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F R E E F e b r u a r y 18 , 2 0 15 / V o l u m e X X X V I , N u m b e r 2 5 / O u r 4 3 r d Ye a r /

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Hindered Development

Do multiple agendas kill downtown projects?

War

Cecil

How

district attorney and mayor in panel discussion

A. Malone

minister remembered for his leadership

not whether

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on Drugs

dancing with and without a wheelchair

messiaen Festival

Sending signals

Mary Lorson mystic French makes multimedia composer in the spotlight PAGE 20narrative PAGE 19

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VOL.X X XVI / NO. 25 / February 18, 2015

Hindering Development .......... 8

War on Drugs

City of Ithaca

Film Dramatizes Local Problems

City Modernizes Trash Fine System

ccording to Tompkins County District Attorney Gwen Wilkinson, it is time to “rethink our priorities” about drug crime and sentencing. She said, “I think that I am not the only district attorney in New York who thinks that it is time to rethink our priorities … in sentencing people to prison for nonviolent drug offenses.” Wilkinson shared her views about the War on Drugs during a panel discussion and film screening at Cinemapolis hosted by Mayor Svante Myrick on Feb. 16. The film, Eugene Jarecki’s The House I Live In, is Mayor Svante Myrick a sweeping (Photo: Keri Blakinger) indictment of the drug war. Released in 2012, the film, which garnered a Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, addresses the disparate racial effects of the drug war, the private prison industry, and the human toll of policies of mass incarceration. Although the primary story focuses on a family friend of Jarecki’s, it incorporates interviews with The New Jim Crow author Michelle Alexander, The Wire creator David Simon, neuroscientist Dr. Carl Hart, John Jay College of Criminal Justice Professor David Kennedy, a variety of law enforcement officials, and a number drug users and dealers. The film’s unequivocal conclusion is that the War on Drugs has done more harm than good. As Simon tells viewers, “What drugs haven’t destroyed, the war against them has.” At the film’s conclusion, local stakeholders engaged in a questionand-answer panel discussion regarding the local implications. Myrick offered some personal background in part of his response. “I was born under Reagan in the inner city to a black male,” he said. “My father was a drug addict. He was addicted to crack cocaine, and he was addicted for 20 years and he cycled in and out of jail and prison and rehab. “The resources we have in Ithaca are far better than the resources where I was born … The one area I think we could improve … is that of housing.”

thaca’s property owners soon might find that the city’s practice of ticketing for trash left out several days in a row without letting them know of the issue causes less mess on their balance sheets. A $6,954 notification system will allow city building inspector Martin (a.k.a. Tony) Love to send emails when he writes a ticket to a property owner for having garbage on the porch or in the front yard. This system will, hopefully, make a memory out of rentiers’ oftrepeated complaint that tickets, which escalate in cost, arrive in bunches and weeks after the violation happened, giving them no chance to fix the problem. Larry Beck of the Rental Housing Advisory Commission summed up complaints he’d gathered from 13 Uncovered trash containers and loose trash on the street (Photo: Tim Gera) landlords at a recent planning committee meeting. He delved come to his office complaining. “By far into the history of the Exterior Property the biggest stress is the time lag. There are Management Ordinance (EPMO) that’s some who say to me ‘Does the city want caused so much grief for owners. me to be a garbageman? I’ve got to go by “In 1999 if I had a tenant who left 25 every morning and pick up the garbage.’” bags of garbage on the porch, I had some There are cases, Sarachan said, kind of notice there was a problem there and he would have had, I think, three days where he does offer some common-sense leniency for those who say they just want a to correct it,” Beck told the committee. chance to clean up immediately before the “The fines at that time went from $40 to fines accumulate. $60 to $80.” The fine structure changed in 2000 continued on page 4 to a steeper escalation, before complaints

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caused Common Council to drop the first fine from $50 to $25. Now, the second fine is $75, then $200 and finally $300 for the fourth and each subsequent violation, with the clock resetting after six months. “We need to go back to some kind of warning period, some kind of opportunity to cure and correct,” Beck said. “We had suggestions that this should be looked at more like a parking violation. They’re not escalating. My car is the same car just like my property is the same property.” Dropping the initial fine level in 2012 did make it easier to deal with first-time offenders, city prosecutor Robert Sarachan said. “For the people who get one every five or 10 years, $25 has fixed a big chunk of the pie,” Sarachan said of those who

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▶ Autism Fundraiser There will be an athletic benefit for Autism Speaks in Ithaca. It is being held at Ultimate Athletics in the Shops at Ithaca Mall, March 25, starting at 2 pm. Scott Noren will attempt to clean and jerk (Olympic style lift) at least 100 kg (220 lbs.) Noren is looking for people and companies to sponsor the event through the linked Autism Speaks fundraising page, as well as people to attend and cheer him on. He plans on donating $1 for every kg lifted up to 100 kg. If he lifts more than that, he won’t be on the hook for that!

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Please consider donating through the web page (fundraise.autismspeaks.org) or showing up on the day of as well. For more information, email Noren at autism188@gmail.com ▶ Foster Grandparents Wayne County Actions is trying to recruit Foster Grandparent Volunteers for Wayne, Ontario, Seneca and Yates counties. If you are 55 years of age or older, have a limited income, and are interested in making a difference in a child’s life, please call Kim, at 315-665-0131 Ext 170.

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How multiple agendas downtown can kill downtown development projects

Into the Mystic . ........................ 19 Cornell festival explores the music of French composer Olivier Messiaen

NE W S & OPINION

Newsline . ............................... 3-7, 11, 13 Sports ................................................... 14

ART S & E NTE RTAINME NT

Art . ....................................................... 20 Music . ................................................... 21 Music . ................................................... 22 Stage ..................................................... 23 Film . ...................................................... 24 TimesTable .................................... 26-29 Encore .................................................. 29 Classifieds...................................... 26-28 Cover Photo: Attorney Nathan Lyman at 130 East Clinton (Photo: Tim Gera) Cover Design: Julianna Truesdale.

ON THE W E B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. B i l l C h a i s s o n , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , 6 07-277-70 0 0 x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m K e r i B l a k i n g e r, W e b E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J o s h B r o k a w, S t a f f R e p o r t e r , x 225 R e p o r t e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m A r t S a m p l a s k i , E d i t o r i a l a s s i s t a n t , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Tim Gera, Photographer p h o t o g r a p h e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Steve Lawrence, Sports Editor, Ste vespo rt sd u d e@gmai l .co m M i c h a e l N o c e l l a , F i n g e r L a k e s S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 236 Sp o rt s@Flcn .o rg J u l i a n n a Tr u e s d a l e , P r o d u c t i o n D i r e c t o r / D e s i g n e r , x 226 P r o d u c t i o n @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m G e o r g i a C o l i c c h i o, A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 220 G e o r g i a @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J i m K i e r n a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 219 J k i e r n a n @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m R i c k y C h a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 218 R i c k y @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C a t h y B u t t n e r, C l a s s i f i e d A d v e r t i s i n g , x 227 c b u t t n e r @ i t h a c a t i me s . c o m Cy n d i B r o n g , x 211; J u n e S e a n e y A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Rick Blaisdell, Chris Eaton, Les Jink s J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C o n t r i b u t o r s : Barbara Adams,Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Luke Z. Fenchel, J.F.K. Fisher, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Cassandra Palmyra, and Bryan VanCampen.

T he ent i re c o ntents o f the Ithaca T i mes are c o p y r i ght © 2 0 1 5 , b y newsk i i nc . All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $69 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 607-277-7000, FAX 607277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i me s G a z e t t e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING PHOTOGRAPHER By Tim G e ra

Where are all these cats and Dogs?

N Regional Energy

New Cayuga proposal: coal as a back-up

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he fight over repowering the Cayuga coal-burning power plant with natural gas has dogs and cats napping together. Poke around the case history, and you find Earthjustice and the Sierra Club giving their support for motions made to the Public Service Commission (PSC) by a big fossil fuelusing factory in Auburn (Nucor Steel, which, to be fair, does lots of recycling work) and choosing to support NYSEG, a power distributor, over Cayuga Operating Company, a power supplier. The environmentalists and the industrialists have come together on one point throughout this process of proposal and counterproposal that stretches back to mid-2012: They want a decision already. The recent competing proposals from Cayuga’s management and NYSEG that were sent to the PSC on Feb. 6 were initially due on Oct. 24, 2013, so the feeling is understandable. Now that they have arrived, we can see they offer little middle ground between the competing parties: Cayuga says the plant should be converted to natural gas, NYSEG says shut it down because they can support demand by upgrading their lines. Those groups that have lined up on each side are eclectic mixes. The Cayuga plant’s supporters include people of Lansing who don’t want to see $1.2 million in property taxes and dozens of union jobs the plant provides disappear. Included in their number is also the Auburn steel plant, which says it requires consistent power that only a close-by plant can provide or they might move to Pennsylvania, and local colleges, which want to see their carbon impacts on the grid reduced by nearby natural gasgenerated power. Those in favor of shutting the plant are the aforementioned environmental groups in conjunction with ratepayers of the region who have coalesced in a group called “Ratepayers and Community Intervenors.” Their argument is partly economic—they don’t want to be on the hook for the $150 million Cayuga wants NYSEG to pay for the plant—and partly environmental. They don’t want anything to do with paying for the conversion of a plant that will generate fossil-fuel-based power for any length of time in the future. At a press conference held by the Community Intervenors on Feb. 10, Ulysses town supervisor Elizabeth Thomas asked the PSC to avoid considering the possibility of Lansing losing tax revenue in their decision. “Basing the decision whether to keep the plant open on tax implications, rather than if the power is actually needed is

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flawed,” Thomas said. “An energy policy was the insistence on keeping the ability made for the sake of propping up taxes is to switch on the coal burners if necessary not an energy policy.” despite switching both boilers to gas. The PSC, however, is legally mandated “When the price of gas goes up, they to consider local economic impacts, which can switch back to belching toxic fumes include taxes and those AFL-CIO union into the air so they can turn a profit,” jobs provided by the plant. Weiser said at the Feb. 10 conference. With livelihoods at stake, the PSC Cayuga Operating Company’s must “always consider the trade-offs,” Feb. 6 proposal insists that it is about says James Larocca, who retired from maintaining a constant supply of power, the Public Service Commision in 2013. not profit. “Adding dual-fuel capability “I think the commission’s job, in my would help meet the goals set by the judgment, is the necessity of assuring that the companies that will profit and benefit from various supply projects aren’t completely insulated from the risk of those projects. “It troubled me on my time on PSC. At the end of almost every day the ratepayer was the ultimate guarantor, the ultimate bank for most of this stuff,” Larocca continued. “Ratepayers Irene Weiser (center) leads power plant protesters (Photo: Tim Gera) probably can’t be entirely protected from all risk; on the other hand they shouldn’t be the party that New York Independent System Operator [NYISO],” states the proposal’s cover carries all the risk.” letter, “to establish fuel assurance from Coal prices under the Northeast generators and would allow for enhanced Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative reliability and potential ratepayer savings carbon trading rules caused the Cayuga plant’s closure for months in 2012; it wasn’t in times where natural gas supplies are scarce and/or natural gas prices are very competitive to sell coal-generated power high.” The NYISO is the descendant of in New York. It seemed strange to many, then, in Cayuga’s latest proposal, there

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trashfines

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“If I see four tickets and I have photos, and they’re all lids off a garbage can, I can’t in good faith make that a $300 ticket,” Sarachan said. “Maybe it should be a $25 ticket.” Beck told the committee that one scenario he’s heard repeated many times is a renter moving into a new place, then getting hit with a $300 ticket because their address had already accrued a history of violations. Most of the time, Beck said, the fine is passed onto the renter. “I think it was not understood too well (in 2000),” Beck said. “There was a Cornell student on council who said ‘$300 sounds good to me.’ I don’t think he had the context to understand he or his roommates might get the fine.” The new notification system was included in the 2015 city budget, according to housing supervisor Gino Leonardi. The program is customdesigned by Zhe FM Solutions in Freeville, which has also developed a property

management database and housing inspection program for the city. The system includes a mobile device for Love’s use that will synchronize with the property database, keep track of offenses, and send out the all-important immediate notice of a violation. For now, that immediate notice will still come with an immediate ticket. The planning committee is taking a wait-andsee approach, according to Alderman Seph Murtagh. “[Leonardi] will do whatever he needs to do to implement the system,” Murtagh said. “If they say fines are still too much, we’ll go back and look at it.” Once the system is running, Leonardi told the committee that if Common Council decides to change the fine structure or add a warning notification period before a ticket is issued, the software allows for an easy change of those numbers and times. The software will also ensure that a full 24 hours elapses before a follow-up citation can be issued. • —Josh

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N Black History Month

Cecil A. Malone Week: Recalling a Leader

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ishop Cecil A. Malone didn’t take vacations from helping people and loving the Lord. “Family vacations turned into working trips,” said his son, Amos Malone. “It didn’t matter where we were at, if he saw a need he helped out.” The City of Ithaca declared February 9 to 15 to be Bishop Cecil A. Malone Memorial Week in honor of the Bishop’s legacy of lovingkindness. On Sunday, Feb. 15, family and friends formed a motorcade that went from Cecil A. Malone Drive, the location of his church, to the Southside Community Center to honor his memory. Before his untimely death at age 50 in 1980, Malone became known in Ithaca and places far-flung as Florida and Arizona for his dedication to helping anyone who needed a meal or a place to stay. “There were always extra people sleeping in the house,” Amos Malone said. “Somebody would come, and he’d say ‘get out your bed, get on the floor.’ He didn’t just tell us to do this. He would do it first. That was the way him and my mother was. It was normal for us.” Malone and his wife Ruby founded the Bethlehem Church of Jesus Christ in 1962, now located along Cecil A. Malone Drive, renamed for him in 2000. Malone also founded churches in Elmira; Geneva; Cantonment, Fla.; Huachuca City, Ariz.; and Enterprise, Ala., where he, his family, and his fellow ministers often visited. Jerome Reeves was part of the Ministerial Alliance that Malone founded. “The Alliance was staffed by ministers raised under Bishop Malone’s direction,” Reeves said. “Our job was to go out and instill in the other communities the same things he was doing in the city of Ithaca.” The Bethlehem Church grew its membership through the dedication of prayer groups that walked house to house around Ithaca, Reeves said. “People who didn’t have a home church were given an opportunity to come visit with us,” Reeves said. “The majority of them came and stayed. We also did prison work in Clinton Correctional, Auburn, Elmira, the county jail.” Reeves says his wife Shirley ministered to inmates in the Tompkins County Jail for 15 years, during which time the sheriff, Bob Howard, gave permission for inmates to visit Bethlehem Church for baptism if they decided to accept the Lord.

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Bible classes in other towns like Kingston and Monticello and visiting nursing homes were other parts of the rounds for the Alliance’s ministers, Reeves said, besides visiting the churches the Bishop planted. “He didn’t want ministers raised under him sitting at home waiting for the opportunity to minister, to preach,” Reeves said. “His vision was to send us out so we can touch the lives of not just folks in the city but in other areas.” Taking the gospel to the South and

in education, particularly the Special Personal Learning Lab (SPELL). “SPELL was for people to help children and adults, help them learn to read and write,” Amos Malone said. “To further their self in the community. He would teach. I would have to teach. We’d all take hands in helping. Everybody joined in to help volunteer.” Her father’s dream of expanding his church’s educational ventures from the after-school SPELL program to a fullgrown school never happened due to his early death, Barrett said. She hopes the Bishop’s legacy of “work to develop community” lives on in her work for the city. “The Bishop was always the kind of person who could be reached as far as touching the lives of other folks, particularly people who were of a poorer nature,” Reeves said. “The people most affected by him were the mentally challenged or emotionally challenged. Bishop Malone took time out with these people. They loved coming to church. The Bishop had so much love and compassion it was hard for them to resist.” • —Josh

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Cecil A. Malone “in the spirit” (Photo: provided)

West sometimes meant new faces coming to Ithaca. “He initiated bringing some of the indigenous people from [Enterprise] to here,” Amos Malone remembers. “They were working in slave-type conditions, in the early ‘70s.” When the Bishop moved his family out of the city to five acres in Danby, his children and church brethren worked under far freer conditions than prevailed in the South to raise their own animals and grow their own food. “We were doing sustainable living before it was popular,” Malone’s daughter Eloise Barrett said. “We did a lot of farming and had chickens, not only for us, but for members of the church who came out and helped. We had apple orchards, and made jelly and applesauce. The food was distributed, at no cost either, everybody just came out and helped and everybody benefited from the harvest.” Barrett says that her current work with Ithaca Youth Bureau coordinating tutoring and mentoring programs for students in grades 6 through 12 is an extension of her father’s work

Myrick explained that the city needs both transitional and affordable housing. He said, “If we can’t get you into housing first we can’t solve any of your other problems.” “To me, housing is the number one priority that I want to attack on the issue of drugs in the City of Ithaca,” Myrick concluded. In response to a question about how to decrease the U.S. prison population, which the film notes is the world’s highest, one audience member called out, “Just legalize it!” Myrick responded by noting that the War on Drugs has been fought primarily in poor neighborhoods, where drug exchanges occur out in the open and residents often do not have the means to get legally prescribed drugs. “If we treated some of those illicit drugs more like legal drugs,” said Myrick, “we would stop criminalizing poverty. We don’t send drug users to prison. We send poor people who use drugs to prison.” Myrick asked, “What can one city in a corrupt system do to set itself apart? This screening is a part of the effort to figure that out.” Another part of the effort, he explained, is the Ithaca Municipal Drug Policy Committee, a group of about 50 local stakeholders that has been meeting for nearly seven months. In addition to Myrick and Wilkinson, the panel included Andrew Taylor of the Southern Tier AIDS Program, Jobe Zulu of the Ithaca Youth Bureau, John Stroud, Jennifer Radcliffe, and William Rusen, CEO of Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services. • —Keri

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Ups&Downs ▶ The apple harvest, Community Science Institute and the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network are collaborating to hold the 2015 “What’s In Your Watershed?” series, with the first event scheduled for Wednesday, March 4 from 6-8 p.m. at the Tompkins County Public Library BorgWarner Room West. The event, “PostBan Stream Monitoring: What’s In Your Watershed?” will highlight the ways in which the hydrofracking industry has the potential, or is already, impacting waterways in New York. If you care to respond to something in this column, or publish your own grievances or plaudits, e-mail editor@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “Ups & Downs.”

Heard&Seen ▶ A Good Laugh, Ever Need a Good Laugh? As we celebrate 20 years of community service, the Cancer Resource Center is staging: “One Funny Ithaca Story” A comedic tribute to everything Ithaca stands (and sits) for! Sunday, March 22 from 2-3:30pm at The Space @ Greenstar, 700 W. Buffalo St. Emcee: Gary Stewart, CRC board member. ▶ Top Stories on the Ithaca Times website for the week of Sept. 11-18 include: 1) Groton Girls Basketball Getting Wins Off the Court 2) $320K Near Miss in Candor 3) The Incident at Danby: Standoff Between SWAT and David Cady 4) Are Ithaca School Bus Driver Suspensions Fair? 5) Friday Night Hoops: Groton Ends Spencer-Van Etten’s Season For these stories and more, visit our website at www.ithaca.com.

question OF THE WEEK

Do you think that downtown development projects should receive tax abatements? Please respond at ithaca.com. L ast Week ’s Q uestion: Do you have natural gas lines running into your house ?

