Ms. Carpenter will be guest musician Peter Dodge. Regi Carpenter has told stories around the world. This program will be tales from her family history as she grew up near the St. Lawrence River in upstate New York.

2/02 Tuesday

1/31 Sunday

cinemapolis

Ryan MacEvoy McCullough, fortepiano: Adeste Fideles: A Winter Schubertiade | 3:00 PM | Barnes Hall, Cornell, Ithaca | Features Schubert’s Fantasie in F Minor for piano four-hands, D. 940, with Matthew J. Hall, and the sublime B-flat Sonata, D. 960, performed on

The Cornell University Klezmer Ensemble | 7:15 PM | Kendal At Ithaca, 2230 N Triphammer Rd, Ithaca | Playing several genres or klezmer music, most based on Dr. Rubin’s research: American klezmer from New York and Philadelphia of the 1910s and 1920s; the repertoire of New York clarinetist Dave Tarras from the late 1930s to mid-1940s; Russian (Ukraine/Belarus) klezmer from pre-revolutionary times. The ensemble is now led by brassist Ryan Zabel.

Film Friday, 1/29 to Thursday, 2/04. Contact Cinemapolis for Showtimes Carol | Set in 1950s New York, a department-store clerk who dreams of a better life falls for an older, married woman. | 118 mins R | Brooklyn | An Irish immigrant lands in 1950s Brooklyn, where she quickly

Most Likely to Succeed | Documentary focuses on the story of a school in San Diego that is completely rethinking what the experience of going to school looks like. | 86 mins. |

falls into a new romance. When her past catches up with her, however, she must choose between two countries and the lives that exist within. | 111 mins PG-13 |

Anomalisa | A man crippled by the mundanity of his life experiences something out of the ordinary. | 90 mins R | Room | After five-year-old Jack and his mother escape from the enclosed surroundings that Jack has known his entire life, the boy makes a thrilling discovery. | 118 mins R | Spotlight | The true story of how the Boston Globe uncovered the massive scandal of child molestation and cover-up within the local Catholic Archdiocese, shaking the entire Catholic Church to its core. | 128 min R| Youth (La giovinezza) | A retired orchestra conductor is on holiday with his daughter and his film director best friend in the Alps when he receives an invitation from Queen Elizabeth II to perform for Prince Philip’s birthday. | 124 mins R | Lazer Team | Tuesday, 2/02, 6:00 PM | Four losers are thrust into the position of saving the world when they stumble upon a UFO crash site and become genetically equipped to the battle suit on board. | 102 mins PG-13 |

Cornell Cinema

Wednesday 1/27 to Tuesday 2/22 | Contact Cornell Cinema for Showtimes Straight Outta Compton | The group NWA emerges from the mean streets of Compton in Los Angeles, California, in the mid-1980s and revolutionizes Hip Hop culture with their music and tales about life in the hood. | 147 mins R | The Winding Stream | The Winding Stream is a 90-minute High Definition music history documentary-in-progress that tells the story of the American roots music dynasty, the Carters and the Cashes. | 90 mins NR | Chi-Raq | A modern day adaptation of the ancient Greek play Lysistrata by Aristophanes, set against the backdrop of gang violence in Chicago.. | 127 mins R | The Martian | During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney is presumed dead after a fierce storm and left behind by his crew. But Watney has survived and finds himself stranded and alone on the hostile planet. With only meager supplies, he must draw upon his ingenuity, wit

Notices Give a Chance Raffle | 1/27 Wednesday | Solomon Organization, 92 River Road, Summit | The Solomon Organization, owner and manager of nearly 1,000 apartment homes in Ithaca needs your help to give away $5,000 to one non-profit in the region as part of its new Give a Chance raffle. All qualified 501C3 non-profit organizations* that contact Solomon before Jan 29 will be entered into a poll on its Ithaca Apartment Management Facebook page.  The poll will be open from Feb. 1 through March 1 and all interested can vote for their favorite charity once per day. All non-profits that are interested in participating, or individuals interested in nominating their favorite charity can contact Christie Williams at 607.272.9206 or cwilliams@ solomonorg.com Ithaca Sociable Singles Dinner | 6:00 PM, 1/27 Wednesday | Istanbul Restaurant, 311 3rd St, Ithaca | RSVP Loisannethomas@hotmail.com Mentors Needed for 4-H Youth Development Program | CCE Education Center, 615 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Mentors commit to 3 hours per week for this school year, with the option to continue next year. The Mentor and Student meet twice a week at Boynton Middle School from 3:25 PM until 4:35 PM.The Mentor-Student Program is an opportunity to make a positive impact in a young person’s life. An adult Mentor meeting regularly, one-on-one with a middle school student and read, do homework, play board games, and more. Behind-thescenes help with programming very much needed. For more info, call (607) 277-1236 or email student.mentor@ yahoo.com. Lifelong: Free Tax Preparation Program |1/28 Thursday | The program serves ALL Seniors 60 and over, with spouses of any age. Also served are Individuals with disabilities, Families with incomes below $53,000 and Individuals with incomes below $32,000. Weekly tax clinics begin January 28th and are held THURSDAYS

And Then There Were None,

Cinemapolis, Thursday, January 28, 7:00 p.m.

Elmira Little Theatre, Friday, Jan. 29 through Sunday, Jan. 31

This self described “Indie Rock band with a Yogic Twist”, invites everyone in town to come and celebrate the debut of their first ever music video. Created by Jeff Hodges, it will premiere at Cinemapolis, accompanied by a killer party to boot! Answer the Muse is a group that promises to take you on a journey of joy. They combine rock music, originals, chant, theater, and deliver unique interactive performances every outing. Be part of the launch - the band will play, share the video, and wine and refreshments will be plentiful!

