September 14, 2022

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F R E E S E P T E M B E R 14 , 2 0 2 2 / V O L U M E X L I I I , N U M B E R 4 / O u r 5 0 t h Ye a r

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

Fall Guide To The Finger Lakes

2022 COUNTY PROPOSES AID TO AIRPORT

DRINKING WATER FEARS PUT TO REST

WHERE ITHACA CRIME HAPPENS

“FLOOD” FINALLY MAKES IT TO STATE

INN OFFERS MEMORABLE MEALS

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NEWSLINE

VOL. XLIII / NO. 4 / September 14, 2022 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

ON THE COVER:

Help For Airport Is Focus Of County Budget Discussion

Buttermilk Falls Cover photo by Becky Enders (Special section cover art by Cheryl Chalmers)

Facility Will Need Financial Assistance For At Least The Next Three Years

SPORTS ..........................................7

T

By M at t D ough e rt y

he lack of revenue coming from the Ithaca Tompkins International Airport will have a major impact on Tompkins County’s 2023 budget. That much was clear at the September 6 meeting of the Tompkins County Legislature. The airport has seen decreased passenger traffic due to the pandemic’s impacts on the travel industry and its slow recovery. According to Tompkins County Administrator Lisa Holmes, “passenger traffic is a significant source of revenue for the local airport.” In 2021 passenger traffic was at 50% of 2019 pre-pandemic levels, so it’s easy to see why the airport is seeing a decrease in revenue. The recommended budget includes a three-year plan to assist the Airport’s

recovery, with $1.3 million in 2023. The budget also includes $342,481 to pay half of the debt service on the recent terminal project, a cost expected to recur for the next three to five years. The airport has initiated a three-year recovery strategy to maximize revenue and reduce expenses. Regarding the airport funding, Legislator Mike Sigler (R-Lansing) inquired as to whether the money committed by the County would be a loan to be paid back as fees are generated in the future. Holmes responded saying that the responsibility for maintaining the airport ultimately falls on the County, and while it is expected the airport will again be self-sustaining in the future this is a measure realistically meant to subsidize the department in the short term.

Decreased passenger traffic at Ithaca Tompkins International Airport means the County will need to provide financial help. (Photo: Ash Bailot)

T A K E  City Looking For Concerned Citizens — The City of Ithaca is looking for people to serve on advisory boards and committees. There are openings on the Board of Zoning Appeals http://www. cityofithaca.org/368/Board-of-Zoning-Appeals, the Cable Access Advisory Committee http://www.cityofithaca.org/369/Cable-Access-OversightCommittee, the Community Police Board http://www.cityofithaca. org/379/Community-Police-Board, the Ithaca Housing Authority http:// ithacaha.com/board-commissioners/, and the Workforce Diversity Advisory Committee http://www.cityofithaca.org/350/WorkforceDiversity-Advisory-Committee. Information about the roles and responsibilities of each board or committee is available on its webpage. If you are interested you’ll need to complete the application form at http:// lfweb.tompkins-co.org/Forms/coiBoardsCommittees. Be aware that the application form doesn’t support Chrome so you’ll need to use a different

NEWSLINE ....................................3 WHERE ITHACA CRIME HAPPENS ......................................8

The IPD’s online dashboard

FALL GUIDE ........ AFTER PAGE 10 County Administrator Lisa Holmes says the help for the airport should be viewed as a subsidy not a loan (Photo: File)

Legislator Mike Sigler hoped that assistance to the airport could either be paid back, or come from federal funds. (Photo: File)

MUSIC ..........................................11

Sigler made the argument that the funding should come from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), but Holmes responded that significant funds have been received by the airport through other federal programs and that the County’s funds through that program (ARPA) cannot be directly committed as the airport received other similar federal funds. Holmes recommended a county budget for fiscal year 2023 that totals $207.7 million, and a capital budget that totals $121.5 million. The median-price for a home in Tompkins County has increased from $205,000 in 2021 to $225,000 in 2022. By increasing the share of property tax revenue (tax levy) that the County receives out of the now larger pool of property taxes by 1.46%, Holmes believes owners of medianpriced homes could actually see a reduction in their County property taxes of $83. The Legislature will hear presentations from County departments detailing their budgets over the next month through the Expanded Budget Committee, an extension of the Budget, Capital, and Personnel Committee.

BOOKS .........................................15

N O T E browser. Appointments generally take a few months to process since the Common Council meets monthly. For more information you can call the City Clerk’s Office at (607) 274-6570, Option 2.  Bike Donations Wanted — If you’ve got a bike that has been outgrown or isn’t being used, consider donating it to Bike Walk Tompkins. The organization is always looking to match people up with used bikes on an ongoing basis. They refurbish the bikes and put them through a safety check, and then sell them at affordable prices, sometimes donating them to people in need. At the moment they’re specifically looking for adult-sized bikes, hybrid, road, or mountain bikes, and bikes in working condition or near-working condition, that could be sourced back out to the community . If you’d like to donate a bike or bikes, reach out to simon@bikewalktompkins.org for information and to arrange a pick up or drop off time.

DINING .......................................12 ART ..............................................13 STAGE ..........................................14 TIMES TABLE .............................16 CLASSIFIEDS ..............................18

ON T HE WE B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 M A R K L E V I N E , M A N A G I N G E D I T O R , X 1217 E D I T O R @ I T H A C ATI M E S . C O M J A I M E C O N E , E D I T O R , X 1232 SOUTHREPORTER@FLCN.ORG CH R I S I B E R T, C A L EN DA R ED I TO R , A R T S @ I T H A C ATI M E S . C O M A N D R E W S U L L I V A N , S P O R T S E D I T O R , X 1227 SPORTS@FLCN.ORG M A T T D O U G H E R T Y , N E W S R E P O R T E R , X 1225 R E P O R T E R @ I T H A C ATI M E S . C O M STE VE L AWRENCE, SPO RTS CO LUMN IST ST E V E S P O R T SD U D E @ G M A I L .CO M SHARON DAVIS, DISTRIBUTION FR O N T@ IT H A C ATI M E S . CO M J I M B I L I N S K I , P U B L I S H E R , X 1210 J B I L I N S K I @ I T H A C ATI M E S . C O M L A R R Y H O C H B E R G E R , A S S O C I A T E P U B L I S H E R , X 1214 L A R R Y@ I T H A C ATI M E S . C O M F R E E L A N C E R S : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman THE ENTIRE CONTENTS OF THE ITHACA TIMES ARE C O P Y R I G H T © 2 02 2 , B Y N E W S K I I N C . All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972–1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973–1978), combined in 1978. F O U N D E R G O O D T I M E S G A Z E T T E : TO M N E W T O N

SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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INQUIRING Cinemapolis Exec Director Bossard Steps Down PHOTOGRAPHER

N E W S L I N E

By Josh Bal d o

WHAT IS THE MOST UNEXPECTED TURN YOUR LIFE TOOK?

“Met my best friend when my car broke down” – Romana W.

“Never expected to get a job as a professional dancer in India” – Heather M.

Reflects On Community Support During COVID

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By B rya n Va n C a m pe n

thaca’s cinematic landscape has been changing and evolving lately. Cinemapolis Executive Director Brett Bossard is leaving the art-house non-profit theater after a nine-year stint, for a new gig at his alma mater Ithaca College as Executive Director of Alumni and Family Engagement. This comes on the heels of Cornell Cinema Director Mary Fessenden retiring after 35 years. It’s been quite a long time since Bossard was an IC undergrad, coming down the hill to see “Slacker” (1991) and “Dazed and Confused” (1993) back at the old Cinemapolis in Home Dairy Alley. Bossard spoke to the Ithaca Times about the ups and downs of almost a decade in the indie film business. Ithaca Times: Nine years is a piece of time. Since we last spoke for Cinemapolis’s 30th anniversary in 2016, two big things that have happened since then. First there was the pandemic. Brett Bossard: Yeah. [laughs] Yes. IT: Can you even talk about that in the past tense? BB: Yeah, I think we can say we’re on the other side of it. IT: What was that whole experience like? BB: Certainly unexpected. Nobody ever plans for that. I think it was really

“My new job” – Caeln H.

“Having my daughter; it set me on a path of my passion” – Lexie S.

Cinemapolis has had to cope with the extensive construction around it, making entry to the theatre an adventure at times. (Photo: Josh Baldo)

“Going to trade school and not an Ivy league” – Sarah C.

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encouraging how quickly the community responded, to support us and to make sure that we knew that they’d be here for us when we were able to open the doors again. Just in that first four weeks from when we closed back in March of 2020, I think we got over a hundred new members who just immediately showered us with support and said, “We wanna make sure you stick around.” And I think it helped that we made it very clear that we were gonna keep the staff on the payroll during the closure. We’re a living-wage employer, and that was really important to me and the board, to make sure that everybody was able to remain whole during the closure. That was harrowing. It was kind of like my version of a capitol campaign for the cinema, because of other COVID relief grants, and of course, the big new operator’s grant that the Federal government made available to movie theaters and performing arts centers. It amounted to about three-quarters of a million dollars that we had to raise in the course of the 65 weeks we were closed. But who’s counting? [laughs] IT: That was the introduction of your virtual model. BB: Yeah, that was just a nice confluence of theaters that were willing to change the way we thought about things, and distributors, really. It was key that the indie distributors were able to be nimble and adjust practices. In many cases, these were films that they already had plans to do a theatrical release for, and they were sorta stuck. They had to do something with these films, they’d acquired and paid for them and spent some money on marketing them, so they really had to find a way to find an audience for them. That seemed like a perfect fit for keeping us going during what was a potentially very dark time for film exhibition. [laughs] IT: And the theater has been renovated, post-COVID. BB: We had plans to do some renovations anyway, so we took the opportunity while we were closed to do them. We completely renovated the bathrooms, adding new hands-free fixtures, a fresh coat of paint and new countertops. Just to reopen, we had to make changes in the way the ventilation in the cinema was handled, we changed the filtration. We started public screenings back up in June of 2021, and we just in the last month went back to full

Bossard believes that Cinemapolis now being able to show some of the same films as Regal will be a boon for downtown. (Photo: Josh Baldo)

capacity screenings. That was more than a year of operating with limits in place. IT: The other big change is that for the first time, movies can play at Regal and Cinemapolis. What has it been like, factoring more mainstream titles like “Elvis” and “Nope” into the mix? BB: I think the industry has just changed immensely, particularly since the pandemic, but even before that. Many distributors were doing away with what they called “zone clearances” for their films, so they were booking films at any theater that would buy them, basically. Films like “Nope” and “Elvis” and “Three Thousand Years of Longing” fit our audience, and we can provide an opportunity for our audience to see a film without going up the hill. We’re not creating a danger for Regal, let’s put it that way. IT: What were some big recent hits? BB: Well, certainly “Everything Everywhere All at Once” was a tremendous success for us. We opened it in early April, and we played it for 15 or 16 weeks. Now, granted, in other metropolitan areas in upstate New York, they have multiple movie theaters that would have been playing that film, but pretty much from Syracuse to Buffalo, Cinemapolis was the top-selling theater for that film. We sold more tickets than anyone else. It hit a lot of sweet spots, both students and otherwise. I thought it was a great movie, and to see it accepted with such fervor among our audience was really gratifying.


UPS&DOWNS

N E W S L I N E

Fears Raised Regarding Local Drinking Water Put To Rest

Ups

To the County for doing what it can to support the airport. We need a thriving air hub to remain a vital community.

Downs

To people who are leaving their household trash along downtown streets. A trash tag really doesn’t cost that much.

Tompkins Gets Tied Up In Schuyler County Environmental Controversy

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HEARD&SEEN

By M at t D ough e rt y

ompkins County officials, surprised by claims made in a press release from the environmental watchdog group Seneca Lake Guardian (SLG), reached out to the group to clear up their concerns and then joined the group in criticizing the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) issuance of a permit based on faulty information. SLG recently put out a statement saying that the DEC ignored its own regulations by authorizing County Line Materials Recovery Facility, a waste transfer facility to be built in Cayuta in Schuyler County, to transfer 30,000 gallons of contaminated water — otherwise known as leachate — per year to the Ithaca facility. Chair of the Ithaca Area Wastewater Treatment Facility (IAWWTF) Special Joint Committee, Cynthia Brock responded to these claims saying, “The DEC did approve the permit, and the Seneca Lake Guardian and their attorney Earth Justice is filing an article 78 to challenge the permit.” SLG says that all of these leachates contain carcinogenic PFAS and there are currently no regulated ways to remove PFAS. Therefore, they should not be adding to creating new sources of PFAS that might discharge into the lake. According to Brock, “I think they’re saying about 80 gallons a day could be transferred. But keep in mind that [IAWWTF] treats 6.5 million gallons a day. They’ll probably wait until they fill a truck, they won’t be just transferring 80 gallons at a time. But even a truckload of this sort of water is not a significant volume for what we treat on a daily basis.” Additionally, Brock said that the IAWWTF is not permitted to treat industrial wastewater and that all industrial users are required to comply with industrial pretreatment standards and extensive technical review prior to releasing into the IAWWTF as set forth in the City’s State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES) permit. The Acting Assistant Superintendent of Water and Sewer for the City of Ithaca,

Heard

Brock believes the state is likely to come up with ways to regulate and set standards for PFAS. (Photo: Provided)

Yvonne Taylor of SLG claimed the DEC ignored PFAS concerns in issuing a permit. (Photo: Provided)

Scott Gibson, also said that “we simply cannot accept a waste stream that will cause harm to the treatment plant or cause a violation of our discharge permit.” He continued saying, “Haulers are issued approval only after a rigorous testing schematic.” The IAWWTF collects wastewater from a wide array of sources such as sewage, waste from dairy farms, landfills, porta potties, and more. Brock says that “the facility tests everything to make sure that it is within the limits that we are approved to receive, and then if it is within those limits, we treat it to remove those contaminants.” According to an SLG press release, “In its permit application, County Line described how it will handle the incoming waste and outgoing wastewater. The facility will accept municipal and commercial garbage, construction and demolition debris.” This debris contains PFAS, which exist in nearly everything manufactured. PFAS, otherwise known as per- and poly-floral alkyl substances, are chemicals that are known to be hazardous to human health and are a major cause of cancer. During the water treatment process, liquids are separated from the waste material and create leachate. This leachate is contaminated by the PFAS that existed within the materials it was separated from. According to SLG, this leachate has been authorized to be transported from the County Line facility to the IAWWTF, where it will then be discharged into Cayuga Lake. According to the president of SLG, Joseph Campbell, on June 15 the DEC granted County Line clearance to receive up to 500 tons a day of municipal wastes and other materials at its 7.49-acre site on Route 13 about one mile east of Alpine Junction in Cayuta. The vice president of SLG, Yvonne Taylor, recently said, “DEC ignored that County Line is a likely source of PFAS and

issued an operating permit anyway. We plan to challenge DEC’s decision while remaining vigilant in partnership with the treatment facility in an effort to protect our drinking water.” However, Scott Gibson says that SLG’s claims that PFAS contaminated leachate is being released into Cayuga Lake isn’t entirely accurate. According to Gibson, “many PFAS are actually removed in the sludge management process.” He continued saying that “PFAS become bound to solids which are then sent to a press to remove water and shipped to a landfill for disposal.” From there, the landfill produces leachate as rain water and other liquids move through the material and that leachate is then transported back to the treatment facility for further processing. Gibson says, “This is not to say that all PFAS are removed but to suggest that they are blowing out into the lake untreated is simply untrue.” The impact of forever chemicals like PFAS is an emerging issue that the EPA and DEC are just beginning to take seriously. These compounds exist in all waste streams, including private homes, collection systems, septage receiving and leachate. However, there are currently no wastewater testing requirements for PFAS. Assembly Member Anna Kelles of the 125th District, in response to the confusion and the potential threat to drinking water said that “Exposure to toxic forever chemicals known as PFAS is a growing issue that threatens the drinking water of New Yorkers across the State. I’m glad that Seneca Lake Guardian will fight to reverse DEC’s lackluster decision to issue a permit that erroneously directs these chemicals to go to a wastewater facility that is not perContin u ed on Page 10

People aren’t ready to start talking about local elections yet. They want a break and a respite from the turmoil of the rest of the world.