60 percent of respondents answered “yes” and 40 percent answered “no”

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Wrong Rx for Education I

magine if you went to your doctor and she told you that for the benefit of your health you needed to diet and exercise. Your doctor provided you with different diet and exercise options; along with a healthy dose of encouragement and some practical advice as to why you shouldn’t take this recommendation lightly. Your homework was to follow this advice to the best of your ability and in six months the test would be to see how well you followed her prescription would be administered. In the six months between that initial visit and the follow-up appointment you decided for a number of reasons not to do your homework. As wonderful as the potential benefits might be, the lifestyle change proved to be too burdensome and traumatic. Instead you continued your bad habits of eating poorly and not exercising. You knew your doctor meant well, like other doctors who had given you similar advice, but your unhealthy habits didn’t just develop overnight. Instead they were symptomatic of a larger and deeper history of chronic health related issues. Finally the day of the test arrives and your doctor determines that you are even sicker than you had been before. Your doctor is deeply concerned and of course seriously disappointed. She reevaluates your case and develops a new plan of attack, hoping to mitigate the damage that has already been done. You feel guilty but the guilt is nothing compared to the struggle that lies before you. Of course no one in their right

We Still Love You

mind would blame the doctor for your deteriorating health; it’s obvious to anyone that your doctor told you which steps to take to avoid this outcome. Now imagine if the doctor was a teacher and the patient a student. Not just one student, but several classes of students numbering one hundred or more students in total, with varying degrees of chronic educational ailments and limitations. Under Governor Cuomo’s latest round of education proposals, the students would have no part to play in their educational health care plan. Instead their teacher would be held solely responsible for their failure. Many of these failures are a result of a complex and inordinate number of variables, external influences, and fluctuating circumstances. In addition, there would be no consideration for the student’s physical and mental health, family life, home environment, or educational history. There would be no need to consider these external forces that are beyond the extremely limited control of the teacher. Powerful forces like poverty, mental and physical abuse, truancy, cognitive and developmental deficiencies, and equitable school funding. All of these would be ignored and treated as if they were minor distractions and concerns. Under Cuomo’s new evaluation plan 50 percent of a teacher’s entire career, her livelihood, and her professional integrity would be ultimately judged by continued on page 7

By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r

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elcome teachers to Ithaca Loves Teachers 2015! Coming so close on the heels of the Pearson Corporation-sponsored Albany Hates Teachers 2015, it’s been a bit of a struggle to coordinate and schedule all the lastminute events we’ve added. Here are the new additions to the activities, ALL FREE, available to educators in Ithaca this week. Enjoy! Governor Cuomo Piñata Bash Using paper maché made from the pulped workbooks from previous educational initiatives, ILT has crafted hundreds of Andrew Cuomo Piñatas. Go ahead and take a whack with all your might! You’ll feel great! Feb. 18, 6 p.m. until we run out. 2 locations, to accommodate anticipated attendance: Barton Hall and the State Theater. Shuttle bus service available. Don’t You Have A Test To Teach To? Top secret studies show that too much classroom time is wasted on activities for which the results can’t be objectively measured. Renowned expert on all things education-related, Charlotte Danielson who, it turns out, is a real person, will lecture on the Value-Added Model of teacher evaluation and using arcane and wordy rubrics to judge whether or not your teaching looks the way it should. Feb. 19, 7 p.m. A four-top booth in the State Diner has been reserved to accommodate anticipated attendance. APPR Participate in a panel discussion: what does it really stand for? All Professionals Pound Rocks? Any Pupils Prefer Rote? Andrew Plays Political Roulette? Assemblymen Prefer Pearson Riches? Feb. 19, Happy Hour. Southwest corner

of the bar at Maxie’s. The Blame Game A new favorite. Why should the governor have all the fun? Climate changing? Blame meteorologists! Smoking patients get emphysema? Blame doctors! Sunspot activity? Blame astronauts! Your state has the most corrupt state politicians in the United States of America? Blame voters…oh, wait… Game cards available all week at the Downtown Visitors Center. Teach Like A Robot Workshop Building on the success of the Learn Like A Robot and Evaluate Teachers Like A Robot workshops, real experts, steeped in weeks of actual classroom experience and graduate degrees will help you identify and remove creativity in your classroom and always keep the question in mind: “is this good for Pearson?” Feb. 20, 1-3 p.m., TST BOCES campus. Embracing the Common Core MiniCourse Mystified by the indecipherable gobbledegook in the Common Core? Don’t fight it, learn it! Using techniques developed by Rosetta Stone, you can learn to parse phrases like “instituting educational reforms through principles determined by “standards-based education” which mandates clear, measurable, and concrete standards for students as opposed to ”norm-referenced rankings” of curriculum, assessments, and professional development.” Why speak English when you can talk for hours, sound smart, and actually say nothing very much at all? People make lucrative careers with this simple skill. Celebrity instructors include Ithaca’s own Dr. Luvelle Brown. continued on page 7

YourOPINIONS

CINT Founder Follows the Standoff

It seems strange that at a time when police agencies throughout the country are being confronted about the killing of citizens, the public in Tompkins County is outraged by police agencies doing everything possible not to kill a resident. The death of Mr. Cady in Danby is sad and unfortunate, but it is the result of a series of decisions he made that led to his death by his own hand. “All lives matter” seems to have been taken very seriously by law enforcement in this case. I do not have specific knowledge of this incident, but as a co-founder of both the SWAT and Critical Incident Negotiation Team (CINT), I have some idea of the process. Almost 19 years ago, the Ithaca City Police responded to a noise complaint at an apartment on West State Street. An 6 T

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emotionally disturbed woman named Debbie Stagg, a patient at the clinic I supervised, was barricaded in her apartment, screaming and yelling. Using the protocols of the time, the police broke in. During the struggle Ms. Stagg stabbed and killed Investigator Mike Padula. Ms. Stagg was then shot and killed. After the finger pointing ended, I met with then IPD Deputy Chief Randy Haus and others, to develop a plan which would make barricades and hostage taking have better outcomes. We wrote grants to buy equipment for both the SWAT and negotiation teams. Our first vehicle was a used ambulance. Our overall approach was unique. Both teams would be made up of police officers from most county agencies. Using continued on page 11


Guestopinion

Dealing with Gap Elimination S ince its inception, Andrew Cuomo’s Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA) policy has withheld approximately $9.5 billion of promised funds to schools across the state, resulting in a tremendous strain on resources. Many schools, including the Ithaca City School District from which $28 million has been withheld, have been forced to dip into local reserve funds and increase local taxes. Due to the nature of reserve funds and the unpopularity of last year’s tax increases, ICSD will be unable to cover the lack of state aid by these means this year. On Thursday, Feb. 12, the Ithaca High School Site Based Council met in the school’s library. In addition to student and faculty members, the meeting was attended by board members Brad Grainger and Patricia Wasyliw as well as Linda Glaser, a representative of the parentrun activist group Save Our Schools (SOS), who spoke on Cuomo’s proposed educational reforms, the (GEA), and their impact on the district’s budget. SOS was formed last school year with the goal of passing the new budget, in which they succeeded. This year their primary focus has shifted to repealing the GEA in order to prevent further losses in funding at a statewide level. Glaser reported that the Gap Elimination Adjustment was devised during the 2010-2011 budget cycle. Essentially, the adjustment withheld funding set aside for public schools away in order to close a gap in the state budget. Now, despite the fact that there is a surplus in Albany, this policy is still in effect. State funding is crucial to public schools. It assists in the payment of teacher salaries, funds state-mandated programs, and makes extracurriculars such as sports teams and the arts possible. While it is still unknown exactly how much money the ICSD will be receiving in the upcoming year, Grainger reports that losses will be between one and four million dollars. Seeing as it costs roughly $100,000 annually to support a teacher in the district, that decrease in funding is significant. Board member Grainger explained that should the district not receive its promised state funding, there will most likely be severe cuts. When cuts ensue the first losses will be anything deemed nonessential by the state. As could be expected, this includes sports, arts, and extracurricular programs. Glaser stated that at the elementary level, full-day prekindergarten education is deemed nonessential. At the secondary level, many of Ithaca High School’s Advanced Placement programs will be among the first to go. Not only will this limit opportunities for students, but the elimination of AP courses will result in ballooning class size in honors and regents sections. Teachers and other staff will also

inevitably be cut. Glaser also stated that Cuomo’s proposed new reforms would only worsen the situation. His new plan calls for zero increases in state aid, which has the potential to be especially harmful in Upstate New York, where 33 percent of state aid is given and yet from which 44 percent of funding used to bridge the budget gap was taken. Because state aid is given to districts on a need basis, cutting funds hits poorer schools harder. In Tompkins County, where six of eight school districts are considered to be of below average wealth, this is a major concern. Despite outcry, Cuomo is of the opinion that schools need to be more efficient with the funds that they are given and that districts should combine. Even if district mergers were quick and easy processes, it is simply not the localities’ job to make up for state aid, which has already been promised to them. What can be done? Unfortunately, it’s not so straightforward. As an individual, Glaser encourages everyone. Support assemblywoman Barbara Lifton to become co-sponsor of bill A.2271, which advocates for the elimination of the GEA. Make a call to Albany. Support local groups like SOS. On Thursday, March 19, there will be a meeting of the legislative forum to further discuss these issues, held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Lansing Middle School auditorium. It is open to parents, students, community members, administration staff, and teachers’ association representatives from the entire county. The meeting is made possible by the Because We Care campaign, backed by Lansing, Ithaca, South Seneca, and Trumansburg Schools. – Abby Katz, Ithaca Katz is part of parent group that is montioring the discussion between the administration and teachers at ICSD regarding state aid to the schools.

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the outcome of one single state test, a test given on one single day, out of a 180-day school year calendar. And whether or not those students attended 100 percent of those school days with the necessary support and supplies essential to their success is, according to Cuomo, irrelevant. Andrew Cuomo is man of privilege and power, who has never experienced hunger or economic uncertainty, a man who never attended a public school, and who has never taught a single day in his life. A man who pretends to have the cure to a complex illness that he doesn’t have the training or the skills to understand, let alone diagnose. It would be like a surgeon

receiving surgical advice from someone whose only medical knowledge is derived from watching hours of TV dramas about doctors and nurses. Yet somehow with no public education experience to speak of, Mr. Cuomo feels like he is entitled to make such an enormously misguided, misinformed, and reckless education proposal. Of course a life of privilege and entitlement will make you think you can do anything, unless of course parents, students, school boards, and teachers make him realize he can’t. – Liam O’Kane, Ithaca Liam O’Kane has 18 years of teaching experience. He has been an English teacher at Watkins Glen High School for 12 years. Before that he was a teacher in Watervliet, N.Y., Manhattan, and the South Bronx. surroundedreality contin u ed from page 6

Feb. 20, 6-9 p.m. Tompkins County Library. Name The Test Contest Even with pre-tests, post-tests, Regents exams, TerraNova tests, standalone field tests, exit exams and the New York State Testing program, we still have more standardized tests than we have names for them. Enter your proposals in the marked suggestion boxes at twelve venues located downtown. Last year’s winner, “Crush My Soul Proficiency Exam” was disallowed by the State Education Department, but we’ll try again! Mysteries of the Universe: The 2020 Electoral Map A fun, interactive sleuthing activity for amateur pundits—not limited to teachers! This year’s mystery: can an ethnic northeastern Democratic governor who resembles Steve Buscemi and whose educational policies pander to an electoral base that exists only in his mind can even win the Iowa caucuses in 2020? (Spoiler alert: no.) A great way to cap off Ithaca Loves Teachers week! Feb. 21, 6-8 p.m. Ithaca Beer Co. •

power plants can’t find any gas, having the option to start a fire in the coal-burners, then, is all right. Just once in a while. What the ratepayers say is that they have no option: whatever the PSC says, goes. Larocca agrees that they might have reason to feel a bit shut out. “The pressure on the PSC always is more intense from industry,” the former commisioner said. “Without the consumer protection board and consumer advocacy weaker in recent times, it increases the burden on the PSC itself to be that protector of consumer interests.” Whoever comes out victorious, they still have time to comment and nap with their unexpected partners. The PSC has no set timetable to wrap up this business. •

The Talk at

ithaca com

In response to our coverage of the city’s antiquated system of levying fines on landlords for trash infractions at residences: Thanks for writing this story. Actually I looked through 28 folders (tickets) and found these tickets were associated with 95 other tickets, indicating quite a few people are getting more than one ticket. It took seven days for these 28 tickets to reach the court, and probably another two or three days for the summons to be delivered. This allows for frequent multiple tickets being handed out for the same offense before the owner knows about the first one. I also noted that over half of the fines are cancelled by the prosecutor. This makes for a lot of busywork and a very inefficient system. The other thing is that dealing with a summons is really quite an inconvenience. The court house is remote and the bridge is out. Also, Mr. Murtagh seems not to appreciate the serious problem of the city handing out so many tickets. The inspector’s time...the court’s time, the prosecutor’s time, the property owner’s... And it’s often for a trivial case of some can without a lid or a simple unopened bag sitting by a porch. He so easily dismissed my case by sayCayugapower ing no one would be fined for such a case as contin u ed from page 4 mine. So maybe someone should send him a summons and then he would realize it’s not a other regulatory bodies that were created small thing to deal with even when your case in the wake of the Great Northeast is dismissed. Blackout of 1965. -TTerpening The possibility of natural gas price This reader spoke for a lot of people regarding spikes might play some part in the request, the standoff in Danby with David Cady: but what the PSC seems to be saying is: I still find this disturbing. If He didn’t it values fuel flexibility. In its decision to come out, keep an eye on him until he does. allow a repowering at the Dunkirk power Then arrest him. Pretty simple. plant, released last December, the PSC -Harry approved its coal-burning capacity if the On our defense of our film critic for his review gas lines aren’t bringing in anything. A of “American Sniper”: “Polar Vortex” report came to a conclusion I find the editorial response very disturbthat there is a “very real need to maintain ing. You are telling us that both the editor generation and fuel diversity in New and the writer are not knowledgeable of and York—especially in times of severe cold.” disrespectful towards our military. You are “Certainly, the trend the state has entitled to your opinion as that’s what these been pursuing for many years now is to guys and gals die defending. You have also get out of coal business,” Larocca said, and forever colored my impression of you and that has included the PSC. your paper which I’ll now term the Ithaca What the PSC says now, it seems, is Yellow Rag. that when it gets real, real cold, and the -John The I thaca Times / Februar y 1 8 - 2 4 , 2 0 1 5 7


Hindering Development How multiple agendas can kill downtown projects

By Bill Chaisson

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n his State of the City address and at a Jan. 11 Planning and Economic Development meeting, Mayor Svante Myrick stated and restated his wish to reform the Community Investment Incentive Tax Abatement Program (CIITAP). The program, last revised in 2012, is presently in its third iteration and is designed to encourage development in the city center, where the cost of construction is much more expensive than elsewhere. On Dec. 11 the board of directors of the Tompkins County Industrial Development Agency (IDA) voted 3-2 against a tax abatement package for a project at 130 E. Clinton St. At the public hearing on Dec. 3 several people spoke in opposition to the project, arguing that the building was not “green” and that the site was inappropriately steep. Some speakers openly expressed a dislike for the developer, Jason Fane. Myrick, who is a member of the IDA board, did not attend the Dec. 11 meeting, but told the Ithaca Times that he would have voted against it because it was not a mixed-use building. County Legislator Martha Robertson, another member of the IDA board, did not attend the meeting for the vote. Members businessman Larry Baum and Jim Dennis, a county legislator and the chair of the IDA board, voted for the abatement package. County legislators Will Burbank and Nathan Shinagawa, and architect Grace Chiang voted against. “This is not just the fallout of the 130 Clinton project,” said Gary Ferguson, the executive director of the Downtown Ithaca Alliance (DIA), of the announced intention to revise CIITAP, “but really it has been building up through the whole program. It’s really time to take a look at 8

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it.”

Agreeing wholeheartedly is Nathan Lyman, Fane’s attorney, whose practice has focused on real estate law for 25 years. In the wake of the IDA decision Lyman sat down and wrote a lengthy essay that summarizes the history of tax abatements in Ithaca, describes the process that the 130 E. Clinton St. went through with the city planning department and planning board, and then argues that politics had interfered with the decision. Lyman intends to send the document to Myrick later this month in the form of a letter.

Why Downtown Tax Abatements ?

The Community Investment Incentive Act (CIIP) was inaugurated in 2006 to attract development to downtown Ithaca. During the five years of its existence, only one proposed project, Cayuga Green, succeeded in getting through the approval process. In his letter to Myrick, Lyman reminds the mayor that in 2012 on the same day that CIITAP was created to replace CIIP, the Common Council (of which Myrick was a member) consolidated the planning and building departments and made the decisions of the new department’s staff and boards binding on all other agencies and boards in the city government. The intent and the review criteria of this law require the planning board to consider input from all of the various boards and committees that developers previously had to approach and satisfy individually. In this new process, “community benefits” were negotiated between the city and the developer as part of the site plan approval. The process was supposed to give certainty to a decision by the city, and make the planning board the authoritative voice for the city if there was disagreement between one or

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G a ry F e r g u s o n , E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r o f t h e D ow n t ow n It h ac a A l l i a n c e ( P h o t o : Ti m G e r a) more of the many boards, committees, and departments that make up city government. It also required the planning board to consider input from the numerous citizen groups and individuals who actively participate in public hearings.

“Every [downtown] project needs some kind of help,” said the DIA director. “If not abatements, then tax credits or a payment plan to purchase property.” Ferguson said that since the end of the recession in 2011, the price of construction has risen dramatically. “In-fill projects are in difficult sites,” he said, nodding toward the east end of the Commons where the Marriott is being constructed on a small triangular parcel between the Aurora Street bridge, East Green Street, and the parking garage. “It is easier to build on a cornfield.” “There are two types of abatements,” Ferguson continued, “and the popular press, even the New York Times, mixes

them up. One is related to job creation, and the other is related to investment decisions. It’s important to distinguish between the two. A lot of the criticism has been aimed at the ones related to job creation.” He said that the recent decision of Mercedes-Benz to move from New Jersey to Georgia has some people worried because after the tax abatement period ends, the car maker can simply move again, taking its car making machinery and its jobs with it. Projects in downtown Ithaca, however, are long-term investments. “Real estate,” Ferguson said of the downtown projects, “is not portable. These are not buildings that are going to be there for a few years. They’re built for 50 years or more, and if what’s there goes out of business, we’ll put something else in there.” Jobs, he said, are not the preeminent reason for encouraging


downtown development. “We want these developments in the core,” he said, “because by putting them there, you’re saving energy. I don’t get why this isn’t on the table.” The DIA director was philosophical, if slightly frustrated, by the introduction of other issues into the public discussion about incentives to development. “If you build outside the core,” he said, “then there is no entry point to discuss labor, building materials, energy efficiency. But when you build downtown, as soon as you ask for help, then you subject the project to meeting other well-meaning demands.” These demands include using local union labor, getting a living wage for jobs created by the new development, using “green” building materials, incorporating alternative energy technologies, and preserving the natural environment. As Lyman and others have pointed out, all of these demands increase the price of a project.

Well-Meaning Demands at 130 Clinton

Dennis, the chair of the IDA, voted in favor of the abatement package for Fane’s project at 130 E. Clinton St. He said, immediately after the vote and again more recently, that he felt that the majority had voted against Fane as a person. “If anyone else had proposed this project,” he said, “it would have gone through, just like the Carey Building project did immediately afterward at the same meeting.” Dennis admitted to being somewhat mystified. “I have to live with these people,” he said of his fellow board members, “but I said I felt they were wrong. The people on that board had no history with Jason Fane. I dealt with him often in the 1970s and ‘80s when I was on the city council. I think if you looked it up you would find that he would be in the top five when it came to money spent on housing in this city, and he’d also be in the top five when it came to taxes paid.” Lyman was frustrated that opponents of the 130 Clinton project seemed not to have looked at any of the work done by the city planning department or the planning board. In his letter he notes: All input from public comments and other city boards/departments were considered, potential impacts were determined, and “the Planning Board, acting as Lead Agency, has required mitigation to all impacts as detailed in the FEAF, part 3.” Those potential impacts included environmental, aesthetics, slope failure, potential runoff, foundation failure, surface water control, and a host of others. Specific reference in the Planning Board findings was made to input from the Conservation Advisory Council, Shade Tree Advisory Committee, Transportation engineer, City engineer, County Planning Commissioner, County Environmental Management Council, and Planning Board. The developer was required to do a flora and fauna inventory study of the 1.78 acre site, visual impact study, slope stability assessment, archeological survey, numerous borings and storm water management plan.