Elmira Little Theatre will be staging this Agatha Christie crime drama both this weekend (Jan. 29-31), and next (Feb.5-7). The excitement never quits in this fabulous murder mystery. Ten strangers converge on an island, all with proper invitations, yet under unknown circumstances. Slowly, they come to find the truth of their gathering is much darker than any could have foreseen. With as many murders as George R. Martin’s Game Of Thrones, this quick-paced thriller will keep you on your seat the entire performance.

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Answer The Muse: Video Party,

The Glass Menagerie | 7:00 PM, 1/29 Friday | Lehman Alternative Community School, 111 Chestnut St, Ithaca | Widely considered one of the classics of American theater, the play is highly regarded for its poetic script and for the largely autobiographical story, which launched playwright Tennessee Williams to fame. Shows are on Friday, Jan. 29 at 7:00pm, Saturday, 30 at 2:00pm, and on Sunday, 31 at 7:00 pm. And Then There Were None | Runs Jan. 29 through Jan. 31 | Elmira Little Theatre, 1000 Laurel St, Elmira | The excitement never lets up in this Agatha Christie murder mystery! Ten strangers converge on an island, all with invitations to join Mr. and Mrs. U. N. Owen for some purpose, whether it be for fun and relaxation or even to keep an eye on the other guests. But the truth is much darker than any one of them can guess. Info at elmiralittletheatre.com Joy of Improv -- A Theater and Movement Improv Playshop | 1:00 PM-6:00 PM, 1/31 Sunday | Acting Out Studio, Center Ithaca, The Commons, Ithaca | Guest improv teacher and performer Anne Bassen is coming to Ithaca to lead a “playshop” on improv, a fun and uplifting performance art form. No experience necessary, although experienced folks are welcome as well. Ask Erica @ ericavmarx@gmail.com or (607) 279-6402. Peter and the Starcatcher | Runs January 31 through February 21 | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | Winner of five 2012 Tony Awards, Peter and the Starcatcher is

a swashbuckling, musical adventure! This grown-up’s prequel to Peter Pan is an innovative theatrical extravaganza featuring a dozen actors playing over 100 unforgettable characters. For showtimes and more information visit www.kitchentheatre.org

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from 9-noon and 12:30 to 4:30; Fridays from 9 to 1 and Saturdays from 9 to 1. Taxpayers can call 607-793-6144 Monday through Friday from 9-4 to schedule an appointment and talk with a screener. Workshop at CAP: FIND YOUR FANS: Relationship Marketing for Small-Scale Creators | 5:30 PM-7:30 PM, 1/28 Thursday | CAP ArtsSpace, 171 The Commons, Ithaca | Presenting a marketing workshop by Ryan Miga. By the end of the series, participants should have a confident understanding of how to use social media to find and connect with their most dedicated supporters! (Although CAP is the arts council, you don’t have to be an artist to take this workshop. The info is general(Read the rest of the workshop description at http://artspartner.org/ content/view/for-artists-art-organizations.html. (or www.artspartner.org) Sunday Square Dancing | 7:00 PM, 1/31 Sunday | Temple Beth-El, 402 N Tioga St, Ithaca | Square Dancing is a low-impact aerobic activity that stimulates both mind and body. Easy and fun for people of any age. Sunday Squares is free and open to all. We dance to a wide variety of popular music, and learn dance steps used all over the world. Come alone or with a partner. No special dancing skills required. 2016 Master Composter Application: Application Deadline: February 1 | CCE Education Center, 615 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Ten in-depth classes and volunteering will train you to be part of this enthusiastic group committed to promoting responsible composting. Classes are held Thursday evenings from February 11th to May 12th at Tompkins County Cornell Cooperative Extension in Ithaca. Apply by Monday, February 1st. For more information or to apply, visit our website http://ccetompkins.org/mc or contact Adam at 272-2292 or acm1@ cornell.edu. The Ultimate Purpose: Free Speech Open Forum Discussion | 7:00 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | The Mate Factor Cafe, 143 The Commons, Ithaca | Please join us for tea, cookies, and a lively open discussion on the deep issues concerning humanity and our future. Every Tuesday Night at 7 O’Clock. 

St, Ithaca | Adult classes and private instruction in dance, music, visual arts, language arts, and performance downtown at the Community School of Music and Arts. For more information, call (607) 272-1474 or email info@ csma-ithaca.org. www.csma-ithaca. org. Learn to Knit, Learn to Sew at SewGreen | SewGreen, 112 N Cayuga St., Ithaca | Sign up now for SewGreen’s classes in knitting and sewing for adults and kids. Classes start January 27. The complete class schedule and an easy sign-up link can be found at www.sewgreen.org/classes For more information, contact Katie at sew@ sewgreen.org The Basics of Indian Curries | 6:30 PM-8:00 PM, 1/27 Wednesday | GreenStar Cooperative Market, 700 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | Experience the rich, deep flavors, aromas and spices of India, while tasting some delicious curry dishes. This class will be taught by Chef Ipshita, creator of That Indian Drink and professional chef. Registration is required - sign up at GreenStar’s Customer Service Desk or call 273-9392. Community Forum on Heroin and Opiates: Focus on Treatment | 5:00 PM-6:30 PM, 1/28 Thursday | BorgWarner Room, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Treatment options in the area including medical, outpatient, residential, and self-help. Representatives will include: Alcohol & Drug Council of Tompkins County, CARS, and Ithaca Health Alliance. Will include Q&A.  Coping with Anxiety: A Panel Discussion | 1:00 PM-2:30 PM, 1/28 Thursday | Finger Lakes Independence Center, 215 Fifth St, Ithaca | This workshop features a diverse panel of individuals who are focused on providing basic information about anxiety, sharing their personal experiences, and offering helpful coping techniques, services, and strategies to help make dealing with the challenges of anxiety less overwhelming and more manageable.  Jeanne Calabretta, N.D, A.A.S., CNHP, Nature’s Sunshine Manager | 3:00 PM-4:00 PM, 1/28 Thursday | The Jenkins Center, Suite 110, 301 South Geneva St., Ithaca | Topics include, The Gut::Brain Connection, Flower Essences and the emotional areas of the brain, Herbs that do not counteract medications, Lifestyle changes (at your own pace), and much more! Open to the Public. Reserve a place by calling