Seen

It looks like Ithaca is returning to what passes for normal. Downtown seems more crowded. Performances have bigger audiences. People walking around just appear more upbeat.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own praise or blame, write news@ithacatimes. com, with a subject head “U&D.”

QUESTION OF THE WEEK What’s the biggest issue facing Ithaca right now? 35.3% Affordable housing. High rents are driving working people out of the City. 61.8%

Crime and policing. Can we reimagine policing AND keep the City safe?

2.9%

Homelessness. How do we balance the needs of the unhoused and property owners?

N EXT WEEK ’S Q UESTION :

With COVID receding will you shop locally and in-person more? Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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GUEST OPINION

ITHACA NOTES

Revitalizing A Voice Of The Land

3,000 Hands Clapping

By Gayo g ohó:n ǫˀ L e a r n i ng P roj ect Wor k i ng Grou p

By St e ph e n Bu r k e

A

narrative of genocide and displacement: that’s the first—and until recently, only—story that most people hear about the inhabitants of the lands surrounding Cayuga Lake prior to European colonization. Knowledge about the Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ (pronounced “guy-oh-KHOH-no”, and also known as “Cayuga”) people who lived in this region for thousands of years is too often summarized All most people know of the original inhabitants of this area comes from historical markers by roadside “historical” markcommemorating their destruction. (Photo: File) ers that catalog a few days of the scorched-earth campaign of This tragedy, however, along with Washington’s troops in late September the continuing trauma of diaspora and of 1779, as they burned villages and disenfranchisement, is not an endpoint crops in their attempt to drive out Inin the story of the Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ people, digenous people. Carrying few physical although the simplified road signs might items other than treasured seeds, and make you assume this is the case. holding tight to their language and traDescendants of these courageous and ditions, Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ families fled to resilient people have survived, and with Ohio, Canada, and western New York; later, some moved to the Oklahoma ter- them, so have cultural identity, language, ritories. Facing starvation and a bitterly and foodways. The Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ people cold winter ahead, many lost their lives during the initial exodus. Contin u ed on Page 10

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dearth of downtown parking was disconcerting one recent night before realizing that a concert was the reason: a big show at the State Theater. Then the mild annoyance became, instead, reason to be glad. After more than two years of viral standstill, the world is stirring again. Of course, concerning the virus, it ain’t over till it’s over, and it ain’t over. The State Theater has crowds, but so do drug stores giving booster shots. But it’s good the crowds are beginning to tilt. In anticipation, the State Theater has a full slate of good shows scheduled. September is traditionally known as “the season,” or the start of it each year, in the worlds of art, culture and entertainment. Check the Arts and Leisure section of the New York Times on Sundays in August, and then in September, and you will notice a substantial increase in page count, with previews, reviews, announcements and ads for new shows, activities and exhibits of all kinds. At 1,500 seats, the State Theater is a major concert venue in central New York. Cornell University presents concerts, but tends not to publicize them much off campus, and the acts tend to skew toward a college audience rather than a wider one. Shows presented at Cornell are generally in halls primarily meant for lectures, classes and athletics. The State is a real, vintage theater, with elaborate, oldfashioned decor, Byzantine and busy. The seats have red fabric, of course. The massive curtains are maroon. The State was a movie theater until a time when such large houses became untenable. For a few years it was reconfigured with two screens, with the balcony walled off as a second theater, but that wasn’t profitable either. It sat vacant a few years until community activists brought it back for live shows. (It should be noted that this brief recap passes over, with apologies and respect, years of strenuous revival efforts by a great number of dedicated citizens and businesses.) A special energy exudes from such a magnificent old showcase in the heart of a modern town. There are no dedicated parking lots; performers’ tour buses sit out front, on the street. Stage doors open to the sidewalk. Between afternoon set-ups and evening performances the players might stroll downtown, visiting the record store, gui-

tar shop, book stores, food markets, cafes and restaurants. Sometimes there are antics. One of the first important shows at the newly revived State in the ‘90s was Ani DiFranco. She had played as a relative unknown at the GrassRoots Festival a few years before and developed a regional following (she is from Buffalo), but in short time her career took a rapid turn to massive popularity. It promised to be a big night for the State, until it developed that Patty Larkin, a more established artist with a similar fanbase, was scheduled to play the same night at a theater two blocks away. It was a smaller theater, but it threatened to divert interest from Ani’s show, and maybe hundreds of ticket sales. The smaller theater might easily sell out, but the State had a thousand more seats to fill. There was gnawing worry at the State up until the afternoon of the show, when a staffer coming in reported a stirring sight outside: hundreds of fans lining up on the street, three or four hours before showtime. The show was general admission and they were arriving early - extremely early - to get good seats. The box office checked ticket sales. In those less automated days, such information was less readily retrieved. The numbers indicated that the show might sell out, competition or no. The crowd outside indicated it would be powerful. Someone went to get Ani. “You have to see this,” they said. “There’s a line going around the block.” Curious, a bit incredulous, Ani went to a stage door that opened to the street. She peeked out just a crack, not to be seen. But to get the full scope she had to emerge, and finally did. She tried to be furtive, but it didn’t quite work, and she was spied. Then the incredulity was from the crowd, but people stayed cool: some gasps, but no signs of grasping. With that Ani felt comfortable enough to come out. She stood with her hands on her hips and addressed the crowd. “Hey, what’s the matter?” she shouted. She looked up and down the block. “Couldn’t you people get tickets to see Patty Larkin?” The crowd was too addled to laugh, but Ani did. “Well, don’t worry,” she said. “We’ll do a few of her songs.” After many years Ani is back in Ithaca for a show November 8, making music and memories; maybe covering Patty Larkin, who knows. The State Theater, of course, is the scene.


SPORTS

Ithaca 5 & 10 By St ev e L aw r e nc e

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thought the algorithm goblins were at work. Last week’s column pointed out that I am 30 years into my tenure as the Ithaca Times sports guy, and when I was looking for a story idea for this week, who should pop up, but Bob Congdon, about whom I started writing...you guessed it...30 years ago. Ithaca’s Henry Williams finishes first in the 10K portion of the Ithaca 5&10. Back then, I wrote about Bob’s impressive streak also saw the Virgil 100-Mile Ultra and the of twenty-some consecutive Boston start of the N.Y.S. Adult Cross Country Marathons (he would run many more), season. A lot of people that would have and this week I saw that he was one normally been at the 5 & 10 were competof the loyal runners taking part in the ing in those races.” iconic Ithaca 5&10, described on the Once again, I tracked down Bob CongFinger Lakes Runners Club’s website as don and he said that he didn’t run as well “Ithaca’s oldest foot race.” I asked Gary as he wanted to, but that he was pleased McCheyne—this year’s Race Directo keep his streak going. He has run every tor—just how long the event had been in existence, and he said, “This was our 45th one of the 45 Ithaca 5 & 10s, and he is also a member of the exclusive Boston Marayear. We took a couple of years off, but thon Quarter Century Club. He told me, this was year number 45.” “I ran Boston forty times—thirty conMcCheyne—who has directed or secutive—and that got me into the club.” co-directed the race for 10 years—first Looking back, Bob said, “I was one of ran the 5 &10 in 1978, back when those the race’s (the Ithaca 5 & 10) originators, numbers represented miles rather than and Jim Hartshorne got involved as Race kilometers. I was not aware of the switch, Director. He knew how to run things.” As so when I asked him who won the races, area runners know, when Jim got involved and he said, “the winning times were with something, it was done properly, 32:06 for the 10 and 16:40 for the 5,” I and the race’s longevity would make him thought a pair of world records had been proud, for sure. set. In Gary’s words, “It just got too hard Steve Ryan is another longtime local to get volunteers for the longer races.” He road warrior, and he—at age 71—finished was quick to add, “This year, we had 47 second in the Over-60 division. Bob volunteers, and I really appreciate them huffed a little at having to compete with all. Without them we can’t put on the a youngster such as Ryan, as he laughed races.” and stated that he would prefer an OverThis year’s field of 168 runners (and 75 age group, given he is now 77. Bob 15 in the kids’ Fun Run) ranged in age implied—of course—that he would run from 10 to well over 70, and McCheyne faster next year. said, “Every year, they come out of the woodwork.” The runners were treated to a cool morning with a light rain (“runner’s ● ● ● weather,” in McCheyne’s words), and the route starts at Ithaca High School, runs A couple of columns back, I wrote down to Court Street, back up Tioga to about the upcoming Friday Night Fights Fall Creek, back up Lake Street. Years ago, at GIAC, but I regret to inform readers a loop around Stewart Park was included, that this Friday’s event has been postbut when the race was shortened due to poned. Balancing the schedules of numerthe difficulty of getting enough volunous fighters is a challenge, and the orgateers, that part was scratched. nizers need more time to make it happen. Gary was impressed that the field was Stay tuned at GIAC’s website (www. so well-populated, given the full running cityofithaca.org/327/Greater-Ithaca-Activschedule in the region. “Our race was just ities-Center) or call the agency at 607-272one of three events,” he offered. “Sunday 3622 for updates.

The Talk at

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Ithaca Times Chooses Division

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arlier this morning [September 2] Ithaca Police Officers responded to another terrible situation that unfolded on the Ithaca Commons, a call for help involving a member of our community experiencing a mental health crisis. This incident was hastily reported on by Ithaca Times reporter Matt Dougherty on Twitter. Why does the Ithaca Times and Matt Dougherty continue to choose division over community healing, partnership, collaboration, respect and understanding? Mr. Dougherty and the Ithaca Times said everything they wanted to in the first paragraph of their story titled “Mental Health Issue on the Ithaca Commons”. “Around 9:30 a.m. on September 2, IPD responded to a mental health incident near the Ithaca Commons. Several officers, including a K9 unit, entered an apartment above the Ithaca Times building and proceeded to taze the suspect multiple times.” They should have just stopped there. The Ithaca Times could have taken this opportunity to use their platform for something constructive to bring our broken and struggling Ithaca community together. Matt Dougherty could have highlighted how in many cases, those suffering from mental health issues in our community remain unsupported and on their own, failed by the system. He could have done research and reported multiple perspectives on the issue from people who can offer solutions. The Ithaca Times could have waited for a factually based statement from the Ithaca Police Department to fully understand the context of the situation this morning. They could have highlighted another dangerous critical incident on the Ithaca Commons brought to a peaceful

resolution by the hardworking men and women of the unsupported and crumbling Ithaca Police Department. Despite everything, these same Officers continue to show up and put themselves in harm’s way for our community and our safety. Ultimately Mr. Dougherty decided instead to use this unfortunate situation where Ithaca Police Officers were responding to a call for help so he could further divide our community and paint our public servants in a poor light. The person who was the subject of the call for help this morning, likely experiencing their worst day, was also unfairly criminalized by Matt Dougherty who referred to them as a “suspect” without even considering the underlying reasons for their behavior. This article was a blatant and shameful attempt by the Ithaca Times to continue to marginalize our police officers from the community while also harshly degrading a person in crisis. This is extremely disappointing; Matt Dougherty and the Ithaca Times should be ashamed. The continued attempts by the local media to divide our community and misrepresent Ithaca Police Officers with no understanding of the dangerous work they do or those who they frequently interact with and assist must stop immediately. We need to come together now and focus on solutions, not politics and the past. We must choose healing over hate. Thomas W. Condzella President, Ithaca Police Benevolent Association Editor’s Note: The Ithaca Times stands behind our story and our reporter.