According to Lyman, the initial

estimate for the cost of the building in 2011 was $2.5 million. After the developer had agreed to changes proposed during the city site plan approval process the price had climbed to $3.2 million. Two changes—to restore the native plant community of the two-thirds of the parcel that run along Six Mile Creek and to convert the design from a gable to a flat-roofed building—added $320,000 to the cost of the project. When it was put out to bid, the low bid that came back was $4.3 million.

uncommon outside of the city center in Tompkins County and Tavaras saw only one in Chenango County during her tenure there. “The city program here has specific goals to increase density,” she said. “They want to attract different types of projects, mixed-use and housing. I have my first meeting this afternoon,” she said

sewer, water, and power. Heather manages a revolving loan program. And we meet with local customers and try to determine whether there is any federal, state, or local program that can help them with technical or financial assistance.” Stamm said that when TCAD met with Fane they described the CIITAP

How the IDA Works

The IDA is administrated for the county by Tompkins County Area Development (TCAD). “We help the IDA consider state and federal policies,” said TCAD Executive Director Michael Stamm, “and we give the IDA the perspective of the private sector, tell them what they need to do to attract jobs, and tell them what other communities do.” CIITAP is, however, different from all the other programs that TCAD deals with, said Stamm. “It is really about community development, not economic development,” he said. “It’s goal is to avoid sprawl, to attract employees to downtown, and to attract students.” While TCAD’s work is to help developers to find ways to close the funding gaps in their projects, the primary cause of a founding gap for a downtown project is how expensive it to build in the middle of a city, even a small one like Ithaca, compared

M i c h a e l S ta m m , E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r o f To m p k i n s C o u n t y A r e a D e v e l o p m e n t ( P h o t o : Ti m G e r a) last week. “It will help me understand better what I am looking at.”

TCAD/IDA Downtown Density Projects Project Year Investment Gateway I (offices)* 2002 $9,850,000 Seneca Place* 2004 $29,000,000 Island Health & Fitness* 2004 $6,750,000 Gateway II (apts)* 2005 $5,600,000 Cayuga Green* 2007 $16,780,000 ItalThai* 2011 $3,428,000 Harold’s Square 2013 $38,000,000 Mariott Hotel 2013 $32,000,000 Carey Building 2014 $5,757,000

What TCAD Does

One of the tasks of TCAD, according to Stamm, is to help applicants for tax incentives anticipate the kinds of questions they are going to get from the IDA. Stamm and TCAD Director *completed Source: Heather Filiberto/TCAD of Economic Development Services Heather Filiberto to building along commercial strips and also explain to the IDA board members on agricultural land. where the applicant’s project fits in the Jennifer Tavaras, the new president of context of the community’s economic the Ithaca/Tompkins County Chamber of development strategy. Commerce, was previously the director By state law the IDA has the ability of economic development for Commerce to grant relief from a portion of property taxes and a sales tax on the cost of Chenango, a non-profit in Chenango construction materials (“furniture, County that does what TCAD does in fixtures, and equipment”) and the state this county. She has just been selected by share of the mortgage recording tax. TCAD to be a new business-community “In some communities the IDA might member of the IDA board. Outgoing be the economic development agency that member Larry Baum left after serving does a lot of other things,” said Stamm. for several years. The county legislature’s “Seneca County’s like that. Broome personnel committee selects the other members, five of whom must by law be County’s like that. In our community, TCAD is that organization. We work on elected officials. infrastructure issues, including air service, Tax abatement packages are

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policies and other projects that had gone through it. “We’ve done half a dozen of those projects,” the TCAD executive director said, “and we tried to anticipate what kind of questions the applicant would get from IDA members. Both staff and our attorney reminded the IDA members under what circumstances they could vote ‘yes,’ ‘no’ or abstain from voting on a project. [For example] you can’t vote against a project because a person might belong to a different political party from you. That actually happens in other counties.” “Essentially you have to apply the policy guidelines that the IDA has set out in its tax exemption policy,” said Filiberto. “They’re on our website. All along we talked to IDA members about applying those guidelines, and they should be consistently applied to all projects.” Filiberto noted that traditionally the IDA has granted tax incentives to industry, particularly ones that don’t compete with other local businesses. If you enhance those companies, she said, that drives the need for the local services. It creates wealth in a community, so you can invest in “quality of life things.” continued on page 10 e b r u a r y

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Taxabatements contin u ed from page 9

“The downtown projects are a completely different animal,” she continued. “They are community development.” “Most of our stakeholders agree that it’s important to have a strong downtown,” said Stamm. “That’s why we agreed to the city’s request that the IDA deliver incentives to a specific geographic area: downtown.”

How Tax Abatements Work

The way that the IDA delivers property tax incentives is through a “leaselease back” agreement. The IDA itself

becomes involved in the purchase and sale of the land and are listed as a leaseholding interest. The attorney’s fees for this kind of transaction are, as Stamm put it, “appropriately high.” Therefore Filiberto uses a rule of thumb that any project that starts down to tax incentive road must be going to increase the assessment of the parcel by $500,000. She points out that this is not the same as the cost of the project. In fact, she recently saw a $3 million project that only increased the value of the property by $500,000. The tax incentives only apply to that increase, not to the entire assessment. She offered the Carey Building project as an example. Travis/Hyde will continue to pay

their full tax bill on the existing building. Only on the stories that they are adding above it will they get a tax break. Stamm (and Ferguson) are at pains to point out that this means that tax abatement does not actually decrease the amount of property taxes that a community is collecting. Because the projects would not go forward at all with out the incentives—because of the high cost of building downtown—the municipalities and the school district would never receive any additional taxes at all. The usual schedule for is for a property to pay only 10 percent of its taxes in the first year, and then increase that amount steadily until at the end of a

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When TCAD staff reminded the IDA board members about their own policies, they were referring to the five different types Jim Dennis of projects that the (file photo) board considers and the criteria listed for each. Number four reads, “Community Investment Incentive Tax Abatement Program (CIITAP) for City of Ithaca Downtown Projects – for application process and incentives to be delivered, please refer to the separate policy.” As passed by Common Council in 2012, CIITAP required projects seeking tax incentives to meet three criteria. First, it should increase the assessment by $500,000 (Filiberto’s rule of thumb); second, the project should be three or more stories tall (to increase density) or be a restoration of an existing structure; and third, it should be in the city’s “density district.” According to Lyman, On July 31, 2014, Nels Bohn (a member of the City’s CIITAP review committee and Director of Community Development at Ithaca Urban Renewal League) wrote to Mayor Myrick stating that a 4th criteria should suddenly be added to CIITAP: “Municipal compliance – all property in the City of Ithaca owned by the Applicant must be in full compliance with all applicable local laws & regulations, orders of the Director of Code Enforcement and current on all local taxes, fees and penalties due.”

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seven, 10- or even 20-year period, they are paying the full amount. (Tavaras described another type of package occasionally offered in Chenango County in which a property would pay 50 percent of their taxes for an agreed-upon period.) Fane was asking for a seven-year schedule through CIITAP. As Ferguson explained, the city program allows an applicant a 10-year period, if they agree to disclose more about their finances.

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The 130 Clinton project had already begun the CIITAP process, when this criterion was added, but the city insisted that it be applied retroactively. After the IDA voted on the project on Dec. 11, board member Shinagawa remarked (as quoted in the minutes) “[The Mayor is not inclined to support this project, as it seems to only meet the minimum standards. There is no plan for mixed use in the building, it is not a good use of resources, and no jobs are created.” None of these criteria are included anywhere in the CIITAP application and the IDA’s own policies instruct its members to refer to the CIITAP application. “We should follow the rules we set up,” said Dennis, the IDA chair, of the vote against the Fane project. “The reasons given out loud were not part of the written criteria.” •


Youropinions contin u ed from page 6

this model, all local police had an interest in collaboration and when incidents happened in specific jurisdictions, officers from that agency could act as liaison. That is why so many agencies were involved in Danby. Deputy Chief Haus then made a very unusual decision. He included non-law enforcement personnel on the negotiation team, inviting me and three of my colleagues from Tompkins County Mental Health to join. All of us attended basic and advanced FBI hostage negotiation training and became full members of the team. It is my understanding that personnel from the Mental Health Department were on site in Danby to add to the expertise available. During every incident I was involved in, suicide lethality assessment was ongoing. What most people forget about SWAT is that the first two letters stand for “special weapons” and the last two stand for “and tactics.” The focus for the nine plus years I was involved was with tactics. Safety is the most important tactic. Making everyone safe in the inner perimeter is the job of the SWAT team. Other officers create an outer perimeter to maintain safety for the community. This can be very inconvenient for neighbors and others trying to live their lives. Negotiators try to make contact and maintain it during these incidents. Sometimes the person talks, sometimes he/she doesn’t. I was involved in a 33-hour incident with an armed individual where he never responded to attempts at contact. Unlike what you see in television programs, the people on the front line don’t make decisions. The “Incident Commander” runs the teams. He/she will be a high ranking officer who can gather information and with assistance, thoughtfully formulate decisions. All the action is not at the scene. Investigators are busy at other locations, finding out specifics about weapons, talking to friends and family, learning all they can about the individual. All of this is directed at ways to resolve the incident peacefully. As time passes, many officers are involved though shift changes. I was not involved in this incident, but I was involved in dozens like it with a variety of outcomes. Mr. Cady was facing the serious charge of felony DUI. He knew he was likely going to be incarcerated, and he feared that. His actions could not be ignored. His continued drunk driving put the community at risk and law enforcement had a responsibility to take him into custody. After deputies came to serve a warrant he shot at them. Even though Mr. Cady under normal circumstances was a good guy, from the moment he took that shot everything changed. Here we have a man who is likely going to prison. He has made a decision to risk his life, the lives of his loved ones, and the police to avoid going to jail. He has nothing to lose. We know he is armed, and we also know he has a history of alcohol abuse. Can we just leave a few cop cars and walk away from this situation? Could this man, whose judgment may be impaired by alcohol, arm himself and slip past those few cops on the

road? What then? I have extensive training and experience in threat assessment. In my opinion, Mr. Cady was a threat to the community from the moment he fired his gun at the deputies and the tactical response was appropriate and necessary. They say that police work is hours of intense boredom followed by minutes of intense fear. Nothing could better describe a standoff. The process of gathering resources takes time. As communication networks are set up, everyone begins to assume their role. I followed the Danby incident in my head, knowing what steps would be taken. I knew that by Wednesday they’d have turned off the power and tried gas and was surprised when he didn’t come out. As the press reported a 60-hour standoff, I was proud

to have been a small part of a police effort that didn’t pay attention to the clock. Most police departments would have kicked in the door and had a shootout long before then. I also suspected that by that time Mr. Cady had ended his life. I have talked to several thousand suicidal people, and with what little I knew about this incident, the outcome did not surprise me. When I saw the pictures of the house, I was taken aback. Having an armored machine that can take the walls off a house was a new tactic for me. However, it may have been another way to resolve things safely. Wood and windows can be replaced, lives cannot. When you have an armed individual, eventually someone has to enter the house. When to do it safely is always a problem. I remember one incident when after many

hours of no contact we assumed the person had escaped. A thorough search revealed him hidden under insulation in an attic. Once a decision is made to enter, people braver than me, with spouses and kids and moms and dads, have to suit up and go in and hope that nothing bad happens. In this case, Mr. Cady had taken his own life, a sad outcome that nobody wanted. It is worthwhile to review these events and try to find better ways to resolve difficult situations. There is always room for improvement. A fund for cleanup and repair may be needed. In my view, law enforcement tried everything possible to resolve this incident peacefully and should be supported for its measured approach and respect for life. – Terry Garahan, Danby

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Tompkins County

New Cayuga proposal: coal as a back-up

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nder a new financing program, commercial property owners could pay for energy upgrades on their tax bills. Last week, elected officials and stakeholders from the county and the city met to discuss local participation in a financing program called “Energize New York.” If the City of Ithaca and Tompkins County decide to participate in the program, qualifying commercial property owners could get funds for energy improvements through a loan attached to the property— not the property owner—and paid every year as a part of the tax bill. There’s a catch, though: if a property owner is delinquent in paying taxes, the municipality could be on the hook for the loan payments until the property reaches foreclosure and is resold at auction. Joe Del Sindaco of Energy Improvement Corporation, the local development corporation that offers Energize New York, explained some of the program’s details to local officials at a Thursday, Feb. 12 meeting and phone conference at the Tompkins County Library’s Borg Warner Room. According to Del Sindaco, who phoned in to the meeting, a variety of commercial landowners would qualify for Energize New York financing. However, there are stipulations, including no recent bankruptcies, a history of on-time tax payments, and an estimated energy savings that exceeds the project’s annual finance payments. The financing terms can go as long as 20 years and interest rates are projected to be in the 3.75 to 6 percent range. The funds can be used for both energyefficiency and renewable-energy projects, including everything from installing more efficient lighting to installing solar panels. One possible snag for property owners: funding is available until the investment has already been made and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) certifies the work. County Administrator Joe Mareane said that stipulation probably wouldn’t be a big stumbling block for interested parties because short-term financing from a bank could be easier to come by with the promise of long-term financing options down the road. Although some at the meeting referred to the funding as a loan, Del Sindaco clarified that technically it is not a secured loan, but a tax lien. “It’s not like a conventional bank loan,” he said. Even though it is a tax lien and the money is collected as an added item on the property tax bill, Mareane confirmed that the costs would not be counted in the city or the county tax levy. Del Sindaco noted that there is some risk to the municipality: “The municipality is responsible for collecting that line on the tax bill and, most importantly for the municipality, they are responsible for paying back that line on the tax bill even if the

taxpayer doesn’t pay on time.” Currently, Del Sindaco said, the county’s delinquency rate on taxes is just 2 percent, while the city’s is even lower at 1 percent. Alderperson Cynthia Brock (D-1st) expressed concern about the proposal, telling other officials, “I’m very apprehensive. I don’t think I’m hiding that at all. The city is a very small municipality. We are vulnerable to even small financial exposure.” Mareane acknowledged that there would be some risk, particularly if a foreclosed property does not sell at auction. He added, “Our history at auction has been very good. I don’t know that there’s been many properties that haven’t sold at auction.” Legislator Martha Robertson (D-13th) expressed support for the idea: “I think this is a huge opportunity, but you know there’s no free lunch in life so we have to minimize

the risk. I think we’re starting to see such Lifelong Need help with your taxes? Spring a greater consciousness about the urgency to do something and it’s not enough that and Lectu Lifelong Spring Classes new construction be held to high efficiency Stimulating Mentally, Physically, S standards. We’ve got to fix what we’ve and Lectures *Lifelong Stimulating cheon already got. This seems like a way to doMentally, Physically, Socially and Creatively Call L it that doesn’t require local out-of-pocket *Lifelong Annual Meeting/Luncheon, May 15, Ramada Inn. *Trips support or abatements.” Call Lifelong for reservation. call to r We are here to help... For the county, the next step is to refer *Trips to interesting places – *Che Free Tax Preparation for seniors 60+, the matter to a committee for further review call to reserve your seat today! lon before holding a public hearing on the people with disabilities, individuals cla *Check our website for Lifeproposal. If the full legislature then approves below $32,000, families below $53,000.* and Fitness long Learning * classes in coming weeks. it, the county would sign an agreement with * Some complex returns may not qualify. IRS certified volunteer counselors. Sponsored by the IRS. Energy Improvement Corporation and *Northside-Southside program picnic, July 23, formally request membership through the at Titus Towers. noonToday Call (607) 229-5691 corporation’s board. • —Keri

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sports

Not ‘Whether, But ‘How’

Rik Daniels Leaves his Wheelchair to Dance By Ste ve L aw re nc e

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Endicott High School, Tina studied at the School of American Ballet, danced in Stuttgart, Rio de Janeiro, Montreal and Iran. Nearly 30 years ago, she steered herself in another direction, as she married and raised a daughter. “I stopped dancing for 27 years,” she said, “and while I never lost my feet, so to speak, I did lose my balance and endurance.” Tina became interested in DanceAbility International, an organization that says its mission is “to encourage the evolution of mixed-abilities dance by cultivating a common ground for creative expression for all people.” She has since “interacted with people of all abilities … some were blind, some were deaf, some were missing limbs and some live with developmental disabilities.” Quoting Alito Alessi, DanceAbility International’s Artistic Director and cofounder, Tina added, “All people have a right to dance, and all bodies speak.” She is, in fact, very grateful that her body speaks to the degree it does, given she had polio as a child. “Rik and I were both March of Dimes poster children,” she said, revealing yet another component of their bond. The two met at the CRS Barn in Lansing, and Tina recalls, “I had Rik Daniels and Tina Christina-Price (Photo: Scott Stull) been looking, but I had not yet met someone with his athleticism. I knew I had to get back in that he was a seven-time All-American as shape.” a gymnast at SUNY Cortland. Rik grew Tina is now a faculty member at the up in the Bronx—where he entertained Community School of Music and Art crowds as a break dancer—and he says of (CSMA), and calls it “a wonderful place his athleticism and artistry, “Everything that breathes positive energy.” She says was borne of my adaptation in life. I she is grateful that “CSMA is behind have learned to navigate as necessary, (supporting) me, and we hope to add I ‘pommel horse’ my way into the tub, diversity and have a company of dancers and onto a stool, and I ambulate around with mixed abilities.” Tina has been as necessary, sometimes walking on all invited to an inclusive dance festival in fours like a dog. That image puts some Edinburgh, Scotland, and hopes to keep people out of their comfort zone, but teaching and choreographing as long that’s the way it is. For my whole life, it as possible. Her gratitude evident, she was never a question as to ‘whether’ I offered, “For me to take my shoes off the can do something, it was a question of wall and dance again is such a gift.” ‘how.’” Rik’s really was a “disability is not Rik agrees that the collaboration is inability” story, and I enjoyed writing it a mutually beneficial one. “I was doing and getting to know him. a one-man performance art piece at the These days, Rik is collaborating with CRS Barn dance studio, and Tina was very choreographer Tina Christina-Price, persistent in her desire to work together. a classically trained dancer who has I have always enjoyed using my body in performed and taught around the world. ways that inspire people, and for a long Their work uses Rik’s wheelchair and a time, that happened by default. Now I try stationary chair “as a basis for movement to bring more intention to the process, exploration,” and they are in the midst of and Tina is working with me in ways that creating and performing several pieces are really helping me develop. I feel very (they are on You Tube, if you’d like to see blessed to have guidance like that.” • a sample). After graduating early from Unionhave, over the years, had readers say, “That was an interesting column, but can you please explain how it qualifies as a ‘sports’ story?” This week’s story about two dancers may elicit similar inquiries, and I will answer it before going any further. In my opinion, two crucial components of athleticism are simply getting more out of our bodies (and minds and spirits by extension) than we have previously, and functioning at the height of our abilities, whatever they may be. About a decade ago, I wrote a story about Rik Daniels, who has used a wheelchair for his entire life. I was amazed that Rik was able to walk on his hands for extended periods, up and down stairs, and


SPECIAL SECTION

Family

MATTERS

ADHD: An Evolutionary Edge? Cornell doctor cautions against over-medicating attention deficits

