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39th

Annu al

Apple

festival 2021

DOWNT

OWN IT HACA

OCTOBE

, NY

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A 3-DA YF S T A T E 'S E S T IV A L C E L E B R A T IN G APPLE G N ROWER S & C ID E W Y O R K ER MAK ERS

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of

2021 BREAKING GROUND

City celebrates conference center construction PAGE 3

SPOTTED

LANTERNFLIES City forester urges vigilance against insects PAGE 5

FIRST WIN

Little Red football beats Johnson City PAGE 4

DISNEY

PREMIERE

Former Ithacan’s show premieres on Disney Channel PAGE 27

MUNDANE MARVELS

We review the latest at Corners Gallery PAGE 30


KEEP IT SIMPLE:

3 Airlines.

10 Daily Flights.

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VOL.XLII / NO. 6 / September 29, 2021 Serving 47,125 readers week ly

F E AT URE S Tenant’s Tales: Shaun Fenner����8 An Ithacan resident has lost his home — how did he end up here, and how can it be fixed?

A candle in the darkness����������27 Optimistic middle schooler Molly meets curmudgeonly ghost Scratch in Disney Channel’s newest show — created by Ithacan Bob Roth.

Newsline��������������������������������������������������3-5 Opinion�������������������������������������������������������� 6 Letters�������������������������������������������������������� 7

Apple Harvest Guide������������������ 11 Best of Ithaca 2021���������������������� 15

ART S &E N T E RTAINME N T Film������������������������������������������������������������� 29 Art�������������������������������������������������������������� 30 Times Table���������������������������������������������� 32 Classifieds����������������������������������������������� 34

DEVELOPMENT

City breaks ground on conference center, affordable housing building

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groundbreaking on the afternoon of Sept. 24 saw a milestone reached in the years-long effort to bring a conference center, affordable housing, and more parking to downtown Ithaca. What started with a crumbling garage in need of repair transformed into a massive private-public partnership that will result in a 12-story building that includes 181 low- and moderate-income apartments, a 49,000 sq.ft. conference center, 350 public parking spots and a small retail space built by the Vecino Group. The garage demolition has been underway since midsummer, but the groundbreaking made the start of construction official. During the hour-long groundbreaking ceremony elected officials, leaders of local agencies and representatives from the Vecino Group lauded each others’ efforts to make the project a reality. “We could have just done the simple thing and rebuilt the garage,” Mayor Svante Myrick said. “But this is Ithaca, so we never just do the simple thing.” Executive Director of the Downtown Ithaca Alliance

Gary Ferguson echoed that, and said that in most places it would have just been a garage. “Instead of just trying to rebuild it, our city leadership reached out and said, ‘let’s do something different,’” he said. “It was a wise and sage decision.” Ferguson said in 2002 a consulting firm studied Ithaca to see if it would be a good place for a conference center, but ultimately decided no. “They told us we didn’t have enough downtown hotel rooms to support a conference center at that time, and they were probably right,” he said. “And they told us that nobody would come to Ithaca to come to meetings. Why would anyone

drive to a place like Ithaca, off the beaten path? So it got put aside.” The project was picked back up again in 2016. “We have four wonderful downtown hotels, two inns, and an inventory of hotel rooms that can support a conference center,” Ferguson said. “That’s what we’ve been trying to do since 2016. And here we are at the groundbreaking.” Assemblywoman Dr. Anna Kelles, who worked closely on the project during her time on the Tompkins County Legislature, noted that the conference center will bring visitors to Ithaca during the weekdays, instead of only on weekends. “We will have a place to attract people ot our city in the middle of the week,” she said. “This is a huge boon and we need to hold that and honor that and celebrate it.” She also touched upon the affordability aspect of the project, and the struggle for af-

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▶  Boosters - The Tompkins County Health Department announced guidance from the state regarding booster shots of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines after an initial two-dose Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine series. The following recommendations are for specific populations and those living or working in high risk settings: People 65 years and older should receive a booster shot; Residents

Ground breaking Ceremony for conference center project on September 24 (Photo: Casey Martin)

fordable housing in Ithaca and Tompkins County in general. All 181 units will be listed for below 80% of area median income (AMI), which Kelles said is about $1,300 in Ithaca currently. “When you ask people who are low income who work here, they say ‘I can’t afford that,’” she said. “I want to be really honest about that. We have the job of increasing housing in all brackets but also need to explicitly prioritize housing below 80% AMI. If we do that, the 80% will pull down and it will truly become affordable. This building does that. I am grateful to everyone who worked on this. This is a great day.” -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

N o t e

of long-term care settings age 18 years or older should receive a booster shot; People aged 50-64 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot; People aged 18-49 years with underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot; People aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission due to workplace or

ON T HE WE B

institutional setting may receive a booster shot. If an individual has questions and/or is ready to receive their booster dose, they should contact their healthcare provider or local pharmacy. TCHD will share additional availability as future clinics are planned. For more information visit tompkinscountyny.gov/health.

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Visit our website at www.ithaca.com for more news, arts, sports and photos. Call us at 607-277-7000 T a n n e r H a r d i n g , M a n a g i n g E d i t o r , x 1224 E d i t o r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m J a i m e C o n e , E d i t o r , x 1232 SouthReporter@flcn.org C a s e y M a r t i n , S ta f f P h o t o g r a p h e r P h o t o g r a p h e r @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m C h r i s I b e r t , C a l e n d a r E d i t o r , x 1217 A r t s @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m A n d r e w S u l l i v a n , S p o r t s E d i t o r , x 1227 Sports@flcn.org Steve L awrence, Spo rts Co lumnist St e v e S p o r t sD u d e @ g m a i l .co m M a r s h a l l H o p k i n s , P r o d u c t i o n D i r ec t o r / D es i g n e r , x 1216 P r o d u c t i o n @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F a i th F i s h e r , I n t e r n , x 1217 FF i s h e r @ I t h a c a T i m e s . c o m Sharon Davis, Distribution F r o n t J i m B i l i n s k i , P u b l i s h e r , x 1210 j b i l i n s k i @ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m L a r r y H o ch b e r g e r , A ss o c i a t e P u b l i s h e r , x 1214 l a r r y@ I t h a c aTi m e s . c o m F r e e l a n c e r s : Barbara Adams, Rick Blaisell, Steve Burke, Deirdre Cunningham, Jane Dieckmann, Amber Donofrio, Karen Gadiel, Charley Githler, Linda B. Glaser, Warren Greenwood, Ross Haarstad, Peggy Haine, Gay Huddle, Austin Lamb, Steve Lawrence, Marjorie Olds, Lori Sonken, Henry Stark, Dave Sit, Bryan VanCampen, and Arthur Whitman

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All rights reserved. Events are listed free of charge in TimesTable. All copy must be received by Friday at noon. The Ithaca Times is available free of charge from various locations around Ithaca. Additional copies may be purchased from the Ithaca Times offices for $1. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $89 one year. Include check or money order and mail to the Ithaca Times, PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. ADVERTISING: Deadlines are Monday 5 p.m. for display, Tuesday at noon for classified. Advertisers should check their ad on publication. The Ithaca Times will not be liable for failure to publish an ad, for typographical error, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the space in which the actual error appeared in the first insertion. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason and to alter advertising copy or graphics deemed unacceptable for publication. The Ithaca Times is published weekly Wednesday mornings. Offices are located at 109 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850 607-277-7000, FAX 607-277-1012, MAILING ADDRESS is PO Box 27, Ithaca, NY 14851. The Ithaca Times was preceded by the Ithaca New Times (1972-1978) and The Good Times Gazette (1973-1978), combined in 1978. F o u n d e r G o o d T i m e s G a z e tt e : Tom Newton

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INQUIRING

N e w s l i n e

CONSERVATION

PHOTOGRAPHER Gov. Hochul works with NYSEG to cancel Bell Station land auction By C a se y Mar tin

IN 3 WORDS OR LESS,

WHAT’S THE BEST THING ABOUT ITHACA?

“Definitely The Food.” -Joseph HV.

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YSEG and Gov. Kathy Hochul reached an agreement on Sept. 24 to cancel the online auction for the Bell Station property that was scheduled to take place on Oct. 11. “Bell Station Landing is the largest privately-owned shoreline in the Finger Lakes region, and as we contend with the consequences of humans’ impact on our environment, we must consider ways to protect and preserve this unique property for future generations,” Hochul said in a press release. “I thank NYSEG for stepping up and being a good corporate citizen by willingly agreeing to

cancel the land auction. Private development could have irreparably damaged this environmentally sensitive property, and if the auction proceeded, the opportunity to preserve the land for conservation and public access could have been lost forever.” “NYSEG has long preferred that this parcel of land be conserved, and I thank Gov. Hochul, Chair Howard, Commissioner Seggos, and Commissioner Kulleseid for their collaboration and support in resolving this matter,” Carl A. Taylor, President and CEO of NYSEG and RG&E, said in the release. “As a resident of the

Finger Lakes region for more than 30 years, I understand the importance of caring for our natural resources and being a good corporate citizen. Building sustainable communities in the areas we serve continues to be a priority for our company and this decision will benefit the conservation efforts in the Finger Lakes region for years to come.” In addition to the cancellation, Hochul directed the NYSDEC and the Departments of Public Works and State Parks to facilitate discussions with NYSEG in preserving the land and protecting habitat and the water quality of Cayuga Lake. The decision to cancel the auction came after an outpouring of protest against the auction from local residents, the Lansing Town Council, county and state officials and many others. “This is welcome news for

the thousands of residents across our region who will be able to enjoy this pristine area of Cayuga Lake’s shoreline for generations to come,” Sen. Pam Helming said in the release. “I was proud to join with so many dedicated people and organizations to achieve this outcome. Thank you to Supervisor Ed LaVigne and the Town of Lansing, Tompkins County, Finger Lakes Land Trust and Executive Director Andy Zepp, Cayuga Lake Watershed Intermunicipal Organization, and my many Lansing constituents for their advocacy. Thank you to the Public Service Commission, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and NYSEG. And thank you especially to Governor Hochul for listening to our concerns and recommendations, and continued on page 7

continued on page 4

“All The Water!” -Drew H. & Gwen R.

“Fun People Watching.” -Sarah B.

“Yes and Culture” -Yogi-Medicine man-Asif

Little Red #11 Aidan Cornell (Photo: Casey Martin)

Sports

Little Red football gets first win of season despite low roster numbers “ME!” -Spike

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he week did not unfold as Ithaca High football coach Clarence Welch III

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would have scripted it. His Little Red team was about to play its first game on its brand new 20 2 1

field — with its shiny new press box and sparkling new turf — and, in the coach’s words, “Let’s just say that we didn’t have the best practices early in the week, and some of the kids were making some bad decisions.” Welch added, “I sat them down as a team, I told them they had to

check their feelings at the door, deal with this as a team and they responded well.” By the time Friday rolled around, “The weather was perfect, the players looked great in their game-day shirts and ties, the teachers and continued on page 7


UPS&DOWNS

N e w s l i n e

Ups The weather in Ithaca is rarely cause for celebration, but the cooler fall temperatures combined with bright sunshine has been delightful. Let’s hope it holds up for the Apple Harvest Festival this weekend!