Park Bathrooms Are Disappointing

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n an area that has some of the most beautiful parks in the world, why is it that the bathrooms are such crap? There are so many wonderful people living around the Finger Lakes area. I’m certain folks would donate their time to paint rusty doors and brush away cobwebs. Perhaps stores would supply paint, brushes, etc. and write it off as a donation. Next time you are in Taughannock, Cass, and Myers, be a “four flusher” and check out all the facilities. Cindy Schachner Margolis, Ithaca

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SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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WHERE ITHACA CRIME HAPPENS The IPD’s Dashboard Offers Access To Data On Calls And Staffing By M att Dougherty

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hen the City of Ithaca set out to reimagine public safety two years ago, building a better relationship between residents and police was the top priority. As part of that effort the Ithaca Police Department developed an online data dashboard and gave the public access to it on June 8. In a statement released to the media, Acting IPD Chief John Joly said, “There is a ton of information available here and we are excited to share this with the public.” He continued saying, “...it’s just to be transparent, we wanted to be able to provide the citizens with a window into what happens, what the Ithaca Police Department is doing, and what their tax dollars are paying for.” However, he also said that “it’s important for people to understand the limitations of our resources.” The dashboard can be found on the City of Ithaca website at https://www.cityofithaca.org/752/Community-Dashboard and includes up to date information about police calls, responses, and arrests going as far back as 2019. The dashboard also provides the public with information regarding the number of officers that respond to a scene. According to Joly, the number of officers responding to an average call is down as a result of staffing shortages. The information can be filtered by year, location and call type and is updated on a weekly basis, every Tuesday at midnight. The dashboard is designed to increase community oversight of IPD and will allow community members to gain an understanding of the types of calls IPD responds to as well as the volume of calls. It also provides information about where calls are coming from and how many of those calls result in arrests. At the time of writing, the dashboard indicates that since January 2022 there have 8 T

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been 13,490 total calls made to IPD and 496 of them–or 3.7%–have resulted in arrests being made. The overwhelming majority of calls, which according to the dashboard is 96.3%, do not result in arrests being made. The most common response locations have been at the Ithaca Arthaus, West Village apartments, Walmart, 7 Eleven, Cayuga Gardens Apartments, Wegmans, the St. Johns Center and the Ithaca Commons. While arrests aren’t made often, the majority occur at Walmart followed by 7Eleven, Ithaca Arthaus, Wegmans Grocery, West Village Apts, and the Dandy Mini Mart. IPD Sergeant Mary Orsaio, who presented the dashboard to the Common Council’s Reimagining Special Committee,

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explained that when the Ithaca Police Department is listed as a response location, as it is in the largest number of calls (764), it is because the call was made to the IPD or someone physically came into the IPD. Orsaio said the data shown on the dashboard is compiled from IPD’s InTime timekeeping software and its Spillman records management software and is operated using Microsoft Power BI. Orsaio also noted that there are roll over help boxes and a tutorial video available to help citizens understand how to access data. The dashboard does not, at present, offer a mapping feature. The Ithaca Times has taken the data from the dashboard and created a map of the top locations for calls and arrests.

CALL DESCRIPTIONS

When you explore the IPD Dashboard the ways calls are described might be confusing. Here’s a guide to what those terms mean, based on the original report prepared by the Reimagining Public Safety Working Group. These are not an exact match for the Call Types used in the IPD’s Dashboard, but they provide enough information to help understand what the terms in the dashboard mean. • Assault: Calls related to the unlawful attack by one person upon another. • Assisting another Gov. Resource: Calls relating to assisting another agency or resource. • Bomb Threat: Calls related to a threat to bomb.


2022 Totals As of September 11 13,490 calls 496 arrests 1. Ithaca Commons 128 calls, 0 arrests 2. Seneca Street Parking Garage 84 calls, 0 arrests 3. Chanticleer 25 calls, 5 arrests 4. 7 Eleven 195 calls, 30 arrests 5. Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services 38 calls, 7 arrests 6. 210 Hancock Street Apartments 44 calls, 6 arrests 7. Chuck’s Gas Mart 59 calls, 7 arrests 8. St. John’s Center 147 calls, 9 arrests 9. Dandy Mini Mart 76 calls, 11 arrests 10. Cayuga Garden Apartments 178 calls, 7 arrests 11. Ithaca Arthaus 416 calls, 25 arrests 12. West Village Apartments 405 calls, 16 arrests 13. Wegmans 161 calls, 18 arrests 14. 200 block of Fair Street 22 calls, 4 arrests 15. Northside Wine & Spirits 22 calls, 7 arrests 16. Walmart 252 calls, 44 arrests 17. Byrne Dairy 96 calls, 6 arrests 18. Stewart Park (not shown due to scale) 122 calls, 0 arrests • Burglary: Calls related to the unlawful entry into a building or other structure with the intent to commit a theft. • Cardiac Arrest: Calls related to a person experiencing reported cardiac arrest. • Child Abuse: Calls related to the act of willful harm to a child. • Civil Complaint: Calls that relate to complaints not criminal in nature. • Criminal Mischief: Calls related to the destruction of property. • Dead Body: Calls relating to the scene of death; differs depending on whether medical attention or CSI (crime scene investigation) is needed.

• Disorderly Conduct: Calls relating to public activity or behavior that's offensive or disruptive and interrupts other people's ability to enjoy a public space. • Dispute: Calls to investigate a dispute between individuals. • Domestic: Calls related to disturbances or assaults involving adult members of a domestic relationship. • Drugs: Calls related to illegal narcotics. • Fraud: Calls related to the use of deceit to induce an entity to part with something of value or to surrender a legal right. • Harassment: Calls related to reports of being the subject of ongoing unwanted contacts.

• Intoxication: Calls related to intoxicated individual(s). • Local Law: Calls relating to municipal code violations. • Missing Person: Calls relating to missing person reports. • Noise Complaint: Calls relating to excessive or bothersome noise. • Parking Problem: Calls related to illegal or hazardous parking. • Personal Injury Accident: Calls related to a vehicle collision in which someone is injured as a result. • Property Check: Calls to check a property for signs of break in while the owners are not present.

• Property Complaint: Calls relating to complaints regarding private property. • Psychiatric: Calls related to mental health. • Public Health Complaint: Calls related to a public health related event. • Robbery: Calls related to the taking or attempt to take anything of value from the control, custody, or care of another person by force or intimidation. • Sex Offense: Calls related to any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is inContin u ed on Page 10

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mitted or allowed to accept industrial waste in the first place, protecting the drinking water sources of Ithaca residents. We must continue this kind of work across the State.” According to Brock, “New York State is in the process of trying to come up with ways to regulate and set standards for PFAS and PFOA’s,” but the DEC or EPA has yet to act. Brock continued saying, “I think it’s coming soon, but it doesn’t exist yet. So to claim that the wastewater treatment plant is somehow negligent or irresponsible was unnecessarily alarmist because [IAWWTF] does everything we can to make sure that we remove contaminants to the utmost extent.” Brock added that “there are sure to be [PFAS] testing requirements in the future. We want to assure residents that the IAWWTF has and will continue to engage in rigorous testing and compliance with the law to protect Cayuga Lake as a high-quality drinking water source that people can feel confident about.” Brock also said that one of the benefits of the IAWWTF is that it has a longstanding partnership to do research on emergent contaminants with Cornell University and Ithaca College. “We were in the forefront in the push against microplastics in the water and trying to remove microplastics from our waste stream. So we have always been very aggressive in researching these things.”

and their language are richly tied to the landscape from which they sprang, here in what we know as the Finger Lakes region. Embedded in this language structure itself are profound lessons about relationships with the natural world, and guidance for responsible and gratitude-fi lled stewardship of our environment. Alarmingly, Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ language is now designated as critically endangered by UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Fewer than a dozen people survive today whose first language is Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ–and only one lives in the traditional Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ homelands in New York State. Nonetheless, many more are now learning to speak Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ and are working towards its revitalization and spread. The Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ Learning Project is a fiscally-sponsored project of the Center for Transformative Action, based in Ithaca. The Project offers place-based Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ culture and language classes taught by a first-language speaker. Year-round classes are offered virtually to reach

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capable of giving consent or reports of unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse. Shots Fired: Calls related to reports of hearing gunshots with no indication of a victim. Suspicious: Calls related to reports of suspicious persons, vehicles, or circumstances. Theft: Calls related to the unlawful taking of property from the possession of another entity. Traumatic Injury: Calls related to reported injured person. Trespassing: Calls to investigate a person unlawfully on another's property. Unsecured Premise: Calls related to investigating a premise with an unsecured door or window. Warrant: Calls related to court issued warrants. Weapons: Calls related to weapons, people being in the possession of or a found weapon. Welfare Check: Calls related to requests to check on the health or safety of a subject.

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the Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ diaspora throughout the US and Canada, and are also presented locally to familiarize nonGayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ people with the language and perspectives of the First Peoples of this land. Fees from locally-presented classes help support the Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ Learning Project’s main mission: to support Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ language revitalization efforts that are rooted in ancestral Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ lands and to serve as a politically neutral meeting point for Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ people wanting to learn more about their language, culture and ancestral lands. People and culture thrive when language and connection to place stay alive. Remember that highway historical markers only tell the stories of those who erected the signs. Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ culture and language persist right here in the Finger Lakes Region, through language study, perspective, and in relationship with the landscape. For more information about attending Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ culture and language classes or becoming a part of the Gayogo̱ hó:nǫˀ Learning Project’s crucial language revitalization efforts, visit https://gayogohono-learning-project.org/. The next session of local in-person classes starts September 28.



Public Cruises, Community Events & Private Charters

Welcome Aboard! DiscoverCayugaLake.org | 607-327-LAKE

Artist Residency

work by Maryam Adib

Open House

Paintings by Brian Keeler 743 Snyder Hill Rd Ithaca, NY

Sunday, Sept. 18 2:00 - 4:00pm 435 Ellis Hollow Creek Rd, Ithaca

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Open Daily 12-5 by Appointment www.northstarartgallery.com

607-323-7684

BRIAN KEELER “Cayuga Light Impression,” oil on panel, 26 x 30”

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Call info@northstarartgallery.com


Birding

Flying Circles Around Cayuga By Mark L e v ine

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ayuga Lake is a birding mecca for those in the know. Visitors with an interest in all things avian may make the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (159 Sapsucker Woods Road, https:// www.birds.cornell.edu/home) their first stop—with good reason since it is a worldrenowned facility and a great day trip on its own—but local birders know there are a dozen other incredible sites circling Cayuga that offer opportunities to see a large variety of migratory, breeding, and nesting birds, every season. Here are the twelve must-go spots for birding around Cayuga Lake this fall. We’ll start in Ithaca and make our way up the east side of the lake and then down the west side. One quick note before we start off: many of these sites have information kiosks where you can obtain more birding information than we’re able to provide here.

1. Stewart Park, Ithaca There are lots of reasons to visit Stewart Park, but for birders its lakeshore and the outlet of Fall Creek are great places to see migratory waterfall. Check out Renwick Woods and the Fuertes Natural Area for Songbirds and smaller Birds of Prey. The pond just east of Fuertes is popular with common geese and ducks. And don’t leave without scanning the southwest side of Fall Creek for large flocks of nesting Double-crested Cormorant. In fall, you’re apt to see Brant, Green Heron, Ruddy Duck, and those Double-crested Cormorant.

2. East Shore Park, Ithaca This next stop is just a short stroll up the lakeshore from Stewart Park. What makes it different than Stewart Park is that it offers better views west across the lake, giving you a chance to see large flocks of seasonal migrations. In fall you can hope to see Black Scoter, Great Black-backed Gull, Hooded Merganser, and Ring-billed Gull.

3. Myers Park, Lansing The highlight here is the outlet of Salmon Creek where you can look westward over the lake for waterfowl and migrations. The Salt Point Natural Area’s trails offer opportunities to see Songbirds and Birds of Prey. Historically there have been Osprey nests in the vicinity. Fall will offer chances to see American Coot, Carolina Wren, Redtailed Hawk, and Turkey Vulture.

4. Long Point State Park, Aurora The whole shoreline offers spots to see Waterfowl and migratory birds, but focus on the point near the marina which gives a great panoramic vista. The trails east of the main road will give you opportunities to spot Songbirds, woodpeckers, and owls. In fall, you might see American Kestrel, Northern Flicker, Short-eared Owl, and Yellow-rumped Warbler.

5. Frontenac Park, Union Springs Both North and South Pond are springfed, and as a result, don’t freeze in the winter, making them prime spots. Another excellent location is at the point by the marina at the southern tip of the park. The railroad bridge at the north end of the park gives you a vista to a marsh across the canal. Autumn offers opportunities to see Black-capped Chickadee, Dark-eyed Junco, Hooded Merganser, and Northern Cardinal.

6. John Harris Park, Cayuga Like all these lakeshore sites, Waterfowl and migratory birds should be visible here. But what makes this site special is that it’s a prime cold weather spot since the area north of the park near the channel doesn’t freeze over during winter. There are often many different species of ducks nearby. In fall, look for Belted Kingfisher, Blue Jay, Bonaparte’s Gull, and Gadwall.

7. Mud Lock on River Road, Cayuga For many, the highlight of any birding trip around Cayuga Lake is visiting the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge at the north tip of the lake. There are driving tours, walking tours, viewing towers and platforms. Download the online tour by the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex ( https://mwc.oncell.com/ en/tour-of-the-montezuma-wetlandscomplex-153838.html ) on your phone. Make sure to stop at C-S Canal Lock 1, commonly known as the Mud Lock (136 River Road). From the boat launch area you can scan the marsh and see the Bald Eagle nest atop the transmission tower to the southwest. In fall the Bald Eagle are usually easy to spot, and you’re also apt to see Canada Goose, Double-crested Cormorant, Pied-billed Grebe, and Ringnecked Duck.

8. Cayuga Lake State Park, Seneca Falls It’s now time to start down the west side of the lake. Cayuga Lake State Park is yet another great location to see Waterfowl and migratory birds. The main boat launch area is perhaps the best spot, but there are also good sighting opportunities around the campsites on the other side of Route 89. In fall expect to see Black-capped Chickadee, Great Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, and Ringbilled Gull.