Learning

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Art Classes for Adults | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State

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Come experience the Cornell Chorus and Glee Club at their musical peak, having just returned from a three-week concert tour of Guatemala and Mexico. They play a Return from Tour Concert on Friday, 1/29 8:00 p.m. at Sage Chapel. Come out and welcome the crew back! (Photo Provided) (607) 277-7337 www.mhaedu.org History Center Genealogy 101: A Basic Training Workshop | 10:30 AM-12:00 PM, 1/30 Saturday | History Center, 401 E State St, Ithaca | Interested in your family history? Archivist and Research Services Director, Donna Eschenbrenner, will give a tour of The History Center’s extensive genealogy collections and show all the interesting materials that can help you find your family’s history. Reconnect and Relax: A Couples Back Massage Workshop led by Gary Fine | 1:30 PM-4:00 PM, 1/30 Saturday | Fine Spirit Studio, 201 Dey St., Ithaca | Deepen the connection in your relationship through the power of touch. Couples will learn how to perform a soothing and therapeutic back massage sequence. We will explore the muscles that lead to low back pain. More info http:// www.finespiritstudio.com/events. html#backmassage or 607-564-3690 Winter Fly Tying Workshop | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 1/30 Saturday | CCE Education Center, 615 Willow Ave, Ithaca | The Introduction to Fly Tying features nine two-hour sessions with

several different instructors who will teach you the basics of tying the dry fly, wet fly, nymph and streamer patterns that are the most effective in our area. Dates for the training-1/9-3/5/2015. Space is limited so sign up now. http:// ccetompkins.org/events/2016/01/09/ fly-tying-workshop-series. Info at 607-272-2292 (extension 139) ahs38@ cornell.edu T’ai Chi Classes at Lansing Library |11:30 AM-12:30 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | Lansing Community Library, 27 Auburn Rd, Lansing | John Burger - Instructor. Please wear loose, comfortable clothing.

Special Events St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church Festival Committee: Community Dinner | 6:15 PM, 1/28 Thursday | St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church, 120 W Seneca St, Ithaca | The menu will feature oven roasted Greek chicken, Greek style spaghetti with hot melted butter, Greek salad, beverage, and dessert. Contact and Info at (814) 881-2333.

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City of Ithaca Community Police Board | 3:30 PM, 1/27 Wednesday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca |

Online Calendar See it at ithaca.com.

Chanticleer Loft, Friday, January 29, 7:00 p.m.

Now in its 6th year, the Winter Village Bluegrass Festival continues to bring the best acts in bluegrass music to Ithaca and the Finger Lakes. This year they’re focusing on young and progressive bands like Front Country, the Lonely Heartstring Band, and the Molly Tuttle Band. Winter Village’s favorite fiddler, Darol Anger and Emy Phelps will make their festival debuts. Host band Paris Texas featuring Bobby Henrie will be performing along with Finger Lakes favorites Aaron Lipp and Steve Selin.

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Meetings

Community Advisory Group (CAG) | 6:00 PM, 2/01 Monday | Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | CAG is concerned with Ithaca’s contaminated sites. It convenes to promote greater public participation in clean-up projects, and to help citizens and involved government agencies make better-informed decisions. City of Ithaca Board of Zoning Appeals | 7:00 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | Natural Areas Commission (NAC) | 5:30 PM-7:30 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | The NAC supports the conservation of the designated Natural Areas within the City of Ithaca and advises the Board of Public Works, the Department of Public Works, Common Council, and the Conservation Advisory Council, regarding public concerns about Natural Areas, threats to the

IMperials EP Release,

Hangar Theatre, Friday, Jan 29 through Sunday, Jan 31

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Evening of Jewish Stories, Poetry and Music | 7:30 PM-9:00 PM, 1/30 Saturday | Temple Beth-El, 402 N Tioga St, Ithaca | This is a family event with presentations by Ithaca community members, both young and old. Live Klezmer music and Israeli dancing! Temple Beth El social hall, corner of Court and Tioga Streets. Public welcome. Info www.tbeithaca.org Harlem Globetrotters | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | Newman Arena at Bartels Hall, 103 BARTELS HALL, CAMPUS ROAD, Ithaca | A star-studded roster will have fans on the edge of their seats to witness the ball handling wizardry, basketball artistry and one-of-a-kind family entertainment that thrills fans of all ages. Join Globetrotter stars after the game where they will stay for an autograph, photograph and high five session for fans (subject to availability).