PESTS

Lanternfly found on Seneca St. garage, city urges vigilance

Downs You thought roadwork was slowing down? You would be incorrect. Closed lanes and roads have caused some headaches lately, but with any luck the streets will be smoother for it. Fingers crossed.

HEARD&SEEN

Heard The summer concert series at Bernie Milton Pavilion may be over, but there was still some lovely live music there last Friday evening, setting the mood for diners waiting for a table.

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potted lanternflies are still a threat in Ithaca after an adult lanternfly was found on the Seneca Street garage. According to City Forester Jeanne Grace, the insect is likely from the same infestation that was reported at an apartment building near the intersection of Stewart Avenue and University Avenue. Grace said that was first reported last fall, and she’s been working with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets ever since. “What was decided to be the best course of action would be to remove a bunch of trees in the area, because they found egg masses on a lot of the trees,” she said. “We worked with them to make sure we were getting rid of as many egg masses as we possibly could.” The state continued to have inspectors assigned to the Ithaca area to look for spotted lanternflies and up until recently, only nymphs (the larval stage of the insects) had been found in the immediate area. There was some slight concern when the adult lanternfly was found on the Seneca Street garage because Grace said lanternflies aren’t very good fliers, so they don’t usually travel very far. The garage is about one mile from the original infestation site, so Grace said they thought it could have been one opportunistic lanternfly who had hitched a ride

somehow or a second infestation. Upon further investigation, inspectors from the state examined the garage from top to bottom to check for other adults or egg masses, but didn’t find anything, leading them to conclude it was likely an adult from the Stewart Avenue infestation. According to Grace, lanternflies aren’t an insect that causes a huge problem in urban settings — they won’t destroy natural areas like the emerald ash borer — but they do pose a major threat to the agricultural sector. “In general they’re not killing healthy trees — they like a variety of trees but they also really like grapevines,” Grace said. “They can kill grapevines and cause grape harvest to be nearly impossible because the adults swarm on the grapes that are ready to harvest and that makes it impossible to do mechanical picking.” She added that they also really like apple trees. “We have vineyards and apple orchards in upstate New York, so it’s a big concern that we really limit that [lanternfly] population,” Grace said. So far, there hasn’t been word of any vineyards having an issue, according to Grace. “I’m sure [owners] are out looking and vineyard managers are on high alert looking for that insect to show up,” she said.

For right now, Grace said they will continue to execute a locally targeted plan to reduce the population of lanternflies to continue to protect orchards and vineyards nearby. “We did that by removing trees with eggs on them,” she said. Lanternflies particularly like a tree called the tree of heaven. They don’t need it to survive, but if there’s one in the area they will find it and feed off of it, so Grace said that’s a good place to be monitoring. “There have been other areas where the insect has been managed using the tree of heaven as a trap tree,” she said. “They treat the trees with pesticide so when they come feed off it they’re killed. So that’s another management strategy.” If you find a lanternfly, the best thing to do is catch it and put it in the freezer in a plastic baggie — this will both kill and preserve the insect. You can then call Grace or the state directly and someone will come grab the sample to make a positive identification. “It would be very helpful if people in the Ithaca area can do that,” Grace said. “People in Fall Creek or Cayuga Heights might find adults and it would be really interesting to track how far they’re traveling and find out if we have any other populations.” Grace also encouraged people to be vigilant and aware

of the ways lanternflies travel larger distances. She said to make sure there are none in your car or in your trunk when you’re traveling, otherwise you could be responsible for bringing an infestation to another city. She said the insects like to lay their eggs on trees, masonry stone and rusty metal, so it’s not unheard of to find egg masses on the inside of wheel wells and other parts of a vehicle. “So if you’re going to be traveling, just take a look at your car,” she said. “Look under the wheel wells at this time of year while they’re laying eggs.” Grace surmises that’s likely how the infestation ended up in Ithaca — someone from a place that already had an infestation came to Ithaca with egg masses on their car. Grace describes the masses as looking like a smear of very fine grade clay, but suggests Googling what they look like so that you’re familiar. “Just be vigilant and make sure we’re not delivering the seed of infestation somewhere else,” she said. The city forester can be reached at 607-272-1718, and the Department of Agriculture and Markets can be reached through the form at https://agriculture.ny.gov/contact-us. -Ta n n e r H a r d i n g

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Seen Is it just us or have the sunsets been particularly nice lately? Yes, they’re coming earlier and earlier each night, but at least they’re pretty.

IF YOU CARE TO RESPOND to something in this column, or suggest your own praise or blame, write news@ithacatimes. com, with a subject head “U&D.”

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What is your best advice for dealing with the mosquitoes? 16.7% Deep Woods GTFO 12.5% Vegan DEET 4.2% Cinnabon-tronelle 45.8% Stay away from fresh air 20.8% Full body N95 suit

N ext Week ’s Q uestion :

What is your favorite Apple Harvest treat?

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Visit ithaca.com to submit your response.

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GUEST OPINION

SURROUNDED BY REALITY

Friends of the Library sale starts Oct. 9 Hollywood to the Rescue G . M . Bu r n s

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By C h a r l ey G i t h l e r

he Friends of the Library (FOL) in Ithaca will soon open their doors at the Regina Lennox Book Sale Building on 509 Esty Street for their October fall sale. For nearly 75 years, the FOL has sold myriad books to help fund area libraries and, according to their website, to “place more books in more hands.” In addition, the dates for the library sale are Oct. 9-11, 16-18, and 23-26. FOL suggests “lining up early in the morning of that day. First come, first served.” For the book enthusiasts ages 60 and over and for those with disabilities that make shopping difficult, “Senior Day” is the Wednesday between the second and third weekends, Oct. 20, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Make sure to bring your own bags too.

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According to Anne Neirynck, assistant to the book sale coordinator, this library sale will offer more than 200,000 items such as books, records, CDs, DVDs, puzzles, games, stories on tapes and CDs for both youngsters and adults. There is much to peruse, including foreign language books and category defiers which include books about unique subjects and titles to collector’s corners that offer antiquarian books, records, comics and games. This sale will have three long weekends and it seems to be a great time to “gather up the books and movies for the long winter months that are coming in Ithaca,” Neirynck said. For more information go to: Http://www.booksale.org

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ittle-known fact: When Wharton Studios decamped from Ithaca in 1919, they took their toys and headed west one step ahead of a crowd of summonswielding creditors. Unable to get things up and running out there, Ted Wharton signed on to work for Louis B. Mayer, subject to a secret clause in his contract that has only now come to light: Mayer’s studio had to make at least one film set in Ithaca, New York within 105 years. As every popcorneatin’, movie-watchin’ American knows, Louis B. became MGM Studios. Now, desperate for a studio-saving blockbuster and burdened by the secret Wharton contract proviso, MGM has sent its most important executive to our fair city to scout locations and fish for ideas... Scene: The Milkstand restaurant on a recent Tuesday morning. Seated at a window table is none other than MGM Feature Film Division president and producer PAMELA ABDY. STUART PARKE, a local columnist and an author of a dozen unsold spec scripts (not his real name) has managed to score a breakfast meeting and has just been seated at the table as ABDY prepares to order... WAITER: From our menu this morning, might I recommend the chocolate strawberry waffles? We take the finest cuts of aged, imported Belgian waffle, coat them with ganache drizzle from our chocolatery, wrap them in parchment with our award-winning dairy fresh whipped cream, slow-roast them for ninety minutes in our wood-fired, clay-filled kiva, and serve them with a garnish of wilted maple leaves on a burled mahogany plank. ABDY: Or...you could have the chef whip us up an egg white omelet. Oh, and put in some shallots, only with the shallots just brown them slightly with a little olive oil. And no salt. Make it a big one and we’ll share. WAITER: (withdrawing) Very good, Madam. ABDY: (to PARKE) OK, kid, you got two minutes. Amaze me with your best idea. PARKE: All right, P.A., get this. A gritty rural drama. Picture an idyllic landscape in upstate New York. There are lakes, gorges, rolling hills, some vineyards and dairy farms. Nestled therein: a college town. A place perhaps that had once seen better times, but charming, you know? Suddenly, people notice a handful, and then scores of new buildings. Big ones — eight, ten stories high — and they’re trashing the ambiance. They’re proliferating like emerald ash borers. Collegetown disappears completely. It’s a catastrophe. The once-bucolic setting has acquired the quaint industrial charm of Bayonne, New Jersey. In desperation, the citizens

turn to their last hope: James Bond. That’s your franchise, right? Or maybe the whole thing is animated. I don’t know. Anyway, somewhere in here we work in a chase scene: a fleet of Priuses is pursuing a construction vehicle. They scream down Buffalo Street and everybody is airborne when they hit Stewart Avenue. One of those huge fireballs in slo-mo. Finally, tranquility on the streets is restored, but it’s too late — the tourist industry is gone and the place has lost its mojo. Sort of an apocalyptic “Lego Movie” meets “A Civil Action.” Whaddya think? Genius, right? ABDY: So...thin plot, and depressing. Maybe you should amaze me with your second best idea. PARKE: Actually, I’ve got a better one. Should have told you this one first: same idyllic landscape, same nestled town. Only climate change turns the place into Aintree, Georgia. Snowless winters, sweltering summers. Kudzu, grits, NASCAR hats, anti-vax, the whole schmear. Three buddies decide to leave their troubles at the office and go on one last canoe ride in Cayuga Inlet before it’s permanently choked by toxic algae blooms. I’m thinking Dwayne “The Rock,” Leo and...bear with me...Johnny Depp. They get freaked out by a weird-looking, banjo-playing hillbilly kid. Then there’s a chase scene — Boss Hogg and his lackeys are right on the boys’ tail as they scream down Buffalo Street... ABDY: (cutting him off) Whoa, professor. Every grip in the industry knows algae blooms are box office poison. This is what you bring me? PARKE: Wait! One more! It’s the summer of 2021. At last, America’s longest war is over. 20 years of ration books, bond drives, the draft, high taxes, wartime shortages and the daily sacrifice that has become every citizen’s reality are behind us once and for all. A soldier, a sailor and an airman return to their home town of Ithaca and have to re-adjust to the society they had left years before. One’s a banker, one’s a soda jerk and the sailor was badly injured in a shipboard fire. ABDY: I’m listening... PARKE: Well, it’s about how each one of them finds a way to move forward with their lives. Now that the war is over, we’re ripe for a movie about our own stories instead of all that grim Taliban stuff. ABDY: Dude, and I don’t say this often, this is gold! I smell Oscars! Let’s blow this beanery and get to work... ABDY and PARKE bolt out of the restaurant just as the waiter comes out of the kitchen bearing a giant egg white and shallot omelet and we... FADE TO BLACK