Double-crested Cormorant are visible all around the lake during the fall. (Photo: Frank Schulenburg / CC BY-SA 4.0)

9. Sheldrake Park, Ovid This is a wonderful spot to look eastward across the lake and The Bald Eagle at Montezuma are usually easiest to spot in the fall. (Photo: Friends Of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex) perhaps catch views of large flocks of Migratory birds. The wooded areas will give you a Waterfowl along the lake shore but focus chance to see Songbirds. In fall, you could on the outlet of Taughannock Creek which spot Belted Kingfisher, Common Loon, is a great spot to see Loons. Don’t leave Mallard, and Ring-billed Gull. without crossing Route 89 and walking the gorge trails where you’ll see lots of Songbirds, and also take in the highest waterfall east of the Rockies. In fall, expect to see Common Loon, Common Merganser, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and Pileated While a great site for spotting migraWoodpeckers. tory Waterfowl, the woods on either side of the boat launch are excellent spots for Songbirds. Be aware that you’re leaving state land when you reach private driveways south of the launch. Heading north, make sure to cross Hicks Gully and JohnThe last spot on our circle tour is son Creek before you leave. Likely birds Ithaca’s popular multi-use Cass Park at the to spot here in Autumn are Great Blacksouth tip of the lake. If you haven’t gotten backed Gull, Less Black-backed Gull, Red- your fill of Double-crested Cormorant bellied Woodpecker, and White-breasted by now, head south from the marina and Nuthatch. look across the inlet. Hog’s Hole is the best spot here to see Songbirds but be aware the ground there can be quite wet unless the water level is low. That’s most likely in the winter and early spring. In fall look for Cedar Waxwing, Downy Woodpecker, and As you enter the home stretch of your Gray Catbirds, as well as Double-crested lap around the lake, make sure to stop Cormorant. at this popular park. You’ll be able to see

10. Dean’s Cove State Boat Launch, Romulus

12. Cass Park & Allan H. Treman State Marine Park, Ithaca

11. Taughannock Falls State Park, Trumansburg

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History

When Ithaca Rode Shotguns By C h arl e y Githl e r

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or many years, if anyone outside the region had heard of Ithaca, it was very likely because of either Cornell University or the guns of the Ithaca Gun Company. Now, except for its reputation among gun owners and collectors, Ithaca Gun has mostly receded into local history. Only the smokestack remains as a physical reminder of the factory, and issues surrounding redeveloping the site have swirled for years, but the story of the company’s rise and decline are an important part of Ithaca’s heritage. The genesis of the Ithaca Gun Company dates back to Ithaca’s manufacturing heyday. It was a feature of America’s growing Industrial Revolution during and after the Civil War that businesses were seemingly freely started and abandoned. There was a “can-do” spirit in the air, and if an enterprise failed, you picked up and tried something else. Ithaca Gun was born in that context. Lewis Smith, of Center Lisle (near Whitney Point on today’s Route 79), had failed in the tanning business, so he started a general store. Then, at some point he connected with William Baker, also a Center Lisle native, who had designed and patented several improvements to gun mechanics, and by 1863, the two of them

joined forces and began manufacturing firearms, first in Marathon, then in Lisle. Soon Lewis’ sons, Leroy and Lyman, worked in the business and it grew. By 1877, they had moved to Syracuse, making “Baker’s Patented Double Breechloaded Gun.” Then in 1883, Baker and Leroy Smith relocated to Ithaca as the “Ithaca Gun Works” where they purchased, for $6000, the property, flume, water wheel, and water rights on “water power lot #6” on Fall Creek. By 1885, they were calling themselves the Ithaca Gun Company. The site they bought was already in an industrial pocket. It had most recently been the Ithaca Falls Steam Bending Hub and Spoke Works furnishing, according to an 1881 Ithaca Journal advertisement, “bentwork, hubs, spokes, etc. for carriages and sleighs.” That section of Fall Creek, thanks to Ezra Cornell’s 1832 dam and tunnel, supplied a reliable source of water power and there were grist mills, saw mills, and the Ithaca Paper Company that dated back decades by the time Smith and Baker got there. In 1886, Leroy Smith and his brotherin-law George Livermore bought out the Baker interests, and the company became a family business, which it would remain

for the next 81 years. Leroy himself was involved in the design of some of the company’s guns, and patented four “hammerless” shotguns in the late 1880s. In time, Leroy Smith and George Livermore agreed in a handshake deal to split the company equally. Ithaca Gun incorporated in 1904, and the Smith and Livermore branches of the family each got 50% of the stock. Leroy and George and their descendants would alternate in executive positions until the mid-1960s. The firm grew quickly. By 1900, Ithaca Gun had 80 employees. A series of expansions of the physical plant (1890, 1904, 1917) brought the facility from the bank of Fall Creek to the edge of Lake Street, and the company’s rise to prominence fit squarely within the rise in general manufacturing in the late 19th century in Ithaca. In the 1880s, when Ithaca Gun became an Ithaca company, the newly-minted city (incorporated in 1888) had a glass company, cigar factories, the Ithaca Calendar Clock Company, a hive of industrial activity around the inlet/ canal and a host of other small companies. In 1890, there were 80 firms in and around town, selling $1.7 million in products. In fact, even with all the new businesses, industrialization was still kind of new in the 1880s. Before 1811 in New

The first year of production at Ithaca Gun in 1880. (Photo: The History Center in Tompkins County)

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Annie Oakley insisted on using an Ithaca shotgun for her performances in the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, and the company touted that insistence in its ads. (Photo: The History Center in Tompkins County)

York, a manufacturing company could be incorporated only by a special act of the New York State Legislature; a cumbersome process. Even after that, there were limitations on a company’s size and the types of manufacturing that were permitted. But by late in the century, a company could commence business much more freely, and could incorporate by filing a certificate with the Secretary of State. Of course, the labor movement grew in step with this surge in new businesses. In April 1881, Ithaca cigarmakers went on strike to oppose an anticipated wage cut. In January 1881, 21 women at the Button Works on the corner of Auburn and Franklin Streets walked out, demanding higher wages. (The factory relocated to Scranton, Pennsylvania in response.) Ithaca was by no means unique in this regard. There was scarcely a city of any size in the Midwest or Northeast that didn’t have numerous manufacturing businesses at the time. Not all the companies would survive, but Ithaca Gun did, and its longevity as a family business makes it as noteworthy as its success. Contin u ed on Page 5


ITHACA GUN contin u ed from page 4

Also, there were the guns. Very early, the company developed a reputation for high quality, innovative design and artistic decoration. Ithaca guns were particularly noted for exquisite engraving on metal components as well as elaborately-carved wooden stocks. One of its greatest successes was in 1907, when Ithaca Gun bought the rights to Emil Flues’ patented shotgun that had only three moving parts per barrel. They upgraded the design and the Ithaca Flues double-barrel shotgun became the best-selling American-made gun of its kind, with more than 223,000 sold by 1926. It effectively drove Remington out of the double barrel shotgun market. All businesses ebb and flow, of course, but the first three decades of the 20th century were flush times for Ithaca Gun. During the 1920s, the company was making 50,000 guns per year, and its products were being sold and advertised widely. Annie Oakley insisted on Ithaca guns when she performed in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. John Philip Sousa (at one time president of the American Trap Shooters Association) was an Ithaca Gun enthusiast. Dwight Eisenhower and George C. Marshall owned 76749 double-barrel Kendal Dog Ad shotguns. for Ithaca Times T: 10 x 5.5 Ithaca

Then the Great Depression hit and sales took a nosedive. At the lowest point, in the years 1931-1933, the sales force was reduced to 18-20 workers at any given time. Around 1937, though, the company began production of what is probably its best-known and most popular shotgun, the Ithaca Model 37. It was an almost immediate success and went on to have the longest production run of any pump-action shotgun, and more than two million of the guns have been sold over the years since. Lightweight and durable, its bottom-ejecting feature made it adaptable for either right- or left-handed users. It became the standard issue shotgun for the Los Angeles and the New York City police departments and is still available today. In December 1941, the United States entered World War II, and the entire plant capacity was devoted to the war effort. All the civilian gun manufacturing equipment was packed into storage. Before the end of 1942, Ithaca Gun employed 900 men and women in day and night shifts, working around the clock. The company made, among other things, Colt .45 Automatic Pistols, producing 382,000 of them by the end of the war. After the war, the company was sustained by sales of the Model 37, and various products for the U.S. government

The Ithaca Gun factory in its heyday. (Photo: The History Center in Tompkins County)

and law enforcement agencies. Successive generations of the Smith family continued to run the firm. George Livermore actually remained as Chairman of the Board of Directors until his death in 1950 at the age of 104. (His son Paul left the family house at 313 North Aurora Street to the Ithaca community. It currently houses the Ithaca United Way.) By the 1960s, though, things changed. For one thing, there was a shift in the culture. The civilian demand for shotguns leveled off. America was no longer a rural country where “every farmer needs a shotgun.” Furthermore, nobody in that generation of the extended Smith family was interested in running the company. It

was decided that Ithaca Gun should be put up for sale. The company was a family business in more than one sense though, in that there were families that had generations of gunmakers that had worked for Ithaca Gun. In deference to those employees, the Smith family held out longer than they should have, turning down a number of offers that didn’t promise to keep the company in Ithaca. Ultimately, a holding company bought the factory and the gun designs, becoming a diversified entity called General Recreation, Inc. The Smiths got the promise to stay, but not in writing. Contin u ed on Page 14

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Libations

Georgian Wines On My Mind By Bil l C h ai s son

I

n 1994 Marti and Tom Macinski, owners of Standing Stone Vineyards, planted an acre of Saperavi grapes. Two other winemakers in the Finger Lakes—McGregor Vineyard and Dr. Frank Vinifera Wine Cellars—also had this ancient variety from the Republic of Georgia in the ground. Until 2011, no one was allowed to put the name “Saperavi” on a bottle because the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) did not recognize it as a wine-making grape. This is ironic because archaeological evidence shows that the Georgians have been making wine in the Caucasus Mountains for 8,000 years. On May 12, 2022, Dr. Frank Vinifera Wine Cellars held its first Saperavi festival. It was, said owner Fred Frank, a tremendous success. About 300 people tasted both Saperavi and Rkatsiteli, the most popular red and white wines, respectively, from Georgia. In addition to the host vineyard’s wine, visitors were able to taste several wines imported from the small republic east of the Black Sea and north of Armenia. Konstantin Frank, who was a professor at the polytechnic university in Odessa, Ukraine, brought Saperavi and 59 other grape varieties over to the Finger Lakes in

the 1950s. Like other Old-World wineproducing varieties, it is derived from Vitis vinifera. While Konstantin was an academic, his son Willy was a businessman. “When he took over in 1984,” said Willy’s son Fred, “he began to run it as more of a business and less as an experiment.” Willy Frank whittled down the list of wines made to more proven varieties. Saperavi took a back seat. It is a teinturier variety, which means that both the skin and the pulp are red. “We don’t need to soak it on the skins as long,” Frank said. “Most wines get more tannic while the color leaches from the skins during maceration.” Maceration is the part of the winemaking process during which tannins, color, and flavor leach into the must, the mixture of pulp and juice in the tank. In most grape varieties the juice is grayish or clear, but with teinturier grapes it is red from the start. Saperavi’s shorter maceration is an advantage in the East, Frank said, where grapes may not ripen fully before harvest. Saperavi is not especially winter-hardy, less so than Cabernet Franc or Lemberger (Blaufränkisch) but more so than Pinot Noir. The bunches are very loose and it is, according to Frank, less prone to rot (until it isn’t, as we shall see).

Fred Frank held a successful Saperavi festival at Dr. Frank Vinifera Wine Cellars in May, highlighting Georgian wines. (Photo: Josh Baldo)

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The Saperavi grape from Georgia was one of the Old-World varieties brought to the Finger Lakes by Konstantin Frank in the 1950s. (Photo: Josh Baldo)

Frank praised the deep red color of Saperavi and described the flavor profile as “all across the board,” changing greatly with growing conditions. Dr. Frank Vinifera Wine Cellars grows this grape near Keuka Lake in a site that is steep and stony with shaley, acidic soils. In 2007 they planted Saperavi in the Hector “banana belt.” “The water in Seneca Lake is 600 feet deep, which moderates the winter temperatures,” Frank said. “The vineyard there has deep, loamy soils that are more basic, less steep, and less rocky.” The Dr. Frank Saperavi wine is a blend of grapes from these two locations. “It is fermented in steel with an open top,” he said, “and manually punched down.” This latter process breaks the skins. “Then we move it into French oak barrels for a second malo-lactic fermentation.” The conversion from malic to lactic acid creates wine with a rounder, fuller mouthfeel. After the second fermentation it is kept in new French oak barrels for about a year before bottling. Dr. Frank produces between 500 and 750 cases of Saperavi per year, and every year they are planting more vines of this variety. In the early 1960s, during 2 0 2 2

Konstantin’s time, production was more limited and sporadic. Fred Frank worked with his grandfather during high school and college. Although he studied business at Cornell, he worked in the wine industry for many years afterward. After he succeeded his father as president of the winery in 1993, he began to blend the philosophies of the previous two generations, an approach continued by his daughter Megan, who has graduate degrees in both business and the science of wine. Saperavi is again on the shelves. The popularity of this Georgian grape took off about nine years ago, according to Fred Frank. “You need multiple makers to popularize a wine,” he said. “Saperavi is one of the up and comers. The next big buzz is going to be sparkling wine.” Which is interesting because that is one of the things that Fred Merwarth makes with it. Oskar Bynke, Merwarth, and his wife Maressa own Hermann J. Wiemer Vineyard in Dundee, which in 2017 acquired Standing Stone Vineyards in Hector, along with what had expanded to 8.5 acres of Saperavi grapes. Contin u ed on Page 7


GEORGIAN WINES contin u ed from page 6

Merwarth had no prior experience with Saperavi and, he said, Standing Stone really didn’t either. By 2017 the Macinskis had only made a couple of barrels of wine because only an acre was producing grapes. However, they planted over seven acres after 2014, and by 2021 all of these vines were producing. It is in a single block that extends from the Seneca Lake shore eastward up the hill. Merwarth, who is also the vineyard manager, noted there are interesting undulations in the block. The rows run north-south, divided by an east-west road. North of the road the vines are bigger with higher production. These are berries he uses for sparkling wine and rosé. South of the road the vines are smaller, produce less and are used to make red wine. “We tackled it in a systematic way,” Merwarth said of making Saperavi wines. They begin by selecting grapes from several different places in the block in order to eventually blend them. All their grapes are hand-picked. He, winemaker Dillon Buckley, and assistant winemaker Bryanna Cramer focused on rosé first. “We picked early and it had screaming acid,” Merwarth said. They put whole clusters in the tank and pumped over the juice instead of punching down. They made it in steel, wood, and stone tanks and blended the results. “The stone was interesting,” Merwarth said. “It rounded out the fruits.” They add Gewurztraminer—up 5-6%—in

order to lighten the rosé and round out the taste. Merwarth said the acidity of Saperavi is perfect for sparkling wine. “We stop the cuvée [juice extraction] at 30%, so Saperavi doesn’t yield a lot,” he said. “We usually go to 70% with other grapes.” While they produced and sold rosé and sparkling Saperavi, they continued to search for the best way to produce a red varietal bottle. “We were surprised by the lack of tannins,” Merwarth said. “So, we started adding whole clusters and doing pour overs.” They focused on getting enough heat from the fermentations. “We found that it lacked a mid-palate structure; the flavor is up front and then drops off.” The acid level was high—12-13 grams per liter—even when the grapes were very ripe when picked. “We have a philosophy of not adjusting the wine,” Merwarth said, “so we had to adjust the process of making it.” For example, by varying factors in malo-lactic fermentation they could reduce acidity. He gave a lot of credit to his winemakers, Dillon and Bryanna, who are both intrigued by this exotic grape and have pushed ahead with the experimentation in the winemaking process. Their plan for the coming harvest is to try carbonic maceration, a process used to make Beaujolais. This method uses a closed-tank to create a carbon dioxide-rich environment. Fermentation takes place inside the grape while it is still whole and uncrushed. Saperavi is quite versatile. In addition to being suitable for rosé, sparkling wine, and varietal bottles, it can also be Contin u ed on Page 15

Standing Stone started with a single acre of Saperavi in 1994 but now has more than seven acres of the grape. (Photo: Josh Baldo) FALL GUIDE / SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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Ithaca Is Gourd-eous

Pumpkins Are Passé, Gourds Are Glamorous By Julia Nage l

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hat is Gourdlandia? It’s a place that honors the gourd, according to owner and gourd artist Graham Ottoson . “It’s a little bit hard to categorize Gourdlandia, because it’s kinda like a farm, kinda like a gallery, a little bit like a shop,” Ottoson explained. The farm/gallery/shop is located at 77 Rachel Carson Way in Ithaca’s EcoVillage, a co-housing community with more than 200 residents. Gourdlandia is open yearround to visitors of all ages and artistic abilities, though some of the projects have minimum age recommendations. The best time to tour the gourd garden is late summer to early fall. Visitors can browse the shop, explore the gourd garden, watch a demonstration, learn about the gourd art process or make a piece of gourd art to take home. “The gourds are so accessible. You just need a few simple tools,” Ottoson said. “It’s hard to mess up a gourd.” After 25 years spent “catching babies” as a midwife her childhood creative urge was reborn and she started looking for a new craft. Ottoson’s fascination with gourds sprouted on a serendipitous drive to Candor, New York. On the way there, something caught her eye. On the way back, she stopped to investigate.

