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F R E E A p r i l 1, 2 0 15 / V o l u m e X X X V I , N u m b e r 3 1 / O u r 4 3 r d Ye a r /

Online @ ITH ACA .COM

Sparkling

Development

legalizing a dangerous thing? PAGE 3

Newfield Secedes

disgruntled town joins next county PAGE 4

Now

& Then

artifacts and lists at Handwerker PAGE 13

Talking Dead

“Spoon River” turns 100 PAGE 16

Fight Still On

Teacher evaluation sent on to the state Department of Ed.

Tough Guy Poetry

Bill Stratton writes for biker hippies PAGE 17


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VOL.X X XVI / NO. 31 / April 1, 2015

Cuomo vs. Teachers .................... 8

Tompkins County

Tompkins County

crowd concerned the “Biggs property” (former location of the county health department) located on Harris B. Dates Drive. In 2012 the county decided to sell the property and put out a request for proposals (RFP) from developers. The plan for affordable, eco-friendly housing drew significant criticism and ultimately a lawsuit from area residents. Eventually the developer, NRP Properties, the lone RFP respondent, withdrew its proposal upon discovering more wetlands on the property than initially believed. Ed Marx, commissioner of planning, gave an update on the county’s plans regarding the project. He said, “There’s no proposal at this time … but we’re having some informal conversations.” In response to a question, Marx said that he would not

Seasonal Roads Still Impassable

Uncertain Future For “Biggs” Parcel

here’s a joke going around in upstate New York: there are two seasons, winter and roadwork. While it isn’t quite roadwork season yet, some towns and villages are already faced with the task of road clearing and rehabilitation when it comes to seasonal roads. By state law seasonal roads are supposed to open on April 1. At the March 26 Tompkins County Council of Governments (TCCOG) meeting, municipal officials discussed the possibility of sending a letter to state officials requesting that this year municipalities receive administrative relief allowing them not to open seasonal roads until April 15. The group circulated a sample email from Caroline Town Supervisor Don Barber (who was not present) to Senator James Seward (R-51st). The email noted that in many years, towns have been able to remove snow by mid-March and therefore still have enough time to make the roads usable by April 1. However, it said, “This year is an exception. With less than a week until April 1, all of the Town of Caroline seasonal roads are still plugged with snow and ice. Just removing the snow would be an expensive and, in some cases dangerous, challenge.” Danby Town Supervisor Ric Dietrich concurred: “Most of the rural towns have the majority of their roads that are still dirt. I’m sure everyone is experiencing some level of road disintegration.” Tompkins County Legislator Michael Lane (D-14th) asked whether state legislation was really necessary, and Dryden Town Supervisor Mary Ann Sumner observed that state permissions wouldn’t necessarily be required because town highway superintendents have the authority to close roads for emergency purposes. Next on the agenda, the council heard from County Attorney Jonathan Wood about the rules regarding municipalities and gift-giving. Wood read aloud a relevant portion of the New York State Constitution specifying that municipalities and school districts cannot give gifts—it’s “constitutionally impermissible.” He continued, “The thing is, when is it not a gift?” The issue usually comes into question when a government wants to fund non-profit organizations. Wood explained that the rules are broader for counties and cities than for towns

parklers are one step closer to being legal in Tompkins County. Although it is a not so well kept secret that sparklers can be purchased locally, legality notwithstanding, on March 24 the county legislature’s Government Operations Committee voted to move forward a resolution that would legitimize such purchases. Legislator Dan Klein (D-7th) noted that the resolution title could be misleading and proposed to change it. The original title proposed excluding “common, safe items” from the definition of dangerous fireworks. Klein questioned whether sparklers could really be considered common or safe and suggested that the title be changed to refer to “sparkling devices.” Although County Legislator (Danby and Caroline) Dan Klein Klein ultimately (Photo: Keri Blakinger) voted in favor of the resolution, currently recommend releasing another he cautioned, “This is not like saying RFP. Also, he said, “If nothing should work we are legalizing Tiddlywinks, this has out … the other option would be simply some risk associated with it.” Legislator to sell the property. It would be likely that Dooley Kiefer (D-10th) noted that the that would be the next recommendation.” proposed local law specifically refers to Given some of the public comment, wood sparklers, which are safer than wire the possibility of selling the property looks sparklers. strong right now. Steffen Schuhmann, After voting to approve the resolution who lives near the property in question, itself, the committee also voted to set a told the committee, “If the county decides public hearing date for the Tuesday, April 21 legislature meeting. continued on page 5 One discussion item that drew a small

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▶ TC3 Alumni Award nominations, Tompkins Cortland Community College and the TC3 Foundation are looking to recognize alums who have distinguished themselves in their careers and service to the community. TC3 and the TC3 Foundation are seeking nominations for two awards – the Distinguished Alumni award and the Community Leadership award. The Distinguished Alumni award recognizes those alumni who have established themselves in their career and in service to

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their communities. The Community Leadership award honors alumni who have demonstrated exceptional community participation or outreach efforts. Any community member can nominate TC3 alum for these awards, which are given out each year. Applications can be found online at TC3.edu/Foundation and will be accepted through April 10. Additional information is available by calling 607.844.8222, Ext. 4369 or by email at alumni@TC3.edu.

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The fight over teacher evaluations

Postmodern & Ancient . .......... 13 Handwerker puts the now next to the then

NE W S & OPINION

Newsline . ........................................... 3-7 Health ................................................. 11 Sports ................................................... 12

ART S & E NTE RTAINME NT

Art . ....................................................... 15 Stage ..................................................... 16 Books .................................................... 17 Music . ................................................... 18 TimesTable .................................... 20-23 Encore .................................................. 23 Classifieds...................................... 25-26 Real Estate........................................... 27 Cover Photo: Teachers at Lansing Rally with Cuomo Cutout (Photos: Brian Arnold) Cover Design: Julianna Truesdale.

ON THE W E B Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. B i l l C h a i s s o n , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , 6 07-277-70 0 0 x 224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m K e r i B l a k i n g e r, W e b E d i t o r , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J o s h B r o k a w, S t a f f R e p o r t e r , x 225 R e p o r t e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m A r t S a m p l a s k i , E d i t o r i a l a s s i s t a n t , x 217 A r t s @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Brian Ar nold, Photographer p h o t o g r a p h e r @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m Steve Lawrence, Sports Editor, Ste vespo rt sd u d e@gmai l .co m M i c h a e l N o c e l l a , F i n g e r L a k e s S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 236 Sp o rt s@Flcn .o rg J u l i a n n a Tr u e s d a l e , P r o d u c t i o n D i r e c t o r / D e s i g n e r , x 226 P r o d u c t i o n @I t h a c a T i me s . c o m G e o r g i a C o l i c c h i o, A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 220 G e o r g i a @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m J i m K i e r n a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 219 J k i e r n a n @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m R i c k y C h a n , A c c o u n t R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , x 218 R i c k y @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C a t h y B u t t n e r, C l a s s i f i e d A d v e r t i s i n g , x 227 c b u t t n e r @ i t h a c a t i me s . c o m Cy n d i B r o n g , x 211; J u n e S e a n e y A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Rick Blaisdell, Chris Eaton, Les Jink s J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c a T i me s . c o m C o n t r i b u t o r s : Barbara Adams,Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Luke Z. Fenchel, J.F.K. Fisher, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Cassandra Palmyra, and Bryan VanCampen.

T he ent i re c o ntents o f the Ithaca T i mes are c o p y r i ght © 2 0 1 5 , b y newsk i i nc . All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $69 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 607-277-7000, FAX 607277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i me s G a z e t t e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING PHOTOGRAPHER By Br i an Ar nol d

What Was the Last Book You read?

N April Fools

Newfield to Join Tioga County

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“ The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson” —Colleen Kearns

“Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig” —Dan States

“The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt” —Patrick Nellis

“Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events #10), by Lemony Snicket” —Rose Buck

“The Music Lesson by Victor Wooten” ­—Steve Piotrowski

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t this week’s Tompkins County Legislature meeting, Newfield announced its intent to secede from the county. During the portion of the meeting dedicated to comment from elected officials, Newfield Town Supervisor Jeff Hart read from a prepared statement: “I am Jeff Hart, Newfield town supervisor, and I’m here along with my fellow board members to inform you of our intent to secede from Tompkins County. This week, we heard rumors of proposed countywide zoning. We don’t know if those rumors are actually true, but it doesn’t really matter. This is just the last straw. We’re done.” Although no one on the legislature seemed particularly shocked or impressed by the new revelation, some legislators had questions. Legislator Martha Robertson (D-13th) asked, “Where do you intend to secede to? Is there some place that wants you?” Newfield Councilwoman Joanne James replied, “Well we haven’t decided on that yet. We’re still exploring our options. Our first choice was Texas, but after we looked into it further, the state seemed a little over-regulated. It looks like we’re going to have to settle for Tioga County.” Legislator Leslyn McBean-Clairborne (D-1st) asked the Newfielders, “Does Texas have something against us? Why wouldn’t they take one of our towns? I’m a little insulted by that.” Newfield Councilwoman Casey Powers said, “They told us they don’t want our waste transfer station.” Legislator Peter Stein (D-11th) asked for some clarification on the matter. “There is I’m confused,” he said. Pausing, he added, “Why would you even want to leave Tompkins County?” “The dirty Z-word!” said Hart. Raising her hand to comment, Legislator Dooley Kiefer (D-10th) said, “I am not opposed to your resolution in principle, but I do object to the missing commas in lines 32 and 54.” “Commas-schmlommas,” Hart said. “We already passed this. So we don’t really care what you say.” Making gestures towards inclusiveness, Newfield Councilwoman Christine Laughlin said, “By the way, anyone who is interested is welcome to come along with us, whether it’s Texas or Tioga.” Councilman Roy Trask nudged her away from the mic, saying, “Well now, let’s not get carried away here.” Legislator Dan Klein (D-7th) said, “Have you thought about the fact that you’ll probably lose bus service if you leave the county? Tioga County cut its bus system last year.” 1 -7 ,

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leave?” “Well I’m not sure,” Mareane said. “But, I can say that if Texas changes its mind and accepts them, this could be a really interesting way to avoid the tax cap. This might be something that Tompkins County wants to consider taking a look at. If they’re just going to Tioga County, then I see no real benefit for us.” There were murmurs of assent and Legislator Will Burbank (D-12th) said, “I’m not sure about Texas, though … maybe California’s interested?” Chock said, “I’d settle for Colorado, if California’s not interested.” While Legislators Glenn Morey (R-9th) and Mike Sigler (R-6th) both favored Texas, Robertson expressed interest in Florida. Legislator Nate Shinagawa (D-4th) said, “We could definitely find a state with a more attractive flag, like Arizona.” A number of legislators expressed emphatic agreement. It appears that relative prettiness of the state flag could be a major deciding factor moving forward. Legislature Chair Mike Lane Newfield Town Supervisor celebrates the impending secession to (D-14th) said, “In the interest Tioga County. (Photo: Keri Blakinger) of time, I’d like to move along here. Do we want to form a Grinning, Hart said, “Yes, yes we have. Secession Committee to study We’re going to use ATVs. The fourth-grade this further?” With no dissent, the class at the elementary school came up legislature eagerly approved a resolution with an ATV-based public transit system. formally acknowledging the creation of It will kick ass.” subcommittee to select members of a Carol Chock (D-3rd) said, “Joe, are Secession Committee for the county to they allowed to do this?” study the possibility of seceding from itself. County Administrator Joe Mareane The committee’s first meeting is explained, “I’m not sure what the laws are scheduled for April Fools Day in the in Tioga and Texas as regards ATV-based legislature chambers on East Court public transit systems.” Street. • “No, I meant the seceding part,” —Keri Blakinger Chock clarified. “Are they allowed to just TCcog

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and villages. Interestingly, under the law, municipalities can give to other municipalities and that’s not considered an illicit gift. Next, the council discussed whether rules should be changed regarding the use of the council’s funds. Sumner commented that she would oppose regulations that would make it easier to spend the money with less advance notice. Ithaca Town Supervisor Herb Engman added that such funds should not be used for projects that would incur expenses on a recurring basis. After some discussion, the council decided to put together a working group to further explore the issue. In other budgetary matters, local municipalities are considering joining forces with BOCES to help meet the shared services requirement for tax-cap compliance for the next tax year. County Administrator Joe Mareane reported on a recent meeting with BOCES officials, during which municipal officials discussed

the possibility of using BOCES for certain centralized services. Currently, BOCES offers tax collection services for some of its member districts, which was one possibility that both Mareane and Engman said they found intriguing. Engman said, “I was surprised at how open BOCES and the school districts were to talking about these possibilities.” Also, Mareane explained that efforts to explore a shared municipal court system are still moving forward. The shared-services committee had come up with a list of group membership, which Mareane said would likely include the District Attorney, assigned counsel representative, a designee of State Supreme Court judge, Hon. Robert Mulvey, two defense attorneys, two municipal judges, including at least one non-attorney judge, a city court judge, and two chief elected officials from local governments. The council approved allowing the sharedservices committee to make the final approval on the group’s membership. • —Keri

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N City of Ithaca

The Hot Truck May Get New Location

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he Hot Truck may be soon doing something besides selling lots of its Triple Sui sandwich—the latenight institution might change its location, which, even though it’s a truck, it does very rarely. Right now, the Hot Truck is parked on Stewart Avenue and pays $702 a year to the city for the location. Hot Truck, Inc. President Al Smith, also owner of Shortstop Deli, believes that a new Hot Truck will be required soon to replace the current 1984 model. This means more sales are required, since new food trucks cost somewhere in the range of $200,000 these days. Smith has decided that moving to the food truck parking spot designated at the corner of Eddy Street and Dryden Road will help business. He told the Board of Public Works in a letter sent last June he was willing to pay over $6,000 a year in permits for the privilege, if BPW granted the Hot Truck rights to be open all day, every day. Lou Cassaniti, of Lou’s Hot Dog Stand, told BPW on March 23 that Smith and the Hot Truck should be granted any changes they want to make. “I heard they’re seeking a change in location,” Cassaniti said. “I’m here to endorse them in anything they do … there’s no better business in town, no better people. We all should support them in whatever changes they want to make, which I’m not sure of.” The city made food trucks parking on streets legal in January 2014. That legislation granted the Hot Truck a “heritage permit” for its location on Stewart Avenue that includes the right to have one permanent location. After some internal discussions, BPW member Mark Darling told Smith in an Govtops

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to sell this property then my wife and I, as well as a few neighbors, would be interested in purchasing this property. If we purchase this property we would be interested in keeping it as undeveloped green space.” After the committee approved two resolutions moving forward funding for the airport roof repair project, Airport Manager Michael Hall gave an update on the state of the airport and its struggle with a decreasing number of customers. Hall began by noting that enplanements are down 25 percent since 2010. He added, “That trend is regional. It’s not unique to Ithaca at all; Binghamton and Elmira are down by comparable amounts.”

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email he “came away with the sense that compressor—they said, ‘we’ll work with the Heritage Permit’s conditions are for you,’” Smith said. that truck in that location” on Stewart When the current Hot Truck was Avenue, though Mayor Svante Myrick had purchased in the mid-1980s, then a weighed in with his support in October. electrical plug was installed; an outlet on Myrick explained his reasoning for a nearby pole has long supplied the Hot supporting the move at the March 23 Truck’s power. meeting. Though Smith said he was willing to “I understand we’re making an pay for daytime hours, Myrick’s remarks exception and making an exception sounded like the agreement he favors is for makes all of us uncomfortable,” Myrick late-night hours only, every night of the week. said. “Here’s why I think we should treat the Hot Truck differently. Because it’s a historic resource. I’m beginning to learn the more I’m in this job what a historic resource means. It’s an institution not because of where it is, but what it is.” Smith told BPW that his Hot Truck started on Dryden Road in 1960 as Johnny’s Big Red Grill Pizza Truck. “The pizza, the subs, the truck serves, all started on Dryden Road,” The legendary Hot Truck. (File photo) Smith said. Some members of BPW For anyone curious about the origins were under the impression that Smith of the Hot Truck’s name, Smith had a might try to sell the Hot Truck after story to tell BPW. Back in the 1920s, after achieving a move in location. Louie’s lunch trucks started running, the “I will be president of Hot Truck, Inc. Zounakos family operated three trucks. until they put me in the ground,” Smith Two of them rotated in 12-hour shifts— told the board. “I don’t smoke, and I don’t the third one didn’t have any power and drink, and my mother will celebrate her 97th birthday on April 1.” served cold food and sandwiches across the street on Stewart Avenue. That was the Smith explained why the Hot Truck Cold Truck. doesn’t move. “Eventually the cold truck went away, “We used to park in front of so you just had the Hot Truck.” • residential halls, and Cornell asked if there was anyway to do away with the — J o s h B r o k aw One of the problems that could be causing this downward trend is the lack of service reliability. Hall explained, “Part of that is because two of the three destinations are in the northeast corridor—Philly and Newark are two of the more difficult airports in the country.” The Philadelphia and Newark hubs, Hall said, are “filling up,” and in ten years those hubs might not have room for flights from Ithaca. Hall said that the airport has met with professional consultants and with airline executives to discuss, among other things, the possibility of utilizing lesstrafficked hubs outside of the northeast corridor. The committee also voted unanimously to authorize the use of $20,000 of contingency funding to pay for the community social outreach worker position proposed last year by the City

of Ithaca. During the last budget cycle, the county already set aside $20,000 in contingency earmarked for this purpose. City Attorney Ari Levine addressed the committee in support of the resolution, saying that the new position would be an opportunity to reduce police involvement in the downtown area. He said, “Currently IPD responds to a great number of calls that are simply not criminal in nature.” He stressed that IPD would still respond to those calls that are criminal in nature. The city has already approved its portion of the funding, and the Downtown Ithaca Alliance will provide funding as well. The position will be housed at Family & Children Services, a local non-profit. Levine said that he hopes someone can be hired as soon as May. • —Keri

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Ups&Downs ▶Gentleman of the Year, Brandon Thompson, a junior at Cornell University, has been named the winner of the 2015 Gentlemen Showcase, earning a $500 scholarship and the title of 2015 Gentleman of the Year (College Category). With more than 2,000 votes, Brandon, who is current Chairman of the Cornell College Republicans, Director of Operations on the executive board of Cornell Faith and Action, and Captain of Cornell’s intramural soccer team, won the contest. Carter Fowler from Florida State University came in second. Contest hosted by the Network of enlightened Women (NeW). If you care to respond to something in this column, or publish your own grievances or plaudits, e-mail editor@ithacatimes.com, with a subject head “Ups & Downs.”