BELLSTATIONLAND Contin u ed From Page 4

taking action on a solution that benefits the community and preserves this remarkably diverse natural resource we are so fortunate to have.” “I want to thank Governor Hochul, the DPS, DEC, OPRHP and NYSEG for their commitment to preserve Bell Station, a truly beautiful stretch of undeveloped land with 3,400 feet of pristine shoreline on the east side of Cayuga Lake with wooded hillsides, cascading waterfalls, critical bird habitat, and rare threatened plant species,” Assemblywoman Anna Kelles said in the release. “Cayuga Lake is one of the last remaining fresh water reserves in the world. Preserving the forestlands will not only protect the lake from land erosion runoff and negative impacts of shoreline septic systems but will preserve the land for tour-

ism and ecological education. I want to thank our community for their powerful advocacy and ongoing stewardship of our natural resources and environment.” The Finger Lakes Land Trust for the past eight to 10 years has acted as the NYSDEC agent in acquiring the 470acre property that features 3,400 feet of shoreline on the east side of Cayuga Lake, and plans on doing so moving forward, although Executive Director Andrew Zepp needed to confirm this. Zepp said the cancellation of the auction was tremendous news. “We’re thrilled and thankful for the governor, commissioner of the DEC Basil Seggos, NYSEG and all our elected officials for taking a big step in ensuring the future of this really unique spot in the Finger Lakes,” Zepp said. - A n d r e w S u l l i va n

SPORTS Contin u ed From Page 4

school staff were all fired up and everything came together, starting with the opening kickoff.” The result of everything coming together was a dominant 51-14 win over Southern Tier Athletic Conference rival Johnson City, the Little Red’s first win of the season. The team had shown some real moments of promise in its first two games, but going up against schools with much larger rosters presents challenges on a few levels. To get some insight, I connected with senior tri-captain Chase Sposito (Jack Yaggie and Micah Fioriello are the other two captains), who put up some big numbers, running for one touchdown and passing for five more. I asked Chase how many players are on the roster at this point, and he said, “Right now, there are about 25 on the active roster.” That, I pointed out, is at least 10 or 20 fewer than is ideal, and I asked Sposito if that means that many of the players — including him — are playing both ways. While the QB replied in the affirmative, he was quick to add, “I always remember — and appreciate — that the four linemen are also playing both ways, and they’re getting banged up a lot more, pushing guys around every play. They’re doing the real work while I’m running around at linebacker, not getting touched on a lot of plays.” I also asked Chase about the challenges he faces given the fact that in an ideal world, a quarterback comes off the field after an offensive series, takes a breather while consulting with his offensive coordinator (O.C.) about the unfolding game plan, and goes back out refreshed and ready. In Sposito’s words, “The biggest thing for me is to keep a clear mind and not overthink it. On Friday, John Nicholas, our O.C., picked up some tendencies the

opponent’s defense was showing, and we adjusted accordingly. Much credit to him. Also, the blocking was great, and on a lot of the plays I felt no pressure, and I was able to spread it around to several receivers.” (Aiden Cornell and Fiorello each had two touchdown grabs.) The result was a lit-up scoreboard, and the home team’s first win of the season. I brought up another challenge I thought might present itself given the perpetually low roster numbers. How challenging is it, I asked, to be a captain and a team leader and feel the need to prop up teammates when the going gets tough while you are playing against teams that are able to send in the proverbial fresh horses while your guys are running out of gas late in the game? For Chase, it is a matter of perspective, as he said, “I tell them that some schools have 50 or 60 guys on the roster, and many of them are going to practice and putting in the work and never seeing a snap. We’re not going to magically see a 60-man roster, so we’ll just play both sides of the ball and try to enjoy it.” Welch addressed the low numbers, saying, “I tell the guys it’s like a throwback to the days of ‘Ironman’ football. I have seen team photos, and there are only 13-15 guys in the picture!” Chase Sposito will not soon forget Friday’s big win. “It was unbelievable,” he said. “The student section was packed, the new press box looked great, and we were playing in front of all our friends and family for the first time in two years!” He added, “The band sounded great... it was all the sights and sounds of what a high school football game should be.” The Little Red will host Waverly this Friday at 7 p.m. - S t e v e L aw r e n c e

THE TALK AT

YOUR LETTERS How vaccine mandates affect Cayuga Health

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ast month, New York State announced that all healthcare workers in the state will need to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by September 27th. The announcement applies to all medical staff in New York State including Cayuga Health employees across our entire system and network of providers. The vaccine requirement from New York State will not seriously impact our health system operations with the vast majority of our employees vaccinated for COVID-19. I respect that the decision to get vaccinated is personal, but as a health system I want to recognize that we do recommend vaccination as the first line of defense against COVID-19 for most individuals. Like all other health care facilities across the state Cayuga Health is following this mandate, and we knew when this was announced that we might lose several valued and loyal employees. It is not easy to see employees leave our organization due to this mandate, we hope that those who have chosen to remain unvaccinated will rejoin our organization when this pandemic is over or if they change their mind. We value every person and their individual decisions regarding vaccination. -Dr. Martin Stallone, CEO/President of Cayuga Health Systems, via press release

Re: Drawing the lines

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’m sure I’m not the only reader who finds these hazy maps, with inadequate or non-existent legends, very difficult to discern and compare. I suggest the Commission get a graphic designer. -Edward Swayze, via Ithaca.com

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n top of raising assessments and tens of millions in CARE aid, our local legislators want to further raise the tax rate? Property taxes are a huge burden on those who live in the county. It is the most regressive type of tax that penalizes

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Re: Dining review of The Royal Court

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would like to comment on Mr. Henry Stark’s review of the Royal Court Restaurant, which was published in the Sept. 22 issue of The Ithaca Times. He stated that he visits the Royal Court Restaurant “on Route 13 in Ithaca every few years to update the Times readers”. I take issue with many of his negative comments regarding the food offerings and portions, the service, and even the server’s knowledge in answering questions he had about the origin of wines. I was born in Ithaca, have lived here all of my life, and I have been a regular customer at the Royal Court Restaurant since the day it opened. Many of my local family members, as well as many long time members of the Ithaca community are also regular customers at the Royal Court Restaurant, both for lunch or dinner and also for business gatherings, holiday celebrations and other large get-togethers. I do not know what Mr. Stark is used to in restaurants during his travels, but I don’t think he will ever find it in Ithaca. -Olympia McFall, Ithaca, NY

Write to us!

Re: County Admin presents $194M budget

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people for owning a home and especially cripples those with limited incomes. My family was long blessed to be home secure, despite having only one breadwinner in my single mom. Part of it was inter-generational equity saved over many decades that helped us purchase a home with no mortgage costs. But when the Great Recession hit, it hit my family especially hard. Three years of property taxes accumulated, and we had a choice of either selling the home or risking tax foreclosure. We lost much of that inter-generational equity. We as a community are so strongly against bad-cause evictions, yet speak nothing of the evil of the County or City seizing and auctioning off the homes of families who can’t pay the oppressive property taxes. The taxes are too high. We need leaders who are willing to tackle this most pressing issue, not make it worse. - J a s o n E va n s , v i a I t h a c a . com

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Say something or respond to an article by writing editor@ithacatimes.com. Letters must be signed and include an address and phone number. We do not publish unsigned letters. Letters may be edited for length and readability. To the Editor, Ithaca Times, 109 N Cayuga St., Ithaca, NY 14850

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TENANT’S TALES: SHAUN FENNER

An Ithacan resident has lost his home — how did he end up here, and how can it be fixed? By Andres Rendon 8  T

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haun Fenner, a tenant in Ithaca since February of last year, was forced to leave his apartment last Thursday after an eviction hearing earlier this month. On Sept. 2, Genevieve Rand and Sarah Curless, organizers from the Ithaca Tenants Union (ITU), went to eviction court where Fenner, along with other tenants and landlords, were at the courthouse for hearings and judgements. Fenner was only several minutes late to his court time of 9 a.m. but that was enough for the judge to give a default judgment to Fenner to be evicted by Sept. 23. Fenner’s eviction notice was filed as a holdover case, under two reasons. The first being a nuisance argument, where the landlord, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services (INHS), claimed that Shaun had unapproved guests and had left trash in an alleyway. The second reason for the eviction that held more weight in court though, was the non-renewal of Fenner’s lease. Currently, in Ithaca, the option of renewing a lease is up to the landlords and not the tenants themselves. According to Fenner, however, he had reached out to INHS at least four months before the court date to renew his lease, and INHS stated that they will take it under consideration. “I had asked so many times, but the ball was in their court,” Fenner said. “They never gave me a yes or a no.” The eviction warrant was issued to Fenner on Sep. 9, but Fenner didn’t find out immediately due to an illness. According to Rand and Fenner, the eviction was only taped on Fenner’s front door, and no actual notice was given. He only found out when a neighbor notified him of the notice days later. Given that Fenner found out that he needed to leave days after the warrant was delivered, it gave him less than two weeks to make arrangements for his belongings and for housing after. Several attempts were made to contact the INHS, specifically Melody Susco, the director of property management, and Justina Fetterly, the strategic communications director. However, communication with either of the individuals of the INHS in general was unsuccessful.

The request to renew his lease with INHS wasn’t the only issue Fenner had with management. Throughout his time at his apartment, Fenner stated that he had to be relocated for renovations that the INHS needed to make to his apartment and the building. However, after the renovations were supposedly completed, Fenner came home to the same apartment, where nothing was fixed. “They didn’t do a darn thing in that apartment. Nothing,” Fenner said. Another instance was when Fenner lost his key and the INHS was lengthy in their aid to Fenner. Being an elderly and disabled man, Fenner noted how such instances make it more difficult for him to manage, and the lack of help from the INHS only creates more concern for him. Rand made it clear that landlords in Ithaca, and in general, do not sympathize with tenants and only have their own interests in mind. Rand stated, “The legal system is very unforgiving to tenants. The laws aren’t written by tenants, they’re written by wealthy people who invest in property.” Both Rand and Curless pointed out that what is happening to Fenner, and even other tenants goes against the mission statement of the INHS. On their website, the INHS states “INHS is dedicated to expanding housing opportunities for low and moderate-income residents of Tompkins County and the surrounding region. It seeks to foster communities that embrace diversity, equity, and sustainability in ways that produce lasting outcomes.” Rand has stated that INHS can hold true to their mission statement and call off the eviction. However, INHS hasn’t done so. INHS was started in 1977, inspired by an urban renewal program in Pittsburgh that relied on a partnership between residents, businesses and local government. Ithaca joined the growing network of successful Neighborhood Housing Services, which still exists today as NeighborhoodWorks America. According to INHS’s website: “Ithaca’s NHS evolved rapidly. Starting with helping homeowners maintain or improve their homes with low-cost loans and other types of home-repair assistance, INHS soon began acquiring and redeveloping dilapidated rental properties, constructing new homes and rent-

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als, and helping community members buy their first homes.” NeighborWorks America has honored INHS multiple times by highlighting its programs as “best practices” in the affordable housing field. Rand and Curless noted that the INHS is mostly unresponsive in these matters. Aside from concerns regarding the INHS, Rand and Curless also mentioned that the lack of housing in Ithaca highlights Fenner’s situation and the housing crisis in general. Rand and Curless stated that not only are housing prices steadily increasing in Ithaca, but vacant buildings in the area are also being used to drive the prices up and kick the poor out. Curless stated that this method of keeping houses in Ithaca empty was “gentrification.” “I’m sure landlords would deny it and be like ‘why would we not rent units that we have available’ and it’s because they are losing money,” Rand said. “In the very short term you would be losing money, but landlords think of 10-year plus timelines.” After Sept. 23 when Fenner was due to leave the apartment, Rand and Curless went to the INHS and tried to come up with solutions to keep Fenner housed. Unfortunately, the INHS did not cooperate. Currently, Fenner’s whereabouts are unknown. Rand has not been able to get in touch with him but hopes that he is safe. This story about Fenner comes to light as the city works on bringing forth a Right to Renew legislation, which aims to protect tenants from losing their homes by guaranteeing them the option to renew their lease except under specific circumstances such as nonpayment of rent. It also protects tenants from retaliation by landlords due to things like demanding repairs or organizing with other tenants. At the Sept. 15 Planning and Economic Development Committee meeting, Taylor Moon from the Tenants Union said displacement is the most common reason tenants reach out to the union for help, and that 72% of displacement cases are explicitly related to non-renewal in one form or another. The bill is currently out for circulation and public input and will be back in front of the committee on Oct. 20.