2016

Combining the easiness of indie rock, the twinkle of emo-funk, and the desire to further their collective taste, Ithaca’s Imperials have been jamming around town since 2013, and have been an Ithaca Underground darling that entire span. Friday night they bring their newly formed vision to the best rock club in Ithaca (The ChantiLoft, duh), and look to turn heads with this extended notion. Indie rockers will be abound, and will be privy to some sweet opening acts: Take One Car, Red Sled Choir, and Benjaminto.


ecosystems, and opportunities to improve protective measures. Town of Ithaca Planning Board | 7:00 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | Town Of Ithaca, 215 N Tioga St, Ithaca |

Books Coloring: Stress Relief | 5:00 PM-6:00 PM, 1/27 Wednesday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | GM Asha introduces you to the stress relief that is coloring. Yes, coloring. All the rage these days, but many have known for years how taking a colored pencil to a page can ease the mind. We will have colored pencils and pages to color, or you can bring your own book. Free and open to the public YOGA Storytime with Diane Hamilton | 10:00 AM-11:00 AM, 1/27 Wednesday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Join Diane Hamilton as she brings a children’s book to life with yoga! This class is for adventurous book-lovers age 2-10 and any inspired adult companions. (Wear comfortable clothes, No mat required). Save 10% on this or any yoga-themed children’s book, when you attend Storybook Yoga, this Wednesday! Wham Bam Poetry Slam | 6:00 PM-7:00 PM, 2/02 Tuesday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Open mic Spoken Word/Poetry night led by Meredith Clarke, and featuring YOU! And your original literary works.

Art Shadow Portraits/Shadow Films: Somewhere Between Darkness & Light | 5:30 PM-8:00 PM, 1/27 Wednesday | BorgWarner Room, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Come play and explore with us at our shadow themed visual art and film stations. Be a part of your next community created art project to be on display for First Friday in February. Visit yourartclub.com. ongoing Buffalo Street Books | 215 N Cayuga Street, Ithaca | Emily Koester: New Works, New Growth. Creating art is a process of exploration and expression. New Works, New Growth focuses on symbolic representation of time and change, through a medium similar to stained glass. All pieces in this collection were created in 2015. Call

HeadsUp The Weekly Pairings

by Christopher J. Harrington

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his week we’re going to run down the top shows to rage, and we’re going to pair the killer bands playing these raging shows with their appropriate alcoholic drink. Meaning, you’ll be able to go out and rage, drink appropriate alcohol, wax philosophical on the meaning of the comparison, and build your spectrum of interstellar taste aesthetically and palatably. Kicking things off Thirsty Thursday is the progressive-psychedelic powerhouse Head Band at Ithaca’s best closet-spaced nightclub Casita Del Polaris. Things are going to get tight and exploratory so you should pair the band up with something quick so you don’t spill your drink while getting you’re jam on! I’d suggest a glass of Merlot – and then a quick Trouble Maker – you’ll be jamming hard in no time. If you decide to get your progressive rock on somewhere else Thursday night, hit up The Nines. The jazzy-prog-70’s funk abstractors Let’s Be Leonard will be delving in and out of funk extensions and psychedelic free-jazz forms. In honor of their epic saxophonist Conor Dunn, who creates some wicked space with his swirling layers of suggestion, I suggest drinking a frothy Guinness Stout. The burnt flavor of the beer will pair righteously with the old-school vibe of the band, and after a few stouts you’ll

273-8246 CAP ArtSpace | Center Ithaca, The Commons, Ithaca | Aviation Anthropology – the Micro-culture of Small Airports. Photographs by Jon Reis. Jon Reis has been studying the micro-culture of aviation since the late 1970s. This show contrasts B&W silver based photographs of aviation environments taken in the seventies with recent visually rich color views. For more information, visit artspartner. org. Community School of Music and Arts | 330 E.State / MLK Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 | Annual Open Show. Works by 70 regional artists in painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, ceramics, fiber art, and mixed media assemblage will be on view from December through January at the Community School of Music and Arts’

be swimming warmly in a psychedelic haze. You can’t drink at Ithaca Underground shows held at The Chanti-Loft, but you can have a brew in between sets downstairs at The Chanticleer, and even dip in for a quick shot at Lot-10, which is just a nose-hair away. The Imperials EP release show at The Chanti-Loft features two other sick bands that deserve a nice toasting to. Poughkeepsie’s Take One Car forge echoing post-rock, Beatnik lyricisms, and post-hardcore gravity, mounting a serious fist pumping barrage. Because this band reminds me of being on the road, and slinking around on the West Coast, I want something sunny to pair with them. I recommend a responsible Corona Bomb: a shot of Bacardi Limon and a nice cold Corona to chase it down. Also, hopefully these guys have some vinyl at their show, because they’re really damn sick! Ithaca’s Red Sled Choir bring restraint, abstraction, and indieformalism to the court - a combo really screaming for something creative to pair with them. I’m thinking head over to Lot-10 and get yourself a Star Gazer before the set. The combination of chardonnay, pineapple juice, and dark rum will have you contemplative, a little goofy, and feeling just right to catch some experimental music. If all else fails just grab yourself a few pints of Ithaca IPA Flower Power. That seems to be a popular brew around these parts, and should satisfy your inner-rage. It’s looking like a heady week folks. So get out there, mingle, head-bang, drink, fist pump, hippie dance - you know it’s good for you. Cheers! •

much anticipated Annual Open Show. Curated this year by Terry Plater, a painter based in Ithaca, this exciting exhibition showcases a wide array of artistic talent and interests. Visit more than once to appreciate everything this show has to offer!| www.csma-ithaca. org Elevator Music and Art Gallery | @ New Roots Charter School (116 North Cayuga Street/The Clinton House elevator music | Ashley Click: Smoke and Mirrors. Visit newrootsschool.org or call (607) 882-9220 EYE | 126 E. State/MLK St., 2nd, Ithaca | The Lustrous World of Giselle Potter. Artist Giselle Potter is like no other. Her colors are plucked from nature: her imagery, insanely appealing. She can take an everyday and make it extraordinary. A frequent contributor to The New York Times and The New Yorker,