Heard&Seen ▶ Saving Lake View, Lake View Cemetery, Inc. will hold its Annual Meeting at the Ithaca Town Hall, 215 N. Tioga St. on Sunday, May 3 from 2 to 4 p.m. It is very important that Lot Holders, Family and Friends attend. Agenda will include an update on the reorganization and revitalization of Lake View over the past year as well as recruitment and election of a slate of Board Members. Questions can be directed to the Town Clerk, Town of Ithaca, 607-273-1721. ▶ Top Stories on the Ithaca Times website for the week of March 25-31 include: 1) T’burg Grad Named to Forbes “30 Under 30” 2) Gola Osteria, a Tuscan Hideaway 3) Lonnie Park Releases Solo Abum 4) Hornbrook Road: The Aftermath 5) Mesko Sentenced to 5 Years For these stories and more, visit our website at www.ithaca.com.

question OF THE WEEK

To reduce your property taxes, would you like to see the rich pay more in income taxes? Please respond at ithaca.com. L ast Week ’s Q uestion: Have you ever attended a meeting of the City of Ithaca Common Council ?

44 percent of respondents answered “yes” and 56 percent answered “no”

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No Fooling T

Quirky Is As ...

his is our April Fools issue. As much as we would have loved to fill the whole issue with “joke” stories, there are in fact just a couple. Writing a story that is making fun of what really goes on is tough in a place like Ithaca, where the ridiculous is stockin-trade. It is a little difficult to come up with a satire of a city board that is capable of carrying on an earnest hourlong discussion about the color of the drapes to be hung in hotel windows to simulate a waterfall. It was pretty clear that the representative of the hotelbuilding company felt like he had fallen down a rabbit hole. Some issues just aren't funny and should be handled with kid gloves at the end of ten-foot poles. Israel is obviously one of those, as we found out a couple of weeks ago. Not that we didn't know Israel was a delicate subject. Everyone knows that. But we found out that there are some subjects about which a local newspaper can essentially do nothing right. A group had been “tabling” at Greenstar Cooperative Market for several weeks in an effort to drum up support for a petition to be presented to the coop's board and thence perhaps passed on to its membership for a vote. This is the normal way of things at Greenstar. The group is part of a “boycott, divestment, sanctions” (BDS) movement that is copying the approach taken against the Union of South Africa during the anti-apartheid protests between the 1960s and 1980s. The local effort involves trying to get Greenstar to

boycott foodstuffs made in Israeli and by Israel-sympathetic companies. This seems to include mostly hummus and as such is largely symbolic as regards Israeli commerce as a whole and probably hummus makers as well. In the March 11 issue we published an article about the boycott effort at the cooperative and in the March 18 issue we published another about the fact that Cornell students were hiring lawyers to defend against “anti-Semitic” harassment. At our website we have a weekly poll on the homepage (called “What Do You Think?”) and during the week between these two stories we asked, “Would you support a boycott of Israeli foodstuffs?” naively believing that people had read the story in the paper that week. No such luck. Several pro-Israel commenters, apparently entirely unaware of the local BDS effort, seemed to think that the boycott was our idea and that we were trying to gather support. Some of these comments branded the boycott absurd and some accused all BDS supporters of wanting to end the state of Israel. Pro-Palestine commenters, on the other hand, generally disputed claims of antiSemitism and argued that being against Israeli state policies was not anti-Semitic. Sadly, we received several outand-out anti-Semitic and anti-Israel comments (which we, of course, did not publish), which strongly supports proIsrael commenters’ claims of antagonism continued on page 7

By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r

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ravel and Leisure, a ‘lifestyles’ magazine with 4.8 million readers, named Ithaca, New York the “third quirkiest town in America,” citing Darwin Days, the Moosewood Restaurant and the Cayuga Wine Trail as distinctive features of the city. “The mention is good for Ithaca tourism because it is a major publication,” said Bruce Stoff, director of the IthacaTompkins Convention and Visitors Bureau. Asheville, North Carolina, was ranked at the top of the quirkiest-towns list, followed by Provincetown, Massachusetts, then Ithaca. Simeon D. Witt, Ithaca’s Minister of Magazine Rankings, hasn’t risen to his present level of prominence by taking “no” for an answer. No sooner was Ithaca awarded the number three slot on the nation’s Quirkiest Town roster than Witt was on the phone to Bea T. Dubbs, the quirky town editor for Travel and Leisure magazine. In the wake of the Clinton email scandal, all communication of any kind at the city cabinet level must now be made via a secure municipal medium and transcribed. The following phone conversation will surely silence those who sniff at how tax dollars are spent around here. Bea T. Dubbs: Dubbs here. Simeon D. Witt: It’s Simeon Witt, again, Ms. Dubbs. I hope you got our gift basket! Have you had a chance to look over our 2015 application package for quirkiest town? BTD: Now, Mr. Witt, as I’ve told you, it’s not our policy to discuss pending awards. SDW: I know. It’s just that, well, we came in third last year and we’re just not a third place city. Why, we’ve been named Most Secure Small City, number one in Workforce Growth, Smartest City, Best

College Town, Best City to Walk to Work and City Most Likely to Blow Its Own Horn. That’s a real thing. BTD: That’s all well and good, Mr. Witt, but what does that have to do with your city’s quirkiness? SDW: It’s all in our application and the affidavits. We’ve been a certified eccentric municipality since 1949. I sent you the clippings. We were odd before it was cool! What’s Asheville got? Confederate flags? A few hillbillies? Pssh! BTD: We sent a reporter down there, and she saw people eating grits. Of their own free will. SDW: Hm. I see your point. What about Provincetown, though? There’s such a thing as trying too hard, you know. What did you say in the article … they’re ‘gayfriendly’? That was quirky in 1982. They’re handing out same-sex marriage certificates in the state of Alabama now, for goodness sake. BTD: Mr. Witt … SDW: In Ithaca, we banned vehicular traffic for several blocks to create a pedestrian shopping area. BTD: Lots of cities have done that. SDW: Yeah, well in Ithaca we’ve banned pedestrians in the area, too! BTD: Well, yes, that is quirky. SDW: There’s more. Our most popular house of worship is a grocery store. We have our own currency. In our city, February is 13 weeks long. Our tourism bureau advises people to go to Florida. We maintain and study a substantial herd of hippies … BTD: All right, Mr. Witt. These are good points. I promise to give your materials every consideration. SDW: That’s all I ask, Ms. Dubbs! And now, the waiting … •

YourOPINIONS

Hello From Key West

Thank you for sending your residents and potential tourists to our southernmost city. We loved your website pop-up surrendering to winter and suggesting a trip to Key West. I met quite a few visitors from your city this month. One of my favorite people, poet Katharyn Howd Machan, was here two weeks ago with her friend Carla, and we had a week full of laughter and warmth that included beaches, yard sales, galleries and more. During our discussions it occurred to us that there are so many parallels between Ithaca and Key West that readers might enjoy a monthly letter from our tropical island to our sister city up north. I promise not to rub it in when we are enjoying 80-degree weather while you 6 T

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are expecting a blizzard, as long as you don’t gloat when we are soaking wet in 90-degree plus with 95 percent humidity while you are hiking in cool gorges. For those of you who don’t know the Keys, we are an island community that dangles off the southern tip of Florida and is connected by one roadway and 42 bridges. And while we are islands surrounded by the sea and you are lakes surrounded by land, we have much in common. Our population increases at certain times of the year, as does yours when students arrive for upcoming semesters, only ours are snowbirds and tourists fleeing from the cold. We, too, have issues with noise ordinances and lobbying for living wages. continued on page 7


YouthConnections

Big Brothers, Big Sisters By B r i t ta n i e E a r l e , M at ch Su pp ort S pec i a l ist

Quarterly Feature for the Ithaca Youth can often find the match together at Bob’s Bureau Mentoring program local car dealership, Top 5 Rated, where eet long-time volunteer, Bob, Bob teaches Garrett a thing or two about and his “Little Brother” Garrett. cars and business. They have been matched in When asked to share one thing that the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program of stands out about Bob, Garrett said, “In Ithaca & Tompkins County since 2006. In all the nine years I have known him, February, they will celebrate their ninehe’s always been there for me. He’s seen year anniversary! me through and steered me in the right Bob became a direction.” Big Brother at the Bob wrote back age of 60, but that in 2012, “I have been hasn’t slowed him able to contribute down one bit. Bob some insights on said of Garrett, how to navigate that “I have watched wonderful challenge of this energetic sixgrowing up. It is truly year-old become a rewarding to see some young man.” Garrett of the seeds we have plays the clarinet sown take root and in concert band, start to grow.” practices Jujitsu I’m sure as Bob three times a week, looks back on that and volunteers at the statement now, it still Enfield Firehouse, rings true. The match all while juggling shares a special bond, the demands of high and one I am sure will school. “I’m really last for many, many proud of him,” said years to come. You Bob. can read more about Bob and Garrett (Photo provided) The match Bob and Garrett on shares a strong love our website, www. for cars. Garrett, who studies German bbbsithaca.org, under the “True Stories” in school, will be taking a school trip to section on the right! Germany later this year and is very excited Join the 2015 IYB Mentor Challenge to tour the Mercedes-Benz Museum! You and become a mentor now! •

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We also have concerns about feral animals but instead of complaints about foxes ours are, ironically, about chickens. And, akin to you, we host music festivals, much like your recent One Love Ithaca, in support of grassroots efforts to protect our environment and educate our citizens. We enjoy a thriving arts community and, like Ithaca, there are events and fund-raisers ranging from classy to quirky. So thanks for sending us your weather-weary people, we’ve enjoyed their company. It won’t be long before we are headed your way in search of cool breezes and mild temperatures. I look forward to our Ithaca-Keys connection. In the meantime, may your spring arrive early; ours is here already. Love from The Keys, Jeannie Somma P.S. Quirky Events Keys in March: Pig Races in Marathon featured three separate races. The Asian potbelly race was comical. The annual St. Paddy’s Day bar stroll took place in Key West, and the Intuitive Arts and Psychic Fair was held on Big Pine Key. Classy event of the Month: Fundraiser for Womankind Health Center Weekend

Croquet Tournament and twilight championship on the lawn of a waterfront estate in Key West. All attendees wore white.

Bike Lanes, Please

This is a letter to support Bike Walk Tompkins’ unanimous recommendation of bike lanes along Cayuga Street from Cascadilla to Ithaca High School, which is currently under consideration by the City of Ithaca Board of Public Works. I am a bike-passionate community member living on Cayuga Street and frequent this street by bike year-round. I have an eleven year old son who I would feel much safer about biking to friends’ houses if he has access to a safe bike route. Sharrows don’t quite cut it for our children on this main street that hosts fast moving cars and sporadically parked cars, a combination that makes it difficult for riders to find a safe space within the lane where they will not be in the way of cars traveling on the street or cars that might be pulling out or opening doors. This leaves vulnerable bikers to use sidewalks, which is sometimes the better of two dangerous options, but puts pedestrians at risk and is not even legal for riders over the age of twelve.

In addition to creating a safe and family friendly transportation environment, bike lanes are a demonstration of our commitment to supporting fossil-free city infrastructure. Not only are bike lanes helpful in making the world we want for our future, investing in fossil free initiatives is part of the puzzle of us having a future at all. Thanks to the Board of Public Works and other City Hall volunteers and staff for all that you do to make our community a more just and sustainable place to live. Sharrows (shared-lane markings) have worked moderately well for those who are comfortable “taking the lane” and riding in traffic, but a dedicated bike lane would be attractive to a wider variety of potential users, even more so if these lanes are protected. Dedicated bike facilities on Cayuga Street would complement, not duplicate, bike boulevard infrastructure being installed this year on Tioga Street. Repaving/restriping projects are an excellent opportunity to install bike lanes at little to no additional cost to the community, as they just involve paint and pavement markings. Bike Walk Tompkins specifically recommends studying the use of protected bike lanes with safe and viable intersection crossings. These lanes can be cost effective by, for example, buffering them with a row of parking. Protected bike lanes have been shown to increase the number and diversity of people who are willing to bike on streets like Cayuga that have substantial traffic (including large vehicles such as buses). If protected bike lanes are not feasible, then standard bike lanes would be acceptable. With accommodations for bikes, Cayuga Street will become a central route in a growing network of streets suited for this affordable, healthy, fun and nonpolluting form of transportation. This of course is not enough. We take this opportunity to strongly urge the city to update and implement its bike plan, which has been put on hold for almost 20 years, in order to build a complete and connected bike network. This will be a powerful step towards making biking safer, more accessible and convenient, and contribute to a transportation system that works for everyone in the City of Ithaca. – Caleb R. Thomas, Ithaca Bike Walk Tompkins Editorial

contin u ed from page 6

that cross way over the line from politics to prejudice. Eventually a couple of pro-Israel community members contacted us to tell us that a commenter to the Facebook page of the local BDS group was urging boycott supporters to vote multiple times at multiple devices to skew our webpage poll in their favor. (The anti-boycott contingent had a commanding lead up to this point.) In response to those calls we refreshed our browser repeatedly and continually for a few minutes and watched the pro-boycott wedge of the pie expand steadily. T

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People were clearly cheating, so we removed the poll and posted another that asked if people thought it was OK to cheat on polls. Again, sadly, 15 percent of voters said “Yes.” Ordinarily, when we ask a question about a local issue, in a good week we got perhaps 50 people voting in these polls. In contrast, almost 3,000 votes were cast for and against the boycott of Israeli foodstuffs. Obviously there was some cheating going on here, but apparently more people also care more about international issues than they do about local ones, like whether or not the police acted properly at the Danby standoff (39 votes) or whether or not city police should be required to live in the city (63 votes). We are a local paper that covers local issues. Occasionally national and international issues affect the local community, so we cover them. But the internal security policies of Israel are not our beat, and when we write about a boycott we want comments on the boycott at Greenstar, not the struggle in the Middle East that has been going on since 1948. A lot of residents are simply passing through Ithaca and aren’t much interested in local affairs. Only 63 people bothered to vote in the Fifth Ward (Collegetown) in the last local election. This puts more of a burden on long-term local residents: if you don’t take more of an interest in local government, then a very small group will decide how to run this city. The upside of this situation is that, should you decide to take an active part you will be one voice among relatively few people and will quite likely be heard and rather likely to be heeded. Heck, you could easily end up on a committee, a commission, or a board and become a decision maker. No fooling. •

The Talk at

ithaca com In response to last week’s cover story on affordable housing, we got this comment on Stone Quarry Apartments. Thank you for recognizing that not only are there significant public infrastructure deficiencies for the Stone Quarry Apartment project, but that the project will result in tripling the population of this single-family neighborhood. Spencer Road residents should be applauded for their activism and involvement which led directly to DEC oversight and the focused removal of contaminated soil. It is no surprise that decades of use as an automotive repair facility and dump resulted in “poor soil” and higher costs for this project. Stone Quarry Apartments is now a cleaner, safer family-focused housing complex as a result of the direct democracy of neighborhood residents.

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FightStillOn B y J o s h B r o k aw

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dminstrators and school boards at public school districts across New York State are accustomed to Albany politicians keeping them guessing about how much money they will be given in each state budget. This year, school administrators have had to do more guessing than usual. To begin with, Gov. Andrew Cuomo didn’t release a baseline state aid number when he presented his budget in January. But what has made schoolteachers and public education supporters fighting mad is the governor’s proposal to have student performance on standardized tests factored into evaluation of teacher performance. Student scores will determine half of a teacher’s score when they are being judged for tenure. Pass that evaluation change, Cuomo has told the legislature, and school funding will go up about $1.1 billion (a 5 percent increase) in the 2015-16 budget year. Leave it out, and there will be only a $377 million increase available in a total state education fund of over $22 billion (a 1.7 percent rise). As budget negotiations went into the late-night hours last week, Cuomo and the legislature decided to pass along the work of coming up with new evaluation criteria to the state Department of Education or the Board of Regents; no one had a clear answer about who would decide what, even after the budget was printed on early Sunday morning, March 29. However the teacher evaluations deal comes out, the fact remains that the governor has stoked the ire of public educators to a degree unseen yet in his four

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Teacher evaluation sent to state Department of Ed. years in office. “We’re caught in some kind of chaotic storm that no one can make any sense of,” South Seneca superintendent Stephen Parker-Zeilinski told a crowd of 300 at a rally in the Lansing Middle School auditorium on March 19. “All we really want to do,” he said, “is focus on what we signed up for, which is getting the best education for each one of our students.” The crowd at that rally wore T-shirts that declared “Respect Public Education: It Works.” The event was part of a series staged at schools around the state by the New York State United Teachers (NYSUT). The rallies are intended to let the governor know the high level of disapproval teachers have regarding his proposals. A petition that circulated at the rally asked members of the legislature to “ensure that local control of schools is preserved,” and said that “schemes to balance the budget on the backs of our children … are morally bankrupt” and called for support for “limitless learning, not endless testing.” Delving into all of the philosophies and controversies that surround “highstakes standardized testing,” charter schools, teacher contracts, and all the rest is a task too tough for any one humble story—though this reporter would be happy to talk to anyone with a strong and informed opinion on these essential issues. For now, let us hear what they are saying in the school boardrooms and administration offices about how New York State funds its public school districts and just a bit of talk about what people think of the governor himself. A teaser: Cuomo’s not all that wellliked. (To wit, Zephyr Teachout polled 2.5 1 -7 ,

2015

times more votes that Cuomo in Tompkins County last November.)

Rumors, Projections, Predictions

A rural district like South Seneca, which relies on the state for over 60 percent of its funding, is made particularly uneasy by machinations in Albany that keep administrators in the dark. “It’s the uncertainty that’s hardest for building a budget,” Parker-Zeilinski said. “When revenue is so up in the air and uncertain, it really puts a lot of pressure on a local school board to make an informed choice on how to build the budget moving forward. We hear what I think of as rumors, projections, predictions. Until some deal is made, we don’t know if the most extreme version of what the governor has put out there will come to pass, or whether that was just a step to landing on some number that’s more in the realm of what we’re used to.” After Dryden Central Schools administrators began planning their “best guess” budget last December, the governor’s “State of the State” address in January “threw much of it into further confusion, rather than clarity,” said Adam Bauchner, Dryden’s Director of Curriculum and Instruction. “In response,” he said, “we began to develop a second budget, based upon the worst-case scenario emerging from Albany.” Later, Dryden started developing a third budget proposal that paints “a rosier picture,” Bauchner said, predicated on the state budget ending the “Gap Elimination Adjustment” (GEA). One cannot talk to

anyone involved in New York State public school budgeting without hearing about the GEA and how quickly it should go away.