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Apple Harvest Festival THE FALL-FAVORITE FESTIVAL RETURNS AT FULL CAPACITY THIS YEAR AFTER A LIMITED VERSION IN 2020 B y Hannah Fit z patr ick

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ith fall in its prime time, many people look forward to seeing the changing leaves or finally getting to wear a knit sweater, but if you know Ithaca, you know that the classic fall experience involves all things applerelated — caramel apples, apple cider and, of course, apple cider donuts. For the first time since the fall of 2019, Downtown Ithaca’s Apple Harvest Festival is back in full swing, with lots of fun activities for the whole family and, naturally, plenty of apples to go around. The weekend-long event, which will take place on Friday, Oct. 1 through Sunday, Oct. 3, from 12 to 6 p.m. on Friday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, will feature a variety of vendors, complete with local produce, homemade baked goods, homemade crafts created by local and regional businesses, and an assortment of tasty apple treats to celebrate the fall season. Though there are safety precautions put in place to protect vendors and participants alike, this year’s festival is the first time that it will be held in full capacity since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Last fall, to accommodate for the effects of the pandemic, a socially distanced “Apple Festive” took the place of the traditional festival. The adapted celebration, which took place over the course of a week, featured vendors and local restaurants in a limited capacity, during which no more than six vendors were allowed to set up shop in the Commons in order to keep things small and distanced. In addition, only 50 people were allowed to attend at a time. Masks were also mandatory for vendors and attendees and hand sanitizer was made available throughout the area. Darlene Wilber, the communications and grant development director for the Downtown Ithaca Alliance, said that this year’s festival will look similar to previous years, but will still have additional measures in place to ensure the safety of all participants. “To allow for social distancing during the event, the vendors will be spaced out along the Commons, North Cayuga and West State streets,” Wilber said. “Mask wearing is encouraged while guests are indoors and visiting the businesses. Unvaccinated guests are responsible to wear a mask.” Scott Rougeu, the special events director for the Downtown Ithaca Alliance, said in a press release that he is excited to see this year’s festival return to a more traditional setting. “We look forward to seeing many guests sampling delicious fall-inspired foods and beverages, shopping at the craft show and at local businesses, and enjoying the live entertainment,” Rouge said. “Apple Harvest is an event people won’t want to miss.”

For this year’s festival, the main concern has revolved around safety, especially for the anticipated thousands of people that are planning to attend. Allison Graffin, the marketing director for the Downtown Ithaca Alliance, said that a major part of the planning and permitting process for the event has involved communicating with the Tompkins County Health Department to ensure the safety of vendors and attendees while still keeping the festival’s fun atmosphere alive. “A lot of the mandates that existed in the pandemic have changed so much, so we always have to be quick on our feet to prepare for what’s coming next,” Graffin said. “I think there were certainly challenges to overcome in terms of operating the event safely. We’ve brought in our own security staff in addition to the city police staff to accommodate for the number of people we anticipate to come to the festival, and we had to cut a lot of our indoor events due to social distancing and masking concerns. Without having the ability to adapt to the ever-changing environment of this pandemic, an event of this size simply couldn’t happen.” Though the festival is returning to its traditional setting, there are some changes that attendees will notice, specifically regarding parking. While in previous years, the Green Street parking garage was available to the public, it will be closed off for this year’s festival. Despite this, continued on page 14

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FARMERS MARKET...AND OF APPLES! MARKET...AND LOTSLOTS OF APPLES! DOWNTOWNITHACA.COM DOWNTOWNITHACA.COM FARMERS

festival festival 2 0 2 12 0 2 1

APPLE HARVEST FEST

SATURDAY, OCTOBER2:2: SATURDAY, OCTOBER

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3:3: SUNDAY, OCTOBER

TIME TIME

TIME TIME

PERFORMER PERFORMER

1:00 - 1:45PM

La Llorona La Llorona Fall Creek Brass Band Fall Creek Brass Band Go Gone Go Gone Kitestring Kitestring DJ WhoIsBrianTech

PERFORMER PERFORMER

Noon - 12:45PM

PRESENTED BY:

AT BERNIE BERNIE MILTON AT MILTONPAVILION PAVILION

AT BERNIE MILTON PAVILION AT BERNIE MILTON PAVILION Noon - 12:45PM 1:00 - 1:45PM 1:00 -2:00 1:45PM - 2:45PM 2:00 3:00 - 2:45PM - 3:45PM 3:00 4:00 - 3:45PM - 4:45PM 4:00 5:00 - 4:45PM - 6:00PM 5:00 - 6:00PM

Contin u ed From Page 11

Mirage Belly Dancers

1:00 - 1:45PM 2:00 - 2:30PM 2:00 - 2:30PM 3:00 - 3:40PM 3:00 3:40PM 4:00 -- 4:45PM 4:00 4:45PM 5:00 - 5:45PM 5:00 - 5:45PM

Mirage Belly Dancers East Hill Trio EastGIAC Hill Trio Jumpers GIAC Jumpers Good Dog Good Dog Raed ft. Joe Hayward Busking Busking Papa Raed Muse ft. Joe Hayward Papa Muse

DJ WhoIsBrianTech

PRESENTED BY:

Graffin said that with the abundance of public transportation in the area, access to the festival should not be an issue. “We have been working with the city and h Annual 39t h Annual we’ve been working with our own 39t transportation Apple demand management program to come up with Apple informing the public on alternative ways to get to the festival, so youfestival don’t need to bring your 2 1 festival car,” Graffin said. “There2 0are additional parking 2021 spots in places like Wegman’s, and there are bus stops that are running quite frequently, so we’re really encouraging people to keep in mind that if you really are going to bring your car, consider parking it by one of the bus stops with the highfrequency route into downtown and ride it in. Or if it’s a beautiful day outside, you can bring your bike, or if you live in the area, walk to the festival.” Harvest Festival’s 39th year will LocalApple small businesses in Downtown Ithaca have featurean numerous apple farmers, including created Apple Harvest Festival basketlocal filled Local small businesses in Downtown h with lots oflike gifts and goodies. Stop by any andIthaca all favorites the New York Cider Company created an Apple Harvest Festival basket ofin the shops that helped create fantastic prize fille northwest Ithaca, Little Treethis Orchards in orNewfield, anywith of the shops listed in the FallininEnfield, Downtown lots of and goodies. Stop by any an NY, andgifts AJ Teeter Farm Trail Enter to win (nohelped purchase necessary). of the shops that create this fantastic NY.and Shop Though forany fall festive gifts, books or ofthere the clothing, shops listed inand the Fall in Downt are many fan favorites while you’re there. Shop Local! be necessar Trail and Enter to win (noPlease purchase attending this year’s Apple Harvest Festival, prepared mask up when clothing, entering shops fall festive gifts,and and books thereShop aretofor also some newcomers, particularly buildings during thethere. festival. FindLocal! the trail at: while you’re Shop Please be in the craft department. These include Bags downtownithaca.com/FallinDowntownTrail prepared to mask up when entering shops an That Bite, an independently owned shop on or scan QR code. during website the festival. Find the trail at the buildings popular shopping Etsy that sells downtownithaca.com/FallinDowntownTrail handmade, furry monsters that also act as bags, or scan QR code. Ragtrader Vintage, an online store that sells unique collections of jewelry, cuff links and pocket watches, and Yen Ospina, a self-taught artist based in Ithaca that specializes in colorful, detailed images steeped in her experience as a queer, Colombian-American woman.

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SPECIAL THANKS:

SPECIAL THANKS:

Shred Day COMMUNITY

SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Tompkins Trust Company FAMILY FUN ZONE will be located inside Center SATURDAY & SUNDAY Ithaca from 12-4pm each day of the festival this weekend. FREE games, activities,

suchTrust as Mini golf and FAMILY photo oppsFUN setupZONE throughout lobby while supplies last! Tompkins Company will the be located inside Center Also, please join us Sunday at noon for LilySilly Puppets puppet show. Indoor Ithaca from 12-4pm each day of the festival this SPONSORED weekend. FREE games, activities, BY IN playground too! such as Mini golf and photo opps setup throughout the lobby whilethsupplies last! Annual Also, please join us Sunday at noon for LilySilly Puppets puppet show. Indoor Apple playground too! festival

DOWNTOWN ITHACA

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FAMILY FUN ZONE - LIVE MUSIC STREET October 16, 2021 OCTOBER 1ST-3RD PERFORMERS - SHOPPING FOOD VENDORS DOWNTOWN 9am-12pm DOWNTOWNITHACA.COM FARMERS MARKET...AND LOTS OF APPLES! ITHACA East Hill Plaza SUNDAY,DOWNTOWN OCTOBER 3: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2: 39

2021

ITHACA

AT BERNIE MILTON PAVILION TIME

PERFORMER

Noon - 12:45PM 1:00 - 1:45PM 2:00 - 2:45PM 3:00 - 3:45PM 4:00 - 4:45PM 5:00 - 6:00PM

Mirage Belly Dancers East Hill Trio GIAC Jumpers Good Dog Busking Raed ft. Joe Hayward Papa Muse

Apple Harvest Festival AT BERNIE MILTON is organized byPAVILION the TIME PERFORMER Downtown Ithaca Alliance, a 501(c)3 organization.

PRESENTED BY:

Festival 1:00 -Apple 1:45PM HarvestLa Llorona 2:00 - 2:30PM is organized Fall byCreek theBrass Band 3:00 - 3:40PM Go Gone Downtown Ithaca Alliance, 4:00 - 4:45PM Kitestring 501(c)3 organization. 5:00 -a5:45PM DJ WhoIsBrianTech

Tompkins Trust Company FAMILY FUN ZONE will be located inside Center Ithaca from 12-4pm each day of the festival this weekend. FREE games, activities, such as Mini golf and photo opps setup throughout the lobby while supplies last! Also, please join us Sunday at noon for LilySilly Puppets puppet show. Indoor playground too!