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ike most of what’s said about behavioral disorders, Dr. Richard A. Friedman’s November piece in the New York Times about attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) stirred up controversy in the psychiatry blogosphere. Friedman is clinician at Weill Cornell Medical College and sees patients with ADHD and pays attention to the latest research. In the November article, Friedman, director of the psychopharmacology clinic and a regular contributor to the Times on medical issues, argued that based on recent research, people diagnosed with ADHD are the inheritors of an evolutionary advantage. People who crave novelty and excitement, he wrote, have the same traits as the successful hunter-gatherer. That lust for new experience becomes a liability when one hunts new accounts from a desk 10 hours a day or studies for standardized tests, rather than stomping across the savannah looking for a meal. Perhaps, Friedman said, drawing on his own clinical experience, some who we consider to have a deficit of attention might benefit from a career change that doesn’t tie them to a desk. Less careful readers of his New York Times piece thought Friedman was calling for a complete renunciation of prescribing stimulants, they can [change careers],” like Ritalin or Friedman said. “[ADHD] Adderall, for shouldn’t be viewed differently concentration. from any other medical “There’s problem. The issue you run creativity Richard Friedman (Photo: youtube.com) into with behavior problems and boredom as opposed to other medical in almost problems is people have very every job,” wrote Roey Pasternak strong ideas about treatments they like and on parkavenuepsychiatry.com. “To don’t like. There’s something very special paraphrase Ecclesiastes, there’s a time for about behavior, and how people change medical treatment and a time for career behavior. counseling.” “I’m a pragmatist,” Friedman Friedman said despite the hot takes continued. “Many people want to try a stirred up by any talk about behavioral strategy that starts with no medicine. And issues, there is a season for medication. if that works, great. If you can’t do that, “Not everybody has the luxury or don’t torture yourself.” ability to find an environment where

Contemplating cases of patients he had treated who had the “typical symptoms of ADD” led Friedman to digging into the neuroscience behind the diagnoses. “Maybe the real problem wasn’t attention,” Friedman said. “Maybe the reason why they weren’t focused and paying attention was some primary problem that had to do with novelty and interest and stimulation.” The research bears his theory, Friedman thinks. “Very quickly [those with ADHD] extract from experience what’s interesting to them, and they move on,” he said. “For most of us, the mundane world is interesting enough. If you’re ADD it’s T

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(Photo: iStock)

quickly boring.” Over the past decade, diagnoses of ADHD have spiked and many more children, teens, and adults have been put on concentration medication. Some of that, Friedman thinks, might have to do with the increase in digital device use. “You spend your life in the amusement park outside of school, as opposed to kids growing up in the ‘50s and ‘60s; children read books then,” Friedman said. “Maybe the huge contrast between the school and non-school environment has something to do with it.” Using drugs like Adderall as “study

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very second Saturday of the month the Ithaca Youth Bureau. from February through August, 30 to According to Glogowski, all the projects 50 kids and their parents get together presented at Families Learning Science with some Cornell graduate students in the Together are tied into the curriculum Borg Warner Room of the public library to in the local school districts. CCMR learn about science and technology. has a website (www.ccmr.cornell.edu/ “This is the first year that they will familieslearntogether) that describes the be sticking around for the summer,” program topics in advance. Last weekend said Sarah Glogowski, the head of youth (Feb. 14) the topic was “polymers”. services at the Tompkins County Public On a bitterly cold day over 30 Library. Glogowksi has been in position for two years and and said that “Families Learning Science Together” has been around for at least five years. “It’s open to any child 5 years old or older,” she said. “Most of the kids are between 7 and 11, but there may be kids their with siblings their are younger.” The Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR) is part of a national network of Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers funded by the National Science Foundation Cornell chemistry grad student Maria Sanford cross-linking a polymer. to do interdisciplinary and (Photo: Bill Chaisson) multidisciplinary research. The library program is not their only program aimed at school-age participants made their way to the library children. “Expanding Your Horizons” to make sodium polyacyrlate and learn invites female middle school students in how it is used to absorb liquids. Then the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade in upstate children took a polymer (glue) and crossNew York to spend one day a year on the linked it to create Silly Putty. Cornell campus to attend a series of math and science workshops. CCMR students continued on page 18 also conduct other community programs at 16 T

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Learning Outside

Primitive Pursuits teaches children to have kinship with the environment

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hether you are a youth, an adult, environment, and yet they have no personal connection,” Jordan said. or golden-aged, the team at “They’ve been taught all about problems Primitive Pursuits wants you to in the environment, kind of a fearexperience the Great Outdoors. based system; kids are now so afraid of “Twelve years old or 30 years old or the world collapsing they want to do 40 years old, they suddenly realize what something about it. What is also needed is it means to be human, what it feels to live a personal connection, a kinship, with the fully alive in their bodies,” said Jed Jordan environment.” of those Primitive Pursuits puts in touch with the wild. Primitive Pursuits began in 1999 when Dave Hall of Rural Youth Services started an after-school program in Dryden to take kids into the woods. Tim Drake joined on soon after, little expecting the program would become his life’s work for the next 16 years. From that first afterschool program in Dryden, Hall, Drake and others expanded the program to schools in Danby, Enfield, Lansing, and Newfield. Jordan joined on in 2002 when his daughter became involved, and both Drake and Jordan became fulltime co-directors in 2005. In the past decade, Primitive Pursuits has expanded to a point where, Drake said, “most people around Ithaca seem to have heard of us.” During the first week of February, 187 children participated in a Primitive Pursuit program. Based at Tim Drake (left) and Jed Jordan (center) (Photo: Tim Gera) the Cornell Cooperative Extension, there are camps offered during summer, winter, and school breaks One original Primitive Pursuiter for kids; a forest preschool program; and was Lily Glidden, who recently had a weekend workshops for adults who want scholarship fund started in her memory. to become wilderness instructors, or just Lily started with the program in 1999 as a try out trapping or building snow shelters sixth-grader, and wrote the first grant for through Wilderness Skills Workshops. the program, which funded a trip to the Primitive Pursuits is about teaching Adirondacks. people near-forgotten skills of outdoor “She pushed us in the direction of not survival, and “teaching them how to teach giving up when it was not always an easy these skills,” Drake said. thing to do,” Jordan said. “We’d say, if Lily One example of bringing potential teachers closer to nature is the class Drake wants to do it, we’ll do it.” “Lily forced us to learn more to keep and Jordan co-teach at Ithaca College for up with her,” Drake said. “We want to environmental science majors. “There’s an entire generation of continued on page 18 young people who want to save their

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should be dealt with in a cavalier way,” Friedman said. “If the kid’s not paying attention, not focused, the kid could be smart and bored. It could be an oppositional kid who doesn’t like doing what he’s told. The decision to treat [ADHD] should be based on how much of a problem it’s creating.” § learningscience contin u ed from page 16

Adderall tablets is prescribed for ADHD and (mis)used as a “study drug.” (Photo: Wikipedia)

Attentiondeficit contin u ed from page 15

drugs” is a “pretty dumb idea,” Friedman said. There are “lots and lots of people,” young and older, who are “getting them that don’t need them.” “Teenagers and college students use these drugs thinking these will enhance their performance,” Friedman said. “They help them stay up later and study. They’re not going to make you smarter, it isn’t going to make a C student into an A student.” “You actually retain information better after a period of rest,” Friedman continued. “Pulling an all-nighter is a terrible way to retain information. It’s better to get a full

night’s sleep.” For a parent who has gotten word that his or her child might be ADHD, Friedman recommends a cautious but practical approach to the potential problem. “(The child) could have it at school and not at home, which is typical,” Friedman said. “They should talk to as many teachers as possible: you shouldn’t jump all over something when hearing about it the first time this week or this month. In order to be something that’s really worth investigating, it should be getting in the way, causing trouble.” Not every kid that screws around in school has ADHD, Friedman reminds parents. “This is not the sort of thing that

“They make things at every program,” said Glogowski. “The directions for what they are going to do are posted online ahead of time.” She said that a group of young women engineers from a “seed group” at CCMR also visits the library a few times per semester. “They want young kids to get excited about science,” said Glogowski, “and choose it as a career.” Families Learning Science Together is funded entirely by Cornell. Library programs are always free. The library and the Cornell students prefer it parents sign up beforehand, “So they know how much stuff they have to bring down here,” said the youth services librarian. “Let them know at Cornell. Contact ccmr_outreach@cornell. edu to register.” Other programs at the library are run by the Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC) and Ithaca College students, who teach music and English as a second language (ESL) courses downtown. Glogowski said that she accepts proposals from the general public too. “Sometimes they are just a one-off thing,” she said, “and sometimes there will be several meetings.” For example, a new program called “Ithaca Guys Read” was started in response to the established Mother-Daughter Book Club. Upcoming guest readers for Ithaca Guys Read include Eric Acree on Feb. 21 and city alderman J.R. Clairborne on Feb. 28. §

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honor her way of approaching the world and creating opportunities for another group of kids to say, “Let’s go further.’” Primitive Pursuits hopes to spread its influence farther now that they have hired another program director, John Chilkotowsky, who will join the team in Ithaca from the Wilderness Awareness School in Duvall, Wash. The founder of that school, Jon Young, “revolutionized nature education,” Drake said. Now with another co-director on board, Drake says Primitive Pursuits wants to do its part in furthering our connection with the wilds by both expanding the offerings available to local people and helping other programs launch. “People don’t think about how much overhead a nature program like this costs,” Drake said. “Getting this off the ground took a lot of sweat equity that others might not have. We want to help speed up that process for other people.” Drake and Jordan hope that Primitive Pursuits helps lead to “happy, healthy, helpful people” who have a “sense of cause and effect in life, with not so much unknown fear about what if.” Not every Primitive Pursuit participant will become a seasoned trail guide. Just playing outside for a weekend “and actually seeing some of these things with their own eyes,” Drake says, can have a transforming effect on a child or adult who is only used to the modern, built-up environment. Black bears, fishers, coyotes: Jordan says there’s lots of animal activity going on around Ithaca these days for the intrepid after-school or weekend explorer. “Our area is becoming almost a wildlife hub.” §

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by Jane Dieck mann

Cornell festival explores the work of Olivier Messiaen

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Carnegie Mellon talking about Messiaen. concerto “Duet” with the Toronto Symphony e live in one of nature’s truly beautiful The Composers’ Forum in Barnes Hall on under the baton of the composer and Messiaen places, and now will have the Friday at 1:25 p.m will feature pianist Marilyn student George Benjamin. The festival will opportunity to learn more about what Nonken from NYU discussing the use of the focus on Messiaen’s influence, on the keyboard a deeply spiritual musician, Olivier Messiaen, piano by French spectralist composers and instruments he cultivated, on his closeness to experienced in nature and how his music other musicians influenced by spectralism, a nature and his natural surroundings, as well as reflects his feelings and beliefs about his natural compositional technique developed in the 1970s his relationship with Cornell. surroundings. using computer analysis of timbre quality. Stay From the 1950s on, he frequently consulted Messiaen is considered one of the leading tuned for the piece by Grisey in Concert 2 that recordings from the Lab of Ornithology for and most influential composers of the 20th evening. his transcription of bird songs, and in 1973 he century. The Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies, in collaboration with Cornell’s Laboratory of Ornithology and Department of Music, is presenting a festival/symposium called “Environs Messiaen: Nature Rendered at the Keyboard,” from March 5 through 9. Five performances, four lectures, and various related events celebrating the artistic legacy of this unique musician and teacher will take place at different sites on and around the campus. Renowned musicologists and performers will present and explore the creative links between music and nature, featuring works not only by Messiaen but also by others closely associated with him, including Pierre Boulez (b. 1925) and John Luther Adams (b. 1953), winner of the Pulitzer Prize and, just recently, of a Grammy award. The festival culminates in a two-piano concert by Pierre-Laurent Aimard and Tamara Stefanovich and a master class by Aimard on the final day. Olivier Messiaen (1908–1992), composer, organist, pianist, and teacher, was educated at the Paris Conservatoire, where he then taught until his retirement. He became principal organist at the Église de la Sainte Trinité in Paris in 1931, a position he held for more than forty years. He founded a group of four musicians called La jeune France, was a prisoner of war for a year, during which time he composed one of his best-known works, the Quatuor Olivier Messiaen (left) with Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands at a 1971 concert in Amsterdam. (Photo: Rob Mieremet in Wikipedia) pour la fin du temps (Quartet for the End of Time), and upon his return to France taught classes in analysis and Later that afternoon at 4 p.m. in Lincoln B21 and his wife, pianist Yvonne Loriod, visited composition to Boulez among many others. He the festival will screen Caroline Martel’s awardCornell and the Lab. This is a good year for was fascinated by birdsong, notating these songs Messiaen and Cornell, as it marks the university’s winning documentary called Wavemakers about worldwide and incorporating them into his the history of the ondes Martenot. An electronic sesquicentennial, as well as the centennial of the compositions. He also saw colors when he heard instrument with a wire on the keyboard, it makes musical tones. His widely influential and unusual Lab. a weird, evocative sound with sliding pitch. The An array of unusual events in some very music derives from his deep Catholic faith, his instrument has been widely used in popular and different environments has been scheduled. The celebration of human love, and his devotion to traditional music, from classic Hollywood films Johnson Museum of Art will present electronic nature. to science-fiction TV to the works of Messiaen, soundscapes called Veils (2005) by John Luther Environs Messiaen is the brainchild of Édith Piaf, and Radiohead. Adams to be on view continuously during the Cornell professor and pianist Xak Bjerken and At the Lab of Ornithology on Saturday at festival. Three separate six-hour tracks (Falling his student Ryan MacEvoy McCullough, who 10 a.m., the program opens with two lectures: Veil, Crossing Veil, Rising Veil) are set up to run is working on his DMA in Critical Keyboard Christopher Dingle from the Birmingham simultaneously in different parts of the same Studies and has done considerable research on space. The festival opens on Thursday, March 5, Messiaen and his influence. Both are advocates at 4:30 p.m., in Lincoln 124 with the musicology and promoters of new music. Just before the continued on page 25 colloquium, featuring author Robert Fallon from festival McCullough is performing the piano

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Into the Mystic

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art

Twisted Toyshop

Jeff Szuc’s Postmodern Cartoon By War re n Gre e nwood

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Harlan Ellison illustrated by Salvador Dali. am grateful for the opportunity to We see this boy/man creature with a finally write about the work of the red, round, bulbous body, a giant head in cartoonist-painter-illustrator Jeff Szuc. a red monk hood (suspended on a thin, I first met Szuc in March 2013 at an Ithacon, one of Ithaca’s annual comic book red, cylindrical metal neck emerging from a slot in the body), tiny mechanical tube conventions. Szuc is the illustrator of the arms with bulbous, blue, Mickey Mouse Have You Ever Seen…? children’s book fingers, and fat little legs (in shorts and series written by Etta Kaner. He is also the socks) winnowing down to impossibly writer and artist of Five By Seven, a book tiny, slippered feet. of 5 X 7 inch fantasy The creature paintings painted sits (looking down, one a week for over perhaps drowsing) a year, each with “an next to a stoneaccompanying tale of wreathed pool where woe.” it floats a crazily tiny Szuc migrated here toy boat on a string. to Ithaca from Toronto, There are flowers Canada. Happily, he in the foreground, now has a job designing a sunflower, a red websites for Cornell daylily, a daisy. And University. And he has the background is a marvelous exhibition lost in a blue fog of of his paintings at the floating pixels. elegant Lot 10 Lounge In the far distance in downtown Ithaca. I there is a Dali-esque couldn’t recommend it formation of pink highly enough. cubes…and a distant Szuc has terrific boat on an ocean—its Academic Realism smokestacks emitting chops. But he applies squared off, pixelthem to a vision of formation smoke. a dark, somewhat Self-Portrait as disturbing, fantasy Self Portrait as Elephant (Photo: Provided Elephant is more world of Kafkaesque of a straightforward toys. surrealist painting. The Lot 10 show We see a near-nude young man—jeans has ten acrylic paintings. I’ll attempt to hanging low—with a head like one of capture in words a few of my favorites… those big-eared, tusked, African elephants. War of the Worlds: This is an upshot I find this one very appealing—perhaps on a shelf with a squared-off, blocky, because I have a fondness for the elephant1950s-looking toy robot. The robot is blue headed Hindu god Ganesh (the Remover with orange eyes and red-orange claws, of Obstacles). and a clockwork mechanism can be seen Portrait in Bunny is a sort of in his interior. Behind the robot, on the companion piece to Self-Portrait as shelf, is a still life of what looks like alien Elephant—they are both tall vertical fruit…giant green pears, gourds with lightning bolt zapper patterns, alien apples paintings—and features a near-nude young woman (wearing baby-blue bra with H.P. Lovecraft stems. and panties) with an enormous, big-eyed Hanging from wires are an ornament rabbit head. Rabbit faces peer out of the ball, a toy dirigible, and a five-pointed blue foliage in the background, giving it an star. (And red velvet curtains are parted, Alice in Wonderland feel. revealing the entire, warmly painted There are more paintings to see, but scene.) we’re running out of room here. (And, as Digital Jesus has a look like some sort I was taking notes at the show, Lot 10 was of medieval-kitsch cartoon. We see a bigfull of drunken dancing young people and headed Jesus holding a giant CD, glowing multicolored strobe lights, and it was hard like a halo in a medieval mosaic, and the to clearly see all the paintings.) You’ll have background is breaking up into pixels like to drop by Lot 10 for a cool one and check a scene from that creepy sci-fi movie The out the rest yourself… Matrix. Jeff Szuc’s exhibition will be up at the Toy Boat: This is a great painting… with a surrealist, oddly medieval feel like a Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S. Cayuga St., Ithaca, N.Y. through the month of February. His Breughel or a Bosch, and, in its weirdness, work can also be seen at www.jeffszuc.com. seems like a scene from a fantasy story by

Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodation should contact Eleanor Henderson at ehenderson@ithaca.edu as soon as possible.

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music NYS Baroque

Baroque and On a Trip Goes Sightseeing

By Jane D ie ckm ann

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n Saturday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. NYS Baroque will present a “big band” program, with most of the performers onstage together throughout the evening, called “On the Road” concert in Ithaca’s Unitarian Church, presents mostly 17th-century music from the leading musical centers at the time—England, Holland/Belgium, France, Italy, Austria, and Germany. The ensemble’s musical director and theorbo expert, Deborah Fox, has arranged this journey not according to geography, but more to show the way that instrumentation and ensembles grew and changed over this period and how concurrently the music developed. The program is sort of a “historical and stylistic road map,” she explains, with music principally for the five-part string band, and for viola d’amore and theorbo pairs. Leading the string band is virtuoso violinist Julie Andrijeski, a star well known to NYS Baroque audiences as both instrumentalist and dancer. Other familiar performers are Rochester-based violinist

Boel Gidholm, violist Daniel Elyar from Philadelphia (also playing viola d’amore), and California cellist David Morris. Playing with them are violist Paul Miller— in his last semester of a postdoctoral fellowship at Cornell, leader of the Cornell Baroque Orchestra and performer on the viola d’amore—and violone player J. Tracy Mortimore from Canada. The second theorbo player is Juilliard faculty member Daniel Swenson, who lives outside New York City and “really knows the repertory.” When asked how often she plays theorbo duets, Fox laughed, “Hardly ever.” Apparently there are quite a few, but how often would we have two of these longnecked instruments in one place? Fox and Swenson will play an Italian capriccio by Bellefonte Castaldi, “a bizarre guy” whose pieces often have “fantastical” titles, and a dancelike duet from Partie polonaise by the German Georg Philipp Telemann. The performers have chosen favorite pieces, most of which by unfamiliar composers. As Fox admitted, “We’ve all heard of Telemann, but nobody knows Phillip van Wichel” (whose sonata

represents the Holland/Belgium spot on the map). The music will have an unusually rich and beautiful texture because of the two violas d’amore. The players want especially to show how the same stringband instrumentation from different countries can help us think about a variety of sounds, styles, techniques, and musical forms. The concert opens with 16th century English dance music, short and fun pieces with fanciful titles, in Renaissance style and sound as England turned to baroque music somewhat late. Then comes Italy, where in contrast the baroque came early and had major influence on subsequent musical styles. A sonata by the enormously prolific Tomaso Albinoni, almost a Bach contemporary, has a final movement very similar to a Brandenburg concerto. Giovanni Rovetta’s “Canzone 3” separates the instruments—here are the violins, now come the violas, and finally the bass instruments—while the French sonata by Muffat has everyone playing together. The “Harmonia à 5” by Austrian composer Johann Heinrich Schmelzer has yet another form, where the instrumentalists play a dark and low-pitched chordal accompaniment for Andrijeski’s solo violin melody, set in a very high register. “It is so beautiful,” Fox says, “and it’s the perfect vehicle for Julie.” The longest work on the program, by Austrian composer Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber, is composed in mostly traditional dance movements for two violas d’amore and continuo. Hearing this Partita inspired Miller to learn the viola

d’amore. He describes it as a treble viol, played on the shoulder, with seven bowed strings and seven resonating (or sympathetic) strings. Widely used by composers in the 17th and 18th centuries as an auxiliary instrument to achieve a special color or effect, it has an important role Bach’s “St. John Passion.” Closing the concert is Telemann’s Sonata in B flat, the latest work chronologically on the program, with “a little of everything that comes before,” Fox says, and everyone playing together. It makes a good destination for this special musical journey. An informal talk precedes the concert at 6:45 p.m. The group offers a free open rehearsal at the Unitarian Church, 2:30–5:30 p.m., on Thursday, Feb. 19. Fox says people can come see how the concert gets put together, and also hear “a lot of laughing. We are all such good friends.” • Deborah Fox (Photo by Patricia-Russotti)

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Good. Rock. Band. The Sadies Return to Ithaca By Luk e Z . Fe nche l

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The 2015 Krieger Lecture in American Political Culture

“What’s

Next?