Clockwise from Top Left: Pouring a pint of beer. The progressive-funk crew Head Band. Let’s Be Leonard saxophonist Conor Dunn. Tyler Irish of Take One Car, rocking out. (Photos Provided)

Potter has illustrated over 25 books for kids of all ages and has shown at the Society of Illustrators in NYC and the Eric Carle Museum in Amherst. | www. eyegallery.com Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University | Central Ave., Ithaca | Tuesday-Sunday, 10:00 AM-5:00 PM , to 8:00pm Thursday | OPENING EXHIBIT - Revealed: WPA Murals from Roosevelt Island January 30-May 29 | The first public display of three conserved abstract murals from the future Cornell Tech campus in New York City. ONGOING EXHIBITS: The fire is gone but we have the light: Rirkrit Tiravanija and Korakrit Arunanondchai - January 23-May 29 | Video and new work by Arunanondchai alongside a monumental print by his mentor, Tiravanija,

Lot 10 | (106 S. Cayuga Street) | Dan Emerson, a recent BFA graduate from SUNY Cortland, will be exhibiting his work at Lot 10 during the months of January and February. State of the Art Gallery | 120 West St, Ithaca | “Lyric Visions: Artists Respond to Poetry” will open State of the Art’s 2016 year of exhibitions. Gallery members have created art work in response to the poetry of sixteen regional poets invited by Tish Pearlman,

poet laureate of Tompkins Country in 2013 . The exhibition extends two months with half of the artists showing in January and the other half during February. Call: 277-1626 or Visit: www. soag.org Tompkins County Public Library | East Green Street, Ithaca | Streetscapes, a new exhibit that brings street art inside the Library. Curated by Jay Potter, Streetscapes will feature a collection of work that draws on creativity and inspiration from our urban surroundings. | www.tcpl.org Ulysses Philomathic Library | 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Showing Jim Mason’s Digital Photography. Many of the pieces are limited edition giclée canvas prints with rich color and detail.

Annette Richards,

Trumansburg Conservatry of Fine Arts, Saturday, January 30, 7:00 p.m.

Anabel Taylor Hall, Saturday, January 30, 8:00 p.m. In her work as a music historian and keyboard player, Annette Richards draws on her training in English literature, art history, musicology, and musical performance. Musical and visual aesthetics and criticism are of particular interest to her, as is music in literature, and changing attitudes and approaches to performance in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. On this night she’ll be presenting “J.S. Bach and the Organists” with music by Buxtehude, Scheidemann, Kittel, Krebs, and J.S. Bach. Come out and experience this dynamic virtuoso!

Accomplished storyteller Regi Carpenter will present “Where there’s smoke there’s dinner”, an evening of stories and songs for adults. Performing with Ms. Carpenter will be guest musician Peter Dodge. Presented in more of a coffeehouse setting than TCFA’s familiar auditorium venue, the act promises an evening of tale-telling and music that will affectionately unroll tapestries of personal narrative drawn from Ms. Carpenter’s family history made in the St. Lawrence River country of upstate New York.

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showcase two generations of Thai artists. Tradition, Transmission, and Transformation in East Asian Art January 23-June 12 | Works from the Johnson’s collection explore how Chinese cultural images and artistic styles were adopted and adapted in Korea and Japan. | www.museu cornell.edu

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Town & Country

Classifieds

In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

277-7000 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

Special Rates:

Line Ads: $16.50 for first 12 words (minimum), 30 cents each additional word. 25% Discount - Run your non-commercial ad for 4 consecutive weeks, you only pay for 3 (Adoption, Merchandise or Housemates)

Headlines: 9-point headlines (use up to 16 characters) $2.00 per line. If bold type, centered or unusually spaced type, borders in ad, or logos in ads are requested, the ad will be charged at the display classified advertising rate. Call 277-7000 for rate information.

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

Free Ads: Lost and Found and free items run at no charge for up to 3 weeks. Merchandise for Sale, private party only. Price must be under $100 and stated in ad Website/Email Links: On Line Links to a Web Site or Email Address $5.00 per insertion. Blank Lines: (no words) $2.00/Line - insertion.