Now You’re Really Hurting, Buckaroo

Dr. Rick Timbs of the Statewide Schools Finance Consortium explains the logic of the GEA in metaphors of paying a neighbor kid for mowing the grass: “Say I give you 50 bucks to do some yard work every week. Then, one week I say, ‘You’re getting $45. That’s what I got.’ The next week, I give you $47. You’re saying, ‘What the heck? Where’s my $50?’” The metaphor makes sense when one understands the recent history of New York education budgeting. In very short form: New York City’s “Campaign for Fiscal Equity” argued for years that state school funding was inequitable, punishing poorer districts. In 2006 Justice Leland DeGrasse of the New York Court of Appeals decided that they had a good point. In April of the next year, the legislature passed the “State Education Budget and Reform Act of 2007,” which created what’s known as “Foundation Aid” and marked somewhere between $5 and $7 billion—claims vary— in additional funding for schools over the coming years. A formula was created to decide which school districts should get what monies, with numbers factored in to determine need, including how many students get free lunch, the population density, and how many students speak limited English. Then, there was that recession. To help plug the budget gap after the 2008 financial


back. and how much of the GEA damage they crash, the GEA was implemented for the “If we had been funded by the formula take. Upstate schools are slated to receive 2010-11 budget year. The aid formula 30 percent of the total foundation aid—and for the last five years, we’ve been shorted in was calculated; monies were allocated to the neighborhood of six or seven million,” they account for 40 percent of all GEA a district; then, via “adjustment,” some Parker-Zeilinski said. “Our total budget reductions. It would take $250 million for monies were taken back to eliminate the is only $22 million. We’re talking about the state just to make up that difference, state budget gap. money that was intended to come our way Grainger told the Lansing crowd. Promises were made in 2007 that by Albany’s own formula, that for whatever Part of the problem with the aid aren’t being carried out, Timbs said, even if reason, isn’t coming and never will.” formula is that money that was already year-over-year funding might increase for going to wealthier districts couldn’t very schools one budget to the next. well just be snatched away. “The state says ‘That’s more than you Although the original foundation aid made last year, quit whining.’ We just Ithaca’s schools aren’t so reliant on formula was supposed to allocate funding increased state aid to all school districts,” state aid as the rural districts; last year the in a progressive way to help districts that Timbs said. “If the formula was to start state contributed just under a quarter of needed help, asking wealthier districts to running instantly, you’d need to come up their budget. Even so, $2.8 million was with $4.9 billion to get to the level it should give up all their state aid was not palatable deducted from Ithaca’s coffers by the GEA to their representatives in the legislature. be at the current budget year.” last budget year, according to Grainger. So these districts kept, as a minimum, As an example, Timbs provided a “The first two years of GEA were $500 per student in the formula. “Even spreadsheet of numbers for the Dryden certainly softened by school district. In 2010-11, the [federal] stimulus the district was supposed money,” Grainger said. to get $11,837,399 in “We plugged the gap to Foundation Aid; after some degree with reserves. the GEA was applied That’s running out on us they received $9,136,259 now.” ($2,701,140 less) in state Some prefunds. The next year, the kindergarten classes and “take back” was over $3.3 private instructors were million. When public among the casualties of education advocates say that tight budgets over the the state owes schools X past few years, Ithaca amount of dollars, this is the Superintendent Luvelle money they’re talking about. Brown told the board A further complication at the first-look budget is the property tax cap meeting. implemented in 2012. “We’ve had to give In the simple version it up things we held close to requires districts to get a our hearts the past three, 60-percent “yea” vote from four years when it comes the community for any to the budget,” Brown levy increases that exceed said. “We’ve cut, cut, cut at 2 percent. This restricts times.” flexibility in richer districts Adding to the and eliminates the one difficulties facing school funding option that keeps districts are heightened poorer districts going, or as requirements for Timbs puts it: “Now you’re graduation compared to really hurting, buckaroo.” days gone by. Children Last year Ithaca was one once started school in the of the few districts in the state first grade. Now, many to vote for a rate hike—5.67 C h a i n i n g Te ac h e r Te n u r e t o S t u d e n t p e r f o r m a n c e . experts consider “pre-K” percent—that exceeded ( I l l u s t r at i o n : Wa r r e n G r e e n w o o d) and other early childhood the cap. At their Tuesday, education essential to March 24 meeting the favorable later outcomes. Ithaca’s school Ithaca City School District revealed a 2015- Judge DeGrasse said, ‘We don’t want to do board professes a goal of having a 100a Robin Hood thing, and hurt upper-end 16 budget that includes a 0.65-percent tax percent graduation rate—it’s now hovering schools that are doing a great job,” said rate hike. Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton (D-125th). around 92-percent. In Geneseo, where she Another complication with state aid grew up, Lifton said the graduation rate at “The wealthiest districts were doing 3, 4, is that though it was intended to be more her high school was “60-some percent.” 5 percent in aid. They’re not eager to give equitable in distribution, the formula gets “Now that’s a failing school,” Lifton tweaked in Albany in ways that undermine that money up, and there’s enough people said. “We have greater expectations, with in that position [in the legislature, so that] its intent. the global economy and all that stuff.” it’s politically impossible.” “It’s pretty well known the foundation New state mandates and more Inequities or not, full elimination of aid formula is broken,” Parker-Zeilinski complex jobs require more years and the GEA is a near-constant talking point said. “A lot of political factors have gone more competencies of graduates. Even among school advocates, if for no other into it. So when the aid actually gets the grandest statement of purpose for allocated, it doesn’t bear much resemblance reason than inserting some more certainty American education, preparing democratic into the budget process. The Assembly’s to the equitable formula it was initially citizens, requires more education now. initial budget proposal, for example, designed for.” “It’s complicated to be on juries these promised to not take back just under half One statistic that Ithaca City School the GEA, and threw relatively more money days—you get DNA, [and] all kinds of stuff District board member Brad Grainger is thrown at you,” Lifton said. “And graduates particularly fond of citing—he did so at the into the state aid pool than the Senate should be able to operate as full citizens in budget, which actually did eliminate the Lansing rally, at board meetings, and on a democracy.” GEA. However much money is cited as the phone—is the difference in percentage having disappeared, it’s likely not coming points between state aid to upstate schools The I thaca Ti

Cut, Cut, Cut

Everyone’s Got an Agenda

Gov. Cuomo’s budget proposal—what public school advocates saw was an agenda to ruin teachers’ professions and their schools—was presented as the “Opportunity Agenda.” The most controversial measure was upping the contribution of student performance on standardized test scores to teachers’ evaluations from 20-percent to 50-percent. Also objectionable was an education tax credit that would have allowed write-offs for donations up to $1 million to schools of any type, and an increase by 100 to 560 the number of charter schools allowed by the state. These last two items were dropped during recent weeks of the budget negotiations. On the whole, Cuomo is seen by public teachers as pushing a Wall Streetdriven agenda to privatize education that has nothing to do with their skills or their classrooms. (It has been pointed out that Andrew Cuomo has never attended a public school in his life.) One paragraph in the “Opportunity Agenda” has popped up, paraphrased, in all manner of talk about this budget. You can find it in rally materials put out by NYSUT and editorials about his agenda from both sides. Most of the editorials in favor of the governor’s reforms have appeared in the pages of the New York Post. “Last year, less than 1 percent of teachers in New York State were rated ineffective; but state test results show that statewide only 35.8 percent of our students in third through eigth grades were proficient in math, and 31.4 percent were proficient in English Language Arts. We must ask ourselves: how can so many of our students be failing if our teachers are all succeeding?” Lifton, who declined to describe her own views regarding Cuomo’s motives, did have a copy of a lengthy report by George Joseph—entitled “9 Billionaires Are About to Remake New York’s Public Schools: Here’s Their Story”—that ran in the March 19 issue of The Nation and took what she said was “a pretty cynical view.” The article documents record spending on education lobbying by groups backed by hedge-fund managers that is bent on getting more publically-funded, privately-run schools. Cuomo is framed by the publication as nationally ambitious; it quotes one Albany lobbyist as saying, “He doesn’t give a rat’s ass about education, he just wants Wall Street money.” At the Lansing meeting Lee Adler, a labor lawyer at Cornell’s Industrial and Labor Relations school, was less reticent about Cuomo than Lifton, and shared more of Joseph’s tone. “The governor hates collective bargaining in the public sector,” Adler said of Cuomo’s attitude toward the teachers’ union. “He smooches with all the building trades unions and private sector unions and pretends like he’s a trade unionist. He’s a scumbag.” •

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one of them going to Research Associate n sports, coaches do everything they can to get a strategic advantage on their Robert Forties, who will be this year’s guest speaker at the gala. opponent. For example, in baseball, it American Cancer Society might be putting in a left-handed pitcher Distinguished Events Development to face a left-handed hitter. In football, it Manager Catherine Amico-Orlandini might be running a no-huddle offense. explained the reason the gala is especially However, when the opponent is excited for its attendees to hear Forties cancer, finding an advantage becomes speak to where and how their money a whole new ballgame. Former Cornell donated will be facilitated. University men’s lacrosse Head Coach “It’s a very social event,” she said. Richie Moran, who coached from 1969 to “It brings the community together. It 1996, helped come up with a gameplan to brings us together with defeat cancer at the local Cornell University level more than a decade and keep in touch ago. It will continue with with the researchers. the annual Community So it’s very successful. & Coaches vs. Cancer This year is going to Game-Changing Gala be a little different. As on Saturday, April 18 at I mentioned, in the Country Club of Ithaca. past, it’s been a little bit The event begins at 6 more of a social event. p.m., and tickets are There hasn’t been as $100. However, $57 of much emphasis on each ticket goes toward the American Cancer cancer research at Cornell Society. That’s why University. we’re bringing in Dr. The gala is coForties this year. We chaired Moran and really want the people by local marketing Richie Moran (Provided) attending to know, while businessman Bill Perkins. it’s a fun social event, “Basically, what our reasoning behind it—even they all occurred,” Moran recalled, “was the know what it is—is to raise awareness for [Cornell] basketball coach at the time, cancer and cancer research. We’re all there Scott Thompson, was diagnosed with together to fight that terrible battle.” cancer, and the coaches in the United Last year, the gala raised over $71,000. States have the program Coaches vs. This year, Moran said the goal is to exceed Cancer. And Scott approached me, and said, ‘Do you think we could do something $75,000. In addition to admission, the gala includes a variety of revenue-adding in Ithaca?’ So we got a group of people activities. together, and we each took different titles. “I look and think about the possibility When we started brainstorming ideas for of everything that’s going on,” Moran said. an event, we came up with the idea of a “The various runs, the various walks, the money grab. We had that event for six various events. Any finances to battle this years, and that went over very well.” unbelievable disease that these people have Thompson is currently living in to face gives all of us on the Dream Team Arizona, and is still involved in the cancer a feeling that we’re caring, we’re sharing research world, Moran added. and we’re giving towards the ultimate goal “At that point,” Moran continued, “we of finding a cure for cancer. It’s extremely got together again and made the decision rewarding. to change the name to Community & “In fact,” he continued, “in a 2013 Coaches vs. Cancer. The former committee issue of Time Magazine, the question was was depleting at that time, so we put asked of ‘Can research dream teams find together a new one—the one we have a cure for cancer?’ And it doesn’t really today. We call ourselves ‘The Dream suggest a cure is possible—it suggests Team.’ We utilize coaches from all over, a cure is close. When Scott Thompson including Tompkins County and other presented this idea 11 years ago, I was very counties in the Southern Tier. With this, anxious to help. It’s wonderful to meet we established the event that we’re holding people in this community who have that this year, which will be our tenth.” same eagerness to help. To me, that keeps The gala, which is an officially us excited about what we’re doing with this distinguished event registered with the event.” • American Cancer Society, has helped bring more than $5.6 million to Cornell For information on how to attend University researchers since 1995. There are currently three active American Cancer Community & Coaches vs. Cancer, visit www.gamechanginggala.org. Society grants at Cornell University, with

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Mud, Sweat & Cheers

Event Honors of the Memory of Cpl. Chris Borodoni By Ste ve L aw re nc e

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here is no doubt that our region has some iconic fund raising events: The Ride for Life, Women Swimmin’, the Cop’s Kids and Toys Ride, and Taste of the Nation. All were started and kept alive by people that had a great passion for an issue or a cause, and it appears that as it enters

its third year, Mud, Sweat & Cheers is on its way to becoming one of those events that raise serious money, bolster awareness and solidify community connections. The event honors the memory of Cpl. Christopher Bordoni, a local kid that was a son, a grandson, a brother and a husband.

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He was a hard-working student and athlete at Ithaca High that was drawn to serve his country as a Marine, and was deployed to Afghanistan. He was wounded in January 2012, and passed on three months later. He was 21, and he passed three years ago this week. His loss hit the community hard, and the seemingly endless caravan of vehicles that escorted his coffin from the airport in Syracuse to Ithaca was a powerful thing to witness. People stood in line for hours to pay their respects at his wake and funeral, and several memorial events have been started in his name. Terry Ciaschi is a lifelong friend of Tim Bordoni and Carol Sprague—Chris’s parents—and is himself the parent of a Marine. Terry, who is on the management team at Island Health and Fitness, has called in a lot of favors and pulled together

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a lot of resources, and Mud, Sweat & Cheers has grown bigger every year. This year, Terry said, “We are highlighting the team concept, in honor of a military guy. The team will start with five and finish with five. Nobody gets left behind.” In addition to the 60 teams that will be doing the five station Fitness Challenge (along the Cayuga Waterfront Trail, with stations like Terrible Twenty, Rope Burn, Sled Drag, Hellish Hill and Mystery Obstacle), and there will be a 5K race for people who may prefer that to the Fitness Challenge. The teams will include police officers, firefighters, EMS personnel—Bangs Ambulance entered four teams last year—in addition to teams from construction companies, medical offices, crossfit gyms Vince and Carol Grassi and restaurants. (Provided) “The military will be well represented, Ciaschi said, “and there will be Marine teams from around the state.” He added, “The sponsors—many of whom are veterans—will choose an obstacle to sponsor.” Carol Sprague was kind enough to speak with me and she said, “Terry and his crew do all the legwork and get the sponsors. I just show up and cheer everyone on. Tim and I do have a lot of input in regard to the T-shirt design and where the proceeds go, and this year the event will benefit the Chris Bordoni Fitness Trailhead on the Cayuga Waterfront Trail, and the scholarship in Chris’s name.” Carol said that she is very grateful that the money raised does so much good for so many people, and she said, “Last year, the proceeds went to the Saratoga War Horse Foundation (a non-profit that pairs veterans with retired racehorses to treat PTSD), and I learned that a local veteran was helped. That meant a lot, and when I read about it, it brought tears to my eyes that even in death, Chris is having a positive impact on so many people.” Carol also said, “As emotionally difficult as it is, we are aware that most people that lose a child don’t get the level of support we have been given. It started even before Chris passed, because of what he stood for.” It brings Carol great satisfaction that the legacy of service lives on in the Bordoni family, as Jacqueline, Chris’s sister and a civilian nurse at Fort Drum, just received an award for her quick response that saved a patient’s life, and Casey— Chris’s younger brother—just finished Navy boot camp. Mud Sweat & Cheers will take place on May 9, and registration info can be found at www.mudsweatandcheers.com. Terry Ciaschi would like to thank the dozens of sponsors and volunteers that have once again stepped up to make this event even bigger and better. •

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The Handwerker puts the now beside the then B y Wa r r e n G r e e n w o o d

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he Handwerker Gallery in the Gannett Center at Ithaca College is currently hosting two excellent exhibits worthy of your time and attention: “Taxing Times: Work by Elise Engler” and “As They Saw It: The Easby Collection of Pre-Columbian Art.” Elise Engler’s works are drawings. But she is essentially a conceptual artist. “Elise Engler makes lists,” according to the Handwerker gallery guide, “chronicling particular experiences by drawing and painting all of their components. Subject matter ranges from the personal and intimate to the political and expansive. Having once drawn everything she owned, Engler continues to depict the contents of her luggage whenever she travels. “Drawing from several different projects, the works selected for “Taxing Times” share two concerns—the passage of time and the expenditure of American tax dollars. The work ranges from drawings of the weapons and casualties of the Iraq War to Engler’s recent experience during her federally sponsored time in Antarctica through the National Science Foundation.” Regarding the Easby collection of pre-Columbian art, the Handwerker website has this to say: “Today, many people accept that the ancient peoples of the Americas created art: fine art museums display collections of exquisite objects, courses on pre-Columbian art and scholarly studies present their cultural significance, and the art market assigns their monetary value. However, the ancients did not make objects for those contexts—it was only through the labor of scholars, museum professionals, dealers, and collectors that they became ‘art’. “When Dudley T. Easby, Jr. and Elizabeth Kennedy Easby looked at pre-Columbian objects, they saw works of art, and their life work involved translating their shared appreciation for pre-Columbian art to a broader audience.” Let’s start with “Taxing Times: Work by Elise Engler.” Engler has eleven rather complex exhibits. Here are the ones I found most compelling: Wrapped in the Flag, 2004–2008 Pencil, Color Pencil

These are fifteen tall vertical drawings of the silhouettes of soldiers who died in the Iraq War (including their names and ages). The silos are colored like the flags of their national origin. Most are composed of stars and stripes, but there are some Union Jacks, French tri-color flags, and South American flags as well. The silhouettes are lively— dancing, leaping, walking, posing, praying, and so on.