The Sadies (Photo: Provided

F

A talk about writing, war and pursing a passion”

Jeffrey Gettleman

East Africa bureau chief for The New York Times

Wednesday, February 25, 2015 Kaufmann Auditorium Goldwin Smith Hall 4:30 p.m. American Studies Program

Jeffrey Gettleman is the East Africa bureau chief for The New York Times. He won the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting for his work from Africa. Jeffrey has worked for The New York Times for 12 years, covering everything from the war in Iraq to the annual possum drop in rural North Carolina. He has won several Overseas Press Club awards and a George Polk Award for foreign reporting. He studied philosophy at Cornell (class of 1994) and earned a master’s of philosophy degree from Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar. He has appeared as a foreign affairs commentator on the BBC, CNN, NPR and other networks. He has written for Foreign Policy, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, The New Republic and GQ. Jeffrey lives in Nairobi, Kenya, with his wife and two boys. He is currently working on a memoir.

Admission is free and open to the public.

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ew bands as talented as the Sadies have as good a sense of humor. On “Another Tomorrow,” the two brothers that front the band sing in unison: “Now we’re on our way, and if we don’t make it today, it’s okay, we can make it tomorrow.” Friday, Feb. 20, they’ll stop by The Haunt for a show that will heat up the end of the Ithaca workweek. The underrated alt-country act is best known for making other musicians sound better. Back in the late ‘90s, they brought aboard Neko Case as a backing vocalist, and by the time they toured together in 2004, they served as her backing band. Their collaboration last year with Gord Downie, a celebrity in Canada who was virtually unknown in the United States, made the man imminently more hip. Robyn Hitchcock has never sounded as compelling as when performing with the group, and collaborations with the Mekons’ Jon Langford, R&B Andre Williams, and many others mean that many critics consider The Sadies the modern day Band. (It doesn’t hurt that they’re from Canada). But even without supporting players the Sadies are a ferocious live band, tearing through sets with a joyful energy attacking their signature blend of county, psychedelic, rock and surf. Dallas and Travis Good, brothers and co-bandmates join drummer Mike Belitsky and bassist Sean Dean for music

that is brooding and soul-searching but never depressing. “I get people like my mom asking me if something is wrong because the lyrics are somber and dark,” Dallas Good said. “I don’t think that would be the first question that I would ask of a horror film director.” “Writing poetry depends on how you look at it,” he continued. “Some people write poetry to purge their darkest sins and feelings; other people write poetry because it’s a craft they like to work on. As far as I know, those would be the two root things—either some sort of profound ‘gotta-purge-it’ guy going ‘What the fuck rhymes with love?’ I would put myself on the latter side, but I don’t know; that’s up to the listener.” Local notable Johnny Dowd will open the show. For almost two decades—give or take—Dowd has made music that is as uncompromising as it is path breaking. Early albums like Pictures from Life’s Other Side channeled Hank Williams through a backwoods and backwards experimentalism— sounding both subversive and scintillating. And while no one would ever call Dowd’s last record an easy listen, it is his most accessible. Like the Good brothers, Dowd has a sense of humor that while macabre, is never mean. Or as the Good brothers sing: “It’s a long way down, we hardly made it off the ground, we’re still bound to come around tomorrow.” •


stage

Open Wide Theatre Wants to Shock a Little By Ros s Ha ars ta d

S

equivalent to that of any other city, and omething new and brash is breaking that these artists deserve the chance to onto the Ithaca theater scene. Open show their true, talented selves.” Wide Theatre is the brainchild of The plays featured are: two 20-something theater-makers, Marisa “Flying Solo” by Marissa Biondolillo; Biondolillo and Adrienne Huffman. directed by James Comfort; “After a bad Biondolillo explained the company’s breakup, Carla must decide what to do moniker is because “We love a good double entendre. We are proud to have put together a show that busts open taboos and deals with sensitive topics in an open, fun way.” Huffman added, “Our writing and production meetings tend to be about 50 percent business and 50 percent sexual innuendos. So our title was the product of that The Open Wide Theatre troupe (Photo: Tim Gera) very fun back and forth riffing with a particular item leftover from her that we do. It just seemed to fit so well failed relationship.” with what we were trying to do with the “What We Play For” by James production itself; open people’s minds just Comfort, directed by AJ Sage: “Strangers a little bit more. Or a lot more.” Hailey and Ryan must face some tough Their maiden voyage may be just the tonic for post-Valentine blues. Under the questions after their one night stand.” “Meryl Streep Doesn’t Do Westerns” intriguing title, Be Gentle, It’s Our First written and directed by Jeff Hodges: Time, the producers promise an evening “When a guy’s pickup line doesn’t go as of “sexy, funny, and boundary-crushing planned, two strangers find themselves one-act plays … which do anything but beat around the bush … sexuality, gender, engaged in an enlightening conversation.” “Curse of the Bambino” by AJ Sage, relationships, feminism, and everything directed by Adrienne Huffman: “In this in between. We’re getting into all the modern coming-out tale, a proud father nooks and crannies with this one.” wrestles with nature and nurture when Performances are Friday to Sunday, his son reveals that he roots for the other Feb. 27 & 28 and March 1, at 7:30 p.m. team.” at the Community School of Music and “Misfit Toys” by George Sapio, Arts in downtown Ithaca. More info is at directed by David Kossack : “It’s not what openwidetheatre.com. we are. It’s who we are.” They began with a show by “2’s a Charm” by Deborah Simon, Biondolillo that Huffman wished to directed by Tim Perry: “When Nan’s long direct, then built up an evening of shorts time partner dies, Nan has to deal with by inviting other playwrights on board, many things she hadn’t faced alone in a people they had met through their long time. It’s all coming together except participation in Actors Workshop of for one pesky part—sex. Nan decides to Ithaca. In the final tally, six playwrights, take the matter in hand.” five directors and 19 actors are involved, Biondolillo, Comfort and Huffman several doing double or triple duty. will also share acting duties alongside “We love the opportunity to provide Paige Anderson, Judith Andrew, Mike more opportunities for local actors to do Davie, Ali Diemecke, Clayton Dubin, Jill what they love to do,” said Huffman. “We also seek to provide the kind of edgy, new, Friedmutter, Eric Hambury, Phil Hart, Daniel Masciari, Alek Osinski, James high-quality theatre that might usually Scott, Karlem Sivira, Jim Slattery, Leo be found in New York City or regional theatre environments. We believe that the Stellwag, and Sylvie Yntema. • caliber of actors that live in this town is

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Crossword third annual finger lakes

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Trumansburg Conservatory Holds a Festival

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SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2015 / Information and registration forms at: TLP arTners . org

By Bryan VanCampen

Media SponSor:

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he Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts (TCFA) is back with another great film series. “New York State of Mind: A festival of four documentary films from close to home” includes outstanding documentary films for grown-ups and older teens. S.K. List founded this winter film club and in the past has shown weeks of French-Canadian children’s films and seminal 60’s films. This year, she chose four excellent documentaries that focus on some unexplored parts of the Empire State. Bennett Miller’s The Cruise (1998) will kick off on Friday, Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Miller, who went on to direct Capote, Moneyball and last year’s Oscar-nominated Foxcatcher, made a splashy debut with The Cruise. It helps that Miller has a great subject to cruise with, the chatty, spacey tour guide Timothy “Speed” Levitch, who hosts tourists traveling on the Gray Line’s double-decker Manhattan tour buses. Levitch is an uncanny post-hipster character, pointing out the residences

of the famous and always ready with diatribes, quotes, and opinions. Richard Linklater took to Levitch’s strange aura and cast him in School of Rock and as an animated version of himself in Waking Life, talking about “going salsa dancing with my confusion.” I met Levitch at a Cornell Cinema screening of Live from Shiva’s Dance Floor, and he’s as eccentric as the film allows, and more. Next up is Brother’s Keeper (1992) on Friday, Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. The saga of the Ward brothers, poor chicken farmers from Munnsville, unfolds after one is accused of murdering the other. It was the film that put Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky on the map. They went on to make Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, the Paradise Lost HBO docs, and the pseudo-doc sequel to The Blair Witch Project. As the unknowing Wards get drawn into the dirty business of media, politics and the law, your jaw will drop. I Like Killing Flies (2004) plays on Friday, March 6, 7:30 p.m., and is the only one of the four documentaries in the series

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Messiaenfestival contin u ed from page 19

Conservatoire in England will talk on Messiaen’s relationship to nature and David Gable from Clark Atlanta University follows with a presentation on Boulez and Messiaen. A roundtable panel discussion chaired by McCullough addresses the topic of music and nature in the avantgarde with Dingle, Fallon, Gable, and Ronald R. Hoy, Merksamer Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior. Each day of the festival offers at least one concert. On Thursday in Sage Chapel at 8 p.m. Concert 1 called “Immeasurable Space” features works by Messiaen and Jolivet (a member of La jeune France) for organ, piano, and ondes Martenot, as well as Adams’s The Immeasurable Space of Tones (1998–2001) for organ and small ensemble conducted by Cornell’s Chris Younghoon Kim and organ. Guest performers are Geneviève Grenier from Canada, an ondes Martinot specialist, and pianist Nonken. Cornell graduate student organists Matthew Hall and Jonathan Schakel will join them, the latter also performing Messiaen’s Messe de la Pentecôte. Again in Sage Chapel, Concert 2 on Friday at 8 p.m. presents Ensemble X, directed by Bjerken, who feels the sound in this space with all its resonances is “wonderful.” On the program are works by composers influenced by Messiaen, some shorter pieces of nature music include two premieres—Brush Creek by Cornell DMA composer Corey Keating and Secret Dialogues by British composer James Wood (b. 1953) for solo marimba, to be played by Cornell percussionist Michael Compitello. Claude Vivier’s Lonely Child (1980) will be performed by soprano Lucy Fitz Gibbon, who studies at Bard College with the incomparable Dawn Upshaw, accompanied by members of the Cornell Chamber and Symphony orchestras led by Kim. “Prologue” for viola and resonators from Les espaces acoustiques (six pieces with different instrumentation composed by Messiaen’s student Gérard Grisey), features Ithaca College violist David Quiggle. Concert 3 on Saturday at 2 p.m. is all about Messiaen and birds and takes place at the Lab of Ornithology. Five pianists— guest Mari Kawamura from Boston and Bjerken plus three from his DMA

Xak Bjerken of Ensemble X (Photo: Tim Gera)

program, Andrew Zhou, David Friend, and McCullough, will perform the Catalogue des oiseaux (1956–1958), a cycle of thirteen French bird songs. Professor Hoy will give introductions. According to Bjerken, the birdsongs are not recognizable and the music is really about the sounds of the piano, and also about spaces. The pieces are built like poems— they go in stanzas (Messiaen’s mother was a poet). And they are long descriptions and very surrealistic. Bjerken added that they are very difficult to play, partly because of the “extremely fast dialogue of the birds where the rhythmic groupings overlap but are not coordinated.” Often the accentuation and dynamics are different between the hands or between even parts of a chord to reveal colors, he explains. “The music must be brilliant,

cool, etched, and largely effortless, while the pianist is working like crazy.” The pianist-directors are very pleased with the setting, as the piano will placed in front of the Lab’s big window and there should be birds flying by. The fourth concert, also in a natural setting, is on Sunday, March 8, at 12:30 p.m. at the Guy Nearing Summer House at the Plantations. On the program is Adams’s response to Messiaen’s Catalogue, a composition called songbirdsongs (1974–1980) for two piccolos and percussion, based on the songs of nine North American birds. It is supposedly improvised music, nobody plays together and it doesn’t matter if things line up as it sounds like the chatter of lots of birds together. Performers are IC’s Wendy Mehne and Cornell’s Juliana May Pepinsky playing piccolos, with Compitello and percussionists plus DMA composer Tonia Ko on the celesta. Adams’s music is often performed outdoors, and so is this concert. The advice is to dress warmly and bring along your hot drinks. As space is limited for Concerts 3 and 4, preregistration is necessary. Concert 5 in Barnes Hall on Sunday at 8 p.m., part of the Cornell Concert Series (and therefore with an admission charge), features duo-pianists PierreLaurent Aimard and Tamara Stefanovich performing Messiaen’s Visions de l’Amen (1943), sections of which were played by Messiaen and Loriaud when visiting here in 1973, and Boulez’s Structures (deuxième livre). Both works are for two pianos, with shorter solo pieces by Boulez

also on the program. As the festival’s final event Aimard, who was a student of both Messiaen and Loriod, presents as master class on Monday, March 9, at 10 a.m. in Barnes on the Catalogue des oiseaux, featuring pianists from the DMA program. This festival seems perfect for Cornell’s Sesquicentennial Year, as people and organizations from many corners of the campus have come together for these events. The Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies based at Cornell is the project’s main sponsor, and its competent program coordinator Damien Mahiet with a Cornell degree in musicology and coincidentally a master’s thesis on Messiaen and La jeune France, has been handling numerous practical issues. The co-sponsoring music department faculty and students are participants, as is a professor of neurology. Bjerken and McCullough warmly praised people at the Plantations and the Lab of Ornithology for their helpfulness. There is also backing from the French Studies program and the Institute of European Studies, the Council for the Arts and the University Lecture Committee. And the beautiful natural and interior spaces of the Cornell campus and surroundings certainly have inspired this festival and will enrich its meaning. Our participation will help us understand better a creative genius but also invites us to pause and look and listen again to the world around us. • For more information and to register for two concerts, consult http://westfield.org/ environsmessiaen

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Music

2/19 Thursday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca |

bars/clubs/cafés

2/20 Friday

2/18 Wednesday

Djug Django | 6:00 PM-9:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 South Cayuga Street, Ithaca | live hot club jazz i3º | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Argos Inn, 408 East State Street, Ithaca | Live Jazz: A Jazz Trio Featuring Nicholas Walker, Greg Evans, and Nick Weiser Jam Session | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Canaan Institute, Canaan Road, Brooktondale | The focus is instrumental contra dance tunes. www.cinst.org. Open Jam | 7:30 PM-10:30 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Varna Community Center, 943 Dryden Rd (Rt. 366), Dryden | New, weekly community event. Each week features a local songwriter, poet or author for a one-hour show, followed by an open circle jam. Info at  http:// ithacamusic.net/varnajam; artists with original material should contact David Graybeard at david@davidgraybeard. com or 607-227-7351. Reggae Night w. The Analogue Sons | 9:00 PM-, 2/18 Wednesday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Reggae Night with the Ithaca Allstars | 9:00 PM-, 2/18 Wednesday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca |

2/19 Thursday

5 Mile Drive | 8:00 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Blues, Brews & BBQ w. Dan Paolangeli & Friends | 8:00 PM-,

Dan Smalls Presents: The Sadies w. Johnny Dowd | 8:00 PM-, 2/20 Friday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Dave Solazzo Trio | 10:00 PM-, 2/20 Friday | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca | Post Bebop Acoustic Jazz Diana Leigh & Friends | 6:00 PM-8:30 PM, 2/20 Friday | Oasis Dance Club, 1230 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Live jazz. Jim Hull | 6:00 PM-, 2/20 Friday | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Paul Kempkes ‘Dr.K’ | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM, 2/20 Friday | Six Mile Creek Vineyard, 1551 Slaterville Rd, Ithaca | Salsa Night | 8:00 PM-, 2/20 Friday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Souk: Middle Eastern Grooves | 5:30 PM-8:30 PM, 2/20 Friday | Felicia’s Atomic Lounge, 508 W State St, Ithaca | Souk is Nikolai Ruskin with fellow musicians Jesse Koennecke, Joseph Prusch, and Dara Anissi. They perform a delicious blend of traditional music from around the Middle East. The Pelotones | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/20 Friday | Hopshire Brewery, 1771 Dryden Road, Freeville |

Workshop; 8-11pm Dance! Early Bird | 10:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Agava , 381 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca | Contemporary Folk/Indie IU Fundraiser w/ Grey Gary, Misses Bitches, The Atomic Forces, Sammus, Negative Externalities | 7:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave., Ithaca | Presented by Ithaca Underground. Post Valentine’s Prom Night w/ Sanjuro Fields, Genitor, Dirty Hot Supper | 8:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Night Owls, 3840 US Route 11, Cortland | Rockwood Ferry | 8:00 PM-12:00 AM, 2/21 Saturday | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Special early show. SeepeopleS | 9:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | The Jeff Love Band | 10:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Chapter House Brew Pub, 400 Stewart Ave., Ithaca | Under Construction | 8:00 PM-12:00 AM, 2/21 Saturday | Redder’s Bar & Grill, 1710 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca | The Sugarlumps | 9:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Sacred Root Kava Lounge & Tea Bar, 139 W State St, Ithaca | Music of the Speakeasy culture of the 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s with a danceable blend of rural country blues, gypsy jazz, ragtime, and swing.

2/21 Saturday

2/22 Sunday

Bittersweet | 8:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W. Main St., Trumansburg | Cornell Contra Dance Club | 7:30 PM-11:00 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Memorial Room, Willard Straight Hall, Ithaca | CCDC presents a contra dance with the band Party of Three and caller Peter Styx. 7:30 Beginner

M&T BANK/ITHACA TIMES CLASSIC MOVIE SERIES PRESENTS

Acoustic Open Mic Night | 9:00 PM-1:00 AM, 2/22 Sunday | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Hosted by Jerry Tanner and Lisa Gould of Technicolor Trailer Park Al Hartland Trio featuring Dennis Winge | 6:00 PM-10:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Maxies Supper Club & Oyster Bar, 635 W State St, Ithaca |

DAN SMALLS PRESENTS

Online Calendar See it at ithaca.com.

CFCU COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION/GATEWAY COMMONS COMMUNITY SERIES PRESENTS

CIRQUE ZIVA

Viva Rongovia with Grey Wolf | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W. Main St., Trumansburg |

2/23 Monday

concerts

Blue Mondays | 9:00 PM-, 2/23 Monday | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | with Pete Panek and the Blue Cats Open Mic Night | 8:30 PM-, 2/23 Monday | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca | Signups start at 7:30pm.