DOWNTOWN

ITHACA

www.tompkinstrust.com/shred-day

Apple Harvest Festival is organized by the Downtown Ithaca Alliance, a 501(c)3 organization.

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CONTEST! Local small businesses in Downtown Ithaca have created an Apple Harvest Festival basket filled with lots of gifts and goodies. Stop by any and all of the shops that helped create this fantastic prize or any of the shops listed in the Fall in Downtown Trail and Enter to win (no purchase necessary). Shop for fall festive clothing, gifts, and books while you’re there. Shop Local! Please be prepared to mask up when entering shops and buildings during the festival. Find the trail at: downtownithaca.com/FallinDowntownTrail or scan QR code.

SATURDAY & SUNDAY

The

Annual

T GIFT BASKE

SPECIAL THANKS:

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Best of Ithaca 2021 I

B y Tanner Harding, A ndres Rendon, Mar in L anglieb and Sydne y Keller (Photos: Ca se y Mar tin) t’s that time again — our readers have voted on their favorite people, places and businesses in our annual Best of Ithaca issue. Is this bigger than the Oscars?

Hard to say, but even those with an EGOT don’t have an Ithaca Times Best of Ithaca award, so we’ll let you draw your own conclusions. This year we included some returning categories like

Best New Business, Best Local Band and Best Theatre Production, and introduced some new ones like Best Place to Bring Your Dog and Best (legal) Swimming Spot. If there are any

categories you’d like to see included next year, feel free to reach out to us.

E N T E R T A I N M E N T BEST LOCAL BAND: T H E D E S T I NAT I ON

We were so excited to be able to safely bring back live theatre at the Hangar Theatre, on our brand new outdoor stage! Nik Walker (Sweeney Todd), Donna Lynne Champlin (Mrs. Lovett), and our entire cast were absolutely incredible in our production of ‘Sweeney Todd,’ and truly captivated every audience. Thank you to the Ithaca community for your support through this show, and our entire 2021 Outdoor season.”

The Destination is a nine-piece dance band with its musical focus on the classics: R&B, rock and Latin influenced material. Outstanding vocalists, horns, bass, percussion and keyboard set this group apart from virtually every other group in the CNY area. No other group in the area can match the dynamics and crowd motivating force of The Destination.

B E S T T H E AT R E PERFORMANCE: “SWEENEY T O D D ” ( H A N G A R T H E AT R E )

The Hangar hosted a full summer season at its outdoor theater this summer to provide better protection against COVID-19 spread. Marketing director Thena Lindhorst said: “​​

BEST SOLO ARTIST: D A NN Y G ON E

A street performer for nearly 15 years, Danny Gone usually sets up away from the hustle and bustle of the Commons. You can often find him on Elmira Road, near Five Guys or Taco Bell or maybe Chipotle.

BEST LOCAL DJ: C h r i s Wa s h b u r n a n d To r i Ve e

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BEST SOLO ARTIST: Danny Gone BEST LOCAL DJ: CHRIS WA S H B U R N A N D T O R I V E E

Chris Washburn: “I’m honored and especially grateful to share this with Tori Vee! I wouldn’t have the success I have today without the love and support from my wife, Megan Washburn, and the rest of the WE DJ team including Tori, DJ Dray and fellow Best Of Ithaca DJ Winner from 2020, DJ Devan (aka Doughboy). I’m lucky to have such a talented

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BEST LOCAL RADIO SHOW: Reggae Explosions team around me, but what makes them even better is that they are extraordinary people and we are a family! What makes this award extra special is that I didn’t promote or ask a single person to vote, so the results came organically from people that genuinely felt this way. Thank you Ithaca Times and I’ll always have lots of love for the Ithaca community, Ithaca College, and Ithaca will always be HOME.” Tori Vee: “I had no idea I was meant to DJ until Chris [Washburn] saw something in me that I had not yet seen in myself. So when I

step onto the decks, I want people to feel safe, connected, and above all, joyful when they’re on my dancefloor. A couple of my favorite moments are when I cut out the music and hear people scream-singing to the chorus of a song that everyone knows and jumping out from behind the decks to dance with everyone on the dancefloor. I want people to experience that blissful nostalgia of being 16 again, driving around with friends, singing at the top of their lungs, and laughing. In my mind, being a DJ is more than pressing buttons or spinning

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BEST BOOK BY A LOCAL AUTHOR: C h a r l o tt e ’ s We b written by E. B. White, who earned his bachelor of arts degree at Cornell University.

B E S T G A L L E R Y : S TAT E OF THE ART GALLERY

The State of the Art Gallery is a cooperative fine art gallery operated by its artist-members from the Finger Lakes region of New York. As a non-profit organization, SoAG seeks to enhance the cultural and economic vitality of

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the community; twice a year, the gallery holds exhibitions for non-member artists. SoAG is open four days per week and exhibits change monthly in each of the two galleries. The gallery has been in business since 1989, and currently there are 25 members. The gallery welcomes applications from artists in all media from the local Finger Lakes region and applications are reviewed every month. Interested artists can get information at www.soagithaca.org.

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B E S T L O C A L R A D I O S H O W: R E G G A E E X P L O S I ON S

Reggae Explosions is hosted by DJ Mike Judah every Thursday, 10 a.m. until noon on WICB.org. DJ Mike Judah said: “It is such an honor to receive this award for a second time! Hosting Reggae Explosions each and every week brings me so much joy. My goal is to spread Love and Good Vibes over the airwaves.

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I also want to thank my International listeners as well. Sending me messages from all over the world as far as South Africa, Ethiopia, Ghana, Costa Rica, Tijuana Mexico, up and down the west coast from Seattle Washington to San Diego California. Much Love and Gratitude. Tune in at 92 WICB on your FM dial or find me on iHeartRadio by searching WICB on Thursday’s from 10 a.m.-noon. Big Up y’all!”


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BEST CSA Full Plate

E S S E N T I A L S BEST NEW BUSINESS: HOUND & MARE

“Opening during a pandemic has not been easy, but we are so grateful everyone has been so supportive” said Christine Lam, one of the café’s founders (the other founder is Christine’s sister- Tam!). With its delicious egg sandwiches and coffee, Hound & Mare is sure to quickly become an Ithaca essential.

said McCune. “It has been an honor and pleasure to serve our community for 40 years and I am grateful to all who put their faith in me over the years and for those who voted for me. Thank you to the Times for highlighting excellence in our special community… …Now, what I really wanted to say was: finally, after all these years of stuffing the ballot box, it finally worked.”

B E S T N ON - P R O F I T : G I A C

BEST THRIFT STORE: REUSE

The Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC) has a variety of different activities for people of all ages. “The Center is dedicated to improving the quality of life for the people we serve; advocating for the rights and needs of youth, families, underrepresented, and disenfranchised populations; providing structured employment training opportunities for at-risk youth and adults; and fighting against oppression and intimidation in our community,” says the GIAC’s website.

B E S T C S A : F U L L P L AT E

Full Plate comprises founding members Remembrance Farm, Stick & Stone Farm, The Youth Farm Project (formerly Three Swallows Farm), and a small network of other local growers. According to its website, the collective grows over 100 acres of organic vegetables. “We’re so grateful for the community (farmers and members!) that make this CSA possible. And honored to be voted best CSA among the many wonderful farms feeding this area,” said Molly Flerlage, Full Plate’s Coordinator.

BEST PHYSICAL T H E R A P I S T : D AV E M C C U N E

“As you know, we are blessed in our community to have exceptional health care providers. Working with these fine people has been wonderful and rewarding. The award should really go to our whole office, all of whom work together as a team to provide the highest physical therapy available in our community,”

“We are delighted and grateful for this vote of confidence - especially after the immense effort and dedication of everyone at ReUse throughout the last year! It’s been an honor to support our community, economy and environment through ReUse,” said Diane Cohen, Executive Director of ReUse.

BEST HOME IMPROVEMENT C ON T R A C T O R : T R A D E DESIGN BUILD

Chris Willett, the firm’s Project ManagerDesigner CMO said “We’re honored that the community has thought of us and voted for us. We’ve had some really exciting projects in the last year, in spite of the pandemic, and it was a challenge for everyone. We’re really appreciative of all our clients that stuck with us, and we stuck with them, and got through it all.”

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B E S T A U T O R E PA I R : DIANE’S

Pop goes the diesel? Diane’s is a full automobile repair shop that offers “competitive prices and full explanations for all needed work,” according to their website. It’s also conveniently located and a staple of the West End.

BEST COUNSELING: DEB LEWIS

“I am so grateful that I get to do this work, in this amazing town, with such an amazing group of people — my clients, their families, and my peers, the community of Ithaca therapists,” said The

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MASSAGE & BODYWORK | FACIALS | WAXING | SKINCARE

Rasa Spa offers a holistic approach to wellness for the body and mind.

BEST THRIFT STORE ReUse Lewis. “While the past few years have been incredibly challenging, living and working in Ithaca has sustained me on so many levels. It is an honor to be a part of this community and to give back to it.”

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BEST BARBERSHOP: FINE LINE

Reasonably priced, conveniently located and with an easy online booking system, there’s a lot to like about Fine Line. “The community has given us such a fantastic home here and I’m just so proud to be a part of it. Come in and help us

SEE THE EARTH COME TO LIFE! Explore our special exhibit, Daring to Dig: Women in American Paleontology, visit Steggy the Stegosaurus, marvel at the Hyde Park Mastodon and more at Museum of the Earth!

www.museumoftheearth.org 1259 Trumansburg Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 Open Thursday–Monday, 10 am–5 pm

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celebrate our 10th year of business!” said Elvir Bahtic, the shop’s owner.

B E S T NA I L S A L ON : C AY U G A NA I L S PA

Ivan Yeung, the Spa’s owner said: “We are grateful to the people who are continuously choosing us everyday. Our mission is to provide the best customer service to every person that walks through our doors. We look forward to providing an even better service to our regulars and future customers.”


BEST FOOD TRUCK SILO

F O O D

A N D

D R I N K

BEST PIZZA: FRANCO’S

For the fourth year in a row, Franco’s was voted Best Pizza in Ithaca. Owners Salvatore and Frank Evola have found plenty of success, both critical and commercial, since opening the West State Street pizzeria.

BEST SANDWICH: SHORTSTOP

Another repeat winner, Shortstop is wellloved for its convenient location, made-to-order sandwiches and fair prices. Shortstop Deli was established in 1978 and has been locally owned and operated since day one. A true Ithacan establishment.

BEST COMFORT F O O D : L U NA

Kevin Sullivan, owner of Luna’s Inspired Food in Downtown Ithaca, gave his thanks to Ithaca for winning Best Comfort Food. “The whole Luna team is honored to be chosen as best comfort food, especially after a year of operating during [COVID-19],” Sullivan said. “So many team members worked through challenges to keep our local community well fed this past year.”