MERCHANDISE UNDER $100

MERCHANDISE $100 - $500

Fax and Mail orders only

15 words / runs 2 insertions

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community

buy sell

employment

Looking for Chidren

A son named Travis age 28, originally from Cortland and a Daughter whom I have never met and is from the area. Please contact with any info (call or text) Earland Perfetti (Butch) 607-339-6842 or on Facebook

140/Cars

250/Merchandise

1998 Toyota

CASH for Coins! Buying Gold & Silver. Also Stamps, Paper Money, Comics, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NY: 1-800-959-3419 (NYSCAN)

4 Runner, ONE OWNER, NO ISSUES, Runs Excellent Brand new tires and Brakes, rotors , 02 Senor. $1,700 or best 607-882-5163

SAWMILLS from only $4397.00 - MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillcut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info /DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (NYSCAN)

CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call:315-400-0797 Today! (NYSCAN)

400/Employment Drivers

We Want You! To Drive Away our new box trucks to customers nationwide. Will Train. No CDL Required. Next day pay! Please call (574) 213-8277 (NYSCAN)

410/Business Opportunity

320/Bulletin Board “Cabin Fever”

Quality Pre-Owned Subaru’s

February 6 & &, 2016, Arts, Crafts &b Lifestyle Show at “The Shops at Ithaca Mall”...VENDORS WANTED! Please contact JB Enterprises, 518-491-1130 or visit www.JB-Enterprises.org for more details

for sale. Specializing in Sales and Service of only Subaru’s for 35 years. Give us a call for any of your Subaru needs or if you are looking to buy. Call us First! Mann’s Auto 607-387-9729

NEW YEAR, NEW AIRLINE CAREERS. Get trained as FAA Certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-2967093. (NYSCAN)

CAN YOU DIG IT?

Welcome Winter Villagers!

Heavy Equipment Operator Career! We Offer Training and Certifications Running Bulldozers, Backhoes and Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. (NYSCAN)

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Bluegrass & Folk. We have what you need!

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

(607) 272-6547

272-2602

950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY

www.guitarworks.com

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Art Book Approval-Plan Coordinator

Leading distributor of exhibition catalogues and other art books seeks applicants for key position. Approval-Plan Coordinator has primary responsibility for providing collection-development assistance to some 150 academic libraries through the selection of appropriate artrelated publications. Candidates should have a broad knowledge of art and art history, excellent written and verbal communication skills, solid clerical and computer skills (particularly Excel and Word), and ability to interact effectively with clients and co-workers in busy work environment. Bachelor’s degree in art history or related field preferred. Previous experience in the book trade or library field a plus. For more information, see posting at www.worldwide-artbooks.com/ wwb_staff_list.html. Please send resume and cover letter by January 29th to Mr. Kelly Fiske, Worldwide Books, 1001 West Seneca Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 or by e-mail to coordinator@worldwideartbooks.com

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CAREGivers Wanted

If you enjoy working with seniors, we want you! Join our team and become a Home Instead CAREGiver, providing non-medical companion and homehelper services to seniors in your community. Training, support and flexible shifts provided. No medical degree necessary. Competitive pay rate. Join us for a job that nurtures the soul! Apply online www.homeinstead.com/706 For more information call Lisa Sigona: 607-2697165. Each Home Instead Senior Care franchise office is independently owned and operated.

CUSTODIAL WORKER/BUILDING MAINTENANCE MECHANIC

CUSTODIAL WORKER: (40 hours per week). Complete daily, routine cleaning responsibilities, as directed by immediate supervisor. Prepare set ups for school events. Ability to complete tasks independently. Current Location and Hours: Ithaca High School and Boynton Middle School (Monday-Friday 3:30 pm to 12:00 am) February 5, 2016 (application deadline). The Ithaca City School District is committed to eliminating race, class and disability as predictors of academic performance, co-curricular participation and discipline. Qualified candidates will demonstrate a basic awareness of these commitments and a strong willingness to support these efforts. Minimum Salary: $22,466/ 12-month annual +$1,040 night differential.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders DeWitt Mall

430/General

GARAGE SALES

19. 25 words

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employment BUILDING MAINTENANCE MECHAN-

IC: Brief Description: This position will focus on preventive maintenance, HVAC, heat controls, electric and carpentry. Maintains, installs, and conducts preventive maintenance on a wide variety of heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment, plumbing equipment and systems, and electrical equipment systems. Performs a wide variety of welding, sheet metal, metal fabricating, metal equipment repairs and some machine shop activities. Prepare, paint, and refinish wood, metal and other surfaces. Assemble, install, maintain, repair and rebuild walls, doors, windows, ceilings, floors, furniture, and wood structures and associated hardware including lock sets. Also makes and maintains a large master key inventory. Other tasks assigned as necessary. February 5, 2016 (Application Deadline), Minimum Salary: $34,577/12-month annual (minimum) . Apply to: Office of Chief Administra-

AIRLINE CAREERS

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You Can PL Your ads O ACE N at Ithaca.c LINE om

Employment / Real Estate / Adoption: $59.00 first 15 words (minimum), 30 cents each additional word. Ads run 2 weeks.

| 59,200 Readers

FREE

automotive

Ithaca Times Town & Country Classified Ad Rates

2016

tion Officer, Ithaca City School District, 400 Lake Street, Ithaca, NY 14850. Go to job opportunities at www.ithacacityschool.org for more details.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

15

$

per week / 13 week minimum

employment Fairview Farms

WHATELY, MA needs 5 temporary workers 2/15/2016 to 11/1/2016, work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period. $11.74 per hr. Applicants apply at Franklin/Hampshire Career Center 413-774-4361, or apply for the job at the nearest local office of the SWA. Job order #6666571. GREENHOUSES Workers will be operating all greenhouse equipment, pot fillers, tractors, trucks, forklifts, conveyors; clean greenhouse areas inside and outside; set up and operate irrigation systems; equipment maintenance. Workers will spray, water, and maintain plants as needed. Workers will be aware of insect disease problems and will bring these to the attention of the supervisor. Workers will prepare and load orders onto our trucks according to supervisors direction. VEGETABLES - Workers will be attaching and driving tractors with field implements: set up and run irrigation; hoe, and care for field and greenhouse plants as needed; assemble packing boxes; harvest, grade and pack; load pallets onto trucks using tractor forklift. 1 month experience required in work listed.