2/24 Tuesday

Blue Skies | 6:00 PM-10:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Maxie’s Supper Club & Oyster Bar, 635 W State St, Ithaca | Dan Smalls Presents: The Nth Power w. Jonathan Scales Fourquestra | 8:00 PM-, 2/24 Tuesday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Ed Clute | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Argos Inn, 408 East State Street, Ithaca | Join us every Tuesday for a lively performance from jazz piano virtuoso Ed Clute. I-Town Community Jazz Jam | 8:30 PM-11:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Hosted by Professor Greg Evans Judy Stock: Kids CD Release Party | 10:00 AM-3:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Sunny Days of Ithaca, 123 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | Judy will be celebrating and performing from her fourth kids album. Open Mic | 9:00 PM-, 2/24 Tuesday | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S. Cayuga St., Ithaca | Priests / Tenement / Vacation / Lust | 8:00 PM-, 2/24 Tuesday | Community School Of Music And Arts, 215 E State St, Ithaca | Presented by Ithaca Underground. Professor Tuesday’s Jazz Quartet | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Corks and More, 708 West Buffalo Street, Ithaca | Traditional Irish Session | 8:00 PM-11:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Chapter House Brew Pub, 400 Stewart Ave., Ithaca | Tuesday Bluesday w. Dan Paolangeli & Friends, plus I-Town Jazz Jam | 5:00 PM-11:30 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca |

2/18 Wednesday

Cellist Elizabeth Lyon and Guests | 8:00 PM-, 2/18 Wednesday | Barnes Hall Auditorium, Cornell University, Ithaca | Music by Schubert, Janacek, and Brahms.

2/19 Thursday

Midday Music at Lincoln: Isaac Sharp | 12:30 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | Lincoln Hall, Cornell University, , Ithaca | Visiting lecturer Isaac Sharp on classical guitar. Room B-20. Cornell Concert Series: L’Orchestre de la Suisse Cornell Concert Series: L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande | 8:30 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | Bailey Hall, Cornell University, , Ithaca | Charles Dutoit, conductor; Nikolai Lugansky,piano. Music of Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff, and Ravel.

2/20 Friday

Tara Greenblatt and Polly Wood at ToKo | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 2/20 Friday | ToKo Imports, 215 N. Cayuga St., Ithaca | Two local drummers perform at Toko Imports for the store’s first live show. The Kennedys | 8:00 PM-, 2/20 Friday | May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 E Genesee St, Syracuse | www.folkus.org.

2/21 Saturday

NYS Baroque presents: On the Road | 7:30 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | First Unitarian Society of Ithaca, 306 S. Aurora Street, Ithaca | A string band trip through Europe; music from England, Italy, Germany, Austria, France, and the Netherlands. Marshall Crenshaw | 8:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Westcott Theater, 524 Westcott St, Syracuse | Wind Ensemble | 8:15 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Ford Hall, Ithaca College, Danby Road, Ithaca | Stephen Peterson, conductor; Nicholas Walker, double bass. Dana Wilson: Concerto for Double

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DSP

STATE’S 86TH BIRTHDAY!

Art Bakert and Timna Mayer | 12:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca | Original Guitar & Violin Instrumentals Bound for Glory: Vance Gilbert | 8:00 PM-11:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Bound for Glory, Cafe at Anabel Taylor Hall, Ithaca | Vance is a very funny man, and a good songwriter, too. His good humor is memorable, he’s got a way of tickling your funny bone that you’ll not forget. Welcome Vance back to Bound for Glory. We’re excited to see him again. vancegilbert.com . Dan Smalls Presents: OCD: Moosh and Twist w. Ground Up | 8:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | International Folk Dancing | 7:30 PM-9:30 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Lifelong, 119 W Court St, Ithaca | Teaching and request dancing. No partners needed. Ithaca Folk Song Swap | 2:00 PM-5:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Crow’s Nest Café in Autumn Leaves, 115 The Commons, Ithaca | Traditional ballads, chanteys, & songs, as well as contemporary songs with traditional roots. Bring your acoustic instrument or sing a capella. We’ll take turns going around the circle to lead or request a song. Milkweed | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Felicia’s Atomic Lounge, 508 W State St, Ithaca | An original band based out of Binghamton, NY, that has its roots in American music, drawing from as many influences as possible. Purple Valley | 4:00 PM-6:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Americana Vineyards, 4367 E Covert Rd, Interlaken | SIN Sundays (Service Industry Night) | 9:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca |

Sunnyside Combo | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Oasis Dance Club, 1230 Danby Rd, Ithaca | vintage jazz

• POPOVICH COMEDY PET THEATER

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GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS

ROBERT CRAY BAND

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INDIANA JONES WEEKEND

• ITHACA BALLET PRESENTS: CINDERELLA APRIL 25

STATE THE ATRE B OX OFFI CE (105 W STATE/MLK J R ST, I TH ACA) • 6 0 7 - 2 7 7 - 8 2 8 3 • S TAT EOF IT HA C A . C OM

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Bass and Wind Ensemble | Walter Beeler Prize Winner, TBA

2/22 Sunday

Mason Warrington Orchestra | 2:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Goodwill Theatre Firehouse, 46 Willow St, Johnson City | The area’s premier big band with guest vocalists Judy Giblin and Ralph Muro. Paolo & Felice – Musica Italiana! | 2:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Willard Memorial Chapel, 17 Nelson Street, Auburn | Dressed as traditional Italian troubadours, Paolo Saltarello, on vocals and mandolin, and Felice Mucedola, on accordion, will serenade you with traditional Italian-American melodies. Binghamton Philharmonic: Tragic Beauty | 3:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Anderson Center, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton | Tragic Beauty, a Musical Journey Featuring the BPO Musicians! Sunday Music Series: Nate Taylor ft. Meg Clary | 4:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Auburn Public Theatre, 8 Exchange St., Auburn | Nate Taylor is a folk singer/ songwriter from Stroudsburg, PA. While working a two year stint in corporate New York City, he realized his true dream was to travel and play music.

Film cinemapolis

Special events this week: And the Winner Is... | Hollywood’s biggest award ceremony on the big screen. Food, Drink, Raffles, Silent Auctions, “Guess the Winners” Contest. | Until “Pest Picture” is announced... | 7:30 PM, 2/22 Sunday. Girldhood | Cornell’s LGBT Studies program kicks off their three film series downtown with a one-night only screening of Girldhood. | 7:15 PM 2/19 Thursday. Night of the Living Dead | THE all-time zombie classic. Part of the Fantastic Film Friday Series. | 9:30 PM 2/20 Friday.

Schedule starts Friday, Februrary 20. Visit www.cinemapolis.org for showtimes. Birdman | Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue Of Ignorance is a black comedy that tells the story of an actor (Michael Keaton) - famous for portraying an iconic superhero - as he struggles to mount a Broadway play. | 119 mins R |. The Imitation Game | During the winter of 1952, British authorities entered the

home of mathematician, cryptanalyst and war hero Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) to investigate a reported burglary. They instead ended up arresting Turing himself on charges of ‘gross indecency’, an accusation that would lead to his devastating conviction for the criminal offense of homosexuality - little did officials know, they were actually incriminating the pioneer of modern-day computing. | 114 mins PG-13 | Mr. Turner | An exploration of the last quarter century of the great, if eccentric, British painter J.M.W. Turner’s life. | 150 mins R | Still Alice | Alice Howland, happily married with three grown children, is a renowned linguistics professor who starts to forget words. When she receives a devastating diagnosis, Alice and her family find their bonds tested. | 101 mins PG-13 | Two Days, One Night | Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job. | 95 mins PG-13 | Wild | With the dissolution of her marriage and the death of her mother, Cheryl Strayed has lost all hope. After years of reckless, destructive behavior, she makes a rash decision. With absolutely no experience, driven only by sheer determination, Cheryl hikes more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail, alone. | 115 mins R |

NATIONAL THEATRE UK LIVE Treasure Island | A family friendly

production. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson’s story of murder, money and mutiny is brought to life in a thrilling new stage adaptation by Bryony Lavery. | 6:30 PM- 2/19 Thursday, 1:30 PM- 2/21 Saturday. cornell cinema Visit cinema.cornell.edu for showtimes. Ararat | Canada’s premiere intellectual filmmaker Atom Egoyan addresses the little known 1915 genocide of two-thirds of the Armenians in Turkey in a multi-layered film that raises poignant questions about history, memory, and art’s complicity in atrocities. | 2/23 Monday. Empathy | Inventive doc-mockumentary about the vicissitudes of psychoanalysis. Interviews with real analysts are interspersed with the fictional story of Lia, a voice-over actress who, in between sessions on the couch, narrates

a film-within-the-film about analysts and their obsession with modern design. | 2/19 Thursday. Interstellar | Faced with Earth’s decline as the world is ravaged by drought and famine, a team of scientists embark on a journey through a wormhole in search of a new planet to save humanity from extinction. | 2/19 Thursday, 2/20 Friday, 2/21 Saturday, 2/22 Sunday. The Jungle Book | The last film that Walt Disney oversaw production on, The Jungle Book remains a classic. Join Bagira, Baloo, King Louie, and child-of-the-jungle Mowgli on a trip down memory lane. Part of the Ithakid Film Festival. | 2/21 Saturday. Mississippi Mermaid | A love story masked as a thriller, this Truffaut/Deneuve classic (inspired by Hitchcock’s Vertigo) tells an enchanting story of desire and deception on a tropical island. | 2/19 Thursday. Nightcrawler | Set in the nocturnal underbelly of contemporary Los Angeles, this thriller follows Lou Bloom, a driven young man desperate for work, as he discovers the high-speed world of L.A. crime journalism. | 2/21 Saturday.

The Power of Emotion | A moving and evocative examination of the fleeting and immaterial nature of emotions is composed as a collage of stories, documentary footage and narrated film essays. | 2/18 Wednesday. Signals: A Performance Memoir | Musician/composer/dramatist Mary Lorson grew up in the 60s and 70s in Westchester County, NY, land of corporate plenty... and plenty of dysfunction. In Signals, she sets some of her family anecdotes to contemporary music, narrating and singing these tales, backed up by an eight-piece jazz/rock band.

Special event Watch the Oscars! | At WSH Bear’s Den | 2/22 Sunday.

Stage A Body of Water | 8:00 PM-, 2/18-2/22 Wednesday to Sunday | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | By Lee Blessing. Avis and Moss, a middle-aged couple, awake every morning in a beautiful house surrounded by water, not knowing who or where they are. A mystery about memory and family. Visit http://www. kitchentheatre.org for showtimes & prices. Cashore Marionettes: Life in Motion at Wells College | 7:30 PM-, 2/20 Friday | Phipps Auditorium of

Macmillan Hall, Wells College, | The Wells College Arts and Lecture Series presents a performance of the Cashore Marionettes, a collection of marionette masterworks that redefines the art of puppetry through exceptional artistry, grace and refinement of movement. Dancing Pros Live | 7:30 PM-, 2/24 Tuesday | Clemens Performing Arts Center, 207 Clemens Center Pkwy, Elmira | Starring Edyta Sliwinska, from “Dancing with the Stars,” and Chelsie Hightower, from “Dancing with the Stars” and “So You Think You Can Dance,” this unforgettable live dancing competition is hosted by Alan Thicke, star of the hit TV show “Growing Pains.” Elmira Little Theatre presents Leading Ladies | 7:30 PM-, 2/20 2/21 Friday and Saturday; 2:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Clemens Performing Arts Center, Elmira | A farce about two down-on-their-luck actors who decide to pose as long-lost children Max and Steve to claim an estate worth millions, only to find that “Max” and “Steve” are actually “Maxine” and “Stephanie.” Hedda Gabler | 6:30 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | Handwerker Gallery, Job Hall, Ithaca College, Ithaca | On The Verge presents HEDDA GABLER by Henrik Ibsen, directed by Professor Claire Gleitman (English). Little Women | 8:00 PM-, 2/19 Thursday, 2/20 Friday, 2/23 Monday; 2:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Clark Theatre, Ithaca College, Ithaca | The beloved story of four close-knit sisters coming of age in Civil War–era New England is transformed into an opera and chosen for the annual collaboration between IC’s School of Music and Department of Theatre Arts. Richard II | 7:30 PM-, 2/19 to 2/21 Thursday to Saturday | Hangar Theater, 801 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | The Ithaca Shakespeare Co. begins its 2-year trek through the Bard’s epic 8-play cycle of history plays chronicling England’s Time of Troubles. See www. hangartheatre.org for info. The Thursday Morning Musicales | 10:15 AM-, 2/19 Thursday | Clemens Performing Arts Center, Elmira | The Thursday Morning Musicales, a Clemens Center resident company founded in 1908, is a unique organization in the Southern Tier because of its long history of promoting music, offering outstanding musicians a chance to perform, and recognizing the abilities of students pursuing musical studies. Ventriloquist Lynn Trefzger | 7:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Goodwill Theatre Firehouse, 46 Willow St, Johnson City |

Gloria Ann Barnell Peter Playwright Competition | 2/18 Wednesday | Morgan Opera House, Main, Aurora | Playwrights are invited to submit original scripts to the sixth Gloria Ann Barnell Peter Playwright Competition. Criteria include: the play must be an original work, previously unpublished. It must dramatize an historical event or an historical fiction. Submissions due by 3/2 Refer to www.morganoperahouse.org for clarifications. Direct inquiries to Ann Mathieson (annscott2268@gmail.com) or 315-364-7325. IPEI Annual Adult Spelling Bee | 2/18 Wednesday | Ithaca High School Gymnasium, 1401 North Cayuga Street, Ithaca | Held in the Ithaca High School Wellness Center Gym. Spellers and Sponsors Needed for March 1. Registration Open! http://ipei. peaksmaker.com/ Ithaca Sociable Singles | 6:00 PM-, 2/18 Wednesday | Ciao, 2 Hickory Hollow Ln, Ithaca | RSVP cayugalynda@ yahoo.com Museum Passes at the Trumansburg Library | ongoing | Ulysses Philomathic Library, 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | As part of the Paleontological Research Institution (PRI)’s Community Accessibility Program, two one-day family passes to the Museum of the Earth and to Cayuga Nature Center will be available for check-out from the Ulysses Philomathic Library for Trumansburg families. The passes can be borrowed for one week; available on a first-come, first served basis. Open Hearts Dinner | 5:30 PM-6:30 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | McKendree United Methodist Church, 224 Owego St, Candor | Every Wednesday. Come and join in the fun. Whether you are looking for fellowship or a free meal this one’s for you. Game Club | 2:30 PM-4:30 PM, 2/19 Thursday | Edith B Ford Library, 7169 North Main St, Ovid | All ages and skill levels welcome to play chess, Munchkin Quest, and Ticket to Ride. SpinKnitters | 1:30 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | Ulysses Philomathic Library,

Meetings Regular Board Meeting of the Edith B. Ford Memorial Library | 5:30 PM-7:00PM, 2/19 Thursday| Edith B. Ford Memorial Library, Main St, Ovid | Board meetings are open to the public and community members are encouraged to attend. Town of Caroline Planning Board | 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, 02/21 Saturday | Caroline Center Church, 719 Buffalo St, Brooktondale | 2nd community meeting regarding the update of our Comprehensive Plan. RSVPs to Planning_Board@townofcaroline.org are helpful but not required. In the event of bad weather check the Town website: www.townofcaroline.org

Learning Art Classes for Adults | Community

NYS BarOQUE: ON THE ROAD

Kitchen Theatre, starting February 18 - 22

First Unitarian Society February 21, 7:30 p.m.

Avis and Moss, a middle-aged couple, awake every morning in a beautiful house surrounded by water, not knowing who or where they are. A mystery about memory and family.

Notices

74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Open knitting group Astrology for Teachers | 1:00 PM-4:00 PM, 2/20 Friday | | Workshop and charts printed. 3rd Annual Ithaca Seed Swap | 11:00 AM-3:00 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Cornell Cooperative Extension Education Center, 615 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Bring your home-saved or surplus purchased seeds to share, pick up some seeds for spring planting, learn how to save your own seeds, and get tips on starting plants from seed. Free to those who bring seeds to swap; $5 donation otherwise. Members’ Share Meeting, N. American Rock Garden Society | 1:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Whetzel Room, 404 Plant Sci. Bldg, Ithaca | Open to the public. At least 4 different presenters will share their pictures of local gardens and those farther away. Come earlier with your brown bag lunch for socializing! Soup and/or Chili Nights | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Saint Mark’s Episcopal Church, 17 Main St, Candor | Every Tuesday Night. With dessert and drink. Free Will Donation. Solarize Seneca | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Edith B Ford Library, 7169 N Main St, Ovid | Community members from the four towns are encouraged to meet to discuss a non-profit initiative to bring solar energy to Seneca County.  Bring your ideas and suggestions. For more information contact Tony Del Plato: tonydelplato@gmail.com.

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A BODY OF WATER

Comedic ventriloquist whose off-thewall audience interplay is riotously funny; performances tailored for both family and adult audiences. Please enter through the Corliss Ave. parking lot.

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will present a class covering the basics: PowerPoint 2/24; Word 3/3; Excel 3/10. This class is geared for beginners. Further classes will be developed from participant interest. Registration required. Laptops provided. Sponsor: FLLS Outreach Mini-Grant. Mixed Media Art Journals | 6:30 PM-8:30 PM, Tuesdays | Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts | Visit the TCFA web site for more info. Wayfinding for Mission-Driven People | 1:00 PM-2:50 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Anabel Taylor Hall - Room 314, Cornell University, Ithaca | Join a Freeskool class to discuss Martha Beck’s Finding Your Way in a Wild New World to explore how we’re all connected to each other and the universe, how we can each find our callings — and how we can team up to heal the world. RSVP to adrienne.masler@gmail.com. Ballroom Dancing with Bess Koval | 4:00 PM-5:30 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | Learn ballroom dancing: Feb. 22, Swing; Mar. 8, Cha Cha; Mar. 22: Tango. Call 607-753-8413 for info and to register. Basics of Digital Photography | 12:30 PM-3:30 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Nevin Welcome Center, Cornell Plantations, 1 Plantations Rd, Ithaca | Learn the basics of taking and processing good outdoor digital photos in this hands-on workshop. You’ll learn the basics of file organization, downloading, photo editing, and sharing your beautiful results. All digital camera types ranging from smartphones to DSLRs (digital single lens reflex) welcome. Pre-registration required. Dinner with the Doctor: Heal Your Heart | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | GreenStar Cooperative Market, 700 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | Join Dr. Ammitai Worob for this presentation about how we currently approach heart health and what YOU can do to prevent and even reverse heart disease. A delicious dinner prepared by the GreenStar Deli will be served. Fee: $15 for GreenStar members, $20 for non-members. This class and dinner is open to the public, and is held at the Classrooms@ GreenStar. Registration required - sign up at GreenStar’s Customer Service Desk or call 273-9392. Nutrition for a Healthy Heart | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | GreenStar Cooperative Market, 700 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | Learn how we as a society currently approach heart health, what you can do to get a clear picture of

ThisWeek

School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | For more information, call (607) 272-1474 or email info@csma-ithaca. org. www.csma-ithaca.org. Beginning Spanish | 2:00 PM-, Mondays | Ulysses Philomathic Library , 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Intermediate Spanish | 1:00 PM-, Mondays | Ulysses Philomathic Library , 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | International Folk Dancing | 7:30 PM-9:30 PM, Sundays | Lifelong, 119 W Court St, Ithaca | Teaching and request dancing. No partners needed. $5 donation suggested. Jesusians of Ithaca | 7:00 PM-8:30 PM, Tuesdays | Ithaca Friends Meeting House, 120 3rd St., Ithaca | Open to adults of all ages, orientations, and religions (or lack thereof). Not affiliated with any church or religious institution. For more info, email jesusianity@gmail. com or visit: www.facebook.com/ groups/JesusiansOfIthaca. Learn to Play Bridge or Practice Play | 9:00 AM-12:00 PM, Fridays | Ithaca Bridge Club, Clinton Street Plaza, Ithaca | Coaches available. No partner needed. No signups required. Walk-ins welcome. This is the same group that used to meet at Lifelong. Enter through door to the right of Ohm’s storefront. The Ithaca Bridge Club is located down the hall. Multi-Media Art for Youngsters | Wednesdays | Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts, Congress at McLallen Street, Trumansburg | Registration details and more info is at the TCFA web site. Call 387-5939 or e-mail skl.tcfa@gmail.com. Remedy Staffing: Job Help | 10:30 AM-12:00 PM, Tuesdays | Edith B Ford Library, 7169 N Main St, Ovid | Seneca County Workforce Development is here to help job seekers. Registration encouraged. Sketching in the Greenhouse | 1:00 PM-4:00 PM, Sundays | Cornell Plantations Plant Production Facility, 397 Forest Home Dr, Ithaca | All ability levels, and children ages 12 and older, are welcome. Please bring supplies. Pre-registration is required. Watercolor painting | 10:00 AM-, Mondays | Ulysses Philomathic Library , 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Winter Writing Through The Rough Spots | See website for location and meeting dates | www. WritingRoomWorkshops.com. Microsoft Suite | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Edith B Ford Library, 7169 N Main St, Ovid | Matt Barkee

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your heart health, and what it takes to prevent and even reverse heart disease. Registration required - sign up at GreenStar’s Customer Service Desk or call 273-9392.