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With plenty of open space and beautiful scenery, there’s definitely lots to like about eating outside at Ithaca Beer Co. Add in craft beer and a menu that includes burgers, pizza and poutine? You’ve got a winner.

BEST TO-GO EXPERIENCE: I TA L I A N C A R R Y O U T

I mean, it’s called Italian Carry Out — is it any surprise it won Best To-Go Experience? With easy online ordering, an organized pickup system and delicious pizza and pasta with homemade sauce, what more could you possibly ask for?

BEST FOOD TRUCK: SILO FOOD TRUCK

Co-owner Katie Foley expressed her enthusiasm in winning Best Food Truck. “We are super excited to have been chosen by the people for the third time,” Foley said. “Our fans are a big reason why we do what we do. Thank you for supporting us as we continue to grow.”

Growing,together. B’Yachad means “together” and Temple Beth-El’s B’Yachad Preschool in downtown Ithaca provides a nurturing environment for children aged 2.5 to 5-years to grow together. Employing a bi-cultural curriculum emphasizing kindergarten-readiness, community and caring, B’Yachad builds students’ self-confidence while encouraging investment in one another.

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BEST CLOSED BUSINESS W E ’ L L M I S S : J U S T A TA S T E

The pandemic was hard on the restaurant business, and in it we lost the former Best Downtown Dining winner Just a Taste. The popular downtown tapas restaurant regularly had diners waiting at the door when they opened each day for dinner. It was a favorite on restaurant row with suitable prices and a comfortable setting.

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northwest of Ithaca on Cayuga Lake | estate grown table and ice wines

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Becka Long Manager at Dolce said they are thrilled about winning Best Breakfast. “We are so happy,” Long said. “We’ve definitely been just grinding through this pandemic just like everyone else. It just makes us excited and grateful that people feel the same way after this time. We worked really hard to get here.”

Co-owner of Six Mile Creek Vineyard Mark Renodin said they are happy to win best winery for a second time. “We are pretty

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honored about it [winning] and thankful for the local community that voted for us and also the support we received during the pandemic and during lockdown,” Renodin said.

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P E O P L E

BEST TATTOO ARTIST Phoebe Aceto

BEST ACTIVIST D r. N i a N u n n BEST SOCIAL JUSTICE A C T I V I T I S : D R . N I A N U NN

Dr. Nia Nunn is an associate professor at Ithaca College, and the Board of Directors President of Southside Community Center, Inc. Prior to receiving a B.A. in Early childhood education at Clark Atlanta University and a Ph.D. in school psychology at Michigan State University, Nunn, was born and raised in Ithaca. Today, she wears various head-wraps living back in her community as an educatorperformer-scholar-artist-mother. As part of her passion and responsibility, Nunn is committed to learning and engaging audiences creatively, intensely, and gracefully. Her research, teaching, and service focuses on a Black feminist approach to anti-racist curricula.

BEST VISUAL ARTIST/MURALIST Ye n O s p i n a

BEST PRIMARY CARE D O C T O R: JA M I E L O E H R

“While I thank the community for choosing me as best primary care doctor, I want to say that it is actually an honor for the entire office,” said Dr. Loehr. “Primary care is a team sport and quality care comes from the front staff and the nursing staff and my colleagues and I all working together to provide the best possible care for our patients. Thank you for all your support.”

for family pets featuring medical, surgical and dental care services, according to its website. “We are incredibly honored. This has been a difficult year, and we are grateful for all of our clients for their support,” said Dr. Anne Shakespeare.

BEST PHILANTHROPIST Jerry Dietz BEST MURALIST & BEST VISUAL ARTIST: Y E N O S P I NA

Yen Ospina’s graphic imagery is full of texture and bold colors. Reminiscent of the deco era with a reinterpreted energy this selftaught artist and illustrator showcases her talent, our current culture, the female body, and

B E S T V E T : C O R N E R S T ON E

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dreamscapes in fun and inviting presentations. Through earth tone colors, ornamental layouts, and meticulous detail, the work challenges viewers to delve beyond aesthetic allure and allow mysticism to guide their understanding. Yen’s work is steeped in her personal experience as a queer Colombian-American young woman birthing art right here in the Finger Lakes.

BEST PHILANTHROPIST: JERRY DIETZ

“I am incredibly honored. In a town that has so many generous people, to be singled out that way is quite humbling. It’s certainly always wonderful to be recognized for the work that you do, but it isn’t why we do the work. Why we decide to help people out, it’s just a really important part of what makes us a strong community.”

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BEST KEEPER OF LOCAL KNOWLEDGE: CAROL KAMMEN

Tompkins County Historian Carol Kammen may be an easy choice for this category — but it’s well earned. She’s published multiple books about the history of Tompkins County and the city of Ithaca, often focusing on underrepresented groups like women and people of color. Additionally, last year she won the Lehman Prize for Distinguished Service

from the New York Academy of History for her decades-long career writing, promoting, and contributing to local history.

B E S T TAT T O O A R T I S T : PHOEBE ACETO

BEST BARTENDER: James Dean

“This recognition is an important validation for me, I am honored that what I do stands out, brings joy, personal healing and significance to the wearer,” said Aceto. “This year I have been especially grateful for patient clients, the greater tattoo community, healthcare workers, close friends and family, and myself for trusting my instincts. I am thrilled to be at home here in the Dewitt Mall! “

B E S T T E A C H E R : U NNA M E D

“I feel uncomfortable with the recognition to the degree that I would respectfully decline from being honored in this way. Given the year we just went through, I think it would go a long way to honor the many, many hard-working staff members in the ICSD.”

BEST BARTENDER: JA M E S D E A N

Dean is the owner of Nowhere Special Libations Parlor, operating on W State Street since August 2019. The bar serves seasonal cocktails like hot buttered rum, hot toddies, Navy grog, mint juleps and spiked slushies.

P L A C E S Stewart Park, but we had a lot of people and a lot of music. It went really well!”

BEST PLACE FOR A B I R T H D AY PA R T Y : S T E WA R T PA R K

ger Lakes wines in stock.

With a handful of pavilions, swaying willow trees, numerous playgrounds and perfect Cayuga Lake views, who wouldn’t want to hold a birthday party at Stewart Park? In fact, this year, the park hosted one for itself. “It was for the centennial birthday party,” executive director Rick Manning said. “It was the 100th anniversary of the park as a public park. It was held a week late because of the big storm in

BEST PLACE TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS: ITHACA FA R M E R S M A R K E T

With well over 100 vendors, cozy string lighting, delicious food and communal tables, it’s no wonder the Ithaca Farmers Market was voted as the best place to make new friends. Executive director Anton Burkett said: “Thank you Ithaca! Having a place to make new friends

is so important, and we feel proud that you consider the farmers market to be a great place to meet new people!”

BEST WEDDING VENUE: I T H A C A FA R M E R S M A R K E T

With a rustic, intimate pavilion and waterfront views, it’s hard to imagine a more picture-perfect place for a wedding than the Farmers Market. Executive director Anton Burkett said: “Thank you Ithaca! We really appreciate it that people choose the Farmers

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Market as the place to celebrate their love!”

BEST HIKE: TREMAN S TAT E PA R K

BEST BIKE RIDE: BLACK D I A M ON D T R A I L

Treman is described by the state’s Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation department as an area of wild beauty. The park is highlighted by the rugged Enfield Glen gorge, and boasts winding trails that follow the gorge past 12 waterfalls, including the 115-foot Lucifer Falls, where visitors can see a mile-and-ahalf down the wooded gorge.

Part of the old line from the Lehigh Valley Railroad, the 8.5-mile stone-dust path offers lake views, the sound of cascading waters and a towering canopy of trees. You can bike the trail from the outskirts of Ithaca all the way to Taughannock Falls. The trail is mostly level making for a relaxing ride through nature.

BEST PLACE TO BRING YOUR DOG: ITHACA D O G PA R K

BEST GORGE/ WAT E R FA L L : TA U G H A NN O C K

It’s a classic for a reason. The dramatic Taughannock Falls plunges 215 feet straight down into the gorge and is framed by sheer, rocky cliffs. Plus, the trail along the gorge to the waterfall is an easy but beautiful mile-long hike. It’s always a crowd pleaser.

BEST KIDS AT T R A C T I ON : ITHACA CHILDREN’S GARDEN

Located in the Treman State Marine Park right behind the Hangar Theatre, the Ithaca Dog Park provides ample space for your furry friend to romp around. The park is split into an all dog section and a small dog section, where the weight limit is 25 pounds. Plus, there are buckets to compost dog poop!

BEST HOTEL: A R G O S I NN

BEST PLACE TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS/FOR A WEDDING: I t h a c a F a r m e r s M a r ke t

“On behalf of the team at ICG, a huge shout out to the entire community — not only for naming Ithaca Children’s Garden Ithaca’s Best Kids Attraction, but for joining us in making it so,” Executive Director Erin Marteal said. “ICG has always been a Garden of and by the people and it is fitting that the tremendous group of volunteers, supporters, staff, and community are honored in this way. We believe deeply that all children deserve outdoor experiences that are real and joyful and available, bringing them into a meaningful relationship with nature. This vote signals that our community believes in our mission of connecting children to nature for a more beautiful, resilient, and just world — and that makes us all smile!”

Society every Friday evening from 8 p.m. until midnight. Not a bad way to spend a Friday night.

BEST (LEGAL) SPOT TO S W I M : T R E M A N S TAT E PA R K

Who needs an ocean view for swimming when you can swim in a gorge fed by a 30-foot waterfall? Treman’s swimming hole boasts dramatic natural views, a pebble area for lounging and clear, clean water.

Centrally located and beautifully restored, the Argos Inn is a nationally registered historic mansion. The inn’s website describes it as a modern take on a classic inn, “meticulously decorated with whimsically refurbished antique French furniture and a collection of 20th-century artwork, including original masterpieces by Salvador Dali, Joan Miro and a plethora of other internationally and locally known artists.”

BEST GARDEN: CORNELL B O TA N I C G A R D E N

Cornell Botanic Garden comprises 3,600 acres of herbs, flowers, perennials, vegetables, trees, forces, a lake and 30 miles of public trails. Executive director Christopher P. Dunn said: “All of us at Cornell Botanic Gardens are honored to receive this award. We work hard to provide a resource and inspiration for our greater community in our efforts to create a world of diversity, beauty, and hope. To have our community reciprocate with this award means so much to us all.”

BEST PLACE FOR S TA R G A Z I N G : C O R N E L L O B S E R VAT O R Y

The stark white building with a big dome on Cornell’s North Campus is the Fuertes Observatory, operated by the Cornell Department of Astronomy. Public viewing nights are hosted by the Cornell Astronomical The

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No Time to Get to the Bank? NO WORRIES

With Mobile Check Deposit from Tompkins Trust Company, you can deposit your checks from anywhere using your mobile phone or iPad. So you can put your money in the bank – without putting your life on hold.

TompkinsTrust.com | 888-273-3210 26

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Optimistic middle schooler Molly meets curmudgeonly ghost Scratch in Disney Channel’s newest show — created by Ithacan Bob Roth.