“It was just six gourds at the end of this guy’s driveway. That’s all it was. And we went up and we met the guy, and we learned all about growing gourds,” Ottoson said. Their interest piqued, Ottoson and her husband Otto started growing gourds. Eventually, they had a surplus pile of gourds and no idea what to do with them. “And the way Otto tells it, he says, ‘I came home and she was making a [gourd] lamp,’ Ottoson said. At first, Ottoson worked out of her home, operating her business under the name Hands on Gourds. After moving into the studio space built by her husband, Gourdlandia opened in 2014, and the rest is history. “I’m having a lot of fun here at Gourdlandia. I didn’t even know I could be a businessperson; you know what I mean? And I worried about some of the aspects, like marketing and bookkeeping and any of the bureaucracy,” Ottoson said. “I didn’t know for sure that I could make a living as an artist, and now that I know that I can, I’m really relaxed and I don’t feel like I have to.” Oftentimes, Ottoson explained, visitors come to Gourdlandia and they don’t know Contin u ed on Page 9

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The Gourdlandia farm/gallery/shop is located in Ithaca’s EcoVillage. (Photo: Julia Nagel) 2 0 2 2


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Graham Ottoson has turned a serendipitous encounter with gourds into an art and a business. (Photo: Julia Nagel)

PUMPKINS ARE PASSÉ contin u ed from page 8

what a gourd is—it’s a member of the squash family—much less the history and culture of gourds. She blames this on the historic connection between humans and gourds being largely lost in the modern-day era. “People and gourds go back about as far as people and dogs, and really have had about as much meaning for each other. Gourds were the first musical instruments in a lot of cultures. They predate pottery. And they’ve been used all over the world for so many different purposes. It’s just a long and rich history,” Ottoson said. Gourdlandia operates under a “design your own class” method, which Ottoson said has been quite successful and can be tailored to each person’s interests. “People choose from a list of projects on my website, and then just set it up. It can be just one person…or it can be a group of six people for a birthday party or something,” said Ottoson.

One of the simpler gourd projects is making a nightlight, which takes about an hour and can be done by children as young as eight. For this particular class, people don’t need an appointment, but can instead drop in any time Gourdlandia is open. According to Ottoson, it’s the perfect rainyday project, or unique activity for tourists. For lengthier projects—such as a hanging pendant lamp, a bowl, a keepsake box or a basket—Ottoson explained that people should schedule a class ahead of time and that they generally aren’t a suitable activity for young children given their three-to-fivehour length and the use of sharp or hot tools. Gourdlandia is open Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, or by appointment. The specific hours are posted on their website: https://www.gourdlandia.com/. Reflecting on what visitors enjoy most about Gourdlandia, Ottoson said they seem to appreciate the endless opportunities for creativity and the versatility of the gourds. “For some people, [they enjoy] making stuff. I think for other people, it’s just seeing what you can do with this unique vegetable that you can grow in your yard.” FALL GUIDE / SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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or those in wishing to hop on a bike for leisure, sport or commute, Ithaca has a number of bike shops, trails, and events that make it easy. Additionally, with local activists pushing for a Bike Share program and more bike lanes, the city is on a path to being an up-and-coming haven for cyclists.

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Currently, there are five major bike paths in the Ithaca area; the Black Dia518 West State Street, Ithaca mond trail, the Gateway Trail, the Dryden Rail trail, the South Hill Recreational Trail, and the Waterfront trail. M-F 10-5 • Sat 10-4 • Sun 12-4 The Black Diamond trail is an 8.5-mile stone-dust path that connects Taughannock Falls State Park and Cass Park. A 1566_Quilters corner_[B]_D18_V1 two-way multi-use trail that runs paralThanks for choosing New Delhi 2.4 x 5.5 13th Jan 2015 lel to route 89, the trail is used for both for Best Indian Food & Best Buffet for 2010!! Order online: NewDelhiDiamonds.com leisure, exercise,lunch sport, and commuter Buffet only biking. New Delhi No dine in. Order takeout by phone. $7.99 Dinner menu 7 days 5-10pmMichael Smith is a professor of History Delivery through Doordash and IthacaToGo. at Ithaca College who has biked from his Mon-Sun: 11:30-3:00 p.m. Dinner: 4:30-9:00 p.m. house on Farm street to Ithaca College Call for takeout: 607-272-1003 • 106 W. Green St. • 607-272-4508 • Open every day every day since he began at the college 21 years ago. Smith says that in addition to biking the streets of Ithaca, he also uses the Black Diamond Trail to enjoy biking T h e A n n ua l F i n g e r L a k e s without the automobile traffic he navigates on his regular commute. by Puzzlemaster Adam G. Perl “I use the Black Diamond [Trail] espeCOMPETITION cially if I just want to have a day of riding 1 2 3 A FUNDRAISING EVENT FOR when I don’t have to even think about cars,” Smith said. “Round trip from my TOMPKINS LEARNING PARTNERS 4 house is about a 20-mile ride if I want to Sat., Sept. 24th, 2022 pop down to the Taughannock State Park.” 5 The Gateway Trail is two miles, stretchVIRTUAL EVENT: Play from home ing from the parking lot of Home Depot INDIVIDUAL & TEAM: 2, 3, or 4 on a team. on Ithaca’s South Side to South Aurora ACROSS THREE LEVELS OF DIFFICULTY Street on South Hill. 1 With 4 Across, 1935 Astaire ENTRY FEE: Pay what you wish. and Rogers Classic The Dryden Rail trail is a partially 4 See 1 Across Details and Registration at: completed 14-mile trail that runs through 5 The Roaring 20s, for one Dryden, Freeville, Varna and the eastern DOWN end of Cornell’s campus. Currently, 4.3 1 Part of BTW 2 Dip stick? miles of the trail is uncompleted, however, Please register today ... and play on Sept. 24. 3 “Harper Valley ___” the path is slated to be completed by July Help Learning Partners Support Adult Literacy 2023. For a chance to win FREE ENTRY to the Sad Fact. At least 7,000 adults in Tompkins County can’t read Sept. 24 Crossword Competition In addition to biking on the Black or write well enough to fill out a job application, read a warning complete and email a picture of this puzzle Diamond trail, Smith uses the Dryden Rail to info@CrosswordCompetition.com label on a can of pesticide, or read books to their children. trail and the Waterfront trail for running. Smith said the uncompleted parts of the

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trail Black Diamond trail do not allow him to bike there yet. The South Hill Recreational Trail is a 2-mile trail that takes bikers from Burns Road in the outskirts of Ithaca to the South Hill end of Hudson Street, near Ithaca College. Ducson Nguyen, the alderperson for Ithaca’s second ward, said one of the best parts of biking in Ithaca is the trails that surround the city, and the ability they create to access nature while getting exercise. “I do love our trails,” Nguyen said. “I take the Black Diamond Trail, South Hill recreation trail, and the Dryden Rail Trail. Those are really good ways to connect to Ithaca. We’re lucky to be blessed with these great trails.”

Incoming Bike Share From 2018–2020, Ithaca had its own bike share system run by Lime, a Silicon Valley based transportation company specializing in electric bikes and scooters. Eventually the company left Ithaca in 2020, taking its fleet of bright green bikes with it. However, recent efforts by local activists and the organization Bike Walk Tompkins are aiming to create a community owned non-profit bike share to Ithaca. Contin u ed on Page 11

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Ithaca is planning to add even more bike lanes throughout the City. (Photo: Elijah de Castro)


The Black Diamond Trail from Trumansburg to Ithaca is used for leisure riding and commuting. (Photo: Elijah de Castro)

ITHACA STEERING contin u ed from page 10

Jeff Goodmark has been the Director of Micromobility at the Center for Community Transportation (CCT) since July. As the previous operations manager for Lime in Ithaca, Goodmark says that a community-based model for bike share will be a better way to increase biking accessibility for Ithacans. “CCT is currently in the process of trying to bring bike share back to the city,” Goodmark said. “This time we’re approaching it from a community owned, not-for-profit standpoint. Our goal is to have a fleet of electric bikes that people can use exactly like they used Lime to be available throughout the city and beyond.”

Bike shops There are also a handful of bike shops in Ithaca. Open since 1994, Cayuga Ski & Cyclery offers new bicycles and a variety of bicycle repairs. Jeff Inman is the owner of Cayuga Ski & Cyclery. Inman said the store saw a huge increase in sales that was so large he could not keep up with demand. “During the second half of 2020 and into 2021 we had unprecedented growth in an extremely short amount of time,” Inman said. “It all started when the high school was sent home and kids getting bikes because they’re home now, and then parents getting bikes to ride with kids.” While Cayuga Ski & Cyclery specializes in repairs on man-powered bikes, Green Street’s Boxy Bikes rents and sells electric bikes, which are growingly popular in the area. Like Inman, Sequoia Valoy—the owner of Boxy Bikes—has struggled to keep pace with demand. Valoy said via email that many locals who are interested in purchasing electric bikes have been using his rental fleet.

“I have used my own fat-tire electric bike as my main transportation for years,” Valoy said. “As such, I have ridden it anywhere I have needed transportation, from up to 4-H Acres as a counselor at Primitive Pursuits, to Wegmans to pick up groceries, to Brookdondale to visit the water hole there. For recreational riding, however, nothing beats Black Diamond trail. Many of our rental customers choose to take this path.”

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Biking Events In addition to bike paths, Ithaca also has a flurry of different bike-related events for both recreational and sports purposes. This includes the AIDS Ride for life, an annual bike race that raises money for the Southern Tier AIDS program. Additionally, on Sunday September 18, Bike Walk Tompkins will host the 10th anniversary of StreetsAlive!, a festival in which an 11-block stretch of North Cayuga Street (between Court Street and the Ithaca High School) and part of West Court Street is closed for traffic. Then, Ithacans and their families fill the streets to bike, scooter, walk, and play. Nikki Friske, a Bike Walk Tompkins staff member and the director of this year’s festival, said in a press release that in the following years, the organization hopes to expand the frequency of StreetsAlive!. “The response from local people and organizations signing up to be activity hosts along the festival route has been tremendous, and shows the huge potential for joy, social connection, and capital “L” love when we close the street to cars,” Friske said in a press release. Nguyen said that as an alderperson, he supports biking not just for pleasure and exercise, but also as a form of zero-carbon transportation. “When I joined [Common] Council actually, I walked to work,” Nguyen said. “I was also going to TCAT headquarters and City Hall and everywhere else, so it became impractical. Commuting is actually how I got started biking as an adult.”

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History

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mental site assessment commissioned by the City of Ithaca found that the main factory was extensively contaminated with lead and other toxins. The whole location ultimately became an EPA Superfund site. There have been numerous private and public remediation projects, with the goal of rendering the property suitable for development, and there have also been numerous development proposals since then, which have been abandoned in the chaos and expense of addressing the cleanup of the property. It has been a cascade of unpleasant discoveries. Between 2002 and 2004, the EPA spent $4.8 million to reduce lead levels, and they removed 4,500 tons of lead-contaminated soil between the factory building and the creek. Still, tests in 2006 showed the continued presence of lead, as well as arsenic, cadmium, and chromium. Furthermore, the building had become a graffiticovered hazard, with scores of mattresses and at least one fire. At a cost of $2 million for demolition and remediation, the old Ithaca Gun factory was torn down in 2009. There were unexpectedly-high levels of asbestos and barium present, so most of the bricks and mortar had to be removed from the site. Again in 2015, the EPA removed another 200 cubic yards of loose stone and lead-contaminated soil from lands bordering the site of the factory.

ITHACA GUN contin u ed from page 5

It didn’t go well. While gun manufacturing continued, General Recreation filed for Chapter 11 (Reorganization) bankruptcy in 1978, and the plant closed. It was reconfigured and reopened by local investors in 1979, but the company filed again for bankruptcy in 1986, furloughing 100 workers. In the end, manufacturing was moved out of Ithaca to King Ferry in 1989. The company endured a number of sales and relocations in the ensuing years, and currently operates out of Upper Sandusky, Ohio. The fate of the site of the former factory is a topic more familiar to recent generations of Ithaca residents. The company had operated on the property between Fall Creek and Lake Street for over 100 years. The building itself was described as a “hodgepodge of old and new, not suitable to repurposing to other industry” at the time of General Recreation’s first bankruptcy. More ominously, a century of gun testing and manufacturing residue had left a toxic legacy. It was also the location of uranium metal tube testing in the early 1960s for the federal nuclear weapons program. After the second bankruptcy in 1986, the buildings were shuttered. A 1997 environ-

As recently as 2017, DEC soil samples revealed that lead levels on the nearby Ithaca Falls Gorge Trail exceeded the EPA’s removal management level, but also declared “that the site no longer poses a threat to human health or the environment”. There does seem to be progress on Women working at the Ithaca Gun factory during World War II. (Photo: The History Center in Tompkins County) the prospect of redevelopment, up and the nature of site improvements are though. A 2020 amendment to New York State’s Brownfield Cleanup Program seems addressed. The fate of the last remaining physical feature of the old factory—the finally to have cleared the way to moving Ithaca Gun smokestack—is up in the air. forward, and last December the property In its day, the Ithaca Gun Company was was acquired by 121-125 Lake Street, LLC, a major local employer and a pillar of the owned by Visum Development Group. thriving industrial portion of Ithaca’s economy. Currently, Visum is proposing to build The company’s reputation for high-quality, a four-story, 77-unit, 109-bed market-rate artistically-decorated guns was international in apartment building—a mix of studios scope and lives on among collectors and huntand one- and two-bedroom apartments— ers. As with much of our industrial past, Ithaca called “The Breeze Apartments.” The project is wending its way through the process Gun’s legacy is also inextricably entwined with the environmental costs of manufacturing. Still, of getting Planning Board approval and the Ithaca Gun Company is an essential part of is a frequent item on the Board’s meeting agendas as issues regarding final soil clean- the story of the City of Ithaca.