Town&Country

Classifieds Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

real estate

FREE Home Energy Audit

Renewable Energy Assessment serving Ithaca since 1984. HalcoEnergy.com 800-533-3367

In Print | On Line | 10 Newspapers | 59,200 Readers

277-7000

real estate

Services

Painting

Interior, Carpentry Repairs, Handyman George 793-3230

Internet: www.ithaca.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

SUNDAY POSTSTANDARD

Home Delivery, 20 weeks for $20.00. 273-5641 or 275-1684

Trip Pack n Ship

employment

employment

Packing & Shipping around the World. Save $5 with Community Cash Coupon. Trip Pack n Ship in the Triphammer Market Place 607-379-6210

Services

850/Mind Body & Spirit

The City of Ithaca`

King Farm Inc

Townsend, MA needs 12 temporary workers 2/29/2016 to 6/1/2016. Work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period. $11.74 per hr. Applicants apply at: North Central Career Center, 100 Erdman Way, Leominster, MA 01453 978-534-1481 or apply at the nearest local office of the SWA. Job Orders #6705703. Greenhouse laborer, minimum 1 month greenhouse crops and vegetable crop experience required. Able to learn to grade plants by name, variety, color & quality to employer standards, duties include (but not limited to): Skin 20’h greenhouses, transplanting & routine handling of plants & containers, load trucks & maintain work area. Must be able to bend, lift and carry 50 lbs.

King Farm Inc.

Townsend, MA needs 4 temporary workers 2/15/2016 to 19/17/2016. Work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period. $11.74 per hr. Applicants apply at North Central Career Center, 100 Erdman Way, Leominster, MA 01453 978-534-1481 or apply at the nearest local office of the SWA. Job Orders #6658829, Greenhouse laborer, minimum 1 month greenhouse crops and vegetable crop experience required. Able to learn to grade plants by name, variety, color & quality to employer standards, duties include (but not limited ): Skin 20’h greenhouses, transplanting & routine handling of plants & containers, load trucks & maintain work area. Must be able to bend, lift and carry 50lbs.

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. No Experience Required. Start Immediately! www. ThelncomeHub.com (AAN CAN)

is accepting applications until February 3, 2016 for the following position: Sanitation Worker: Currently, there is one vacancy in the Department of Public Works. Minimum Quals: None. Salary: $13.21/hour. Youth Program Leader: Currently, there is one vacancy in the Youth Bureau. Minimum Quals: Visit the website for further info. Residency: Applicants must be residents of Tompkins County. Salary: 39,871. Exam: An exam will be given at a later date. City of Ithaca Hr Dept., 108 E. Green St., Ithaca, NY 14850, (607)274-6539. www.cityofithaca. org The City of Ithaca is an equal opportunity employer that is committed to diversifying its workforce.

There’s no time like your time Hypnotherapy with Peter Fortunato, (607) 2736637; www.peterfortunato.wordpress. com

Custodial Worker (40 hours per week)

Complete daily, routine cleaning responsibilities, as directed by immediate supervisor. Prepare set ups for school events. Ability to complete tasks independently. Current Location and Hours: Ithaca High School and Boynton Middle School (Monday-Friday 3:30 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.)

805/Business Services Child Care

February 5, 2016 (application deadline)

1040/Land for Sale

Openings for infant-preschoolers in safe, nurturing home available. 27 years experience. 387-5942

REPOSSESSED LAND BARGAINS

Four Seasons Landscaping Inc. 607.272.1504 Lawn maintenance, spring + fall clean up + gutter cleaning, patios, retaining walls, + walkways, landscape design + installation. Drainage. Snow Removal. Dumpster rentals. Find us on Facebook!

Cooperstown Lakes Region & Catskill Mountains! 5 acreas - $19,900, 11 acres - $39,900, Streams, lake access, mountain views! Clear title, fully quaranteed transaction! Owner financing! Call 888-905-8847. NewYorkLandandLakes. com (NYSCAN)

The Ithaca City School District is committed to eliminating race, class and disability as predictors of academic performance, co-curricular participation and discipline. Qualified candidates will demonstrate a basic awareness of these commitments and a strong willingness to support these efforts. Minimum Salary: $22,466/12-month annual +$1,040 night differential

Building MaintenanCe MeChaniC

Ithaca’s only

520/Adoptions Wanted PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. (AAN CAN)

610/Apartments You’re Sure to Find

the place that’s right for you with Conifer. Linderman Creek 269-1000, Cayuga View 269-1000, The Meadows 2571861, Poets Landing 288-4165

720/Rooms Wanted ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates .com! (AAN CAN)

hometown electrical distributor

Brief Description: This position will focus on preventive maintenance, HVAC, heat controls, Since 1984 electric and carpentry. Maintains, installs, and 802 W. Seneca St. Ithaca conducts preventive maintenance on a wide 607-272-1711 variety of heating, ventilation and air conditioning fax: 607-272-3102 www.fingerlakeselectric.com REPLACEMENT equipment, plumbing equipment and systems, WINDOWS and electrical equipment systems. Performs REPLACEMENT a wide variety of welding, sheet metal, metal A FULL LINE OF VINYL Manufacture To Installfabricating, metal equipment repairs and REPLACEMENT WINDOWS REPLACEMENT WINDOWS We Do Call It forAll Free Estimate & some machine shop activities. Prepare, paint, WINDOWS VINYL Professional Installation A FULL LINE OF Custom made & manufactured and refinish wood, metal and other surfaces. AREPLACEMENT FULL LINE OF VINYL WINDOWS by… Assemble, install, maintain, repair and rebuild REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Call for Free Estimate & Call for Free Estimate & walls, doors, windows, ceilings, floors, furniture, Professional Installation 3/54( Professional Installation Custom made & manufactured and wood structures and associated hardware Custom made & manufactured 3%.%#! by… by… including lock sets. Also makes and maintains a 6).9, NY large master key inventory. Other tasks assigned 3/54( 3/54( Romulus, 315-585-6050 as necessary. 3%.%#! or Toll Free at Your one Stop Shop