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hen middle schooler Molly McGee moves to Brighton with her family, she faces everything — leaving her old friends behind, moving into a decrepit old house, finding a ghost in her bedroom — with intense optimism, joy and positivity. On the other hand, the ghost,

named Scratch, has one mission — to bring misery to Brighton and all who inhabit it. Former Ithacan and Cornell graduate Bob Roth is one of the two writers/creaters of Disney Channel’s new show, “The Ghost and Molly McGee,” which premieres Oct. 1. Roth said he and his writing partner, Bill Motz, had been carrying the idea for the show around for years before finally getting their chance with Disney. “We don’t quite remember where the initial idea actually came from,” Roth said. “His recollection is I walked into our office one day and said ‘I have a funny idea for a TV show!’” The scene Roth described to Motz is seen in the first episode, where Scratch does his very best to scare Molly out of her new bedroom and home. He curses Molly and tells her he’s going to be around her forever if she doesn’t leave, but Molly, in her traditionally optimistic way, tells him that having a new best friend around forever sounds great to her. “And that’s all there was to it,” Roth said. “We carried it around for a few years, pitched it here and there and got nibbles occasionally […] And then we finally got Disney interested

in it and that’s when we started digging into it.” As Roth and Motz started exploring storylines and discussing how the two characters, operating on polar opposites of the positivity spectrum, would react to different situations, they realized something about the characters felt familiar. “We realized everything [Molly] would do is something [Motz] would do, and everything [Scratch] would do is something I would do,” Roth laughed. “Bill is an extrovert, an optimist, happy-go-lucky. I’m an introvert and a pessimist and would be happy to be left alone. That Ithaca weather cloud is kind of over me all the time.” He said that realization opened things up, and said from there things just “exploded out.” “We knew the entire world,” he said. “That’s sort of how it came together over many years.” Roth moved to Ithaca when he was 3, grew up here and then attended Cornell University as an English major.

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DISNEY SHOW Contin u ed From Page 27

“I crammed in every creative writing course I could,” he said. “I begged every professor asking if I could write a screenplay.” When he graduated from Cornell, he packed up his Toyota Tercel and headed to Los Angeles, where he’s been ever since. He does return to Ithaca during the holidays to visit his in-laws, though he hasn’t been able to come in the past couple years due to the pandemic. “I’m really missing Ithaca right now,” he said. “Hopefully I’ll be back for Christmas.”

Roth is hardly a newcomer to the world of television, with writing credits for shows like “LEGO Star Wars: The Freemaker Adventures,” “Phineas + Ferb,” “Darkwing Duck,” “Brandy & Mr. Whiskers,” “The Penguins of Madagascar” and “Kim Possible” under his belt. However, this is the first time he’s been the creator and showrunner for a series. “It’s such a hard time in this industry to get anything new on the screen,” he said. “I’m tremendously honored.” He said COVID threw a wrench in their working process, but that technology made it possible for the crew to continue working throughout the pandemic. “It hasn’t been easy, but it’s been remarkable how easy it has been,” he said.

“We have a wonderful crew that’s incredibly talented and incredibly dedicated to this show. As dark as this last year-and-ahalf has been, working on this show has been a little candle in the darkness for us all.” The levity of the show comes from the relationship between Scratch and Molly — despite their stark personality differences, it’s clear pretty quickly that he has a soft spot for her. “We didn’t want to do a show where our two main characters hate each other,” Roth said. “It’s a show about friends, and we’re going to see that friendship deepen and that bond become stronger and stronger as the season unfolds.”

Bob Roth

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Scratch’s job is to keep the town of Brighton miserable, but Molly lives to spread joy wherever she goes and, according to Roth, Scratch is “so charmed by her he’s going to kind of take his eye off the ball,” which then creates problems with the Ghost Council. The town of Brighton was inspired by a few small towns the writers know. Motz grew up in Rock Island, Illinois and Roth spent a lot of time in Towanda, Pennsylvania growing up because it’s where his grandparents lived. They also gathered some inspiration from Cedar Falls, Iowa. The main characters of Molly and Scratch are played by Ashly Burch and Dana Snyder respectively, with Jordan Klepper as the voice of Molly’s father Pete, Sumalee Montano as the voices of Molly’s mother Sharon and grandmother, and Michaela Dietz as the voice of Molly’s brother Darryl. The first season will also welcome Kelsey Grammer, Greta Gerwig, Yvette Nicole Brown, Jane Lynch, Danny Trejo, D’Arcy Carden and Patton Oswalt (among others) as guest stars. “Our two lead actors bring so much of their own personalities into it,” Roth said. “They’re wonderful [at improv], they riff off each other all the time […] They bring their own unique dimensions to the characters and make them unfold in ways we never would have imagined.” And while the first season has yet to air, the show has already been renewed for a second. “It’s a tremendous relief and it’s a great vote of confidence,” Roth said. “I think the entire crew has been feeling really great about the show we’re making, and the company has put its full force behind it. So it feels great.”


Film

Solitary Man

Oscar Isaac earns and a police station burns By Br yan VanC ampe n

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wo of the year’s best movies couldn’t be more different in content, point of view and style, but I’m treading lightly about their plots. What makes them great should not be spoiled. Paul Schrader’s “The Card Counter” (Focus Features-Martin Scorsese, 2021, 109 min.) opens with Oscar Isaac taking a motel room for the night, paying with cash. Now he’s taking the paintings off the wall and piling up furniture. Now he’s wrapping everything in sheets with twine. Now he’s seated at his desk writing in his journal, sipping from a small bottle of hooch and leaving not one fingerprint. Now we’re in. We want to know who this guy is. More or less, Isaac is “Will Tell,” a career gambler. He rarely speaks unless he has something to say, and even then he doesn’t waste a syllable. He’s all about being disciplined and cautious. He knows just how long he can work the blackjack and poker tables before getting caught. Schrader’s film feels like a loose remake of Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Hard Eight,” with Isaac the veteran gambler taking on a raw young kid (Tye Sheridan) as a traveling companion; he has wisdom to pass on to the kid. Sheridan’s character ties into a part of the film that is best not revealed, and Tiffany Haddish co-stars as Isaac’s agent, setting him up with financiers for a piece of the action. “The Card Counter” represents a real comeback for Schrader, and it’s poetically apt that Martin Scorsese “presents” this film; the two men defined ‘70s cinema with movies like “Taxi Driver” (1976) and “Raging Bull” (1980), and Schrader went on to make strong films like “Hardcore” (1979), “American Gigolo” (1980), “Light Sleeper” (1992) and “Affliction” (1998). (If you want more background on Schrader, read Peter Biskind’s “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls,” even though I disagree with Biskind’s thesis that Schrader was all washed up by the late ’90s. “Affliction” is not the work of a washed-up filmmaker.) Since the 2002 Bob Crane bio-pic “Auto Focus,” Schrader’s had a bad run of luck, losing final cut on some movies, and having films taken away from him and finished by others. It’s nice to see him

back doing his tough portraits of fringe characters and solitary men, uncut and unvarnished. ● ● ●

I love contained thrillers. I call ‘em “Spam in a Can” movies. Joe Carnahan’s “Copshop” (Open Road-Sculptor MediaZero Gravity Management-G Base FilmRaven Capital Management-War Party Films, 2021, 107 min.), co-written with Kurt McLeod from a story by McLeod and Mark Williams, earns its bloody funny place alongside “Spam” classics like “Rio Bravo,” “Assault on Precinct 13,” “VFW” and “Die Hard,” the greatest such film in the genre. (And yes, “Die Hard” is a Christmas movie. Now shut up and eat your brussels sprouts.) We’re in a Nevada police station. A hit man (Gerard Butler) and a con man (Frank Grillo) are in opposite jail cells. The entire crime syndicate seems to be after the con man, and various killer types plot to take over the station and take out Grillo. Except for the tough and capable rookie cop played by Alexis Louder in a take-no-prisoners turn, the rest of the cops are dirty or fools. As with “Die Hard,” once Carnahan introduces the characters and the lay of the land, “Copshop” lets loose and doesn’t let up until the end credits roll. This is strong stuff, gory and blackly entertaining. In a movie designed to showcase lots of strong eccentric actors, Toby Huss steals the picture as a psycho Southern cracker hit man. Huss gives a truly odd and hilarious performance, singing and cackling, and it all feels impromptu. Carnahan quit or was fired from “Mission Impossible III,” so there’s one joke that slams “The Last Samurai” — one of Cruise’s lesser efforts, if you’re at my house. When Grillo takes down his topknot, Huss tells him he looks like Cruise “in that samurai movie nobody went to see.” Recommended: “The Eyes of Tammy Faye” at Cinemapolis; “The Conjuring” on Netflix RIP: Melvin Van Peebles (“Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song,” “Boomerang”) RIP: Willie Garson (“There’s Something About Mary,” “Soapdish,” “Groundhog Day,” “Being John Malkovich”)

Regal Cinemas “The Card Counter” is currently showing at Cinemapolis and “Copshop” is showing at Regal Cinemas at the Ithaca Mall.

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Vital for Life

by Betsy Schermerhorn Director, Marketing and Admissions

THE IMPORTANCE OF SOCIALIZATION Having a social circle is beneficial no matter what a person’s age, but for the elderly, it may be challenging to cultivate friendships. As seniors age, they risk becoming isolated, which can be concerning. High levels of socialization help increase their longevity and improve their quality of life. Older adults with social supports are less likely to be at risk for depression and more likely to exercise regularly, which leads to a host of physical, mental, and cognitive benefits. Whether still living at home or in assisted living, opportunities exist for socializing, such as joining a senior center, enrolling in continuing education classes, exploring a new hobby, and volunteering at a local hospital or soup kitchen.