Gouache, Pencil, Color Pencil

This is like an illustrated story of Elise Engler’s adventure to Antarctica with the National Science Foundation’s Antarctica Artists and Writers Program. It is composed of charming, handwritten text with hundreds of little illustrations imbedded within that text. It looks like a children’s book expanded across a wall. It is a diary of the events leading up to the trip and the adventure itself: the people, places, animals, landscapes. There are helicopter pilots cooking diner, penguin colonies (600,000 in one colony), cool South Pole vehicles, miniatures of Engler’s paintings and sketchbook drawings, the Gumby toy she took with her, mountains, frozen lakes, glaciers, Saturday night soirées with costumes, wigs and dancing, icicle sword fights, and on and on, but I was running out of time and the gallery was closing. I got in a quick look at… Lake Hoare Windows Accordion Book, 2009–2010 Digital Print, Edition of 25

One of Elise Engler’s lists. (Photo: Brian Arnold)

There are 4424 of them. The first name is T.S. Childeas (age 30). The last is J.A. Taylor (age 20). Collateral Damage, 2004–2008 Pencil, Color Pencil

This work is composed of seventeen pieces, hung vertically. It has a feel like a mass grave. These are silhouettes representing Iraqi civilians killed in the Iraq War— 17,550 of them. Some are merely numbers. Many have names. Some represent whole families killed. Here are a handful of the names: Ahmed Abdul Hussein, Valentina Bashar Faraj, Hewa Salah Sa’aed, Nour Karim Nour, Jalil Ibrahim, Omar al-Falahi, Sultan Salman Rekan, Thahi Hammud. Real people. It reminds me of visiting the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C. during an antiwar protest in March of 2003. A wall of the dead. A super-gravestone. As Kurt Vonnegut wrote in SlaughterhouseFive: “There is nothing intelligent to say about a massacre.” On a more cheerful note: Ninety-Degree Draft 1 – 10, 2009 – 2011

This is a very charming, very long, accordion book, each page with a window view of Antarctica. Let’s move on to “As They Saw It: The Easby Collection of PreColumbian Art,” curated by Prof. Jennifer Jolly (Department of Art History), Gabriella Jorio (’16), Sarah McHugh (’15), and Kenneth Robertson (’15). This exhibit is structured in three displays: At Home With the Easbys: This is a recreation of the Easbys’ (mid-20th century) study, living room, and dining room, so one can experience the pre-Columbian art the way the Easbys might have at home. The Antiquities Trade: To quote from the gallery info: “This section of the gallery is constructed as a visualization of how antiquities circulated within global markets, both legally and illegally, during the 20th century. Objects pass between key players in a complex and dynamic network of power, politics and capital.” The players include archeologists, huaqueros (looters), runners (quasi-criminal middlemen who buy from the looters and sell to the dealers), dealers, forgers, and artisans, collectors, scholars, government officials, and museums. The exhibit is set up so we can learn about all these people and see how the antiquities pass between them. In the Museum: Again to quote the gallery continued on page 19

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art

Deconstructing Structure

Chris Oliver and Ann Reichlin’s Inherent Structure By Ambe r D onof r io

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e take in little instances of our everyday lives: the way the paint around our front door is cracked and peeling in tan strips, that empty can of tar we saw by the roadside on our way home one night, or that pile of tangled wire by the toolbox in our childhood garage. The structures in which we live—whether they are homes, schools, workplaces, or stores— are environments that become a part of us so easily, ingrained within our individual memories and histories purely through our convergence with them and the objects within them. Buildings are separate entities from us, and yet as bearers of shelter, warmth, and comfort they are capable of carrying an intimacy that can be attributed to their inherent familiarity. Inherent Structure, a show featuring recent sculptures by Ithaca-based artists Chris Oliver and Ann Reichlin, fully encompasses this sense of familiarity and comfort mentioned above, while also investigating and dissecting the structures (primarily physical, though arguably mental as well) that constitute our lives within the physical realm. Curated by local art practitioners Rob Licht and

Robin Tropper-Herbel, Inherent Structure, according to Tropper-Herbel, is an attempt to “expand local visibility of contemporary sculptural practice” by bringing a show of three-dimensional work to the Community School of Music and Art (CSMA). Indeed, sculptural shows seem few and far between when compared to the outpour of two-dimensional works. It’s exciting, then, to enter into a space wholly dedicated to sculpture and the tangibility of it. Even the few pieces that are hung directly against the wall, all of which are by Reichlin, exhibit the textures and materiality present in the larger, freestanding sculptural works as well. Double Beaumont by Chris Oliver is one of the largest pieces in the exhibit, constructed from pine lumber and nails. Massive and impressively built, the sculpture is the infrastructure of two houses: one situated with its base on the ground while the other is angled upside down as it is constructed from one side of the other house’s roof. In this way, we as viewers simultaneously see the same house from two angles at once. We can peer through the walls, but also look down

inside the house from its underside, as if the propose. reverse of an aerial view. It is a dissection, Ann Reichlin’s work is smaller in an analysis, a literal new way of seeing. It scale than Oliver’s, but it is just as focused is an act of deconstruction that forces us to on examining structure through an examine a house in full and the structures exploration of commonplace objects and and intricacies that lie beneath a finished discarded building materials. Iterations product. and Improvisations are both a series of Yours for a Modern Monday is another different combinations and compositions work by Oliver that deserves mention, and of materials such as wire and screen. it is installed in the ground floor of the They present their viewers with a series building, if one of possibilities about dares to descend what sculpture can be the steps. and questions of where Consisting of 16 these materials came wooden frames from and the instances that stick out they witnessed. They are from the wall at pieces of a structure or perpendicular home, each component angles, each small enough to hold in frame displays one or two hands, but yellowed together in their nuanced newsprint multitudes—shocks of articles, images, pinkish red, bundled wire, pieces of and layers upon layers of cardboard, or mesh—they imply much bits of rug—all more history than can between layers be determined by the Chris Oliver’s Double of glass. There materials themselves. are old photos They are ordinary and Beaumont (Photo: Brian Arnold) of former they are beautiful. Like members of the Inherent Structure as a New York Giants and sea vessel survivors, whole, Reichlen’s sculptures grasp at the cut-off print advertisements, and an article underpinnings of what constitutes a home, titled “What Scientists Are Doing.” There and in that exploration births a space vast is cracked wood and torn carpet. Each enough for years of pondering, for the document Oliver unearthed from under artists and viewers alike. • old floorboards of a house, and each Inherent Structure is on display at the found object is displayed with the wisps Community School of Music and Art, 330 E. of nostalgic curiosity they undoubtedly MLK Jr. St., until April 24.

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Donald Weilerstein, violin Vivian Hornik Weilerstein, piano

THE LOUIS K. THALER CONCERT VIOLINIST SERIES PRESENTS

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MASTER CLASS Saturday, April 11, 2015 1:00 p.m. Iger Lecture Hall (Room 2105) Whalen Center The concert and master class are free and open to the public. Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodation should call (607) 2743717 or email ekibelsbeck@ithaca.edu as much in advance of the event as possible.

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Spoon River Anthology at Trumansburg By Gly ni s Har t

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SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 2015 8:15 P.M.

April Séance D

into the thesis. After Dore contacted her, ennis Dore has been wanting to do they spent hours on the phone working Spoon River Anthology for a long out how to present Spoon River: which time. monologues to choose, what did they mean, An extended meditation on the brevity how to interpret each character. She was of life and the animal urgency of love and unable to finance a trip to T’burg to see the its cousins, Spoon River is a collection of production, so Dore set up a GoFundMe monologues, the epitaphs of people under site so she and her husband could come. the grass of the Spoon River graveyard in They were, happily, able to raise enough, and the end of the 19th century. First written by poet Edgar Lee Masters as a novel in 1915, it Lundberg will be attending Saturday’s show. The production was first presented as a play takes place, interestingly, by actor Charles Aidman; on the 100th anniversary while many productions use Aidman’s arrangement of the Anthology’s of the monologues, it’s publication; also, opening not necessary (and would night, says Dore, is the be incredibly lengthy) to 150th anniversary of the use every one. Dore, like Confederate surrender at other directors, has made Appomattox. “We have his own arrangement, in a segment in Act 2 that collaboration with Margaret revolves around Lincoln. Lundberg, who wrote William Herndon was Lincoln’s law partner and her bachelor’s thesis on best friend, who spent feminism in Edgar Lee Director Dennis Dore (Photo: Glynis Hart) all his life’s savings, after Masters’ work. “I found her Lincoln’s death, collecting because I googled ‘Spoon every last one of his letters.” River Suffrage,’” Dore explained. Online, there are endless threads and “I’m trying to give a very strong voice debates about the Spoon River characters, to the feminine principle,” he said. “It’s what their monologues mean, who did what missing in the world ...” But not, at least, in to whom and whose fault is it. The play this work. There are around 60 monologues goes beyond being interactive and becomes presented by 18 players, the how-I-died personal; listening to the monologues stories of people high and low in the town: Chase Henry, the town drunkard; Benjamin unfold, each audience member begins piecing together a narrative, a personal Pantier, an attorney who is buried with his version of the town. Graveyards, by their dog; Mrs. Williams, the milliner; soldiers; nature, are democratic: high and low alike a traveler passing through; the son of the richest man in town—everyone. The central end up in this place, and while social story is that of Minerva Jones, “heavy of status divides people in life, Spoon River’s body,” “cockeyed” and “with a rolling walk.” graveyard places those who were valued Jones is seduced by a local ne’er-do-well, in life next to those who were despised, or then becomes pregnant, then turns to the simply forgotten. Allowing each dweller in doctor for an abortion, which ends her life. the graveyard to speak becomes a way to “The women in Spoon River are key tackle not just questions of social justice, but examples of the issues of the time,” said the purpose of life itself. Lundberg. “The women’s monologues “I’m trying to deal with the represented some very strong female voices.” metaphysical mysteries,” said Dore. “In Act Masters, she noted, wasn’t particularly One, we ask the mystery; in Act Two, we try progressive in his attitudes toward women to answer.” in his personal life: “That was one of the Dore directed a half dozen plays at the obstacles I faced in doing the thesis. In the old Firehouse Theatre in Ithaca, and was end I wrote it as an imaginary interview.” involved in that company “all the years it was Some of the women are conventional: the intact.” When he moved to Trumansburg, doctor’s wife is unsympathetic toward he gathered local men of the community Minerva Jones and complains bitterly about for a memorable 2004 production of Twelve the doctor’s prosecution for Jones’ death. Angry Men. Now, a series of health issues Others, like Mrs. Williams, are less so: has added urgency to the project of bringing Well, now, let me ask you: if all the Spoon River to the stage: “To tell you the children born here in Spoon River had been God’s truth, my time is probably wearing reared by the County, somewhere on a farm, thin,” said Dore. “This is my bucket list.” • and the fathers and mothers had been given their freedom to live and enjoy, change Spoon River Anthology, performed by the mates if they wished, do you think Spoon Trumansburg Community Players, runs April River had been any the worse?” 9- 12 at Trumansburg Elementary School Lundberg first got involved in the play Auditorium, Thursday - Saturday, 7:30 p.m., by acting in it, later spinning her interest Sunday 2 p.m. Tickets $10 at the door.


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Violence and Friendship

SPRI NG CL EAN IN G? MAKE A

Ex-Ithacan Bill Stratton’s Poetry Debut By Bil l Ch ai s son

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thacans might remember Bill Stratton in his former capacity as a bartender. He was big and tall with black hair down past his shoulders, and he had a sardonic sense of humor. He lived in Ithaca for eight years before moving to New Hampshire to get his MFA from the state university, where he is now an adjunct professor. Large men who bartend are likely to be close to violence on occasion, and that is reflected in many of the poems in Under the Water was Rock, Stratton’s first collection. It is remarkable how often the narrator of these poems witnesses violence without actually being a part of it. “Fight Outside the Howard Johnsons Circa 1994” begins:

under-addressed subject in poetry. These are not Robert Frost’s “Mending a Wall” kinds of philosophical musings about archetypal situations. These are modern, personal poems about specific people that the narrator cares about deeply. In “Portrait of the Alcoholic as a Young Artist,” the narrator is able to feel nuanced affection for a doomed person. He will sit next to him on the bus, but he won’t go drinking with him.

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And the first verse ends:

I wanted to do something, smoke a cigarette or spit or say something tough. I could not move. I could not look away.

But sometimes the first person is engaged, and the narrator is violent too. In “Burnt” he notes:

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On the “About the Author” page Stratton’s brief biographical note concludes with the promise that he “is an advocate of poetry even among those who might not often read it, and believes that poetry belongs to and with all people, not just poets.” If Stratton is actually going for the biker-hippie demographic with some of his work, I believe he will have some takers. Much of his work is shot through with his mordant humor, displays a strong affection for principled living (and occasionally failing to live by those principles), and makes frequent references to family and friends, often by name. His can be the voice of the shaman of a clan. In “Earl” you live through the morning with a man who enjoys his simple routines, but his thoughts are of a way of life that is ending. In “Albert” Stratton’s great-grandfather walks the property line with his son and grandson “measuring stone walls in strides.” In “Grandpa” an old man narrates in the first person the story of the loss of his arm, his ensuing sobriety, and admits he’d like one more drink on his deathbed. The second section of this book, “Friends Beloved,” includes some of the most moving work; friendship is an

Outside the street were sporadically lit and unlit, the early evening traffic coasted by, people doing the Tuesday shop, the Tuesday yoga class. The Tuesday get drunk and vomit on the side of the bus, most likely not on their to-do list. I want to enjoy my obsession, he told me. And I knew what he meant.

And in addition to all this Stratton is a credible nature poet as well. He credits his rural upbringing, but there is a certain flower-child Romantic strain in the lines of “We are as Birds” where people turn into “momentary birds” with eyes for wings and fingernails for feathers. Most of his work though is more outdoor recreation or labor than nature walk. You don’t want to lose that biker-hippie demographic. There are no complicated structures or inscrutable references in Stratton’s work. His verse is transparent, its economy and naturalness meant to make it pass through you unnoticed, leaving only his meaning and his way of seeing the world, which is both familiar and very much is own, ostensibly casual, yet quite penetrating. •

APril 6–12, 2015

Join us at ithaca College and downtown at Cinemapolis as we explore

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environments inhabited, evolving from internal dynamics and external challenges. Boundaries that unhinge in constant flux.

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Suits • Sportcoats • Sportswear • Shoes 120 Ithaca Commons • 607-273-1371 Mon-Sat 10-6 • Thurs 10-8 benjaminpeters.com

TICKETS: 607.272.0570 WWW.KITCHENTHEATRE.ORG 417 W. STATE / MLK JR. STREET

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AFFORDABLE ONE BEDROOM SENIOR* APARTMENTS! This community offers beautiful apartments filled with all of the amenities you desire. Balcony or patio, central air, dishwasher and large storage closet. On Site Laundry, Elevator, Computer Lab, Fitness Room, Community Room and Patio.

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3687 Conifer Drive, Interlaken, NY 14847 *62 and older or disabled over 18

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS www.coniferliving.com conifervillageinterlaken@coniferllc.com

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Blast from the Past

Kelakos Releases Uncorked: Rare Tracks from a Vintage ‘70s Band By Fre d dy Vill ano

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were surviving as a club band so we were financing the record ourselves, and it was very expensive back in those days,” he recalled. “Some songs didn’t make the album simply because vinyl limited you in terms of time. As we went through all of the material, we felt it would be cool to put this out as a total package.” Uncorked takes the listener on a journey through 15 songs of legit ‘70s nostalgia, often conjuring up visions of Ithaca from years gone by. “I wrote that song about this woman I knew in Ithaca who I was in love with,” he said. “Looking back, it’s kind of funny.” Haberstroh wrote “Frostbite Fantasy” one day after a snowshoe hike with his St. Bernard, demonstrating that, after this past winter, some things haven’t changed all that much in 30+ years. But the real beauty of the record, according to Canedy, is that there was no record label telling them what to do, so there were no boundaries. “Listening back, we were surprised Kelakos (Photo: Provided) that we were as adventurous and naïve as we were,” he laughed. “We thought it was cool to musical idioms effortlessly, even utilizing bring in vibes. We must’ve been out of vibes, marimba, and the Ithaca College our minds to think it was OK for a rock horn and string section on some songs. band to go into the studio and hire a horn Now, thanks to modern technology, and section.” Canedy’s rigorous archiving, Kelakos is Ironically, the only person in the band releasing Uncorked: Rare Tracks from a from the Ithaca area was Canedy—the rest Vintage ‘70s Band. It’s a remix and reof the members hail from Massachusetts. release of Gone Are The Days along with a So how did Ithaca become their home few bonus tracks that didn’t make it onto base? “It was an area I was already working that first record. in,” the drummer said. “I was working Canedy said that the impetus for the with people like Alex Perialas at Pyramid re-release came from wanting to “dust Sound and Dave Porter and Brian Miles off ” the original master tapes. “I’ve been in Brian’s Idols. I also played in an early the archivist for the Rods and Kelakos—I version of 805, so it was my stomping keep everything,” he explained. “I had grounds—the upstate New York Thruway these tapes and thought it would be kind circuit.” The band did move to New Jersey of cool to maybe remix them. So I got my for one year, and played places like Art Pro Tools studio together and transferred Stock’s Playpen in Sayreville, but Canedy them into a digital format.” He’d kept in recalls it was tough to get work as a rock touch with his former bandmates, so it band. “You either had to be total heavy was simply a matter of tackling one song at a time, passing notes back and forth and metal or disco. There was just nothing for tweaking things in the mix. “We started to what we were doing. We were much more successful at surviving in central New realize there was some cool material that York.” • we hadn’t heard in 25 years or more.” Canedy said songs that didn’t make For more information please visit: it onto Gone Are The Days didn’t because www.kelakosband.com of a lack of time, not lower quality. “We ong before he became a founding member of the seminal ‘80s heavy metal band the Rods, drummer Carl Canedy was cutting his teeth on the central New York “Thruway circuit” as a member of Kelakos, a classic-rock band based out of Ithaca that released a pretty exceptional album back in 1978 called Gone Are The Days. Kelakos also included singer/guitarist George Michael Kelakos Haberstroh, guitarist Mark Sisson, and bassist Lincoln Bloomfield. Their music had a lot in common with other unsung bands of the ‘70s like the Good Rats and Dust, who, though rock n’ roll in nature, often defied pigeonholing. Kelakos’s music often referenced other


‘now&then’ contin u ed from page 13

info: “This space displays objects in a more traditional museum style.” And there are three displays: Animals: Water, Land & Air, The Human Form and Ritual Vessels. In the Museum is my favorite display. I have long been fascinated by preColumbian civilizations. (I did research on them for a science fiction film treatment I wrote.) And I’ve always loved animals, so I found some of the figurines in the Animals case most endearing. My favorites:

Ditko would have come up with in a Dr. Strange comic in the 1960s. And there’s much, much more … looking like the work of a pre-Columbian Dr. Seuss or whimsical space aliens. But I’ll let the Ever-Perceptive Reader discover it on his or her own. There’s lots more to see. And I think it could bear repeated viewings. So if the Ever-Perceptive Reader has the time to drop by and catch the show, I think he or she will find it rewarding. •

Bat Vase Fragment Mexico (Maya or Zapotec) Classic, A.D. 300–900 Ceramic

This is an anthropomorphic animal figurine— like a little cartoon character. The gallery info says he is a bat. Although, to me, this little guy really looks more like an alien teddy bear wearing a loincloth and necklace.