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have round berries, but the younger ones produce oval ones. He planted both in Dundee. Fred Frank noted that the flavor of Saperavi varied greatly, depending on the conditions where it was grown. Fred Merwarth contacted Saperavi expert and wine importer Lisa Granik, who brought him several bottles, all from Georgia. She and Merwarth sat down and tasted them. “Normally,” he said with wonder in his voice, “after you taste several bottles of say, Cab Franc, you can say, ‘Ok, that’s from the Loire, that’s from Bordeaux, that’s from Friuli,’ but not Saperavi. Lisa brought 40 bottles and they were all different.”

GEORGIAN WINES contin u ed from page 7

blended. While the Macinskis original plan to combine with Pinot Noir was unsuccessful, Merwarth has liked blends with Petit Verdot and Cabernet Sauvignon. While the winemakers adjusted the production process, Merwarth also followed a learning curve in the vineyard. “When it’s done, it is really done,” he said of Saperavi ripening behavior. “You have to pick it right away.” The clusters, he said, are big and heavy and when Botrytis fungus (“noble rot”) appeared, it did so in a unique way. Instead of developing spots where adjacent berries touch, in this loose-clustered variety the whole berry gets infected. Saperavi grapes are generally ripe by the middle of October. At Labor Day they were a dark color but were not “filled out.”

Fred Merwath of Standing Stone believes Saperavi is suitable for rosé, sparkling wine, varietal bottles, and blends. (Photo: Josh Baldo)

As they ripen, Merwarth said, the berries actually droop on the cluster, which is unusual. He has planted Saperavi on the west side of Seneca Lake at the Wiemer vineyard. He noticed two forms in the Standing Stones grapes; the older plants

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J

B y B r y a n Va n C a m p e n

ohn Flansburgh, co-founder of They Might Be Giants sat down with me recently to discuss playing an anniversary tour two years late, car accidents, and Ithaca record stores. Ithaca Times: Of all the live shows that got COVID-cancelled, you and John Finnell had been planning a 30th anniversary tour built around your 1990 album “Flood,” and now it’s 2022. Are we still talking about “Flood” or “Apollo 18” (1992)? John Flansburgh: We’ll be performing all of “Flood.” But “Flood” is only forty minutes long, and our show is two hours long, so there’s plenty of other stuff. For us, that’s the saving grace, ‘cause we’re not locked into something monolithic. IT: I’ve been having these visions of endless cartons of “Flood” commemorative merch being buried in a warehouse, like the Ark of the Covenant from “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981). JF: [laughs] That’s a pretty good description. You know, the last two, three years have been really long for everybody, including us. So far this year, we’ve been able to do exactly one show, and then I was on my way home from the first show in an Uber, the car I was in got hit by a drunk driver in Manhattan, and it took me two months to recover. IT: Oh my God. JF: Yeah, I broke—the doctor at the trauma center said I had broken most of my ribs. I was explaining to him how I had to get to Washington, D.C. in the morning, still very much high on the adrenaline of the accident, and not feeling that bad yet. And I was like, “I’ve got to get to D.C. in the morning, I can’t hang out.” And he was like, “Well, you’ve broken most of your ribs [laughs] as far as I can tell, some of them in a couple of places, so I suspect you’re not going anywhere for [laughs] quite some time.” IT: Oh my God. JF: Yeah, it, uh…it sucked. I don’t recommend getting hit by a car to anybody. IT: I don’t think anybody’s ever recommended that. JF: [laughs] No, I know, but try to drive as defensively as you can. So it’s been a long summer for me. I spent over a week in the hospital, and I’ve just been in bed for the last two months. I’m puttering around now, and I’m in pretty good shape. I’m doing physical therapy, and I’m definitely on the mend.

IT: So you haven’t started the tour yet. JF: Well, we did one show [laughs], we had a week and a half of shows; we’d taken two months of touring and kind of divvied it up over about twelve months. Even if a portion of the tour gets knocked out due to COVID, we won’t be cancelling a whole month or two months of shows, which seems kind of ill advised. So we’re just doing things in kind of fits and starts now, and the official first “fit” was going to be in Manhattan and Philly in June, and John Flansburgh (left) and John Finnell are finally getting to play their “Flood” 30th anniversary show at the State Theatre, that’s when I got hit by a car. two years after it was sold out. (Photo: Provided) IT: Uh! Another delay. JF: It’s insane. I mean, at a certain point, you just…It’s so funny, like, I think of JF: Were you working there in 1976? the number of postponements in our career, IT: No, I would have been in eighth grade I probably could have counted on one hand. at that time. I was there near the ever-lovin’ And now with these shows like the one in end from ’98 to 2000. Ithaca, which has been sold out for two years…I JF: Oh, so, late in the day! Yeah, yeah. I think we’ve re-scheduled it three times now. bought “Hey Joe”/”Piss Factory” by Patti IT: I wonder if some people who bought Smith and “Little Johnny Jewel” by Televitickets are students who’ve graduated and sion, on 7” singles, I think on the same day, at moved away. Discount Records in Ithaca. JF: I’m sure there’s a healthy secondary IT: What comes to mind when I say market on these tickets. I mean, yeah, people “Minimum Wage” [from “Flood”]? graduated, people moved to other towns. Life JF: Well, I had, from the age of 17 to 22, I goes on. You know, COVID has just scrambled worked a lot of minimum wage jobs. I worked everything. as a bus boy. I worked in a parking lot. I IT: It feels like “Flood” was the album worked as a clerk. So you kinda get the full that broke you into a wider pop awareness. experience as you kind of cast around differIs that accurate? ent experiences like that. Most of it was really JF: Absolutely. Our first four albums were dull, but I actually learned—in the parking all just like a steady climb, you know? Just lot, I kind of taught myself to play the guitar, because there were just a lot more cultural so I can’t complain too much, but I do like to gate-keepers back then. I mean, our first complain. album got a lot of attention on MTV and woke IT: Gotta ask about “Istanbul (Not Conup a specific kind of audience: the record store stantinople)”. clerk “High Fidelity” audience came aware JF: That was a song that my mom and my very quickly through that exposure. aunt actually introduced me to, when they IT: Hey, I was a record store clerk. were going through a songbook of old songs [laughs] from the 40’s and 50’s. I think it was just piano JF: I was a record store clerk. music in a music bench. And that was my IT: Oh, man. introduction to the song. It’s become very JF: What years? I worked in a really clear to me that it’s a soundalike of “Puttin’ On crummy record store. The Ritz”, or a knock-off of it. There are a lot of IT: I worked in a place called Discount songs in the world like that. Records which was owned by Sam Goody and then we changed our name to Sam They Might Be Giants are playing the State Goody. Theatre on Wednesday, September 21. JF: I know Discount Records! Like, in Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show will Ithaca, or…? begin at 8 p.m. The show is for ages 16+ IT: In Ithaca. only and IDs will be checked at the doors.

Arts&Entertainment Arts& &Entertainment

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS SET TO PLAY STATE—TWO YEARS LATER

SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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Dining

Inn Offers Memorable Experience By He nr y Stark

W

hen I was a student at Cornell I used to bring my visiting parents to dine at Taughannock Farms Inn and we always enjoyed our dinners. I still enjoy my dinners at the restaurant that has The views from The Inn are as outstanding as the food. (Photo: Provided) the same footprint but has acquired a new name under recent owners: The Inn There are three sides available with at Taughannock Falls. It’s a large building the six entrées, a creamed broccoli rabe that was built in 1873 as a summer home and two potato preparations; each is $9. for an obviously wealthy couple. In 1925, Frankly, after spending almost $50 for the owners sold 800 of their acres, which entrées that featured various accompaniincluded Taughannock Falls, and what is ments and sauces on the plate, I wasn’t now the adjacent state park to New York inclined to bring the main course price up State for $10,000. to near $60. I’m happy to say the atmosphere is Besides, since I was there to review, I still elegant with a theme of white linen wanted to try one of the desserts. There tablecloths, navy blue napkins, and an inare four of them priced from $12 to $15. I terior that follows the dark blue and white ordered the Berry Cheesecake Terrine with theme. Each table has a small flickering a Mango Puree and Horchata. (The latter is candle and a small vase with herbs. a plant-based milk paste that originated in I’m also happy to say the service is still Spain and was adopted by Mexican chefs. attentive and efficient. It’s usually sweetened and jazzed up with And most importantly, the food is spices and herbs.) It took a while to arrive outstanding. at the table as it's assembled to order. It was I must also tell you that it’s expensive served in a round dish, similar to dishes to eat here. There are only six entrées and often used for Flan, or Crème Brulee. they range in price from $32-48. Among For some reason there are two separate the six, there are two beef steaks, one wine menus. One was offered in a separate rack of lamb, a snapper (fish), Chicken leather book with the menu and another Milanese and a pasta dish There are often opposite the menu. The smaller one was a couple of daily specials that fit within confusing. There were only six wines and the same price range. During my last visit five of those were Rose (2), Cabernet they were $36 and $42. There are also six Franc (2) and a red blend leaving room for appetizers priced from $13 to $25. only one white, a chardonnay. I’m guessThere is a complimentary offering of ing that there was such a preponderance homemade bread and compound butter. of reds because three of the six entrées I recently ordered the Rack of Lamb were red meat. I was happy to find a much ($48) and was very happy with it. I like larger selection of wines in the booklet “gamey” lamb however I’m aware that with the full menu. many prefer milder meat and they will be I think dining at The Inn at Taughanhappy with this offering. I received four nock Falls is special. The ambience, the rare double chops that were tender and outdoor setting, the attentive service, and had a pleasant lavender beurre rose dressabove all, the beautifully prepared food, ing. They came from New Zealand so con- combine to make it a memorable experisequently were milder than the chops that ence. come from Australia or parts of France. Another time I had Beef LT ($46). The Inn Restaurant, 2030 Gorge Road, Again, I ordered it rare and again, it was Trumansburg, is open 5 p.m. through 9 cooked perfectly. It came with a Peruvian p.m., Thursdays through Mondays. Call Lettuce Aioli and Heirloom Tomatoes (607) 387-7711 or go to https://www. hence the “LT” in the name? inntfalls.com/ to make reservations.


Art

CSMA Show Offers Estimable Work In Various Forms By Ar thur W hit m an

F

eaturing five teaching artists, the Community School of Music and Arts’ (CSMA) “Faculty Show 2022” (Through October 1) presents estimable work in painting, drawing, cartooning, and textiles. It is challenging to compare the work of familiar artists with that of unfamiliar ones. For that reason—and because there are many more of their pieces here than those of two others—both Jessica Warner and Rob Licht appear at an unfair advantage. Warner’s oils are something unique in local painting. And arguably, they make a real contribution to contemporary painting writ large. Melding careful observation of domestic—and domesticated—objects to the virtuosic painterly improvisation of abstract expressionism, they juxtapose

discipline and abandon, the palpable and the explosive. “Sleeping in the Snow,” is her only oil on canvas painting here and her only titled work. It echoes her recent drawing in its seemingly unfinished areas and decorative patterning. More resolved, more lovely, are a pair of smaller oil on paper pieces. One shows us looking down on a purple-gray cloth—also square, but angled away from the viewer. Another piece portrays a brick in pale, rosy strokes enveloped in a dense, aggressive thicket of deep blue and purple. Although familiar to devotees of art in Ithaca, it can be difficult to get a handle on the work of local veteran Rob Licht. A maker of sculptures—he is showing numerous plein air gouache paintings of regional lake scenery, variously done on paper or board. By manipulating the placement of the horizon—near the top to

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near the bottom—he gives us a sense of the palpability of waves and clouds in relation to smoother areas of land, water, and sky. All of the other artists here were new to me. The most interesting and unexpected of three is Ryan Abb, who brings a refreshingly punk aesthetic to this often decorous company. Abb is showing several small but dense photocopied collages incorporating cartooning alongside found graphics and text. Printed on brightly colored, cheap paper, and presented in mismatched frames or pinned directly to the wall—these are truly something else. Most of his pieces traffic more in exuberance than focus or resolution. His work appears at its best where the cut collage aspect comes to the fore—a sort of street Cubism. It does so most compellingly here in “Superbloom Sector,” a smaller piece that incorporates lime and yellow green paper and a dizzying range of imagery. Textile artist Maureen Jackubson is showing three relatively large pieces using shibori, a Japanese resist dying technique. It’s impossible to judge fairly from the limited sample here but her work is perhaps at its best where it is emphasizes texture over the pictorial. In this regard and in its sheer overwhelming quality, “Water Effects 6” is Jackubson’s standout. Dense spottings and

Name

Rob Licht manipulates the horizon in “Puffy Clouds 2020.” (Photo: Provided)

striations of indigo—black-blue—submerge three upright diagonal zig-zags in this remarkably rich work. Painter Jennifer Gibson is distinctly underrepresented here with three skillful but small and quiet landscapes: one in oil and two in watercolor. The edge goes to her work in the latter medium. “Morning Light” shows a dark silhouetted tree, serpentine, leaning in to the lakeside. The figural form and the pale yellow and blue of the dawn are tremendously tender. “Blue Barn in Winter,” transmogrifies a cliché sort of scene in a combination of wet-onwet and more traditionally brushed areas. A solo show dedicated to any of these artist-teachers might be an interesting venture. For all Preview Performances, Same Day Tickets, BIPOC Community Nights, & Free Childcare Matinees

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Kitchen Offers Satiric Look Into Corporate World By Ly nd se y Honor