3%.%#! 6).9,

6).9,

February 5, 2016 (Application Deadline)

866-585-6050

www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Romulus, NY

Minimum Salary: $34,577/12-month annual (minimum)

Romulus, NY 315-585-6050

or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at DONATE YOUR 866-585-6050 or Toll CAR Free at

Wheels For Wishes

Apply To:

866-585-6050

Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Central New York

Office of Chief Administration Officer Ithaca City School District 400 Lake Street Ithaca, NY 14850

x % Ta 100 tible uc Ded

Go to job opportunities at www.ithacacityschool.org for more details and application.

*Free Vehicle/Boat Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *Fully Tax Deductible

Call: (315) 400-0797

WheelsForWishes.org

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

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Independence Cleaners Corp RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Janitorial Service * Floor/Carpet High Dusting * Windows/Awnings 24/7 CLEANING Services 607-227-3025 or 607-220-8739

Love dogs? 4 Seasons Landscaping Inc.

* BUYING RECORDS *

607-272-1504

PUNK REGGAE ETC

lawn maintenance

Angry Mom Records

spring + fall clean up + gutter cleaning

(Autumn Leaves Basement)

Check out Cayuga Dog Rescue! Adopt! Foster! Volunteer! Donate for vet care! www.cayugadogrescue.org www.facebook.com/CayugaDogRescue

LPs 45s 78s ROCK JAZZ BLUES

patios, retaining walls, + walkways

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair. Same Day Service Available

319-4953 angrymomrecords@gmail.com

landscape design + installation

John’s Tailor Shop

drainage

Celebrate the love in your life!

snow removal

VALENTINE’S PARTNER YOGA

dumpster rentals

John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

A Yoga & Thai Massage workshop

Find us on Facebook!

Sunday, Feb 14 * 2-4 pm

Packing & Shipping Around the World

$45 per couple * Save your spots toady!

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS

MIGHTY YOGA

Save 10% with Greenback Coupon

Visit www.mightyyoga.com, 272-0682

Macintosh Consulting

Trip Pack n Ship In the Triphammer Market Place 607-379-6210

DOWNTOWN MASSAGE

http://www.allaboutmacs.com

For relaxation, stress & chronic pain relief

(607) 280-4729

PRAY FOR SNOW!

JOLLY BUDDHA MASSAGE Clinton House, 103 W. Seneca St., Suite 302

Affordable Acupuncture Full range of effective care for a full range of human ailments

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

By Appointment * Book Online

Old Goat Gear Exchange

jollybuddha.us/massage

Buy Sell Trade Outdoor Gear 320 E. State St. Downtown Ithaca

Full line of Vinyl Replacement Windows

Anthony Fazio, L.Ac., C.A.

Free Estimates

www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

South Seneca Vinyl

607-272-0114

315-585-6050, 866-585-6050

Buy, Sell & Consign Previously-enjoyed

FURNITURE & DECOR

Prenatal Yoga With Diane Fine

Handwork Co-op’s WINTER 2NDS SALE

Tuesday 5:30-7:00pm

All through January, get 15% to 75% OFF

Ithaca Times “best yoga teacher” 2013 Couples Back Massage Workshop with Gary Fine 1/30/16 1:30-4

on select pottery, jewelry, textiles, home

MIMI’S ATTIC

decor, fine art and more.

430 W. State St. (607)882-9038 Open Every

102 West State Street, Downtown Ithaca

Day!

273-9400 - www.handwork.coop

Fine Spirit Studio www.finespiritstudio.com or 607-342-2332

Real Life Ceremonies Honor a Life like no other with ceremonies like no other. Steve@reallifeceremonies.com

Signorama of Ithaca Your Full Service Sign Center From Business Cards, to Window Lettering A NYS Certified Women’s Business Enterprise FREE Quotes

607-273-1502

The Yoga School Ashtanga * Vinyasa *Semester Pass $300 *YA registered school * 200 hr TT *Yoga Philosophy * Ayurveda *Cooking & Tea Classes *Gentle Vinyasa *Over 15 years experience www.yogaschoolithaca.com

YOGA ALL FEB. $100 IF YOUR SPINE IS NOT WORTH EVEN $100 TO YOU, “GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR LIFE” $20 STILL GETS YOU 10 DAYS IN A ROW INTRO bikramithaca.com Cow Yoga 269-9642

New at GreenStar

Looking to stretch your grocery budget? So are we! That’s why we’re pleased to introduce our new Co+op Basics program. Co+op Basics offers everyday low prices on many popular grocery and household items,

like 15 oz cans of Organic, BPA-Free Black Beans.

www.greenstar.coop 36

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BPA-Free Orga FIELD DAY

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BL ACK BEANS

99¢

each

Profile for Ithaca Times

January 27, 2016  

January 27, 2016  

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