Grinning Dog Mexico (Tarascan) Post-Classic, A.D. 1250–1500 Stone

Now hiring full-time and part-time culinary leaders & line cooks!

Pre-Columbian objects in the Easby Collection (Photo: Brian Arnold)

Another anthropomorphic animal. Although, once again, this guy looks more like a little crouching pig or boar character than a dog to me—with a wonderful toothy grin. Plumbate Owl Vessel Costa Rica (Maya) A.D. 600–1200 Ceramic

As They Saw It: The Easby Collection of Pre-Columbian Art and Taxing Times: Work by Elise Engler will be on display at the Handwerker Gallery in the Gannett Center, Ithaca College, through April 17. (607) 274-3018. www.ithaca.edu/ handwerker.

In case you are wondering what ‘plumbate’ is, the helpful accompanying gallery brochure tells us: “This object exemplifies the ‘plumbate’ ceramic technique. Plumbate ceramics are glazed using alumina and iron-rich raw slip clay in order to create hard, usually colored surfaces. This technology emerged in Mesoamerica near modern-day Guatemala and Mexico.” It also tells us: “In Mesoamerica the owl figure is associated with the underworld.” I adored this little owl—built into a pot, and stylized in that pre-Columbian Mayan way. (That angular way they stylized their eagles and so on.)

Learn more at our Culinary Recruiting Event Thursday, April 16, 10am-6pm Coltivare: 245 S. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 Apply online wegmans.com/careers Keyword Search: Ithaca Wegmans Culinary Recruitment Event

Please join us!

APRIL 2015 TUESDAY APR. 7 Reading WEDNESDAY APR. 8 Music

Puma-head Finial Peru (Inca) Late Horizon, A.D. 1400 –1530 Copper Alloy

THURSDAY APR. 9 Symposium

I’m crazy about this one. The figurine has a little cylindrical body with a wildly grinning cartoon puma head. He looks like a John Krisfaluci Ren & Stimpy character, or perhaps a Pixar character. I suppose it is because I am both a cartoonist and a lover of animals that I am so attracted to these works.

THURSDAY APR. 23 Art

Distinguished Visiting Writers Series reading by novelist Julia Glass, winner of the American Book Award for Three Junes; 7:30 p.m., Clark Lounge, Egbert Hall. Opera Workshop performance of The Wolf by the Ears, a chamber opera by Dana Wilson exploring the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and his slave mistress, Sally Hemings, within the social and political structures and strictures of the time; 8:15 p.m., Ford Hall, Whalen Center. Annual James J. Whalen Academic Symposium, a daylong celebration of student research, creativity, and performance; 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Campus Center. Opening reception for Time Capsule: 2015 Senior Student Show, featuring work by students in the Department of Art and the Department of Media Arts, Sciences, and Studies; 5:00–7:00 p.m., Handwerker Gallery, Gannett Center. The exhibit runs through May 17, and the gallery is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.; Thursday, 10:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon–5:00 p.m.

This is just a sampling of April events on campus; to view more visit events.ithaca.edu. Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodation should call 607-274-3011 as much in advance of the event as possible. Unless otherwise noted, all listed events are free of charge.

Anthropomorphic Duck Pendant Mexico (Olmec) Pre-Classic, 1200–600 B.C. Greenstone

This little cartoon duck, carved a thousand years before Christ was born, has a beautiful, stripped down design … a bit like Edward Munch’s The Scream, or a design the great American cartoonist Steve

ithaca.edu

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the program will include a performance by After Eight, the Chorus’s a cappella subset, and close with a group of Cornell Songs.

Film cinemapolis

Special events this week:

Music

i3º | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Live Jazz: A Jazz Trio Featuring Nicholas Walker, Greg Evans, and Nick Weiser Djug Django | 6:00 PM-9:00 PM | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | live hot club jazz. Jam Session | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM | Canaan Institute, 223 Canaan Rd, Brooktondale | The focus is instrumental contra dance tunes. www. cinst.org. Reggae Night w. The I-Town Allstars | 9:00 PM- | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca |

Up Jumped Spring | 6:00 PM-7:30 PM | Six Mile Creek Vineyard, 1551 Slaterville Rd, Ithaca | Amanda York Quartet | 6:00 PM-8:30 PM | Oasis Dance Club, 1230 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Live Jazz. Under Construction | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM | Americana Vineyards, 4367 E Covert Rd, Interlaken | An Ithaca-based dance band with a mix of rock, blues, country, funk, 50s & 60s, and more. Johnny Dowd and The Fly Rods | 7:30 PM- | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | The Jeff Love Band | 8:00 PM- | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Gadje | 9:00 PM- | Oasis Dance Club, 1230 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Gypsy Rock. Thunder Body | 9:00 PM- | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Big UpState | 10:00 PM- | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Original Reggae.

4/02 Thursday

4/04 Saturday

bars/clubs/cafés

4/01 Wednesday

Happy Hour with Hoodoo Crossing | 6:00 PM- | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Mad Cow Tippers | 6:00 PM- | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Mad Brain | 7:00 PM- | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg |

4/03 Friday Louder Than Words: Visual Projections and Synth Performances | 5:00 PM- | History Center, 401 E State St, Ithaca | Performances by Sunken Cheek & Weirding Module; visuals by Neeraja D and Ahmed Ozsever. Presented by Ithaca Underground. Toivo | 5:30 PM-8:30 PM | Felicia’s Atomic Lounge, 508 W State St, Ithaca | Tex-Mex, Finnish, and originals.

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Jim Hull | 7:00 PM-10:00 PM | Crooked Rooster Brewpub, 223 Franklin St, Watkins Glen | Loren and Mark Guitar Duo | 7:30 PM- | La Tourelle Resort and August Moon Spa, 1150 Danby Rd, Ithaca | Amazing guitar music; Paris Texas featuring Bobby Henrie will open the show with a short set. Lora Pendleton and Steve Gollnick w/Matt Marano | 8:00 PM- | Silver Line Tap Room, 19 W Main St, Trumansburg | Start Making Sense w. Hall & M. Oats | 9:00 PM- | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Luke G & The Candyhearts | 9:00 PM- | Rongovian Embassy, 1 W Main St, Trumansburg | All ages. Billy Golicki | 10:00 PM- | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Upbeat, Bright Country/Rock.

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Subsoil | 10:00 PM- | The Haunt, 702 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Doors open at 9.

4/05 Sunday

Charlie Young and London McDaniel | 12:00 PM- | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Eclectic Folk, Pop, Rock, Western. The Purple Valley | 4:00 PM-6:00 PM | Americana Vineyards, 4367 E Covert Rd, Interlaken | The Pelotones | 6:00 PM-10:00 PM | Maxies Supper Club & Oyster Bar, 635 W State St, Ithaca | International Folk Dancing | 7:30 PM-9:30 PM | Kendal At Ithaca, 2230 N Triphammer Rd, Ithaca | Teaching and request dancing. No partners needed. Acoustic Open Mic Night | 9:00 PM-1:00 AM | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | Hosted by Technicolor Trailer Park.

4/06 Monday

Open Mic Night | 8:30 PM- | Agava, 381 Pine Tree Rd, Ithaca | Signups start at 7:30 PM. Blue Mondays | 9:00 PM- | The Nines, 311 College Ave, Ithaca | with Pete Panek and the Blue Cats

4/07 Tuesday

Tuesday Bluesday w. Dan Paolangeli & Friends | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Dan Paolangeli and Friends are joined by different musicians every Tuesday. Pete Panek & the Blue Cats | 6:00 PM-10:00 PM | Maxie’s Supper Club & Oyster Bar, 635 W State St, Ithaca | Ed Clute | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Join us every Tuesday for a lively performance from jazz piano virtuoso Ed Clute.

2015

Professor Tuesday’s Jazz Quartet | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM | Corks & More Wine Bar, 708 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | Desmadrados Soldados De Ventura (UK), Eamonn & The Fulcrums, Izzy True | 8:00 PM- | Cayuga Lodge, 630 Stewart Ave, Ithaca | Presented by Ithaca Underground. Traditional Irish Session | 8:00 PM-11:00 PM | Chapter House Brew Pub, 400 Stewart Ave, Ithaca | I-Town Community Jazz Jam | 8:30 PM-11:00 PM | The Dock, 415 Taughannock Blvd, Ithaca | Hosted by Professor Greg Evans Open Mic | 9:00 PM- | Lot 10 Lounge, 106 S Cayuga St, Ithaca | concerts

4/02 Thursday

The Ghost of Paul Revere | 8:00 PM- | Center For the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St, Homer | The Ghost of Paul Revere brings their powerful three-part harmony, energetic performance, and decidedly non-traditional interpretation of traditional American music to Homer. Social Hour at 7, offering desserts, coffee, tea, wine, and beer for purchase.

4/06 Monday

CU Music: Mike Cheng-Yu Lee/ Wayne Lee | 8:00 PM- | Carriage House Cafe, 305 Stewart Ave, Ithaca | Fortepiano & violin recital; music by Brahms and Beethoven.

4/07 Tuesday

CU Music: Cornell University Chorus | 8:00 PM- | Sage Chapel, Cornell, Ithaca | Robert Isaacs, conductor. Music from five centuries including a commissioned work by Lisa Bielawa. As always,

Meet Me at Equality w/filmmaker James Rada | Combines participant interviews with insightful commentary from five historians to provide the audience with a view of what it was like to be present on August 28th, 1963, including never before seen home movies and still photos provided by the participants themselves. Also, a sneak preview of James Rada’s upcoming companion film on the march from Selma. | 5:00 PM4/4 Saturday | 97 mins NR | Touch the Wall | Documentary on swimming superstar Missy Franklin. | 6:30 PM- 4/7 Tuesday | 101 mins NR |

Continuing: Schedule starts Friday, April 3. Visit www.cinemapolis.org for showtimes. ‘71 | A young and disoriented British soldier is accidentally abandoned by his unit following a riot on the deadly streets of Belfast in 1971. | 99 mins R | It Follows | For 19-year-old Jay, fall should be about school, boys and weekends out at the lake. But after a seemingly innocent sexual encounter, she finds herself plagued by strange visions and the inescapable sense that someone, or something, is following her. | 100 mins R | The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | A hotel is the expansionist dream of Sonny, and it’s making more claims on his time than he has available, considering his imminent marriage to the love of his life, Sunaina. | 122 mins PG | What We Do in the Shadows | Viago, Deacon, and Vladislav are vampires who are finding that modern life has them struggling with the mundane - like paying rent, keeping up with the chore wheel, trying to get into nightclubs,

Online Calendar See it at ithaca.com.

and overcoming flatmate conflicts. | 86 mins NR | Wild Tales | A story about love deception, the return of the past, a tragedy, or even the violence contained in an everyday detail, appear themselves to push them towards the abyss, into the undeniable pleasure of losing control. | 122 mins R | National Theatre UK Live Behind the Beautiful Flowers | Based on Katherine Boo’s National Book Award winner of the same name, the play tracks the interconnected lives of garbage traders in Annawadi, a modern-day slum of Mumbai, India. | 6:30 PM- 4/2 Thursday, 1:30 PM- 4/4 Saturday. Shakespeare’s Globe Live Titus Andronicus | Featuring visceral staged violence, this version was part of the Globe’s Summer 2014 “Arms and the Man” season. | 2:00 PM- 4/5 Sunday, 7:00 PM- 4/7 Wednesday. cornell cinema

Cornell Cinema is on break March 28-April 7. other venues Cornell Physics Department. Garwin: The Movie and the Man | 8:00 PM, 4/6 Monday | Rm 401 Physical Sciences Bldg | Feature length documentary about a scientist who helped in the design of the first successful hydrogen bomb, and has spent much of his career since working to make sure such weapons would never be needed. Panel discussion with Richard Garwin, Matthew Evangelista, Kurt Gottfried, and Rebecca Slayton afterwards.

Stage Kitchen Theatre Solo Play Festival: Black Sheep by Darian Dauchan | 4/01-4/05 Wednesday-Sunday | Kitchen Theatre, 417 W State St, Ithaca | Evening shows at 7:30, April 1-2; 8, April 3-4; matinee at 4, April 5. SU Drama: Measure for Measure | 3/27-4/12, Wednesday-Sunday | Loft


the Audubon Seabird Restoration Program will speak on his new book, “Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock.” Copies available for signing after the presentation.

“It’s always smooth, there’s always someone to talk to,” says Greg.

Health & Wellness

local thing—just like we do.”

Specific for This Week: Free Buddhist Meditation and Dharma Talk | 10:00 AM-12:00 PM, 4/04 Saturday | PADMA Center, 114 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | Tibetan Buddhist meditation instruction and lively discussions exploring our innate goodness qualities. All are welcome. 607-865-8068 or www. padmasambhava.org for more information.

Learn how we can help your business thrive. Call 888-273-3210. Or stop by a branch today.

Myles da Cunha & Greg Young, Co-Owners Hometown Markets, LLC

A local grocery store.

A local bank to help it thrive. Theater, 820 E Genesee St, Syracuse | Shakespeare’s problem comedy, presented by the SU Department of Drama. Evening shows at 8, March 27-28 and April 1-4, 8-11; matinees at 2, March 29 and April 4, 11, 12. Tickets at http://vpa.syr.edu/drama/tickets, by phone at 315-443-3275, or in person at the box office.

Notices Specific for This Week: Ithaca Sociable Singles | 6:00 PM-, 4/01 Wednesday | Souvlaki House, 315 Eddy St, Ithaca | RSVP 607-272-6013 or map10@cornell.edu Tompkins Workforce: Professional Opportunity Developers Group | 9:00 AM-11:00 AM, 4/02 Thursday | Tompkins Workforce, Center Ithaca, 2nd fl, Ithaca | Network with people who previously held executive-level or highly technical positions.

Ongoing: Mentors Needed for 4-H Youth Development Program | | CCE Education Center, 615 Willow Ave, Ithaca | Mentors commit to 3 hours per week for this school year, with the option to continue next year. The Mentor and Student meet twice a week at Boynton Middle School from 3:25 PM until 4:35 PM.The Mentor-Student Program is an opportunity to make a

Locally focused. A world of possibilities.

positive impact in a young person’s life. For more info, call (607) 277-1236 or email student.mentor@yahoo.com. Tompkins Learning Partners New Tutor Orientation | 12:00 AM-11:59 PM, 4/02 Thursday | Tompkins Learning Partners, 124 W Buffalo St, Ithaca | TLP seeks volunteer literacy tutors to meet on a weekly basis with adults needing help improving basic reading, writing, and math skills, and immigrants needing help learning English and preparing for the U.S. Citizenship Exam. Orientations for new tutors will be held in March and April. Please contact for dates; pre-registration is required as space is limited. To register, email Shannon Alvord TLPShannonA@gmail.com, or call 607-277-6442.

Town of Ithaca Planning Board | 7:00 PM-, 4/07 Tuesday | Town Of Ithaca, 215 N Tioga St, Ithaca |

Meetings

Cornell Charter Day Weekend Advanced Registration | 12:00 AM-11:59 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | , , | All Charter Day Weekend events are open to the public. All events – expositions of student innovation, dances and performances, panel discussions and lectures, literary readings by notable alumni, artistic exhibitions from the atomic scale to the astronomical – are listed at the Charter Day Weekend website, http://150. cornell.edu/events/charterday/ Events require advance registration; online registration opens Feb. 24. Live streaming will be available for certain

City of Ithaca Common Council | 6:00 PM-, 4/01 Wednesday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | Public is heard during privilege of the floor. City of Ithaca Commons Advisory Board | 8:30 AM-, 4/03 Friday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca | City of Ithaca Board of Zoning Appeals | 7:00 PM-, 4/07 Tuesday | Common Council Chambers - Ithaca City Hall, 108 E Green St, Ithaca |

Guts, Grief & Pizza: A Workshop for Teens | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Hospicare, 172 E King Rd, Ithaca | Teens who have suffered a loss have the chance to share their feelings with other teens going through similar struggles. Group meets on Thursday, April 9, but please register by April 3. For more info or to register, contact Laura Ward at 607-272-0212 or LWard@hospicare.org.

Special Events Specific for This Week: Good Taste Networking Event | 5:15 PM-, 4/02 Thursday | Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell, Ithaca | Make curious connections with art and people at this event for young professionals in Ithaca. Get an inside look at the exhibition with the curators and sample the lively spirits of Finger Lakes Distilling Company. Cosponsored by Tompkins Connect.

Ongoing:

events. Trumansburg Library Spring Book Sale Advance Notice | Ulysses Philomathic Library, 74 E Main St, Trumansburg | Trumansburg Ulysses Philomathic Library will hold its Spring Book Sale April 16-21. Further details as the sale approaches.

Ongoing:

Lectures Astronomy Talks: Galaxies--The History of the Universe | 5:30 PM-7:00 PM, 4/02 Thursday | Lifelong, 119 W Court St, Ithaca | CU Astronomy professor Gordon Stacey will present two talks on the history of the universe, beginning with the discovery that the Milky Way is one of many “island universes” and subsequent discoveries that prove the existence of the “Big Bang.” All are welcome; for more information contact Nahyon Lee at 607-273-1511. NYS Archaelogoical Association Lecture | 6:30 PM-, 4/02 Thursday | Natural Sciences Ctr Rm 208, IC, Ithaca | Michael Malpass of Ithaca College will present “The Middle Horizon Site of Sonay: New Radiocarbon Dates (!) and Interpretations (?).” Lab of Ornithology Monday Night Seminar and Book Signing | 7:30 PM-, 4/06 Monday | Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd, Ithaca | Dr. Stephen W. Kress of

solo play festival

Exhibit Opening, April 3

Kitchen Theatre, April 1-5

A solo show of paintings and collages by Elisabeth Gross-Marks runs April 3-26 at State of the Art Gallery, with a Gallery Night Reception Friday April 3, 5-8 pm.

The Kitchen’s Solo Play Fest continues this week with Black Sheep by DarianDuncan.