Special Events 2300°: Countdown | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 2/19 Thursday | Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning | Enjoy live glassmaking, live music, and great food and drink. Inaugural Ithaca Coin Show | 10:00 AM-3:00 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Fraternal Order of Eagles, 161 Cecil Malone Dr, Ithaca | Buying and Selling Coins, Currency, Gold & Silver Chicken BBQ | 12:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Ithaca Eagles Club, 161 Cecil A. Malone Dr, Ithaca | Chicken BBQ- Dinner includes salt potatoes, baked beans and a roll. Halves also available. $8 for a dinner, $6 for a half. Benefiting: The Golden Eagle Fund, providing grants for organizations that help our Seniors Benefit Spaghetti Dinner, Mecklenburg | 4:00 PM-7:00 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Mecklenburg Fire House, 4495 County Rd 6, Mecklenburg | Spaghetti Dinner to benefit the Mecklenburg Volunteer Fire Company and United Methodist Church. Newfield Lions Club’s Pork Loin Dinner | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Newfield Fire Hall, 77 Main St, Newfield | Serving: Pork Loin, potatoes, veggies, rolls, beverages and assorted desserts. Cost: Adults- $8, Seniors-$7 and kids 5 and under- Free. Lenten Study of Incarceration | 12:00 PM-1:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | St John’s Episcopal Church, 210 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Five-part series including book study of “Locked Down, Locked Out” by Maya Schenwar. Held in the Chapman Room. Garden to Table: Wine, Herbs and Winter Fare | 3:00 PM-6:00 PM, 2/22 Sunday | Statler Hotel, Cornell University, Ithaca | A special wintertime “Garden to Table” program at the Statler Hotel. A three-course tasting will feature delicious recipes enhanced with common herbs that you can grow at home, as well as a sampling of Finger Lakes wines. Part of our ongoing Garden to Table series, a program emphasizing food plants and healthy, locally-sourced cuisine. Pre-registration required. Participants must be 21 or

older and be prepared to provide proof of age.

Nature & Science Primitive Pursuits Free Monthly Primitive Skills Meet Up | Join Primitive Pursuits instructors and members of the community as we work on primitive skills, strive to inspire, share stories, and help each along a journey toward deeper connection & awareness. Call 607-272-2292 ext. 195 or visit us online at primitivepursuits. com to join the club. Guided Beginner Bird Walks, Sapsucker Woods | 9:0 AM-, Saturdays & Sundays | Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd, Ithaca | Sponsored by the Cayuga Bird Club. Targeted toward beginners, but appropriate for all. Binoculars available for loan. Meet at the front of the building. Please contact Linda Orkin, wingmagic16@gmail.com for more information.

Health Adult Children of Alcoholics | 7:00 PM-8:00 PM, Wednesday | Ithaca Community Recovery, 518 W Seneca St, Ithaca | 12-Step Meeting. Enter through front entrance. Meeting on second floor. For more info, contact 229-4592. Alcoholics Anonymous | This group meets several times per week at various locations. For more information, call 273-1541 or visit aacny.org/meetings/ PDF/IthacaMeetings.pdf Anonymous HIV Testing | 9:00 AM-11:30 AM, Tuesday | Tompkins County Health Department, 55 Brown Rd, Ithaca | Walk-in clinics are available every Tuesday from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Appointments are available on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:30 to 3:30 pm. Please call us to schedule an appointment or to ask for further information 274-6604. Chair Yoga | 10:00 AM-, Wednesday | Ulysses Philomathic Library, 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Dance Church Ithaca | 12:00 PM-1:30 PM, Sunday | Ithaca Yoga Center, AHIMSA Studio, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Free movement for all ages with live and DJ’ed music. Free. DSS in Ulysses | 1:00 PM-4:30 PM, Wednesday | Ulysses Town Hall, 10 Elm St, Trumansburg | walk-ins welcome. For info on SNAP, Medicaid, Daycare and Emergency assistance. Call 274-5345

TREASURE ISLAND

Cinemapolis, February 19 and 21

Part of the UK National Theatre Live series. The original rip-roaring tale of pirates and buried treasure, arrr! Adapted for the stage for children of all ages.

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with any questions. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) | This group meets several times per week at various locations. | For more information, call 607-351-9504 or visit www. foodaddicts.org. Ithaca Community Aphasia Network | 9:00 AM-10:30 AM, Friday | Ithaca College, Call for Location | We are looking for stroke survivors who have aphasia (an acquired language disorder). For more information, please contact: Yvonne Rogalski Phone: 274-3430 Email: yrogalski@ithaca.edu Lyme Support Group | 6:30 PM-, Wednesday | Multiple Locations | We meet monthly at homes of group members. For information, or to be added to the email list, contact danny7t@lightlink.com or call Danny at 275-6441. Mid-week Meditation House | 6:00 PM-7:00 PM, Wednesday | Willard Straight Hall, 5th floor lounge, Cornell University, Willard Straight Hall, Ithaca | Monthly Meeting: LGBT Group | 6:00 PM-, 2/18 Wednesday | LGBT Resource Center, 73 Main St, Cortland | Bring a dish-to-pass for a pot-luck supper. ( If you are unable to bring anything, just bring yourself ). Overeaters Anonymous | This group meets several times per week at various locations. | A worldwide 12-Step program for people wanting to recover from overeating, starving and/ or purging. Visit www.oa.org for more information or call 607-379-3835. Recovery From Food Addition | 12:00 PM-, Friday | Ithaca Community Recovery, 518 W Seneca St, Ithaca | Sacred Chanting with Damodar Das and friends | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, Wednesday | Ithaca Yoga Center, AHIMSA Studio, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | More at www.DamodarDas.com. Support Group for Invisible Disabilities | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 2/11 Wednesday | Finger Lakes Independence Center, 215 Fifth St, Ithaca | Call Amy or Emily at 272-2433. Support Group for People Grieving the Loss of a Loved One by Suicide | 5:30 PM-, Tuesday | 124 E Court St, Ithaca | Please call Sheila McCue, LMSW with any questions, 272-1505. Walk-in Clinic | This group meets several times per week. | Ithaca Health Alliance, 521 W Seneca St, Ithaca | Need to see a doctor, but don’t have health insurance? Can’t afford holistic care? 100% Free Services, Donations Appreciated. Do not need to be a

Tompkins County resident. First come, first served (no appointments). Winter Qigong | 5:15 PM-, Tuesday through 2/24 | Office of Suicide Prevention, 124 E Court St, Ithaca | Meditative movement practices to enhance circulation, vitality, health and mood. Yin-Rest Yoga – A Quiet Practice for Women | 4:00 PM-5:30 PM, Sunday | South Hill Yoga Space, 132 Northview Rd, Ithaca | Email nishkalajenney@ gmail.com or call 607-319-4138 for more information and reserve your place as space is limited. Yoga School Classes | This group meets several times per week at various locations--pre-registration required. | The Yoga School, 141 E State St, Ithaca |

Lectures Finger Lakes Native Plant Society: Talk/Slide Show | 7:00 PM-8:30 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Unitarian Church Annex, 208 E Buffalo St, Ithaca | Renee Petipas, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Cornell: “Alvar History, Biology, and Plant Local Adaptation.” Alvars are unique and imperiled habitats that occur in northern Europe and around the Great Lakes. The Stewart Park Merry-GoRound--A Month of Painting | 10:00 AM-, 2/19 Thursday | History Center, 401 E State St, Ithaca | On Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays during February, Christie Sobel will be painting four horses from the Stewart Park Merry-Go-Round at The History Center. Bronfenbrenner Center Talks at Twelve | 12:00 PM-1:00 PM, 2/19 Thursday | Cornell Plantations, 1 Plantations Rd, Ithaca | Listening to Killers: Bringing Developmental Psychology into the Courtroom in Murder Cases. James Garbarino, Loyola Univ., Chicago. Nevin Welcome Ctr., Plantations; lunch served. See www. bctr.cornell.edu for info.

Arts Artist Talk: Photographer David Levinthal | 5:15 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | Johnson Museum of Art, North Central Ave, Ithaca | David Levinthal will discuss his series staging small toys within a studio setting, some which are on view in the exhibition “Staged, Performed, Manipulated.” Open until 8.

THE SUGARLUMPS

Sacred Root Kava Lounge, February 21 – 9 p.m.

Music of the Speakeasy culture of the 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s with a danceable blend of blues, jazz, ragtime, and swing.


Museums Chemung County Historical Society: Exhibit Opening | 12:00 PM-2:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Chemung County Historical Society, 415 E Water St, Elmira | Sweet! explores Chemung County’s long history of confection and candy making. Call 607-734-4167 ext. 204 for more information.

Books Reading: Dawn Lundy Martin | 4:30 PM-, 2/19 Thursday | Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, 29 East Ave, Ithaca | Visit http://english.arts.cornell.edu/creative/ readings/ or call 607-255-7847. Black History Multi-Media Presentation | 6:00 PM-7:00 PM, 2/19 Thursday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Eldred Harris, member of the ICSD School Board, gives a multi-media presentation and leads discussion on Black History beyond the confines of Black History month. Poetry Reading by Robert S. Hummel | 4:00 PM-5:30 PM, 2/21 Saturday | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Books will be available for sale and signature following the reading. Proust Reading Group | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM, 2/23 Monday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | The group will meet in the fiction room and focus on the last half of Volume 6, La Fugitive. Literary Reading: Edward Dougherty | 7:00 PM-, 2/23 Monday | Montour House Cafe & Tapas Bar, 401 W Main St, Montour Falls | The Watkins Glen Writers Group presents a featured reading by Edward A. Dougherty, poet and writer from Corning, as part of the Watkins Glen Reading Series. We will be meeting one hour prior to the reading for a meal, snacks, or drinks; and an open reading will follow the featured reading after a short break.

Kids Art Classes for Kids | 2/11 Wednesday | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | For more information, call (607) 272-1474 or email info@csma-ithaca.org. www. csma-ithaca.org Awana Clubs | 6:30 PM-8:15 PM, Thursdays | Dryden Baptist Church, 138 Virgil Rd, Dryden | For kids ages 3 to 8th grade. Any questions please call 607-844-8319.

Encore Signals & Signs

by Luke Z. Fenchel

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riday, Feb. 20, will see the premiere of Signals, a multimedia presentation that is a part-memoir, part-concert, and wholly compelling portrait of an artist and her family. Mary Lorson, the composer and narrator, is best known as a singer and songwriter of the popular ‘90s art-rock act Madder Rose, but over the last decade and a half she has performed in a variety of projects that are varied but always inspired. The 75-minute performance at Cornell Cinema will be the first public performance, complete with an eightperson band and two screens. Lorson explained that the impetus of Signals was to explore her father, with whom Lorson had a relationship she described as “intermittent.” “He and I were very alike, and even though I did not grow up with him, there were some uncanny similarities. Because he was absent, of course it was easy to

After-School Movie for Children | 3:15 PM-, Wednesday | Ulysses Philomathic Library , 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Cuddle Up Storytime | 10:00 AM-, Wednesday | Southworth Library, 5 S Main St, Dryden | Songs and stories for babies and toddlers. Stay after for play time. Caregivers are required to stay with their child(ren). Baby/Toddler Storytime | 9:30 AM-10:30 AM, 2/11 Wednesday | Presbyterian Chapel, 69 E Main St, Trumansburg | Moto-Inventions | 1:00 PM-2:00 PM, Sundays | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Invent contraptions that can move. Tinker with recycled materials and electricity to make whirling, moving machines. Materials provided by Cornell Xraise. Teen Reads Group at TCPL | 4:45 PM-5:45 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | Hosted by the Tompkins County Public Library every third Wednesday in the Thaler/ Howell Programming Room. Currently Reading: “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio. For more information, contact Teen Services Librarian Regina DeMauro at

Mary Lorson (Image provided)

romanticize him, but the connection we had was very strong.” After her father’s passing in 2010, Lorson began working on stories and vignettes. Signals consists of several stories: some set to song, as well as films and images Lorson collected to her hometown downstate while house-sitting recently. The band includes many of Lorson’s collaborators. “One of the anchor songs,” she said, “is ‘Dad Hardly Knew You, but many are funny—one is even about Nixon

rdemauro@tcpl.org or (607) 272-4557 extension 274. Sciencenter Preschool Story Time & Activity: Tracks in the Snow | 10:30 AM-, 2/20 Friday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | For toddlers and preschoolers, hear the story Tracks in the Snow by Wong Herbert Yee and then use paint and stamps to create your own hand print “tracks.” Sciencenter Preschool Story Time & Activity: A Color of His Own | 10:30 AM-, 2/24 Tuesday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | For toddlers and preschoolers, Hear the story A Color of His Own by Leo Lionni and then make invisible art to take home. Sciencenter Showtime! Under the Sea with CUAUV | 2:00 PM-, 2/14 Saturday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Can a submarine drive itself? Learn about the amazing underwater robot built for competition by Cornell’s Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Team. Sunday Science Demonstrations | 2:00 PM-, 2/15 Sunday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Local high school students demonstrate awe-inspiring science with colorful chemical reactions, fun with physics, and more! Visit www.sciencenter.org/

coming through town.” Another describes an incident when Lorson, banned from her father’s house by a stepmother, “stole a kitchen utensil” from the home in which she was not welcome. “There is something about our current culture that encourages memoir. It is a medium that tends to get under our skin,” Lorson said. “I had been reading graphic memoirs recently, and found them inspiring. I have taught Persepolis to my students, for instance, but I was

calendar.html for specific programs and dates. Story and Art | 10:30 AM-, 2/12 Thursday | Ulysses Philomathic Library, 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Each week will feature a fun theme such as pirates, the circus, fairy tales, music, and more. Winter Recess at Ithaca’s Sciencenter | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Tuesday-Sunday through 2/22. Part of the city-wide Ithaca Loves Teachers initiative. Multiple programs; visit www.sciencenter. org. For information about Ithaca Loves Teachers, visit ithacalovesteachers. com or contact the Downtown Ithaca Alliance, 607-277-8679. Author Visit, Groton Library | 11:00 AM-, 2/21 Saturday | Groton Public Library, 112 E Cortland St, Groton | Katrina Morse, children’s author and illustrator, will read and show artwork, along with audience participation. Contact director@grotonpubliclibrary.org or 607-898-5055 for info. LIFT After School Book Club | 2:30 PM-4:30 PM, 2/19 Thursday | Edith B Ford Memorial Library, PO Box 410, Ovid | 6th grade students, enjoy fun activities and great books!

Romulus Feb. 5 & South Seneca Feb. 12 & 26. Contact the library for more information. Sponsored by the Rosen Library Fund. Chemsations! | 2:00 PM-, 2/22 Sunday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Local high school students demonstrate chemical reactions with color changes, bubbles and light.  Sciencenter Showtime! Coral Reefs | 2:00 PM-, 2/21 Saturday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Explore the undersea life of coral reefs and learn about these fragile animals, touch coral skeletons, and learn about their lives. Lego Night | 5:00 PM-6:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Newfield Public Library, Main Street, Newfield | We have the Legos and Bailey will have a fun new theme. We just received new mini figures; come check them out and make a Lego creation to display in the library. Teen Night, Groton Library | 7:00 PM-9:30 PM, 2/20 Friday | Groton Public Library, 112 E Cortland St, Groton | Episodes of the popular TV show “Once Upon a Time.” With Minecraft, Pizza, iPads, Computers, & Popcorn. Contact director@grotonpubliclibrary.org or 607-898-5055 for info.

See it at ithaca.com.

Lot 10 Lounge, February 18, 6 p.m.

Dubbed “pop in the best possible sense of the word” (Bangor Daily News), SeepeopleS’ sound is an infectious blend of pop, reggae, trance, prog-rock and ambient styles, simultaneously eclectic, tightly crafted and pioneering.

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Online Calendar

DJUG DJANGO

The Dock, February 21, 9 p.m.

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Teen Craft Club | 2:30 PM-4:00 PM, 2/24 Tuesday | Edith B Ford Library, 7169 North Main St, Ovid | Students in grades 6-12 are invited to get inspired and learn new DIY skills! Making collages. Registration required, space limited. Snacks provided. School’s Out Activities: Wii & Playstation Free Play | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 2/18 Wednesday | Edith B. Ford Memorial Library, Main Street, Ovid | Also Minecraft & Board Games. School’s Out Activities: Artful Fun | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 2/20 Friday | Edith B. Ford Memorial Library, Main Street, Ovid | Ages 5-12. Registration appreciated. School’s Out Activities: Movie Matinee – Spiderwick Chronicles | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 2/19 Thursday | Edith B. Ford Memorial Library, Main Street, Ovid | Cuddle Up Storytime | 10:00 AM-, Wednesday | Southworth Library, 5 S Main St, Dryden | Songs and stories for babies and toddlers. Stay after for play time. Caregivers are required to stay with their child(ren).

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also influenced by Alison Bechdel’s Are You My Mother and David Smalls’ Stitches. There is some real appeal if you come from a strange family and look and see to understand how those relationships formed.” Lorson explained that both of her parents had multiple marriages, which left her “half-related to a lot of people. There are no 100 percent siblings to share the exact same experience. Instead, I have brothers and sisters that range from 36 to 60. This helps me get a picture of who they are, and who I am.” Though the 90-minute project will be trimmed a bit to fit its 75-minute run time, Lorson encouraged people to brave the cold. “The good thing about winter is that there are a lot of things to do inside, if you like that sort of thing,” Lorson continued. “And this is the sort of thing to do.” • • • In its eight years since forming, Ithaca Underground has been responsible for deepening and widening the musical experience here in town. The recently incorporated not-for-profit hosted 65 distinct events in 2014 alone. It doesn’t take a math genius to realize that makes more than one event each week. Add the fact that the overwhelming majority of its shows are a flat $5, and you begin to realize that there are few institutions more essential to culture in Ithaca.