“D

o You Feel Anger,” written by Mara Nelson-Greenberg and currently playing at the Kitchen Theatre, offers a satirical look into today’s corporate world. Through the exploration of empathy, Nelson-Greenberg reveals the relationship between understanding feelings and finding one’s authentic self. She uses well-timed raunchy humor, strategic character development, and strong themes to narrate the events of the play. “Do You Feel Anger?” opens by introducing Sofia, a young, optimistic woman. She’s an empathy coach who’s just started a new project at a debt collection agency. She was hired to shift the attitude and behavior of the company’s employees who have been having issues with their client calls. She quickly learns that these people can’t define emotions, let alone sympathize with others. As the show progresses, Sofia finds herself trapped between sticking her ground and conforming to the sexist expectations of the establishment. Megan Rutherford’s costume design, specifically for Sofia, strikingly reflects the character’s internal struggle and rapidly shifting motivations. Simultaneously, M Berry’s lighting design—notably the use of flickering, florescent fixtures—illustrates a similar escalation. Sofia might be trying to help others understand their emotions, but her unwillingness to follow that advice becomes increasingly evident. How can the group learn empathy when their leader doesn’t model the expectation? The boiling point is certainly on the horizon. The Kitchen Theatre’s production, directed by Rebecca Bradshaw, moves quickly; it runs about 90 minutes without an intermission. The parallel structure of the scenes—following the general pattern of a voicemail to Sofia from her mother, a conversation between the characters Sofia and Jon, and a group exercise—helps the audience stay engaged with the plot’s fast pace. Amoreena Wade’s Sofia attracts audience sympathy, while also making people question her intentions. Wade’s a natural

“Do You Feel Anger” explores the link between understanding feelings and finding one’s self. (Photo: Provided)

talent, and despite Sofia’s complexity, she brings the character to life effortlessly. As Eva, Elyse Steingold is vibrant, witty, and honest. Steingold’s delivery impressively lands with every line, and her performance demands attention. While compelling on their own, Wade and Steingold complement each other well. The relationship between Sofia and Eva carries the true message of the play, and its executed beautifully in this production. In other roles, Scott Thomas and Javier David Padilla—as Howie and Jordan respectively—steal the show with their command of stage and their comedic timing. Michael Samuel Kaplan manages to bring humility to the painfully unlikeable character of Jon, and though brief, Susannah Berryman appears as an eloquent Janie. Berryman’s voice does get muffled by the stereo when narrating as Sofia’s mother, but this doesn’t take away from the impact of the voicemail scenes. As it turns out, emotions demand to be felt. Otherwise they’ll skyrocket, and fuses might get blown—physical and emotional. Empathy’s a fine art that requires practice, especially in settings where being vulnerable doesn’t feel particularly safe. Just give Sofia and the group a chance to prove this to you. “Do You Feel Anger,” by Mara NelsonGreenberg, directed by Rebecca Bradshaw. At the Kitchen Theatre, 417 West State St. Running September 6 through 25, times vary. Tickets at (607) 272-0570 or on the Kitchen Theatre’s website: https:// www.kitchentheatre.org/doyoufeelanger


Books

Shull Offers A Respite From Teens’ Toxic Stress By G. M . Bur n s

IT: There is a great focus in your books on understanding young people’s feelings and how they often struggle. alk into any bookshop in this Can you talk about this and how you tap country and one can find moving stories about the times into this element in your recent story. MS: Kafka said, a book is an ax for the young people are undergoing. But tricky frozen sea within us. I times lead to interestthink all stories help us ing stories, and Ithaca chip through the ice. native and Cornell In Billion Dollar Girl alum Megan Shull goes the protagonist, River beyond the daily angst Ryland is struggling in with her sixth book, ways that are heartBillion Dollar Girl. This breaking —the most touching story digs of which is chronic deep into abuse, lonelineglect. She’s yearning ness, homelessness, for a sense of safety and and hunger that many predictable care. It’s teens have undergone, only through a sense of and Shull is skilled and safety and reliable care insightful as she weaves that we find our own the heavy issues of today voice and power. deftly while giving hope IT: Can you say to young readers. how you decided to Ithaca Times: How become a novelist? did the story of Billion MS: After earning Dollar Girl come about my doctorate from for you, and what was Shull’s sixth book is partly anchored in her own unease with Cornell, I set out to help hard for you during popular culture. (Photo: Provided) kids build resilience the writing of it? through stories. I love Megan Shull: A lot of the book is anchored in my own unease that books can provide a sense of attunement and connection and help kids—and with a popular culture that places an all of us, really— feel seen and soothed enormous value on fame, extreme wealth, and less alone. I love that books can help beauty algorithms, and status. That, to validate painful emotions and be a safe coupled with a growing disconnect from haven in a storm. It’s a pretty fun job! our natural world and each other, is havIT: Do you follow the old adage ing deleterious effects on American kids “Write what you know”? and teens. In a lot of ways Billion Dollar MS: Hmm. I’d say I like to go toward Girl is my answer to all of that and, I hope, what I’m most curious about and find provides a soothing respite from the toxic the right people to speak with in order to stress too many vulnerable children and understand what I need to know to craft teens are living with. a story that works. I ask a lot of quesIn terms of what was hard—the sorrow tions and interview people who share of our world and complex problems we face as a human family bring about a lot of their knowledge and acumen with me. In an emotional sense —all those real and humility. tender feelings that are in my books are IT: What do you feel are the main what make us relate and connect with themes / issues that are addressed in each other. The hardest things that we go your book? MS: This book is an exploration of who through are often what make us closer. IT: What do you enjoy about being a and what we value; poverty and privilege; writer? trauma and repair; the interdependence MS: I love making stuff. It’s a good feelof all living beings and our responsibilities ing to make something from your heart to the air, the sea, the earth, and to each and mind then: let it go. other.

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SEPTEMBER 14–20, 2022 / THE ITHACA TIMES

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Music

9/15 Thursday

9/18 Sunday

Bars/Bands/Clubs

CCCP presents percussionist Greg Stuart | 7 p.m. | Milstein Hall Dome, 921 University Ave | Free

9/15 Thursday

9/16 Friday

Maddy Walsh- 2022 Summer Concert Series | 6 p.m. | Bernie Milton Pavilion, Center Commons

Cornell Biennial “A morning in 1953 (Messiaen Reversed, Birds Released)” by Joanna Malinowska and C.T. Jasper at Sibley Hall | 5 p.m. Charis Dimaras Piano Studio Recital | 7 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Stephen Prutsman, piano: CU Music | 8 p.m. | Barnes Hall, 129 Ho Plaza | Free

Keyboard Recital By Dr. Thomas Donahue | 2 p.m. | Willard Chapel, 17 Nelson St Founder’s Day Concert in the Park | 2 p.m. | DeWitt Park, N. Cayuga St. The Pursuit of Life, Liberty, and Love | 3 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St Pre-season Chamber Music Concert: The Gershwin Influence | 3 p.m. | First Unitarian Church Faculty Recital: Vadim Serebyany, piano | 4 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

9/16 Friday M13 | 6 p.m. | Hopshire Farm and Brewery | Free Friday Night Farm Jams: | 6:30 p.m. | Finger Lakes Cider

9/17 Saturday

9/17 Saturday

Red Oak Music Series - Tribal Revival | 12 p.m. | Lime Hollow Nature Center, 3277 Gracie Rd

9/18 Sunday Music & Mimosas at Hosmer Winery at Hosmer Winery | 1 p.m. Sunday Music Series | 1 p.m. | Red Newt Cellars, 3675 Tichenor Road | Free Live music feat. Patrick Young | | Treleaven Wines, 658 Lake Road

9/19 Monday Mondays with MAQ @ South Hill Cider | 5:30 p.m. | South Hill Cider, 550 Sandbank Road Concerts/Recitals

9/14 Wednesday

THISWEEK

Midday Music for Organ | 12:30 p.m. | Sage Chapel, Ho Plaza | Free

Saturday Afternoon Music at Knapp Winery | 1 p.m. | Knapp Winery, 2770 Ernsberger Rd Elective Recital: Kathryn Dauer, soprano | 2 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Elective Recital: Em Haak, voice | 4 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Glenn Tilbrook | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St Rev. Robert Jones at the Conservatory | 8 p.m. | Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts, 5 McLallen St | $15.00 - $20.00 Cornell Concert Series presents Sean Ardoin | 8 p.m. | Bailey Hall, 230 Garden Avenue Junior Recital: Carolyn FitzGerald, trombone | 8:15 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd Mr.Monkey | 9 p.m. | Moondance Restaurant, 2512 Cherry Valley Turnpike

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9/19 Monday Composition Premieres at Hockett Family Recital Hall | 7 p.m. | Hockett Family Recital Hall, Gym Rd

Stage CSMA Improv Class at Community School of Music and Arts | 4:30 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | In this class students will learn the basics of improv in a low-pressure, supportive environment. CSMA Storytelling Through Movement Class at Community School of Music and Arts | 6:30 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Movement can be expressive and freeing, but often we get stuck in the same ways of moving day in and day out. Do You Feel Anger? at Kitchen Theatre | 7:30 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday ComedyFLOPs 3rd Friday Improv Show To Support Loaves & Fishes | 7 p.m., 9/16 Friday | Virtual, https:// www.youtube.com/comedyflops | ComedyFLOPs’ 3rd Friday streaming Improv Shows in support of local area non-profit organizations. This month

we’re supporting Loaves & Fishes! | Free CSMA Self-Portrait Hand Puppets Class - Ages 6-9 at Community School of Music and Arts | 4:30 p.m., 9/20 Tuesday | Join us as we use clay, paint, fabric and styrofoam to create original hand puppets that look just like us!

Art Art Show: Two Pals Painting: Sharing a love of painting and the outdoors | 9:30 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Cortland Free Library, 32 Church St | Come see works by Sandra Cowan and Danielle Bellumori in the library’s gallery. This exhibit will be on display through August. 2022 Cornell Biennial Screening of “Gated Commune” by Camel Collective at Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art | 10 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Created by Anthony Graves (b. 1975, South Bend, IN) and Carla Herrera-Prats (b. 1973-d. Visit the Exhibit Hall | 10 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | The History Center in Tompkins County, 401 East State Street | Walk through local stories and discover the history of Tompkins County Open Hours Our Exhibit Hall is open Wednesday-Saturday 10am-5pm throughout the year. Installation - Ken Feingold (artist) at Johnson Museum of Art at Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art | 11 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | As part of Cornell 2022 Biennial, artist Ken Feingold is exhibiting his installation that features interactive talking heads and AI-generated existential conversations. 2022 Cornell Biennial: Ken Feingold Installation | 11 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Johnson Museum of Art,

114 Central Avenue | Experience Ken Feingold’s new media installation, “The Animal, Vegetable, Mineralness of Everything,” at the Johnson Museum of Art from July 18 through October 21, 2022. | Free 2022 Ink Shop Member Show | 1 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | The Ink Shop, 330 E. MLK/State St | Opening Reception 9/2. The Ink Shop launches a Member show annually giving our membership the opportunity to exhibit their newest work. | Free Ceramics: Jack-o-Lantern Luminaries | 6 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Pottery Works, 75 E. Court St | No Experience Necessary! Learn the fundamentals of hand building in this 2-Session Workshop while creating your own unique set of festive luminaries. Passages at State Of The Art Gallery | 12 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | Artists: Eva Capobianco and Patricia Brown Show dates: September 1 to October 2. Opening reception Friday, September 2, 5-8 pm. Pop In Studio Night | 4 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | Artist Alley at South Hill Business Campus, 950 Danby Road | Several artists studios and the gallery will be open to the public every third Thursday from 4-7pm. 2022 Cornell Biennial “At what point does the world unfold?” by Sara Jimenez at Goldwin Smith Hall | 9/15 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | At what point does the world unfold? is a new installation by Sara Jimenez on Cornell University’s Arts Quad. The Gallery at South Hill Exhibition of Nicholas Gecan’s “Love Your Mother” | 5 p.m., 9/16 Friday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | The Gallery at South Hill presents Nicholas Gecan’s “Love Your Mother”. Based on Environmental Philosophy Nicholas Gecan’s paintings explore the spectrum of human involvement with the natural world. | Free Cornell Biennial “A morning in 1953 (Messiaen Reversed, Birds Released)” by Joanna Malinowska and C.T. Jasper at Sibley Hall | 5 p.m., 9/16 Friday | This project is based on Réveil des Oiseaux (Awakening of Birds), a composition for piano and orchestra by the legendary Modernist composer, Olivier Messiaen (19081982), which premiered in Family Workshop: Snakes and Dragons with the Cornell Her-

petological Society | 10 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Meet members of the Cornell Herpetological Society and learn all about their snakes! Military Vehicle Show | 10 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Central NY Living History Center, 4386 US Route 11 | Military Vehicle Show at the CNY Living History Center in Cortland on Saturday, Sept. 17, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. WWII, Korea, & Vietnam Era vehicles will be featured. | $5.00 - $10.00 Monarch Migration Celebration | 11 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Cayuga Nature Center, 1420 Taughannock Blvd | With the classification of the monarch butterfly as an endangered species, this event focuses on the conservation of Monarch butterflies through scientific research and habitat preservation. Join us for educational programs, seed-bomb making, and the opportunity to catch and tag monarchs. | Free The Gallery at South Hill presents Nicholas Gecan’s “Love Your Mother” | 12 p.m., 9/17 Saturday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | The Gallery at South Hill presents Nicholas Gecan’s “Love Your Mother”. An exhibit focusing on environmental issues and human impact on nature. | Free Desserts at Dusk at Hopshire Farm & Brewery | 6:30 p.m., 9/17 Saturday | Join us for an evening of delicious dessert tastings, local libations, a unique silent auction, art gallery, online auction featuring original children’s literature illustrators, raffles, and Ribbon Cutting for Mix Art Gallery and Revelry Yards | 10 a.m., 9/19 Monday | Please join the Tompkins Chamber, Downtown Ithaca Alliance, and City of Ithaca officials for a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of two new businesses: Mix Art Gallery and Revelry | Free CSMA Art and Art History for Teens at Community School of Music and Arts | 4:30 p.m., 9/20 Tuesday | Calling all teens interested in making art and looking at, thinking about, and engaging with contemporary and modern art!