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STATE OF THE ART GALLERY

Adult Children of Alcoholics | 7:00 PM-8:00 PM, Wednesday | Ithaca Community Recovery, 518 W Seneca St, Ithaca | 12-Step Meeting. Enter through front entrance. Meeting on second floor. For more info, contact 229-4592. Alcoholics Anonymous | This group meets several times per week at various locations. For more information, call 273-1541 or visit aacny.org/meetings/ PDF/IthacaMeetings.pdf Anonymous HIV Testing | 9:00 AM-11:30 AM, Tuesday | Tompkins County Health Department, 55 Brown Rd, Ithaca | Walk-in clinics are available every Tuesday, 9-11:30 a.m. Appointments available Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:30- 3:30 pm. Call 274-6604 to schedule an appointment or ask for further information. Dance Church Ithaca | 12:00 PM-1:30 PM, Sunday | Ithaca Yoga Center, AHIMSA Studio, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Free movement for all ages with live and DJ’ed music. Free. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) | This group meets several times per week at various locations. | For more information, call 607-351-9504 or visit www.

foodaddicts.org. Free Meditation Class at Yoga Farm | 11:15 AM-12:00 PM, Sunday | Yoga Farm, 404 Conlon Rd, Lansing | A free community meditation class for the public. Ithaca Community Aphasia Network | 9:00 AM-10:30 AM, Friday | Ithaca College, call for location | The group provides a casual and comfortable place for stroke survivors who have aphasia (an acquired language disorder) to talk, share experiences, and offer support to one another. For more information, please contact: Yvonne Rogalski Phone: 274-3430 Email: yrogalski@ithaca.edu Lyme Support Group | 6:30 PM-, Wednesday | Multiple Locations | We meet monthly at homes of group members. For information, or to be added to the email list, contact danny7t@lightlink.com or call Danny at 275-6441. Mid-week Meditation House | 6:00 PM-7:00 PM, Wednesday | Willard Straight Hall, 5th floor lounge, Cornell University, Willard Straight Hall, Ithaca Nicotine Anonymous | 6:30-7:30 PM, Tuesdays | Ithaca Community Recovery, W 518 Seneca St, 2nd fl, Ithaca | Nicotine Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women helping each other to live free of nicotine. There are no dues or fees. The only requirement for membership is the desire to be free of nicotine. Overeaters Anonymous | This group meets several times per week at various locations. | A worldwide 12-Step program. Visit www.oa.org or call 607-379-3835 for more information. Recovery From Food Addition | 12:00 PM-, Friday | Ithaca Community Recovery, 518 W Seneca St, Ithaca | Recreational Roller Derby | 7:00 PM-8:30 PM Wednesday| ILWR Training Space, 2073 E Shore Dr, Lansing | The Ithaca League of Women Rollers announces their roller derby style workout program. New or returning skaters of any level are welcome. Trainers are members of the Ithaca League of Women Rollers. Open to men and women 18+. For more information and to register: http://www.ithacarollerderby.com/wreck-derby/ Sacred Chanting with Damodar Das and friends | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, Wednesday | Ithaca Yoga Center, AHIMSA Studio, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | More at www.DamodarDas.com. Support Group for Invisible Disabilities | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 2/11 Wednesday | Finger Lakes

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Independence Center, 215 Fifth St, Ithaca | Call Amy or Emily at 272-2433. Support Group for People Grieving the Loss of a Loved One by Suicide | 5:30 PM-, Tuesday | 124 E Court St, Ithaca | Please call Sheila McCue, LMSW with any questions, 272-1505. Walk-in Clinic | This group meets several times per week. | Ithaca Health Alliance, 521 W Seneca St, Ithaca | Need to see a doctor, but don’t have health insurance? 100% Free Services, Donations Appreciated. Do not need to be a Tompkins County resident. First come, first served (no appointments). Yin-Rest Yoga – A Quiet Practice for Women | 4:00 PM-5:30 PM, Sunday | South Hill Yoga Space, 132 Northview Rd, Ithaca | Email nishkalajenney@ gmail.com or call 607-319-4138 for more information and reserve your place as space is limited. Yoga School Classes | This group meets several times per week at various locations--pre-registration required. | The Yoga School, 141 E State St, Ithaca

Nature & Science Specific for This Week: Cayuga Trails Club: Sweedler Preserve | 1:00 PM-, 4/04 Saturday | EMS Parking Lot, 722 S Meadow St, Ithaca | April 4 - The Cayuga Trails Club will lead a 4-mile spring flower hike in the Sweedler Preserve, Lick Brook.  Meet at Ithaca EMS parking lot. For more information, call 607-257-6906 or visit www.cayugatrailsclub.org.

Ongoing:

Learning Specific for This Week: Storytelling Workshop | 5:30 PM-, 4/01 Wednesday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | The folks from Ithaca Freeskool will provide a safe space to practice fine-tuning the “gift of gab” through games & exercises, idea sharing, performance practice and feedback. Open to the public. Community Fire Ceremony & Munay-Ki Rites | 6:30 PM-9:00 PM, 4/02 Thursday | Foundation of Light, 391 Turkey Hill Rd, Ithaca | Design-A-Tile Workshop | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | The Potter’s Room, 109A E Sate St, Ithaca | Come join us for a lovely evening of decorating and painting tiles while you are browsing around First Friday Gallery Night! We will have tiles of different shapes and sizes! oval and square shapes, small or large. All ages welcome; no experience necessary.

Ongoing: Art Classes for Adults | all day | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E. State St, Ithaca | Adult classes and private instruction in dance, music, visual arts, language arts, and performance downtown at the Community School of Music and Arts. For more information, call (607) 272-1474 or email info@csma-ithaca. org. www.csma-ithaca.org. “Vietnamese Ceramics: Objects at the Crossroads” Symposium | all day | Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell, Ithaca | This April 10 symposium will bring together established and emerging international specialists to present insights and inquiries. Registration is free but seating is limited; contact eas8@cornell.edu to reserve a space by April 3. Learn to Play or Practice Bridge | 9:00 AM-12:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | Ithaca Bridge Club, 609 W Clinton St, Ithaca | Coaches available. No partner needed. No signups required. Walk-ins welcome. The Ithaca Bridge Club is located down the hall from Ohm Electronics in Clinton St. Plaza.

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Guided Beginner Bird Walks, Sapsucker Woods | 9:00 AM Saturday & Sunday | Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd, Ithaca | Sponsored by the Cayuga Bird Club. Targeted toward beginners, but appropriate for all. Binoculars available for loan. Meet at the front of the building. Please contact Linda Orkin, wingmagic16@gmail.com for more information. Cayuga Trails Club Tuesday Hike Series | 4:00 PM Tuesday | Multiple Locations, Ithaca | The Cayuga Trails Club will lead a 2 to 3 hour hike every Tuesday in varying locations. For location details, call 607-339-5131 or visit www.cayugatrailsclub.org. Stargazing at Fuertes Observatory | 8:00 PM-12:00 AM, Friday | Fuertes Observatory, 219 Cradit Farm Dr, Ithaca | The Cornell Astronomical Society hosts stargazing at

Fuertes Observatory on Cornell’s North Campus every clear Friday evening starting at dusk. Free and open to the public; parking across the street. Call 607-255-3557 after 6 p.m. to see if we are open that night.

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Carriage house cafÉ concert Second Prize/Audience Prize winner at the 2011 Westfield International Fortepiano Competition, New Zealand pianist Mike Cheng-Yu Lee (pictured) will present a Carriage House Café recital on Monday, April 6, at 8 PM, playing violin sonatas by Brahms and Beethoven with guest violinist Wayne Lee (no relation) of the award-winning Formosa Quartet. (Photo: Ellen Zaslaw).

Art Openng: Cortland First Fridays | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | Multiple Locations, Downtown Cortland, Cortland | First Fridays celebrate the art and culture of the local community on the first Friday of each month. First Friday Gallery Night | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | The Potter’s Room, 109A E Sate St, Ithaca | Come check out the artwork of a group of The Potter’s Room users. Artists include: Tomas Black, Gerry Monaghan, Abigail Fink, Owen Mann, and more! Ink Shop Gallery—Gallery Opening Receptions | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | Ink Shop Printmaking Center The, 330 E State St Ste 2, Ithaca | Two exhibits: 1) “Witchcraft,” digital prints and mixed media artworks by Ithaca native Camille Chew; and 2) “Duets: Reveling in Remembering,” recent photographs and artists books by returned Ithaca resident Laurie Snyder. Exhibiting through April 28. Photoshow Opening: “2014” | 5:00 PM-7:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | Waffle Frolic, Commons, Ithaca | Michelle E. Wright will host an opening of her travel photography show at Waffle Frolic (2nd floor), featuring 46 local, regional, and national photos in 8 distinct collections. Runs through April 30; hours: MondaySaturday, 9 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sunday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

Measure for measure

Loft Theater, Syracuse University, April 1 - 12 SU Drama presents Shakespeare’s very dark problem comedy, in a staging set in the Belle Epoque. Evening shows Wednesdays-Saturdays, matinees April 4, 11, and 12.

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State of the Art Gallery Opening: Series and Progression | 5:00 PM-8:00 PM, 4/03 Friday | State Of The Art Gallery, 120 W State St Ste 2, Ithaca | A solo show of paintings and collages by Elisabeth Gross-Marks runs April 3-26. Reception on Gallery Night from 5-8 p.m. Hours: Wednesday-Friday, 12-6 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, 12-5 p.m.

Ongoing: Exhibit: “Five Uneasy Pieces: Reworking the Treman Willow” by Jack Elliott | 10:00 AM-4:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Nevin Welcome Center, Cornell Plantations, 1 Plantations Road, Ithaca | These pieces were once part of a living heritage tree known as the Treman Weeping Willow, located in the Newman Arboretum. Planted 80 years ago, the tree had to be cut back to its base in 2011 as it succumbed to age and carpenter ants. Sculptor Jack Elliott asked that the tree segments be delivered to his studio with the objective of reworking the pieces to let them reveal their own significances. Exhibit runs through April 30. Nevin Center hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday. For information call 607-255-2400. Exhibit: Tree + Landscape | 10:00 AM-11:00 AM, 4/01 Wednesday | Corners Gallery, 903 Hanshaw Rd Ste 3, Ithaca | Paintings and works on paper by Stan Taft. Tuesdays Saturdays; http://www.cornersgallery. com/ for more information.

Ink Shop Gallery­: April Exhibits | 12:00 PM-6:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Ink Shop Printmaking Center The, 330 E State St Ste 2, Ithaca | Two exhibits: 1) “Witchcraft,” digital prints and mixed media artworks by Ithaca native Camille Chew; and 2) “Duets: Reveling in Remembering,” recent photographs and artists books by returned Ithaca resident Laurie Snyder. Through April 28. Hours: Tuesday-Friday, 12-6 p.m., Saturday, 12-4 p.m. Johnson Museum of Art, Spring Exhibits | 10:00 AM-5:00 PM Tuesday-Sunday | Johnson Museum Of Art, Cornell, Ithaca | This is no less curious: Journeys through the Collection, through 4/12 | Margaret Bourke-White: From Cornell Student to Visionary Photojournalist, through 6/07 | Staged, Performed, Manipulated, through 6/07 | An Eye for Detail: Dutch Painting from the Leiden Collection, through 6/21 | Cast and Present: Replicating Antiquity in the Museum and the Academy, through 7/19 | New galleries featuring ancient Greek art through the 1800s, ongoing | Cosmos, by Leo Villareal, ongoing. www. museum.cornell.edu Rockwell Museum: Two New Exhibits | 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Rockwell Museum Of Western Art, 111 Cedar St, Corning | As our neighboring institution, The Corning Museum of Glass, is celebrating the opening of a new contemporary art gallery, the Rockwell teamed up with glass specialists at the Traver Gallery in Seattle, WA, to install a celebratory display of nine contemporary glass pieces of the Pacific Northwest on the ground floor. The exhibit will be on view through Memorial Day. Also on display is “The Photography of John Doddato: In Pursuit of the American Landscape,” through Feb. 2016. State of the Art Gallery Exhibit: Series and Progression | 12:00 PM-, 4/01 Wednesday | State Of The Art Gallery, 120 W State St Ste 2, Ithaca | A solo show of paintings and collages by Elisabeth Gross-Marks runs April 3-26. Hours: Wednesday-Friday, 12-6 p.m., Saturday & Sunday, 12-5 p.m. Dowd Gallery, SUNY Cortland: Topographies | 10:00 AM-4:00 PM, Monday - Friday | Dowd Fine Arts Center, SUNY Cortland, Cortland | Features works by Ithaca artist Lindsey Glover and NYC-based artist Claudia Sbrissa. On view March 2-April 10, 2015. The Dowd Gallery is SUNY Cortland’s Dowd Fine Arts Center Rm. 106, corner of Graham Ave. and Prospect Terr.

Books A Novel Idea - Book Club | 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Argos Inn, 408 E State St, Ithaca | Come spice things up, catch up with friends, and get your intellectual side out over delightful cocktails and books that you will not want to put down. Hosted by Buffalo Street Books’ Asha Sanakar. Book Talk: James Strick | 1:00 PM-3:00 PM, 4/04 Saturday | Riverow Bookshop, 187 Front St, Owego | Owego native author James Strick will talk about his new book, “Wilhelm Reich, Biologist.” Reich was the only scientist to have his books burned both by the Nazis and by the US government. Author Reading: Laura Bear | 2:00 PM-, 4/04 Saturday | Buffalo Street Books, 215 N Cayuga St, Ithaca | Author Laura Bear discusses her debut novel, Where The Heart Lands. Graphic Novel and Manga Club | 4:30 PM-5:30 PM, 4/06 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E Green St, Ithaca | For teen readers. For more information, contact Teen Services Librarian Regina DeMauro at (607) 272-4557 extension 274 or rdemauro@tcpl.org.

Museums Museum of the Earth at PRI | 1259 Trumansburg Road, Ithaca | Monday, Thursday-Saturday 10:00 AM-5:00 PM; Sunday 11:00 AM-5:00 PM | Ongoing: The Animals of the Nature Center, Glacier Exhibit, Right Whale #2030, Rock of Ages/ Sands of Time, Coral Reef Aquaria, A Journey Through Time, Discovery Labs, Hype Park Mastodon www. museumoftheearth.org Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell., Ithaca | Tuesday-Sunday, 10:00 AM-5:00 PM , to 8:00pm Thursday | “This is no less curious”: Journeys through the Collection, up through 04/12 | Margaret Bourke-White: From Cornell Student to Visionary Photojournalist, up through 06/07 | Staged, Performed, Manipulated, work by Gregory Crewdson, Carrie Mae Weems, Renée Cox, Katy Grannan, Justine Kurland, Nikki S. Lee, Meghan Boody, Anneè Olofsson, Yasumasa Morimura, James Casebere, David Levinthal, Kate O’Donovan Cook, Anthony Goicolea, and Barbara Probst, up through 06/07 | An Eye for Detail: Dutch Painting

Photo-exhibit “2014” Waffle Frolic, April 3-30

An exhibit of recent travel photography by Michelle Wright will show upstairs at Waffle Frolic on the Commons April 3-30. Opening Reception is April 3 from 5-7 p.m.


from the Leiden Collection, through 06/21 | Cast and Present: Replicating Antiquity in the Museum and the Academy through 07/19 | New galleries featuring ancient Greek art through the 1800s, ongoing | Cosmos, by Leo Villareal, ongoing |

Kids Specific for This Week: Easter Bunny at the Ithaca Mall | | The Shops at Ithaca Mall, 40 Catherwood Road, Ithaca | The Easter Bunny arrives at the Ithaca Mall Saturday, March 21st at 11 a.m., and will be hanging out daily through April 4th during mall hours. While there, guests can also help a U.S. child in need by making a donation to Save the Children. Non-Mythical Beasts | 11:00 AM-2:00 PM, 4/01-4/03 WednesdayFriday | Museum Of The Earth, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca | Come explore the weird and bizarre as we look at the non-mythical beasts that once roamed Earth. Join us for a week full of amazing creatures; each day will have a new, beastly theme! Sciencenter Preschool Story Time & Activity: How Much is a Million? | 10:30 AM-, 4/03 Friday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | For toddlers and preschoolers, hear the story “How Much is a Million?” by David M. Schwartz and then create a paper chain snake. Cecil’s Dino Eggstravaganza | 10:00 AM-1:00 PM, 4/04 Saturday | Museum Of The Earth, 1259 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca | Join us for an eggstra special day filled with a dinosaur egg hunt, egg-themed activities, and some fascinating scientific eggsperiments. There will be real and cast dinosaur eggs that kids will be able to learn about hands-on! Sciencenter Showtime! DNA and You | 2:00 PM-, 4/04 Saturday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Explore the fascinating qualities of DNA and what it can do. Join Cornell’s Julius Lucks and his lab researchers to learn about DNA, genes, and biological engineering. Then, create your own DNA necklace to take home. Rockwell Museum: Spring Break Activities for Kids | 10:00 AM-1:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Rockwell Museum Of Western Art, 111 Cedar St, Corning | A variety of programs/ activities for kids, April 1-2, plus Explore the Galleries on April 3-4. No reservations needed. April 1: Sketching

Encore Modern Horror

by Bryan VanCampen

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, directed by Alex Gibney, now playing on HBO.