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Town & Country

Classifieds

In Print

|

On Line |

10 Newspapers

| 67,389 Readers

277-7000

Internet: www.ithacatimes.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily) 109 North Cayuga Street AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE MERCHANDISE UNDER $100

Special Rates:

FREE

Fax and Mail orders only

AUTOMOTIVE

automotive

buy sell

AUTOS WANTED/120 Cash for Cars Any Car/Truck,Running or not! Top Dollar Paid.We Come To You! Call for Instant Offer 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AANCAN)

250/Merchandise BOATS/130

120/Autos Wanted CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer. 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Boat Docking $600 Season. Next to Bath Lift

Kelly’s Dockside Cafe for sale-aqua-joy premier bath lift-new 607-342-0626 Tom still in box. Cost $600; Sell for $400. cash only! phone 564-6061

140/Cars

CARS/140

XC 70 Wagon 114K, New Tires, Alignment, All Options, 3rd Row Seating. Dependable, driven daily. $7,000/obo. 607-216-2314

Doll Clothes

Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 315-400-0797 Today! (NYSCAN)

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sewing patterns downloadable www. ik-patterns.com designed and tested in Ithaca

WASHER & DRYER STACK $1000

BUY SELL

MERCHANDISE $100 - $500

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$ SALES/245 GARAGE

12#11077E words 2010 / runs til sold Stock Honda Accord

buy sell

LARGE DOWNSIZING SALE. Something for Everyone. August 2 and August 3 8am-5pm, 2 Eagleshead Road, Ellis Hollow, Ithaca, NY 14850

Coupe EX, Auto, Black, 33,001 miles $16,997 Certified Stock #11033 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid CVT, Silver, 26,565 miles, $17,997 Certified Stock #11171E 2010 Honda Insight EX, CVT, white, miles, $14,997 SAWMILLS from 35,224 only $4397.00 - MAKE Certified 2010your Mazda Wagon & Stock SAVE #11124E MONEY with own3 bandmill6-speed, Blue, 44,329 miles, $14,997 cut lumber dimension. stock2 Stockany #11168E 2012 In Mazda Hatchback ready to ship. FREE Info /DVD: Auto, Red, 32,427 miles #12,997www. Honda of Ithaca NorwoodSawmills.com 315 Elmira 1-800-578-1363 Road Ithaca, NY 14850 Ext. 300N (NYSCAN) www.hondaofithaca.com $WANTED$ COMIC BOOKS Pre-1975:

BUY SELL TRADE

Original art & movie memorabilia, sports, non-sports cards, ESPECIALLY 1960’s

800-242-6130 buying@getcashforcom-

ANTIQUESCOLLECTABLES/205

ics.com (NYSCAN)

CASH for Coins! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419 (NYSCAN)

FARM & GARDEN/230

COMMUNITY

(Etna Rd) Just over a year oldword. still new, Non-Commercial: $14.50 first 12 words (minimum), 20 cents each additional Rate applied to non-business ads and prepaid ads. use once a week, guarantee until Feb, MUSICIANS/350 $900 or closest offer. Hilda word. If you charge for a service or goods you are a Business Ads: $16.50 for first 12 words (minimum), 30 cents eachCal additional 607-220-7730 business. Inquire about contract rates. $24.00 Auto Guaranteed Ad - Ad runs 3 weeks or until sold. 12 words $24.00, each additional word 60¢. must notify us to TheYouCats MUSICAL/260 continue running ad. Non-commercial advertisers only Featuring Jeff Howell 25% Discount - Run your non-commercial ad for 4 consecutive weeks, you only pay for 3 (Adoption, Merchandise or Housemates) Taylor 518e Employment / Real Estate / Adoption: $38.00 first 15 NEW words (minimum), 30 cents each additional word. Ads run weeks. FOR 2013 natural finished non-cutaway Grand OrFriday, August 2, 2013 Box Numbers: Times Box Numbers are $2.50chestra per week of premium publication. Writetropical “Times maBox______” at end of your ad. Readers address with grade back sides, NY Sitka spruce box replies to Times Box______, c/o Ithacahogany Times, P.O. Boxand 27, Ithaca, 14851. The Log Cabin top, ebony fretboard and bridge, 500 ap8811type, Main St. Headlines: 9-point headlines (use up to 16 characters) $2.00 per line.black/white/black If bold type, centered or unusually spaced borders in ad, or pointments include multi-binding, abalone sound hole rologos in ads are requested, the ad will be charged at the display classified advertising rate. Call 277-7000 for rate information. Campbell, NY sette, pearl inlaid diamond position 9:00pm - 1:00am Free Ads: Lost and Found and free items runmarkers at no charge for up to 3 weeks. Merchandise for Sale, private party only. Price must and headstock ornament, gold Schaller tuning machines. Expression be under $50 and stated in ad system electronics, w/HSC list: $3518 jeffhowell.org yours: Website/Email Links: On Line Links to a Web Site or $2649 Email Address $5.00 per insertion. IGW Cool Tunes Records Blank Lines: (no words) $2.00/Line - insertion. 272-2602 Border: 1 pt. rule around ad $5.00 - insertion. Taylor 712

Garage/Yard Sale at 6056 West Sene/ runs 2follow insertions ca 15 Rd.words Trumansburg; detour. Household goods, furniture, misc. No clothes. Sat. August 4th from 9:00-2:00.

Collector/Investor, paying cash! Call Will:

CASH Coins! V70 Buying Gold & Silver. 2001 for VOLVO WAGON, 149K. $4,500/obo Also Stamps & Paper Money, Comics, 216-2314 Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NJ: 1-800-488-4175 (NYSCAN)

2004 VOLVO

AUTOMOBILES

2008 SuzukiAWD hatchback. Loaded with extras including cruise control. Very good condition. $10,100. 607-229-9037

BUY SELL Ithaca Times Town & Country Classified Ad Rates

buy sell

260/Muscial MERCHANDISE/250 TOP CASH PAID Four FOR OLD BARREL TABLE SwivelGUITARS! Chairs in Green leather. Vet nice condition. 1920’s thru 1980’s. Gibson, Martin, Fend$275.00

12-Fret NEW

glossy vintage sunburst stika spruce top and natural finish rosewood back and sides grand concert size, ebony bridge and fingerboard with ivroid inlaid “heritage” fretboard markers with 12 frets clear of the body, slot peghead with w/HSC, list: $3378, Yours: $2549 25IGW words 272-2602

GARAGE SALES

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VIOLINS FOR SALE: European, old and new, reasonable prices, 607-277-1516.

employment PETS/270

For Sale BOXER PUPPIES

Registered, Vet checked, 1st shots and wormed. Need loving home, very beautiful. Parents on property. $450/obo. 607-657-8144

564-3662 er, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite,

Homelite HLT-15 Classic weed whackRickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, er, new never used. $60. Stromberg. And216-2314 Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1-800-401-0440 (NYSCAN) RED MAX WEED WHACKER used very little. $50.00 387-9327 SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill-cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N www.NorwoodSawmills.com (NYSCAN)

350/Musicians Sofa Bed Double, green plaid. $150. 257-3997

STUFF

Only small kitchen THE appliances; CATS 1 LazyBoy recliner and anything else you can think of. I21, might have what you want. Sat. Feb 2015<f”Helvetica”> Mostly new, no junk. O’Ryans, 159Call Prescot Ave. for list: 607-273-4444 Elmira Heights, NY 8:30pm-12:00am B>Jeffhowell.org Cool Tunes Records

430/General

COMMUNITY

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here. Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance

ACTIVITIES/310

Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students - Housing available.

Cayuga Lake Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866Triathlon 296-7093 (NYSCAN)

Sunday 8/4/2013

The Cayuga Lake Triathlon will take AVIATION Grads workFalls with JetBlue, place at Taughannock State Park on Sunday, 8/4/13. Cyclists will be on Boeing, NASA and others - Falls start here NY89 from Taughannock State Park Co. Rd. 139 in Sheldrake. There withtohands on training for FAA certificawill be a temporary detour on NY89 betion. Financial aid ifand qualified. Call Road tween Gorge Road Savercool form 7am to approximately 12pm while Aviation Institute of Maintenance the triathlon is in progress. Please800conroutes. Specsider choosing 725-1563 (AANalternate CAN) tators are always welcome to come enjoy the triathlon or register to volunteer! For more details on the Cayuga Lake Triathlon. visit: http:// www.ithacatriathlonclub.org/cltrace/.

LOST AND FOUND/360

SERVICE DIRECTORY

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LOST Prescription Sunglasses LOST around 7/22. Fossil Frames, brown lenses. Probably lost/ between per week 13 weekTrumansburg minimum and Ithaca. Mark (607)227.9132

employment

Heavy Equipment Operators In High

EMP

And Gr E

needs 3 tem 1/13, work provided with will be availa who cannot permanent r work day. Tr and subsiste pletion of 15 contract. Wo the workday $10.91 per tact Ct Depa 6020 or appl office of the Must be abl experience i tivate and h Use hand too shovels, hoe ders. Duties ited to appl weeding, top ing sucker stripping, p vested toba gation activ Must be ab heights up t for the purpo weighing up ence require

Chi Direc

EMPLOYMENT

Demand! Get Hands On Training And

CHURCH C CHILDREN Church of Ith Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Aver- its Children’s or she will age $18-$22 Hourly! Veteran Benefits worship on a Eligible! 1-866-968-2577 (NYSCAN) sume of qu and a list o MAKE $1000 Weekly!! Mailing Broically at off chures From Home. Helping home workby mail to $$$HELP WANTED$$$ ers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Search, Firs Extra Income@ Assembling CD cases Experience Required. Start Immediately. ca, 315 Nort from Home! www.the workingcorner.com (AAN CAN) 14850 No Experience Necessary! Call our LIve Operators Now! Start your humanitarian career! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 Change the lives of others while creating for Newfield http://www.easywork-greatpay.com a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 month Asst. Footba programs available. Apply today! www. (AANCAN) coaches for OneWorldCenter.org 269-591-0518 Apply on AIRLINE CAREERS begin(AAN here CAN) - Get info@oneworldcenter.org www.newfie 8/16/13. FAA approved Aviation Maintenance WELDINGtraining. CAREERS - Hands aid on trainTechnician Financial for EARN $500 ing for career opportunities aviation, qualified students - Housinginavailable. Makeup Arti automotive, manufacturing and more. ion. Train & Job placement assistance. Call AIM Financial aid for qualified students. Job Lower Tuition 866-296-7093 www.Aw placement assistance. CALL AIM 855(NYSCAN) 325-0399 (NYSCAN) National Certifications. Operating

GENERAL/430

U-Pick

The Bank repossessed your car.

Now they want $$$ ?

Okay, they hooked your ride. But before you pay Autovest, Ford, Credit Acceptance, Stephen Einstein, Forster & Garbus, Kirschenbaum & Philips, Lacy Katzen, Melvin & Melvin, Newman Lickstein, Riehlman Shafer, Relin Goldstein, Rubin & Rothman anything, call us. If the lender didn’t follow the law, it may owe you. *

Organically Grown Blueberries $1.60 lb. Open 7 days a week. Dawn-toDusk. Easy to pick high bush berries. Tons of quality fruit! 3455 Chubb Hollow road Pen n Yan. 607-368-7151

Opening Winter 2015!

Ithaca’s only

hometown electrical distributor Your one Stop Shop

Anthony J. Pietrafesa Esq. – a consumer lawyer

315.400.AJP1 (2571)

Since 1984 802 W. Seneca St. Ithaca 607-272-1711 fax: 607-272-3102 www.fingerlakeselectric.com

www.ajp1law.com

See us on www.avvo.com

Serving; Binghamton Norwich Syracuse Utica Watertown Main Office: 1971 Western Ave #181 Albany NY 12203 *Past results no guarantee of a particular outcome. Attorney Advertising.

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

DONATE YOUR CAR Wheels For Wishes benefiting

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY

*Free Vehicle/Boat Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *100% Tax Deductible

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adoptions

rentals

roommates

services

real estate

Writers

THINKING SOLAR?

510/Adoption Services ADOPTION: Unplanned Pregnancy? Caring Licensed adoption agency provides financial and emotional support. Choose from loving pre-approved families. Call Joy toll free 1-866-922-3678 or confidential email:Adopt@ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org (NYSCAN) PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOP-

610/Apartments You’re Sure to Find

the place that’s right for you with Conifer. Linderman Creek 269-1000, Cayuga View 269-1000, The Meadows 2571861, Poets Landing 288-4165

630/Commercial / Offices

TION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. (AAN CAN)

520/Adoptions Wanted A childless young married couple (she 30/he -37) seeks to adopt. Will be handson mom/devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Call/text. Mary & Adam. 1-800-790-5260 (NYSCAN) Adoption: Warmhearted couple wishes to give unconditional love to an infant. Get to know us at RichandRenee@hotmail.com or 315-200-3559 (NYSCAN)

Ithaca Inlet

Across from Island Health & Fitness. 3000 Square Foot Building ON THE WATERFRONT & Taughannock Blvd. Convenient to Routes 89,13,79,96 Downtown Ithaca & Cayuga Lake. PARKING DECK DOCK 2 BATHROOMS. 3 Phase Electric. Please Call Tom 607-342-0626

695/Vacation OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Resort Services. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com (NYSCAN)

700/Roommates

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roomate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates .com! (AAN CAN)

825/Financial

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION Real Estate, Uncontested Divorces. Child Custody. Law Office of Jeff Coleman and Anna J. Smith (607)277-1916

830/Home

Four Seasons Landscaping Inc. 607.272.1504 Lawn maintenance, spring + fall clean up + gutter cleaning, patios, retaining walls, + walkways, landscape design + installation. Drainage. Snow Removal. Dumpster rentals. Find us on Facebook!

We Celebrate

Teachers!

REPLACEMENT Winter Recess Specials WINDOWS on Strings & Accessories.

REPLACEMENT A FULL LINE OF VINYL Pre-K to Grade 12 Manufacture To InstallREPLACEMENT WINDOWS REPLACEMENT WINDOWS We Do Call It forAll Free Estimate & Teachers and School WINDOWS

Employees!

Professional Installation A FULL LINE OF Custom VINYL made & manufactured Now through February 22nd AREPLACEMENT FULL LINE OF VINYL WINDOWS by… REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Call for Free Estimate & Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation 3/54( Songbooks • Repairs Professional Installation Custom made & manufactured Custom made & manufactured 3%.%#! by… by… 6).9,

3/54( 3/54( 3%.%#! 3%.%#! 6).9,

6).9,

Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or Toll Free at 866-585-6050

www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Romulus, NY

Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at 866-585-6050 or Toll Free at BlackCatAntiques.webs.com 866-585-6050

DeWitt Mall

272-2602

www.guitarworks.com

real estate

Call us for a FREE solar assessment. Paradise Energy Solutions 100 Grange Place, Cortland, NY 877-679-1753

Ithaca Times is interested in hearing from freelance movie, music, restaurant and visual & performing arts reviewers with strong opinions and fresh views.

855/Misc. DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $34.99. Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888-992-1957 (AAN CAN)

Please send clips to: editor@ithacatimes.com

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc., for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN. www.woodfordbros. com. (NYSCAN)

865/Personal Services Counseling

Adults; Adolescents; Family; Couples; Individuals. Dan Doyle,LCSWR 607319-5404

1040/Land for Sale ABANDONED FARMLAND! 6ac Stream - $24,900 Beautiful xmas tree plantation, babbling brook, nice views, gorgeous country setting! Less than 3.5 hrs NYC. Call 888-479-3394 or NewYorkLandandLakes.com (NYSCAN) FORECLOSED LAND! *5ac - $14,325, *7ac - $16,415, *9ac - $19,100 Prime upstate NY location just off the NY State Thruway! Buy all 3 for less than $49,000! Woods, dramatic views, town rd, utils, clear title. EZ terms! call: 888-905-8847 NOW! (NYSCAN)

NEED AFFORDABLE LAND

for a Home, Recreation or Agriculture? Buy or Lease only what you need! (607)533-3553

The Jefferson-Lewis BOCES has the following vacancies:

We Buy & Sell

BLACK CAT ANTIQUES

Teacher of the Deaf & Hard of Hearing Impaired/Deaf and Hard and Hearing (.5 FTE).

“We stock the unusual” 774 Peru Road, Rte. 38 • Groton, NY 13073 February hours: 10 to 4 Friday & Saturday or by Chance or Appointment BlackCatAntiques@CentralNY.twcbc.com 607.898.2048

Applicable NYS Certification required. Salary: $42,240-48,740 (pro-rated).*

Interpreter for the Deaf – Experienced with American Sign Language and educational interpreting, NTID or other RID-recognized coursework preferred. Salary: $15,350-26,552.*

Speech Therapist – NYS Cert. Speech/Hearing Handicapped or Speech/Hearing Disabled. Salary: $42,340-48,740.*

EOE

*Starting Date: ASAP, Apply by: Open until positions are filled. On-line applications preferred, www.olasjobs.org/northern, or forward letter of interest/resume to: Dawn Ludovici, Assistant Superintendent for Programs, Jefferson-Lewis BOCES, 20104 State Route 3, Watertown, NY. Email: dludovic@boces.com. More information at www.boces.com.

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Load it Up Any large Pizza with up to 4 toppings + cheese Only $11.99 Save $6.00 with Greenback Coupon at

Papa Johns

Love dogs? 4 Seasons Landscaping Inc.

Free in Home Estimates Window World

607-272-1504 lawn maintenance spring + fall clean up + gutter cleaning patios, retaining walls, + walkways landscape design + installation drainage snow removal dumpster rentals Find us on Facebook!

AAM ALL ABOUT MACS

Replacement Window Specialist Guaranteed Lowest Pricing Visit our Showroom

Full line of Vinyl Replacement Windows

Outerwear Sportswear Kids

Free Estimates

Old Goat Gear Exchange

South Seneca Vinyl

320 E. State St., Downtown Ithaca

http://www.allaboutmacs.com (607) 280-4729

Affordable Acupuncture Full range of effective care for a full range of human ailments Anthony Fazio, L.Ac., C.A. www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

607-272-0114

LPs 45s 78s ROCK JAZZ BLUES PUNK REGGAE ETC Angry Mom Records (Autumn Leaves Basement) 319-4953 angrymomrecords@gmail.com Explore the depths of relaxation THE ULTIMATE SAVASANA Saturday March 7, 1-3pm Yoga Workshop * Save before 2/27! $25. MIGHTY YOGA www.mightyyoga.com, 272-0682

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Being served indoors at the Farmer’s Market, The Space @ GreenStar @ THE SPACE @GREEN STAR COOP Natural Foods Market 700 W BUFFALO ST,ITHACA,NY Saturdays, 11 AM - 2 PM through March 28th!

Ethiopian food will be served indoors

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years

SATURDAY , 11 AM-2 PM JANUARY 24TH -MARCH 28TH FOR MORE INFORMATION ,CONTACT HILINA @607-220-7581/279-7386

For more info, contact Hilina Please come over for a unique flavor! (607) 220-7581 or @atg38@cornell.edu

Protect Your Home with a Camera Surveillance System Les @ 607-272-9175

THINKING SOLAR?

Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair.

with Greenback Coupon

Same Day Service Available

Paradise Energy Solutions

at Monro Muffler/Brake

John’s Tailor Shop

100 Grange Place, Cortland, NY

John Serferlis - Tailor

877-679-1753

***ICE***ICE***ICE*** Professional Insured Removal

Independence Cleaners Corp RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Housekeeping*Windows*Awnings*Floors High Dusting*Carpets*Building Maintenance

* BUYING RECORDS *

Cuisine Coffee! Cuisineand and Coffee!

We are so pleased to announce that

Call us for a free solar assessment

Call Greg at Solutions 607-793-8664

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

www.cayugadogrescue.org www.facebook.com/CayugaDogRescue

MARMOT SAMPLE SALE! UP TO 60% OFF

315-585-6050, 866-585-6050

Ethiopian Enat Ethiopian

Come over for a Unique Flavor!

Adopt! Foster! Volunteer! Donate for vet care!

607-797-3234

Half OFF NYS Auto Inspection

Macintosh Consulting

Check out Cayuga Dog Rescue!

NEW

24/7 EMERGENCY CLEANING Services

102 The Commons 273-3192

Middle Eastern (Belly Dance) & Romani Dances (Gypsy) Beginner Classes Starting Wed. March 11th with

JUNE

Traditional Millwork Conference Saturday, February 28 9-4 For professional and amateur woodworkers historicithaca.org 607-273-6633

Professional Oriental Dancer Call or E-Mail to Register

We Buy, Sell, & Trade

Ithaca’s Friendly local Game Store

607-351-0640, june@twcny.rr.com

Board Games, Geek Collectibles,

www.moonlightdancer.com

607-898-2048

607-227-3025 or 607-220-8739

Educational games for Kids

The Enchanted Badger 335 Elmira Rd. Ithaca

LIGHTLINK HOTSPOTS

MOBIL COMPLETE OIL CHANGE only $24.99 with Greenback Coupon Mobil 1 Lube Express

Black Cat Antiques

Your Planned Parenthood Has Moved! We are pleased to welcome you to our new Ithaca Health Center at

http://www.lightlink.com/hotspots

348 Elmira Road

620 West Seneca Street!

hotspots@lighlink.com

607-273-2937

607-273-1513 PPSFL.ORG

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February 18, 2015  
February 18, 2015  
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