Film Cinemapolis 120 E. Green St., Ithaca

MIGRATION CELEBRATION NOT FROM WISCONSIN

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16TH AT 6:30 PM

Finger Lakes Cider House, Interlaken | Dave Yantorno and company are releasing their third full-length album “Enough to a Degree” at this show on Friday. (Photo: Facebook)

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Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca | Visitors can pick up free tickets at the Celebration’s welcome table for workshops being offered throughout the day on bird banding and natural history filmmaking. A family-friendly day filled with birdwatching, forearm painting, and many more opportunities to connect with birds and nature. (Photo: Patricia Leonard)


September 16-22, 2022. Contact Cinemapolis for showtimes. New films listed first.* The Silent Twins* | Based on the lives of June and Jennifer Gibbons, real-life identical twins who grew up in Wales and became known as “the silent twins” because of their refusal to communicate with anyone other than each other.| 113 mins R Hold Me Tight* | A woman one day simply walks out on her family. Or does she? | 95 mins NR God’s Country*| When a college professor confronts two hunters she catches trespassing on her property, she’s drawn into an escalating battle of wills with catastrophic consequences.| 102 mins R Pearl* | The story of how Pearl became the vicious killer seen in “X”.| 102 mins R See How They Run* | In the West End of 1950s London, plans for a movie version of a smash-hit play come to an abrupt halt after a pivotal member of the crew is murdered.| 98 mins PG-13 Nope | Jordan Peele’s latest film in which the residents of a lonely gulch in inland California bear witness to an uncanny and chilling discovery. | 135 mins R

Cornell Cinema All films are shown at Willard Straight Hall on Cornell campus. The Society of Spectacle | 9/14 at 7:00PM | An avant-garde essay film in which Situationist thinker and political theorist Guy Debord uses a montage of film clips and text to formulate a Marxist critique of capitalism, mass marketing, and consumer culture, inspired by his own landmark 1967 book of the same title. Diva | 9/15 at 7:00pm; 9/16 at 9:00pm | An opera-intoxicated postman surreptitiously bootlegs a famous singer but finds himself in possession of another tape which is sought by the mob. Blue Velvet | 9/15 at 9:30PM; 9/17 at 9:15pm | David Lynch’s classic thriller about sex, drugs, pain, and severed body parts. Cane Fire | 9/16 at 7:00pm; 9/18 at 9:15pm | A kaleidoscopic documentary that considers the Hawaiian island of Kaua’i, from the escapist fantasies of Hollywood’s depiction to the harsh realities of colonialist oppression and environmental destruction that have shaped the life of its Indigenous population. Dos Estaciones | 9/17 & 9/18 at 7:00pm | Fifty-year-old businesswoman María García is the owner of Dos

Estaciones, a once-majestic tequila factory now struggling to stay afloat as the last Mexican-owned plant in a business dominated by foreign corporations. When a persistent insect plague and an unexpected flood cause irreversible damage, María is forced to do everything she can to save her community’s primary economy and source of pride. Cadejo Blanco | 9/21 at 7:00PM | w/ Filmmaker Justin Lerner ‘02 via Zoom. A young woman, Sarita, plunges into Guatemala’s criminal underworld to seek the truth behind her sister’s mysterious disappearance.

Special Events Fall Foliage Eco-Cruise at Allen Treman State Park | 4:30 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | A relaxing afternoon cruise when the light is just right for leaf-peeping from the lake aboard the comfortable and spacious MV Teal. Ithaca Night Bazaar at Steamboat Landing, Ithaca Farmers Market Pavilion | 6 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | A monthly festival of musicians, makers, artists, performers, doers and dreamers. Newfield Fall Festival | 9 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Newfield United Methodist Church, 227 Main Street | Come to the

Fall Festival at the Newfield United Methodist Church in Newfield for family fun with crafters, a bake sale, luncheon, silent auction & face painting! | Free Migration Celebration | 10 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road | Visit the Migration Celebration at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology on Saturday, September 17, 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. It’s free! Enjoy workshops, exhibits, and activities focused on bird migration. | Free Off The Vine Festival | 10 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Robert H. Treman State Park | You’re invited! Join us on September 17th at Robert H Treman State Park for the Off The Vine Music Festival. Moore Family Farm - Fall Festival & Teacher Appreciation Weekend | 10 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Moore Family Farm, 570 Auburn Rd | Teacher Appreciation Weekend at Moore Family Farm. School Faculty & Staff receive FREE admission - 9/17 & 9/18. | $14.95 - $18.50 Ithaca Football vs Alfred University | 1 p.m., 9/17 Saturday | Butterfield Stadium | Ithaca Football vs Alfred Universityn https://athletics. ithaca.edu/calendar.aspx?id=18175 Ithaca Peace Festival at 309 Siena Drive | 6 p.m., 9/17 Saturday | Three day family friendly event to celebrate

diversity, promote peace and build community relationahips while enjoying live music, international cuisine, chidlren’s activities and silent auction. Streets Alive! Ithaca | 1 p.m., 9/18 Sunday | North Cayuga Street, North Cayuga Street | Streets Alive! Ithaca is a day where the streets are closed to cars and open to people to walk, bike, roll, dance, and play. Bike Walk Tompkins is thrilled to produce this magical festival every year and share the nearly endless creative possibilities that a car-free street can bring. | Free BYO for Food and Community Dye Bath at Streets Alive! | 1 p.m., 9/18 Sunday | Cayuga Stret by Thompson Park, north of Gimme! , North Cayuga Street | Join Zero Waste Ithaca at Streets Live! on Sun. 9/18 1-5p for Community Dye Bath! BYO (Bring Your Own) your old clothes and food containers, etc to save our environment. | Free Club Cayuga Sunset Cruises at Allen Treman State Park | 7:30 p.m., 9/18 Sunday | Club Cayuga Sunset Cruises feature lively music on board the MV Teal, operated by Discover Cayuga Lake, with some of our favorite local DJs!

Books Tween Book Club: Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key | 3:45 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Ulysses Philomathic Library - Fall Book Sale | 5 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Ulysses Philomathic Library, Main St | 9/14: Member Night ; Thursday & Friday, 9/15 & 16: All welcome! TCSD classes will be enjoying library field trips and free books from the children’s tent! Saturday, 9/17: UPL joins the libraries of Waterloo, Seneca Falls, Ovid, Lodi, and Interlaken for the “Between the Lakes Book Sale Trail.” Sweet Reads at the Newfield Public Library | 6:30 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | Newfield Public Library, 198 Main Street | Join us Thursday, September 15, 6:30 pm. Let’s talk about the books we are reading over dessert! Visit https://newfieldpubliclibrary.org/ sweet-reads-september-15/ for more info. | Free Virtual Book Discussion: The Wild Edge of Sorrow by Francis Weller | 6 p.m., 9/16 Friday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street |

Constitution Writing (Leading @ IC) at Taughannock Falls Room, Campus Center | 4 p.m., 9/19 Monday | The purpose of this Constitution Writing workshop is to assist student organizations with writing or revising their constitution. Virtual Panel by Panel Graphic Novel Book Club | 6:30 p.m., 9/19 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Comic Book Club Meeting | 7 p.m., 9/20 Tuesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Part 2 -- Famous Fan Clubs of the Marvel and DC Universes | Free

Kids Knee High Story Time - Colors of the Rainbow | 9 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Welcome to Knee High Story Time - a program of stories, songs and more for toddler and preschool children and their family. Science Together: Magnet Fishing | 10:30 a.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Sciencecenter, 601 1st Street | Wednesday, September 14, 10:30-11 am Go Fish!… with magnets! Science Together activities are designed for ages 0-4. Tween Book Club: Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key | 3:45 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | FLIP IT Workshops | 5:30 p.m., 9/14 Wednesday | Edith B. Ford Memorial Library, 7169 Main Street | Join Family Educator, Joan Fifield, for 6 free workshops in September that provide advice, strategies, and tools on how to address children’s day to day behavior. | Free Preschool Art Session 1 | 3 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Preschool Art Session 2 | 4 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Groton Public Library Storytime at Groton Public Library | 6 p.m., 9/15 Thursday | Join the Library for a monthly storytime. This months theme is around The Winter Olympics. Family Workshop: Snakes and Dragons with the Cornell Herpetological Society | 10 a.m., 9/17 Saturday | Johnson Museum of Art, 114 Central Avenue | Meet members of the Cornell Herpetological Society and learn all about their snakes!

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17TH AT 8:00 PM

Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts, Trumansburg | Inspirational storyteller and musician Rev. Robert Jones celebrates the history, humor, and power of American Roots music. His show traces the development and impact of African/American music through the decades, including in his own songs and stories. (Photo: Provided)

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 AT 8:00 PM Bailey Hall, Cornell University | Three-time Grammy nominee Sean Ardoin opens the Cornell Concert Series this fall. (Photo: Provided)

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REV. ROBERT JONES IN CONCERT

SEAN ARDOIN - KREOLE ROCK AND SOUL

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Property Management Operations Specialist. Travis Hyde Properties, Ithaca, NY. Assist in event planning, facilities mgmt. accts. recelvable & customer svc Req’d: Associate’s deg., exp. in closing commercial & residential real estate sales & some travel in Ithaca area. Proficient in Power Bl, Yardi, Adobe & MS Office Suite. Please send resumes to ehyde@travishyde.com

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY

REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

REPLACEMENT A FULL LINE OF VINY Manufacture To InstallREPLACEMENT WINDO REPLACEMENT WINDOWS We Do Call It forAll Free Estimate &

WINDOWS VINYL Professional Installation A FULL LINE OF Custom made & manufact AREPLACEMENT FULL LINE OF VINYL WINDOWS by… REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Call for Free Estimate & Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation 3/54( Professional Installation Custom made & manufactured Custom made & manufactured 3%.%#! by… by… 6).9, 3/54( 3/54( 3%.%#! 3%.%#! 6).9,

6).9,

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Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or Toll Free at 866-585-6050

www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Romulus, NY Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at 866-585-6050 or Toll Free at

866-585-6050


SERVICES

SERVICES

IT HELP

RELIEF PROGRAMS

Home IT/home automation support services. I come to you to help with new projects, or to sort out pesky gadget configuration issues with PCs / laptops, printers that won’t print, Alexa (connecting to power strips, lights, doorbells, locks, AC etc), poor or intermittent wi-fi, networking issues, NAS devices etc. www.graybeardgeek.org

Do you need a Roof or Energy Efficient Windows & Help paying for it? YOU MAY QUALIFY THROUGH NEW RELIEF PROGRAMS (800) 944-9393 or visit NYProgramFunding.org to qualify. Approved applications will have the work completed by a repair crew provided by: HOMEOWNER FUNDING. Not affiliated with State or Gov Programs. (NYSCAN)

MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-543-6440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) Computer with internet is required. (NYSCAN)

MEDICAL BILLING Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! call 866-243-5931 (M-F 8am-6pm ET) Computer and internet is required.(AANCAN)

SERVICES

SERVICES

SERVICES

SERVICES

WATER DAMAGE ? Water Damage to your home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home. Set an appt today! Call: 833-664-1530 (AAN CAN)

820/Computer COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

NEED YOUR GUTTER CLEANED Never clean your gutters again! Affordable, professionally installed gutter guards protect your gutters and home from debris and leaves forever! For a FREE Quote call: 844-499-0277 (ANN CAN)

OWE IRS ? Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 877-414-2089. (AAN CAN)

1000/Real Estate for Sale TOP $$$ DOLLAR Top Dollar for your home guaranteed. Sell today while the market is hot! 315-804-4847, www.gilborealty.com; Gilbo Realty, NY Broker (NYSCAN)

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BackPage A Vibrant, Active Community Center For Learning, Activities, Social Groups

277-7000

DANGER MOLD Are you or someone in your home suffering from

And More! For Adults 50+

Allergy or Asthma? Have your heating ducts cleaned

Lifelong

to remove Dust, Fungi, Mites, Lint & Sout.

120 3rd St., Ithaca

THE WILLIAM GEORGE AGENCY

Rebuilt, Reconditioned, Bought, Sold, Moved

Find out about great advertising ad packages at:

(607) 280-4729

GREENSTAR FOOD CO+OP

Upgrade your home with replacement

Same Day Service Available

windows, we manufacture and install.

Convenient-Clean-Connected

Get The New Ithaca

BECOME A BUS DRIVER Ithaca City School District

Times Mobile App

150 Bostwick Rd, Ithaca

Available in Appstore & Google Play

607-274-2128

ITHACA NEWS Delivered to your inbox every day

CASCADILLA SCHOOL

Ithaca Times Daily Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

CLEANING SERVICES

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102 The Commons 273-3192 New, Used & Vintage Instruments & Accessories

ITHACA GUITAR WORKS DEWITT MALL 607-272-2602 No Long waits for Dermatology Appointments

REAL LIFE CEREMONIES Every life story deserves to be told, and told well. Steve Lawrence, Celebrant 607-564-7149

WEGMANS FOOD MARKET NOW HIRING 607- 277-5800 500 S. Meadow St., Ithaca

JOB.WEGMANS.COM

Qualified, Competent, Caring

Dermatology

25 Years Experience

Brad Yentzer, MD, FAAD

Licensed Enrolled Agent of the IRS

607-708-1330

607-339-0532

308 E. Seneca St * Ithaca

fingerlakesderm.com

845-244-0868

607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

i m e s

John Serferlis - Tailor

SOUTH SENECA VINYL 315-585-6050

Finger Lakes

INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP

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John’s Tailor Shop

ITHACA TAX SERVICE

JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET

t h a c a

950 Danby Rd, Suite 26 South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

READY FOR WINTER?

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547

for over 20 years

FLYITHACA.COM

607-272-3110

Men’s and Women’s Alterations

No job too big or too small

Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair.

LAND & SEA

4 to 1 Student to Faculty Ratio

Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

Tuned, Rented Complete Rebuilding Services

Full Service Grocery Store

770 Cascadilla St., Ithaca

ANIMALS

PIANOS

Fall Business

(607) 273-1009

http://www.allaboutmacs.com

607-272-0114

Looking to Boost your

tclifelong.org

Macintosh Consulting

Fridays 6-7 pm

or call 607-844-6460

607-277-7000 ext: 1214

Shop at the COOP

Yang style all levels at NY Friends House

ANCHEATING.COM

Everyone Is Welcome

** Peaceful Spirit Tai Chi **

www.wgaforchildren.org

607-273-1511

ALL ABOUT MACS

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VISIT US ONLINE

Call Larry at

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WE ARE HIRING

Do now before heating season starts.

119 West Court St., Ithaca

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LOOKING FOR WORK For rates and information contact front@ithactimes.com

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YOUR CBD STORE The only dedicated retail store for all the CBD