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side from the recent surge in superhero movies, if I had to pick one genre that has really surged in recent years, it is the documentary. Netflix Instant View seems to add provocative titles every week—it won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but I must recommend Michael Lee Nirenberg’s Back Issues: The Hustler Magazine Story (2014). HBO On Demand’s documentary page is regularly filled with some of the best contemporary documentaries being produced, particularly the Oscar-winning Citizenfour and Martin Scorsese’s two-part film, George Harrison: Living in the Material World. While we’re on the HBO tip, if you’re up to seeing the best horror film of the year, forget all those insidious

in the Galleries; April 2: Nature-Themed Scratch Art. Contact Beth Manwaring at 607-974-4254 or manwaringb@ rockwellmuseum.org for more information. Sciencenter Moto-Inventions | 1:00 PM-2:00 PM, 4/05 Sunday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Invent contraptions that can move. Tinker with recycled materials and electricity to make whirling, moving machines. www.sciencenter.org or 607-272-0600. Sciencenter: Chemsations! | 2:00 PM-, 4/05 Sunday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Watch as local high school students demonstrate chemical reactions with color changes, bubbles, and light. Registration For Little Voices Music & Motion: Up Jumps Spring! | All day, 4/01 Wednesday | Seven different classes from which to choose starting the week of April 20; register by April 10. Little Voices Music & Motion is a program of the Ithaca Youth Bureau and the Town of Lansing Recreation Department; locations include Lansing Town Hall, Ithaca Youth Bureau, and Jillian’s Drawers on the Commons. Gift certificates and scholarships available for all classes. For more information, check

flicks about conjuring and women in black. The scariest film I’ve seen in months is Alex Gibney’s Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, based on Lawrence Wright’s 2013 book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief; Wright is interviewed in the film and had previously written a profile on filmmaker Paul Haggis (Crash) for the New Yorker. Gibney has done nothing less than fashion a three-act American tragedy that’s paced like a classic mystery thriller. As a confused agnostic I distrust all religious systems, but even by my cynical, jaundiced standards, what the Church Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard (Photo: Wikipedia) of Scientology has done in its own name is abhorrent and evil. I never really knew much who admire and revere Hubbard might about the whole mess before the premiere not know that he barraged his wife with of Gibney’s film. It is an eye-opener. phone calls regarding their daughter and The film takes us from the creation when they divorced, he took all the money of the religion by prodigious sci-fi pulp from their joint bank accounts so that she writer L. Ron Hubbard to his death and would have nothing. Hubbard comes off the passing of the whole operation to as paranoid, a man who really seemed to current chairman David Miscavige. Those believe and be haunted by his own myth,

out our website, and our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ LittleVoicesMusicMotion?ref=hl Primitive Pursuits Spring Camp (ages 6 - 14) | 9:00 AM-3:30 PM, 4/01-4/03, Wednesday-Friday | 4-H Acres, 418 Lower Creek Rd, Ithaca | Welcome SPRING back to the Finger Lakes with 5 days of wild adventures, outdoor skill building, and resounding FUN! Come for two, three or all five days. Call 607-272-2292 ext. 195 or visit us online at primitivepursuits.com. Spring Break at the Sciencenter | 10:00 AM-5:00 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Join us during spring break for special hands-on activities throughout the day all week long. www.sciencenter.org or 607-272-0600. YMCA Free Spring Break Activities | 11:00 AM-, 4/01 Wednesday | YMCA, Graham Rd W, Ithaca | Special activity series for spring break: 1) Wednesday, April 1: noon-1 p.m., Family Kickball, and 1-2 p.m., Family Dodgeball; 2) Thursday, April 2: 11 a.m.-noon, an Easter Egg Hunt in the indoor Y pool--all children will receive a small toy! 3) Friday, April 3: 11-11:30 a.m., Family Boot Camp for all ages, and 11:30 a.m. - noon Family & Kids Zumba.

Ongoing:

us online at primitivepursuits.com. Primitive Pursuits Youth Workshop: East Hill Homeschool Program (ages 6 - 10) | 9:00 AM-1:30 PM, 4/02 Thursday | 4-H Acres, 418 Lower Creek Rd, Ithaca | Find out what makes our homeschool programs the best around! Explore bow-making, walnut dyeing, cob oven construction, shelter-building & thatching, wild food harvesting & more as we build our forest community. Sliding scale fee. Call 607-272-2292 x. 195 or visit us online at primitivepursuits.com. Primitive Pursuits Youth Workshop: West Hill Homeschool Program (ages 6 - 14) | 9:00 AM-1:30 PM, 4/07 Tuesday | Y Adventureland, 1350 Mecklenburg Rd (Rt 79), Ithaca | Find out what makes our homeschool programs the best around! Explore bow-making, walnut dyeing, cob oven construction, shelter-building & thatching, wild food harvesting & more as we build our forest community. Sliding scale fee. Call 607-272-2292 x. 195 or visit us online at primitivepursuits.com.

Online Calendar See it at ithaca.com.

ThisWeek

Lora Pendleton

Silver Line Tap Room, 8:00 p.m.

Permanent Addition

Lora and Steve Gollnick appear with Matt Marano at the Silver Line Tap Room in Trumansburg this Saturday.

The new 26,000-square-foot contemporary gallery building is part of the Contemporary Art + Design Wing, with more than 70 works on display, some never before on view.

Follow Bryan VanCampen on Twitter

L Gibbs Dr, Ithaca | A stay and play program for children 5 months to 5 years old and their parent/caregiver. Go to IYBrec.com for more information or call 273-8364. Sciencenter: Science Together | 10:30 AM-11:00 AM, 3/18 Wednesday | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Parents with their little ones (4 years old & under) explore science through hands-on activities, stories, and songs. Sciencenter educators will also share research-based parenting tips in an interactive, fun environment. www. sciencenter.org or 607-272-0600. Plus, on April 15 enjoy special Week of the Young Child hands-on activities. Primitive Pursuits Youth Workshop: After School at Belle Sherman Elementary (grades 2-5) | 2:00 PM-4:30 PM, 4/01 Wednesday | Belle Sherman Elementary School, 501 Mitchell St, Ithaca | Come join Primitive Pursuits each week, and learn the tools of survival right in the forests around your school. Together we’ll work on making fires (without matches!), build rain-proof shelters, and find wild sources of food. Each week will be a new adventure full of challenges & games to push your skills to the limit. Call 607-272-2292 x. 195 or visit

Art Classes for Kids | Community School Of Music And Arts, 330 E State St, Ithaca | For more information, call (607) 272-1474 or email info@ csma-ithaca.org. www.csma-ithaca. org. Sunday Science Demonstrations | 2:00 PM-, Sundays through May 17 | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Local high school students demonstrate awe-inspiring science with colorful chemical reactions, fun with physics, and more! Visit www.sciencenter.org/ calendar.html for specific programs and dates. Sciencenter Winter/Spring Exhibition: “TreeHouses” | 10:00 AM-5:00 PM | Sciencenter, 601 1st St, Ithaca | Spend time hanging out in the trees! Explore an indoor tree house while you look, listen, and smell for signs of animal tree dwellers at the Sciencenter’s new featured exhibition. Open Tuesday-Sunday. Tales for Tots Storytime | 11:00 AMand 2:00 PM-, Saturdays | Barnes & Noble, 614 S Meadow St, Ithaca | Tot Spot | 9:30 AM-11:30 AM, Thursday, Saturday, Monday, Tuesday | City Of Ithaca Youth Bureau, 1 James

Corning Museum Of glass NEW WING

whereas Miscavige is the real monster; the allegations against him are outrageous and repellent. The word “Hollywood” may have been omitted from the film, but famed Scientologists Tom Cruise and John Travolta are not spared here. If the film is to be believed, Travolta essentially abandoned a staffer who wound up essentially as slave labor and only had the courage to flee when she realized she couldn’t subject her children to her own mistake of joining Scientology. The film also accuses the church of procuring a woman for him when he told Miscavige he “needed a new girlfriend.” The result starts out as Vertigo and ends up as human trafficking. Haggis and actor Jason Beghe have their own painful stories to tell, and more ugly accounts come to light from staffers who have fled over the years. Alex Gibney is one of the most prolific filmmakers working in this particular genre. Just in the past decade, he’s made defining and well-made documentaries on a wide range of topics ranging from Enron, Eliot Spitzer, and super-lobbyist Jack Abramoff to merry pranksters Hunter S. Thompson and Ken Kesey. He tops himself with this film. Now let’s see if anything changes. •

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC BUDGET HEARING, PERSONAL REGISTRATION AND ANNUAL MEETING AND ELECTION OF THE ITHACA CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Public Budget Hearing of the Ithaca City School District (the “District”) for the discussion of the expenditures and budgeting of funds for the 2015-2016 school

year will be held at the District Administration Building, 400 Lake Street, Ithaca, New York, in the Board Room on May 5, 2015, commencing at 6:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time (E.D.S.T.).

NOTICE is also given that voting on: (I) the 2015-2016 annual District budget, which will appear on the ballot as Proposition No. 1; (II) the appropriation and expenditure of funds from the District’s “2013 Capital Reserve Fund” to purchase school buses, as set forth in Proposition No. 2; (III) the election of members of the District’s Board of Education; and (IV) the transaction of such other business as is authorized by law, will take place at the Annual District Meeting and Election on Tuesday, May 19, 2015, at the District’s designated polling places, in Election Districts numbered 1-12, between the hours of 12:00 noon and 9 p.m., E.D.S.T., and that voting shall be conducted by voting machine. NOTICE is also given that a copy of a statement prepared by the Board of Education of the estimated expenses and the amount of money that will be required for school purposes for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2016, together with the appendages required by Education Law §1716, may be obtained at each school in the District; at the District Office, 400 Lake Street, Ithaca, New York, on and after May 5, 2015, during the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., each weekday except Saturday, Sunday or holiday; at the Tompkins County Public Library; and on the District’s internet website at: http://www.ithacacityschools.org. NOTICE is also given, in accordance with §495 of the N.Y. Real Property Tax Law, that the District shall prepare a Real Property Tax “Exemption Report” which will show how much of the assessed value on the final assessment roll (utilized for the school tax levy) is exempt from taxation by the District. The exemption report will list every type of exemption granted and will show: (1) the cumulative impact of each type of exemption; (2) the cumulative amount expected to be received as payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTS), or other payments, from recipients of each type of exemption; (3) the cumulative impact of all exemptions granted. The Exemption Report will be posted on the District’s website and on District bulletin boards utilized for posting public notices. The Exemption Report will be annexed to any preliminary District budget, and will become part of the final budget. NOTICE is also given, that in addition to the proposed District budget for the 2015-2016 fiscal year and school year, which will appear on the ballot as Proposition No. 1, the following proposition will be submitted to the voters: Proposition No. 2 Shall the Board of Education of the Ithaca City School District (“School District”) be authorized to appropriate funds from the School District’s 2013 Capital Reserve Fund in the maximum amount of $890,000 and to expend these funds for the purchase of five (5) 63-passenger school buses, one (1) 63-passenger school bus with a wheelchair lift, one (1) 30-passenger school bus and one (1) 30-passenger school bus with a wheelchair lift?

NOTICE is also given that four members of the Board of Education will be elected. The three Board candidates receiving the highest number of votes will be elected to three-year terms commencing on July 1, 2015. The fourth highest vote getter will win election to the balance of the unexpired term of office of Seth Peacock, ending June 30, 2017, which became vacant due to his resignation from the Board. Pursuant to the provisions of the Education Law, candidates for the office of Member of the Board of Education shall be nominated by petition. A separate petition shall be required to nominate each candidate. Each petition shall be signed by at least 100 qualified voters of the District, and shall state the name and residence of the candidate and each signer. Each petition shall be filed with the Clerk of the District between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. E.D.S.T., but no later than 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 29, 2015. Forms of petition may be obtained from the Clerk of the District. NOTICE is given that the District has established personal registration of voters and has divided the School District into 12 election districts. Accordingly, the only persons entitled to vote on May 19, 2015 are those who are “qualified voters” and who are “registered” to vote as set forth herein. To be a “qualified voter” a person must be a citizen of the United States, at least 18 years of age, and a legal resident of the District for a period of 30 days immediately preceding May 19, 2015. If a “qualified voter” has previously registered with the District or with the County Board of Elections and has voted within the last four (4) calendar years, he or she is eligible to vote at the May 19, 2015 Annual District Meeting and Election without re-registering. All other persons who wish to vote at the Annual District Meeting and Election must either pre-register with the District’s Board of Registration as set forth below, or be registered with the Tompkins County Elections Board to vote in general elections, pursuant to the provisions of Article 5 of the Election Law, on the date of the District’s Annual District Meeting and Election. NOTICE is given that, for those “qualified voters” who are not yet “registered” to vote, the District’s Board of Registration will meet in the Office of the Clerk of the School District, 400 Lake Street, Ithaca, New York, on May 7, 2015, between the hours of 12:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. for the purpose of preparing a Register for each school election district, at which time any qualified voter who appears personally before the Board of Registration will be entitled to have his or her name placed on the District’s Register, provided that at such meeting of the Board of Registration, he or she is known or proven to the satisfaction of said Board of Registration to be then or thereafter entitled to vote at such Annual District Meeting and Election for which the Register is prepared. NOTICE is also given that the election Register prepared pursuant to law shall be on file in the Office of the District Clerk, 400 Lake Street, Ithaca, New York, and shall be open for inspection by any qualified voter of the District from May 14, 2015 through May 19, 2015, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., on any day that the office is open for business. NOTICE is also given that the place in each election district where the vote and election will occur is as follows: Lehman Alternative Community School. 111 Chestnut Street, Ithaca, New York Beverly J. Martin School. 302 West Buffalo Street, Ithaca, New York, Belle Sherman Annex. 75 Cornell Street, Ithaca, New York Caroline School. 2439 Slaterville Road, Ithaca, New York Cayuga Heights School. 110 East Upland Road, Ithaca, New York Danby Fire Hall. 1780 Danby Road, Ithaca, New York Enfield School. 20 Enfield Main Road, Ithaca, New York Fall Creek School. 202 King Street. Ithaca, New York Franziska Racker Centers, Inc. 3226 Wilkins Road. Ithaca, New York Northeast School. 425 Winthrop Drive, Ithaca, New York SOUTH HILL SCHOOL. 520 Hudson Street, Ithaca, New York Varna Community Center. 943 Dryden Road, Ithaca, New York Information regarding the legal boundaries of each election district and directions to the designated voter registration and polling places may be obtained from the Office of the District Clerk during normal business hours. NOTICE is also given that qualified voters of the District may obtain applications for an absentee ballot at the District Office. Completed applications must be received by the District Clerk no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 12, 2015 if the absentee ballot is to be mailed to the voter. If a completed application is received after 5:00 p.m. on May 12, 2015, the absentee ballot will not be mailed, but instead must be delivered personally to the voter. A listing of all persons to whom an absentee ballot is issued will be available for inspection by any qualified voter in the Office of the District Clerk between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. from May 12 through May 18, 2015, other than on a Saturday, Sunday or holiday. Absentee ballots that do not reach the office of the District Clerk by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 will not be canvassed. Dated:

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Tuesday, March 24, 2015 Ithaca, New York

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Town & Country

Classifieds

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277-7000

Internet: www.ithacatimes.com Mail: Ithaca Times Classified Dept PO Box 27 Ithaca NY 14850 In Person: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 109 North Cayuga Street

Phone: Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Fax: 277-1012 (24 Hrs Daily)

Special Rates:

AUTOMOBILES

MERCHANDISE $100 - $500

Fax and Mail orders only

12 words / runs til sold

community

FREE

buy sell

120/Autos Wanted

SAWMILLS from only $4397.00 - MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillcut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info /DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (NYSCAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer. 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

245/Garage Sales HUGE

RUMMAGE SALE Presbyterian Church, 69 Main Street, Trumansburg, April 10 (Friday) 10a-5p, April 11 (Saturday) 8:30a-1p. Pre-Owned Goods of all kinds, fair prices on unexpected finds!

250/Merchandise CASH for Coins! Buying Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Comics, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NY: 1-800-959-3419 (NYSCAN)

270/Pets English Bulldogs

web: www.bg.org office: 607-277-3333 1763 Slaterville Road, Ithaca

He Is Risen! Easter Sermon Series March 15 - April 5

Available to listen on-line

April 2- Maundy Thursday, 7:00pm April 3- Good Friday Communion, 7:30pm April 5 - Early Easter Celebration/Breakfast, 7:30am EASTER Sunday Worship, 10:00am

24

$

SERVICE DIRECTORY

GARAGE SALES

10

15

15 words / runs 2 insertions

10 25 words

per week / 13 week minimum

employment

employment

employment

$

$

$

Green Mt. Orchards

CITY OF ITHACA

350/Musicians THE CATS

For Sale! Female Puppy, 6 weeks old, shots, health guaranteed, good with children and AKC Registered. Cost: $600. Email: ccander.09083@yahoo.com

Houses of Worship

Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 315-400-0797 Today! (NYSCAN)

Non-Commercial: $14.50 first 12 words (minimum), 20 cents each additional word. Rate applied to non-business ads and prepaid ads. Business Ads: $16.50 for first 12 words (minimum), 30 cents each additional word. If you charge for a service or goods you are a business. Inquire about contract rates. $24.00 Auto Guaranteed Ad - Ad runs 3 weeks or until sold. 12 words $24.00, each additional word 60¢. You must notify us to continue running ad. Non-commercial advertisers only 25% Discount - Run your non-commercial ad for 4 consecutive weeks, you only pay for 3 (Adoption, Merchandise or Housemates) Employment / Real Estate / Adoption: $38.00 first 15 words (minimum), 30 cents each additional word. Ads run weeks. Box Numbers: Times Box Numbers are $2.50 per week of publication. Write “Times Box______” at end of your ad. Readers address box replies to Times Box______, c/o Ithaca Times, P.O. Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. Headlines: 9-point headlines (use up to 16 characters) $2.00 per line. If bold type, centered or unusually spaced type, borders in ad, or logos in ads are requested, the ad will be charged at the display classified advertising rate. Call 277-7000 for rate information. Free Ads: Lost and Found and free items run at no charge for up to 3 weeks. Merchandise for Sale, private party only. Price must be under $50 and stated in ad Website/Email Links: On Line Links to a Web Site or Email Address $5.00 per insertion. Blank Lines: (no words) $2.00/Line - insertion. Border: 1 pt. rule around ad $5.00 - insertion.

MERCHANDISE UNDER $100

automotive

140/Cars

| 67,389 Readers

Ithaca Times Town & Country Classified Ad Rates

Fri. April 3, 2015, The Buffalo Head, 1577 Conklin Rd., Conklin, NY 9:30pm1:00am. Sat. April 11, 2015 O’Ryan’s, 159 Prescot Ave.,Elmira Heights, NY,8:30pm - 12:00 am jeffhowell.org, Cool Tunes Records

Humanistic

Passover Seder Saturday April 11 Entrees by

Word of Mouth (reservations required) Members: $15 Non-members: $30/adult, $10/child

♫ Live Music by ♩ ♪ Mel & Sol ♬ 3:00 PM Foundation of Light 391 Turkey Hill Road Contact: holidays@kolhaverim.net

KOL HAVERIM

The Finger Lakes Community for Humanistic Judaism

is accepting applications for the following positions: Seasonal Laborer: Vacancies with various departments throughout the City. Salary: $10-12/ hour. Application deadline: April 3, 2015. Waterfront Director: Vacancy with the Ithaca Youth Bureau from June 30 – August 20, 2015. Minimum Quals: Minimum two years experience in waterfront aquatics. Salary: starting at $12/hour. Visit website for full requirements. Application deadline: April 1, 2015. Day Camp Nurse: Vacancy with Stewart Park or Cass Park. Salary to be determined by experience. Schedule: June 29 – August 1, 2015. Application deadline: April 15, 2015. City of Ithaca Human Resources Department, 108 East Green Street, Ithaca, NY 14850, (607) 274-6539, www.cityofithaca.org The City of Ithaca is an equal opportunity employer that is committed to diversifying its workforce.

430/General AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN) ATTEND AVIATION COLLEGE - Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance training. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7093. (NYSCAN)

Building Maintenance

Helper needed at Moravia Central School District. $14.05/hr. See specifics at www.moraviaschool.org - Job Opportunities or call 497-2670 for application. EOE

Putney, VT needs 1 temporary worker 4/5/2015 to 10/31/2015, work tools, supplies, equipment provided without cost to worker. Housing will be made available without cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon completion of 15 days or 50% of the work contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of the workdays during the contract period . $11.26 per hour. Applicants to apply contact Brattleboro Resource Center, State Office Building, PO Box 920, 232 Main S., Brattleboro, Vt 5302, 802-254-4555, Fax: 802-257-2896. Or apply at the nearest local office for the SWA. Job order #279469. May perform any combination of tasks related to the planting, cultivating, and processing of fruits and vegetables, including, but not limited to driving, operating, adjusting and maintaining farm machines; preparing soil, planting, pruning, weeding, thinning spraying, irrigating, mowing, harvesting, grading and packing. May also use hand tools such as shovel, saw and hoe. One month experience required in duties required.

     

     

  

                       

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employment

BUY SELL

(Etna Rd) Just over a year old still new, use once a week, guarantee until Feb, $900 or closest offer. Cal Hilda 607-220-7730 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Resort518e Services. 1-800Taylor 638-2102. Online reservations: www. NEW FOR 2013 holidayoc.com (NYSCAN) Grand Ornatural finished non-cutaway chestra with premium grade tropical mahogany back and sides, Sitka spruce top, ebony fretboard and bridge, 500 appointments include black/white/black multi-binding, abalone sound hole rosette, pearl inlaid diamond position markers and headstock ornament, gold Schaller tuning machines. Expression system electronics, w/HSC list: $3518 yours: $2649 IGW ALL AREAS -272-2602 ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect 712 roomate toTaylor complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates .com! (AAN CAN) 12-Fret NEW glossy vintage sunburst stika spruce top and natural finish rosewood back and sides grand concert size, ebony bridge and fingerboard with ivroid inlaid “heritage” fretboard markers with 12 frets clear of the body, slot peghead with w/HSC, list: $3378, Yours: $2549 IGW 272-2602

MUSICAL/260

MR. BULT’S is currently hiring experienced class A, CDL Drivers in NY State. If interested in applying, please text “Haul” to 55000 or www.mrbults.com/ careers (NYSCAN)

510/Adoption Services

Start your humanitarian career! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www. OneWorldCenter.org 269-591-0518 info@oneworldcenter.org (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOP-

WELDING CAREERS - Hands on training for career opportunities in aviation, automotive, manufacturing and more. Financial aid for qualified students. Job 2008 SuzukiAWD hatchback. placement assistance. CALL AIMLoaded 877with extras(NYSCAN) including cruise control. Very 206-4006 good condition. $10,100. 607-229-9037

Adoptions. 866-413-6293. (AAN CAN)

TION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift

AUTOMOTIVE

BUY SELL

440/Jobs Wanted

Garage/Yard Sale at 6056 West Seneca Rd. Trumansburg; follow detour. Household goods, furniture, misc. No clothes. Sat. August 4th from 9:00-2:00.

GARAGE SALES/245 610/Apartments

Stock #11077E 2010 Honda Accord Coupe EX, Auto, Black, 33,001 miles $16,997 Certified Stock #11033 2012 Honda Civic SENIORHybrid CAREGIVER Privately hired caregiver/companion. CVT, Silver, 26,565 miles, $17,997 Certified Over 30 years experience! 607.761.6187 Stock #11171E 2010 Honda Insight EX, CVT, white, 35,224 miles, $14,997 Certified Stock #11124E 2010 Mazda 3 Wagon 6-speed, Blue, 44,329 miles, $14,997 Stock #11168E 2012 Mazda 2 Hatchback Auto, Red, 32,427 miles #12,997 HEALTHCARE BILLING of IthacaSPECIALACCOUNTSHonda RECEIVABLE 315 Elmira Road IST: Responsibilities include monthly Ithaca, NY 14850 billing of Medicare, private & commercial www.hondaofithaca.com accounts; Medicare A days confirmation; weekly billing of Medicaid; maintaining cash report/cash receipts journal; completion of bank reconciliations. Experience w/PNP & RMS Sales Journal strongly preferred. Minimum Requirements: AAS Degree in accounting: proficiency in Microsoft Word & Excel spreadsheet applications is a must. Send cover letter, resume with salary requirements to Groton Community Health Center, Inc. 120 Sykes St. Groton, NY 13073. EOE

LARGE DOWNSIZING SALE. Something for Everyone. August 2 and August You’re Sure to Road, FindEllis 3 8am-5pm, 2 Eagleshead Hollow, Ithaca, 14850 the place that’sNY right for you with Conifer.

445/Office / Administration

Linderman Creek 269-1000, Cayuga

MERCHANDISE/250

View 269-1000, The Meadows 257-

1861, Poets Landing BARREL TABLE Four 288-4165 Swivel Chairs in Green leather. Vet nice condition. $275.00 564-3662

630/Commercial / Offices

Homelite HLT-15 Classic weed whacker, new never used. $60. 216-2314 RED MAX WEED WHACKER used very little. $50.00 PRIME LOCATION 387-9327

BUY SELL TRADE

DOWNTOWNfrom ITHACA WATERFRONT SAWMILLS only $4897.00 MAKE SAVE MONEY your own Across&from Island Healthwith & Fitness. bandmill-cut lumber any dimension. In 3000ready Square Foot FREE + DeckInfo/DVD: & Dock. Parkstock to ship. 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N ing Plus Garage Entry. Please Call Tom www.NorwoodSawmills.com 607-342-0626(NYSCAN)

ANTIQUESCOLLECTABLES/205

Sofa Bed Double, green plaid. $150. 257-3997

DONATE YOUR CAR

CASH for Coins! Buying ALL Gold & SilSTUFF ver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Only small kitchen appliances; 1 LazyCollections, Estates. Travel to your Boy recliner and anything else you can home. Call Marc in NYC benefiting think of. I might have what you want. 1-800-959-3419 Mostly new, no junk. (NYSCAN) Call for list: 607-273-4444

Wheels For Wishes

FARM & GARDEN/230 U-Pick

Organically Grown Blueberries $1.60 lb. Open 7 days a week. Dawn-toDusk. Easy to pick bush berries. *Free Vehicle/Boat Pickuphigh ANYWHERE Tons quality fruit! 3455 *Weof Accept All Vehicles RunningChubb or Not Hollow road PenTaxn Deductible Yan. *100% 607-368-7151

700/Roommates

VIOLINS FOR SALE: European, old and new, reasonable prices, 607-277-1516.

825/Financial

830/Home

COMMUNITY

Four Seasons Landscaping Inc. 607.272.1504 Lawn maintenance, spring + fall clean up + gutter cleaning, patios, retaining walls, + walkways, landscape design + installation. Drainage. Snow Removal. Dumpster rentals. Find us on Facebook!

ACTIVITIES/310 Cayuga Lake Triathlon Sunday 8/4/2013

The Cayuga Lake Triathlon will take place at Taughannock Falls State Park on Sunday, 8/4/13. Cyclists will be on NY89 from Taughannock Falls State Park to Co. Rd. 139 in Sheldrake. There will be a temporary detour on NY89 between Gorge Road and Savercool Road form 7am to approximately 12pm while the triathlon is in progress. Please consider choosing alternate routes. Spectators are always welcome to come enjoy the triathlon or register to volunteer! For more details on the Cayuga Lake Triathlon. visit: http:// www.ithacatriathlonclub.org/cltrace/.

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

The instrument everybody can play! Martin, Kala, Gretsch, starting at $40 and over 60 in stock!

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547

DeWitt Mall

950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY

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1040/Land for Sale CONTRACT FELL THRU! 5 acres $19,900 or $254/month! 70% below market! Gorgeous woods, 5 miles to Cooperstown! G’teed buildable! Town rd, utils. Call: 888-905-8847 or go to newyorklandandlakes.com (NYSCAN) UPSTATE NY WATERFRONT! 11 acres - $69,900 Beautiful woods on bass lake 5 miles to Cooperstown! Private setting for camp, cabin or year round home! Terms avail! 888-479-3394 NewYorkLandandLakes.com (NYSCAN)

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Childrenʼs Choir Director (Ithaca, NY)

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL/430 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income@ Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our LIve Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AANCAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093 (NYSCAN)

CHURCH CHOIR DIRECTOR FOR CHILDREN--The First Presbyterian Church of Ithaca is seeking a director for its Children’s (K--5th grade) Choirs. He or she will prepare students to sing in worship on a regular basis. Submit a resume of qualifications and experience and a list of three references electronically at office@firstpresithaca.org or by mail to Children’s Choir Director Search, First Presbyterian Church Ithaca, 315 North Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850

Coaches Needed

for Newfield Central School. Looking for Asst. Football, Varsity and JV Volleyball coaches for upcoming sports seasons. Apply on website at http:// www.newfieldschools.org/node/72 by 8/16/13.

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hometown electrical distributor Your one Stop Shop

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We Buy & Sell

BLACK CAT ANTIQUES

Ithaca Times Issue: Wednesday 4/1 “We stock the unusual” Due: Thursday 774 Peru Road, Rte. Size: 2 (3.125) x 38 3.5• Groton, NY 13073 Spring hours: 10 to 5 Friday & Saturday or by Chance or Appointment BlackCatAntiques@CentralNY.twcbc.com REPLACEMENT 607.898.2048

DIRECTOR OF ONLINE LEARNING Provide proactive leadership & vision for the future of FLCC’s online learning program including retention & success of online students. Provide direct support to faculty in development & delivery of courses & programs. Liaison w/ academic departments to determine online & hybrid course offerings & to develop new courses. Interface w/ IT personnel to improve classroom & online support including early alert technologies. Manage personnel in the online department. Required: Minimum of Master's degree in Education Administration or related field. Five years’ full-time employment in a professional position, including preferably two years supervisory experience. Two years’ experience developing & teaching online courses. Demonstrated ability to apply principles of effective pedagogy, knowledge of learning styles, & use of various instructional design approaches & processes in a web enhanced or online environment. Community college experience preferred, w/ Blackboard LMS & Open SUNY experience desirable. Apply by 4/19/15 for full consideration at www.flcc.edu/employment. Applications will only be accepted online. Address your online cover letter & resume to Grace Loomis, Director of Human Resources.

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needs 3 temporary workers 8/5/13 to 12/ THINKING SOLAR? 1/13, work supplies under $3 tools, a day! Call Now! equipment 866-353-6916 The Cats provided without cost to worker. Housing Call us for a FREE solar assessment. (AAN CAN) without cost to workers will be available Paradise EnergyJeff Solutions 100 Grange Featuring Howell who cannot reasonably return to their Place, Cortland, NY 877-679-1753 permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation reimbursement and subsistence is provided upon comFriday, August 2, 2013 pletion of 15 days ro 50% of the work The Log Cabin contract. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of 8811 Main St. AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/ the workdays during the contract period. $10.91 per hr. Applicants to apply conCampbell, NY MONTH! Call 855-977-9537 (AAN CAN) tact Ct Department of Labor at 860-2639:00pm - 1:00am 6020 or apply for the job at nearest local office of the SWA. Job order #4559149. Must be able to perform and have prior jeffhowell.org experience i following duties: Plant, culBears Bait Shop Sebastian, Florida Beautiful 55+ manuCool Tunes Records at Myers Park, Lansing. Opening March tivate and harvest broadleaf tobacco. Usefactured hand tools such as but not4.4 limited home community. milestoto 31st, 12:30-6:30pm open April 1st at shovels, hoes, knives, hatchets and lad5:30AM. Open on weekends until May theDuties beach. Close to riverfront ders. may include but are district. not lim14th then open daily. (607)387-5576 or ited to applying fertilizer, transplanting, New models $85,000. 772-581weeding, toppingfrom tobacco plants, apply(607)227-7512 ing 0080, sucker control, cutting, hooking, www.beach-cove.com (NYSCAN) stripping, packing and handling harLOST LOST DISHPrescription TV Starting atSunglasses $19.99/month ( for vested tobacco. May participate in irriaround 7/22.SAVE! FossilRegular Frames,Price brown lens12 mos.) $34.99 gation activities, repair farm buildings. Must be able to climb and work at About FREE SAME DAY Installaes.Ask Probably lost between Trumansburg heights up to 20 ft. in the tobacco barn tion! CALL Now! 888-992-1957 (AAN and Ithaca. Mark for the purpose of hanging tobacco lath CAN) weighing up to 50lbs. 2 months experi(607)227.9132 ence required in duties listed.

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Two Acres on the Creek Deceptively Large Home in Ulysses By C a s san dra Palmy ra

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he house at 4242 West Seneca Road Curry Road. The other wing of the house holds the is a lot larger than it looks from the three bedrooms. One of them is a master outside. Essentially the footprint is suite that includes a full bathroom. This enormous, but it is hard to see that from has a double-sized shower stall. The bedthe driveway. room itself has wall-to-wall carpeting. In addition to the house being large The other two bedrooms are smaller overall, there are some truly expansive rooms in the place. The family room alone and have the same laminate flooring as is larger than someone studio apartments. the family rooms. There is another bathIt occupies an entire wing of the house. After you take two steps down from a landing at the entrance, you are in a space with windows on three sides and a gas fireplace. There is enough room in here from a very large television set. The floor here is a very convincing laminate that is made to look like distressed knotty 4242 West Seneca Road, Trumansburg (Photo: Cassandra Palmyra) pine. There is a laundry room in the room off the hall for these two rooms. short hall between the family room and The basement has finished walls and a the kitchen. very dry concrete floor. There is one large The kitchen is equipped with a very room, a smaller one that could be used deep double sink, a gas oven and range for an office, and a room that holds all the (powered by propane), and a dishwasher. utilities. The counters have just been replaced. All of this is sitting on almost two In the back of the house, looking out over a yard dotted with mature trees, there acres just outside Trumansburg village. • is a large dining room/sitting room with a hardwood floor and a cathedral ceiling. The ceiling is covered in tongue-inAt A Glance groove knotty pine and punctuated by two Price: $259,900 skylights. Location: 4242 West Seneca Road, The dining area is at one end and the Town of Ulysses other is dominated by a huge fireplace School District: Trumansburg made of smooth, rounded stones. The Central Schools entire chimney is visible to the ceiling making it feel like a hunting lodge or a MLS#: 300146 vacation home. Contact: Lindsay Hart, Licensed There is a three-season porch attached Associate Real Estate Broker, ReMax to the rear of the house that is home to a In Motion, lindsayhart@remax.net large hot tub. An open porch is adjacent. Phone: (607) 227-5990 (cell) From there you can look out on a broad Website: www.hartandhomes. lawn that stretches down to Trumansburg com Creek, which separates the property from

more than 100 years of mortgage experience in the Tompkins County region. 607-273-3210 RE 5X1.5.indd 1

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Large 2 Topping Pizza $10.00 + tax

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2 Medium Cheese Pizzas $10.00 + tax

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1006 W. Seneca Street, Ithaca

Member FDIC

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LIGHTLINK HOTSPOTS http://www.lightlink.com/hotspots hotspots@lighlink.com Load it Up Any large Pizza with up to 4 toppings + cheese Only $11.99 Save $6.00 with Greenback Coupon at

4 Seasons Landscaping Inc.

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607-272-1504 lawn maintenance spring + fall clean up + gutter cleaning patios, retaining walls, + walkways landscape design + installation

JUNE Professional Oriental Dancer Call or E-Mail to Register

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RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Housekeeping*Windows*Awnings*Floors High Dusting*Carpets*Building Maintenance 24/7 EMERGENCY CLEANING Services 607-227-3025 or 607-220-8739

607-272-0114 BARBER CATHY Has moved from GENE’S to

Check out Cayuga Dog Rescue! Adopt! Foster! Volunteer! Donate for vet care! www.cayugadogrescue.org www.facebook.com/CayugaDogRescue

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LPs 45s 78s ROCK JAZZ BLUES PUNK REGGAE ETC Angry Mom Records (Autumn Leaves Basement) 319-4953 angrymomrecords@gmail.com

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Papa Johns

John’s Tailor Shop John Serferlis - Tailor 102 The Commons 273-3192

MOBIL COMPLETE OIL CHANGE only $24.99 with Greenback Coupon Mobil 1 Lube Express 348 Elmira Road 607-273-2937

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with a Camera Surveillance System Les @ 607-272-9175 Refine & deepen your yoga practice

INTERMEDIATE YOGA SERIES

Triphammer Rd. Lansing

3-Class Workshop Series Sundays, April 12, 19 & Saturday, May 2 1:30-3pm Register for all 3 sessions $40

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We were LOCAL before it was cool. 701 W. Buffalo St. 273-9392 DeWitt Mall 273-8210 28

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Teaching youth preservation trade skills www.HistoricIthaca.org

Ithaca’s Friendly local Game Store Board Games, Geek Collectibles, Educational games for Kids

STYLES & SMILES

The Lansing-Ithaca Rotary Club The Lansing Lions and the Lansing Faculty are holding their annual Chix BQ on Wednesday, April 29, 4pm-7pm at Lansing High School. The prices will be $9 for a half-chicken dinner, $7 for a quarter-chicken dinner, and $7 for a half-chicken only (not a dinner). We welcome take-outs, but would love to have you stay and talk in the cafeteria. The proceeds will go to the Rotary Exchange Program, Lansing Faculty scholarships, and charity programs for the Lions’ choosing

www.greenstar.coop

THINKING SOLAR? Call us for a free solar assessment

Paradise Energy Solutions 100 Grange Place, Cortland, NY 877-679-1753 We Buy, Sell, & Trade Black Cat Antiques

607-898-2048

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April 1, 2015  

April 1, 2015  

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