The best ways to create a healthy social life depend on you and your family’s unique situation. Unfortunately, because of limited time, resources and geographic distance, it can  sometimes be  difficult for families to provide the necessary social support.  And sometimes we don’t want to feel like a burden.  When this happens, it might be time to seek professional help. Call the marketing team at (607) 266-5300 to schedule a tour to see our facilities and learn more about lifecare at Kendal at Ithaca. Find us on the web at http://kai.kendal.org/ P.S. Obstacles such as physical ailments, the loss of a spouse, and mobility problems can lead to social isolation. 2230 N. Triphammer Road Ithaca, NY 14850-6513 (607) 266-5300 Toll Free: (800) 253-6325

Website: www.kai.kendal.org Email: admissions@kai.kendal.org

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istilling collaged photographs of her daily routine, painter Jennifer Small creates brightly colored, angular abstractions that aim to recapture the essence of ordinary seeing. Recalling the roots of modern abstract art in Cubism’s reconstruction of the quotidian, her work fuses freely invented hues onto shapes and patterns that offer a lingering sense of the tangibly real. The Wilmington, Delaware painter is the subject of a current solo show at Corners Gallery. “Mundane Marvels: Paintings by Jennifer Small” (Sept. 25 –

Nov. 6) features 11 modestly sized acrylic paintings on canvas, wooden panel, and paper attached to panel. They share space well with the living room — Corners’ design shop branch — while commanding attention with their own sense of presence and invention. (Small is herself a graphic designer and it’s hard not to see the discipline of her day job in these tightly arranged works.) Small engages a tradition of “hard edge” abstraction that incorporates a subtle painterliness — often contrasting more emphatically brushed areas with more


“Left at the Balcony and Across the Footbridge” by Jennifer Small.

flatly rendered backdrops. In addition to acrylic, she uses spray paint in several of her pieces here to create gradients of color. Her paper on panel pieces contain areas of soft-touch watercolor. Nonetheless, the overall effect here is hard, flat, and clear with the varied paint textures incorporated in a manner akin to collage. “Snowy Rooftops and Unused Railings” is a particularly striking piece, with rich color and dynamic geometry. The 12x9 inch panel is typical in size for this show. An Indian yellow background spills over the edges (like all of the pieces, unframed). A bent pillar, fluorescent pink, juts in from the upper left. Bold red and blue lines — diagonal and curved — create a striking visual rhythm. Pale green and orange shards come in from the right as if trying to gang up on the pink tube. A fragment of sky blue hitting the lower right corner has

been sprayed with a rusty orange—hinting at the natural landscape. Using the same media, “Bright Shadows” and “Morning Sun on the Counter,” are also highlights. Burning pink and red, a chilly pale yellow, and a deep, arboreal green accent the more neutral hues of the former piece. “Sun” bends and twists in on itself with strong red and green armature lines snaking through bent planes of cool gray, pale and dark greens, bubblegum pink, and an area striped beige and dark. I was unable to identify any of the source material that Small uses for her paintings. (Apparently the artist prefers to transform her private memories of place to the point of unrecognizability for the purposes of her public art.) Nevertheless,

these paintings have a distinctly urban quality, evocative of the strong artificial colors and vertiginous spaces of the modern city. Her work suggests a 21st century analog to American Cubist Stuart Davis, whose paintings captured the New York City of the past century with a distinct palette but with a similar nervous energy. Strong, inventive artists benefit from comparison to other strong, inventive artists doing similar or related work. Opening this Friday at the Petrune, painter Domenica Brockman — who co-owns the downtown boutique and who has also shown at Corners — will be showing a selection of her recent painterly geometric abstractions. It is hard to predict all her latest but word has it that she will be show-

ing painted collages as well as her signature encaustic (wax paint) on panel works. Brockman offers a more pared down approach to both color and shape in most of her work than Small. She often works with only two or just a few tones, often black and white with perhaps a strong color or metallic thrown in. Likewise, her geometric and curvilinear forms lay flatly and calmly on her surfaces rather than jostling against each other more dimensionally like Small’s. Finally, the local painter’s color-areas tend toward a grungier texture and feel, which contrasts with Small’s bright cleanliness.

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Music

10/3 Sunday

for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St | $35.00 - $50.00

Bars/Bands/Clubs

Cornell Orchestras concert | 3 p.m. | Bailey Hall, 230 Garden Ave | Free

Stage

9/30 Thursday Tommy Tornado at the Cortland Beer Company | 7 p.m. | Cortland Beer Company, 16 Court Street

10/2 Saturday The Tarps Quartet | 12:30 p.m. | Buttonwood Grove Winery, 5986 State Route 89

10/9 Saturday A Tribute Concert | 7:30 p.m. | Park Church, 208 West Gray Street | $10.00 - $45.00

10/10 Sunday Southside Johnny and the Asbury Dukes - Tickets - Center For the Arts - Homer, NY | 8 p.m. | Center

A Boy And His Soul | 7:30 p.m., 9/29 Wednesday | Kitchen Theatre Company, 417 W. State / W. MLK, Jr. Street | Propelled by the beat of soul, this funny, heart-warming one-man show is a love letter to the power of family and our ability to persevere. Sock Monkey Circus | 10:30 a.m., 10/2 Saturday | The Cherry, 102 Cherry St | Sock Monkey Circus is a marionette

show full of clever monkeys, who are trained to juggle, dance, and swing on a flying trapeze, with their clown trainer, Funny Honey. | $8.00 - $12.00 Singing Notes And Slinging Jokes | 7 p.m., 10/2 Saturday | Liquid State, 620 Green Street | A unique blend of music, song, storytelling, comedy, life, love, and laughter. It is a special evening when Ithaca’s best vocalist, SingTrece, and its funniest comedian, Kenneth McLaurin come together. KINDRED SPIRITS: Behind The Hauntings with Amy Bruni & Adam Berry | 8 p.m., 10/3 Sunday

10/3 Sunday Sunday Music feat. Tru Bleu | 1 p.m. | Treleaven Wines, 658 Lake Road Concerts/Recitals

9/29 Wednesday Midday Music for Organ | 12:30 p.m. | Anabel Taylor Chapel, 548 College Ave | Free Five For Fighting | 8 p.m. | Center for the Arts of Homer, 72 S Main St

9/30 Thursday

Art

Midday Music: Beethoven Piano Sonatas | 12:30 p.m. | Lincoln Hall, 256 Feeney Way | Free

10/1 Friday Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas | 8 p.m. | Hangar Theatre, 801 Taughannock Blvd. | $25.00 - $30.00

10/2 Saturday

KINDRED SPIRITS: BEHIND THE HAUNTINGS WITH AMY BRUNI & ADAM BERRY SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3RD AT 8:00 PM

The State Theatre, W. State Street, Ithaca | Kick off “spooky season” with TV hosts and real-life paranormal investigators Bruni and Berry who will share captivating stories of their own terrifying paranormal encounters. These world-class ghost hunters will also engage with the audience in a Q&A session. (photo: provided)

THISWEEK

Cornell Wind Symphony | 7 p.m. | Bailey Hall, 230 Garden Ave | Free

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| State Theatre of Ithaca, 107 West State St | Amy Bruni and Adam Berry, stars and executive producers of Kindred Spirits on the Travel Channel and formerly partners on the SYFY channel original series Ghost Hunters, dive deep into their history and adventures as real-life paranormal investigators. | $22.00 - $100.00 House of Desires Performance | 8 p.m., 10/5 Tuesday | Dillingham Center, Ithaca College, 953 Danby Road | This 17th-century romantic farce is a wild tale of confusion and mistaken identities complete with wily servants and groping suitors. | $10.00 - $18.00 Biquefarre w/virtual introduction by producer William Gilcher – not confirmed at press time at Willard Straight Theatre | 7 p.m., 10/7 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Thirty-seven years after Farrebique (screening Oct 4 & 6), Georges Rouquier returned to the farming community in South-central France to pick up the story of the Rouquier family who had been The Rider | 9:15 p.m., 10/7 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Brady Blackburn (Brady Jandreau) was once a rising rodeo star before an accident left him with permanent brain damage. Where is the Friend’s House? at Willard Straight Theatre | 7 p.m., 10/13 Wednesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | A sensitive and beautiful film depicting the remarkable reasoning of a young boy surrounded by unhelpful adults in a small Iranian village. Close-Up | 8:35 p.m., 10/13 Wednesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | One day, while riding a bus, a young man tells a woman that he’s the famous Iranian director Mohsen Makhmalbaf.

39TH ANNUAL APPLE HARVEST FESTIVAL

Friday-Sunday, October 1-3 Ithaca Commons | It’s back! Three days celebrating apple growers, cider makers, and of course cider donuts. Apple Harvest Festival will host plenty of farmstand fresh apples and produce, delectable baked goods, a variety of food trucks offering tasty bites, and a craft fair with artisans from around the region. (photo: provided)

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Close to Home and then Some | 12 p.m., 9/30 Thursday | State of the Art Gallery, 120 West State Street | A twoperson show of paintings, drawings and photographs. Landscape Painting Workshop | 9 a.m., 10/1 Friday | North Star Art Gallery, 743 Snyder Hill Road | Plein air workshop with award-winning artist Brian Keeler with demonstration and hands-on at the North Star Art Gallery full day from 9am to 4pm with

an optional evening session from 6pm to 8pm. | $100.00 - $125.00 The Gallery at South Hill, Jessica Warner, The Color of Distance | 5 p.m., 10/1 Friday | The Gallery at South Hill, 950 Danby Road | The Gallery at South Hill, Jessica Warner The Color of Distance. | Free Dan Welden | Aesop’s Fables (Color Sequel) at The Ink Shop | 5 p.m., 10/1 Friday | The Ink Shop Printmaking Center, 330 East State, 2nd floor CSMA bldg. | Dan Welden | Aesop’s Fables (Color Sequel) exhibit at The Ink Shop | Free Bev Lombardo Art Reception | 6 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Historical Seneca County Courthouse Complex (Three Bears), 7175 North Main Street | Bev Lombardo is our Featured Artist for October. There will be a reception and an introduction for the Artist on October 1st at 6pm, and her artwork will be on display in Papa Bear’s Gallery from October 1st until October 30th. Join us for one or both of these events! | Free Gallery Night Ithaca - Every First Friday of the month | 10/1 Friday | Virtual | First Friday Gallery Night is a monthly community celebration of the latest art showings taking place in and around Downtown Ithaca. Women Making Their Mark | 6 p.m., 10/4 Monday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | A virtual lecture from Johnson Art Museum curator Nancy E. Green. Register at tcpl.org. Book Marks: An Artist’s Journey with Books | 6 p.m., 10/6 Wednesday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Local artist Barbara Page will discuss the creation of her book Book Marks: An Artist’s Card Catalog, which features 434 richly illustrated works created on old library checkout cards.

Film Blonde Venus | 7:15 p.m., 9/29 Wednesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Under studio pressure to make a fifth film with the sublime Marlene Dietrich, director Joseph von Sternberg shot this campy but moving modern fairytale about beauty and virtue-and in the proceess Isabella | 7 p.m., 9/30 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Argentinian filmmaker Matías Piñeiro

SINGING NOTES AND SLINGING JOKES

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2ND AT 7:00 PM

Liquid State, 620 Green St, Ithaca | Ithaca’s favorite comedy & music married duo will perform their unique blend of music, song, storytelling, comedy, life, love, and laughter. A great occasion to catch some truly positive vibes. (photo: Facebook)


Annual Wedding Showcase | 12 p.m., 10/3 Sunday | Inn at Taughannock, 2030 Gorge Rd | Their fourth annual Wedding Showcase -- this time hosted in the grandeur of the new Enchantment Wedding Garden. Tune into Tasting Tuesday On ESPN Ithaca 1160AM/107.1FM (WPIE) | 4 p.m., 10/5 Tuesday | Wagner Vineyards, 9322 State Route 414 | Bike Commuting 101: Community Forum and Q&A | 12 p.m., 10/6 Wednesday | Online (Zoom), 315 N Aurora St | Bike Walk Tompkins and Way2Go are hosting an online forum and Q&A focused on bike commuting throughout Tompkins County on Wednesday, October 6th at 12pm. Register online through the provided url. | Free Women’s Volleyball at SUNY Cortland | 7 p.m., 10/6 Wednesday | Women’s Volleyball at SUNY Cortland https://athletics.misericordia.edu/ calendar.aspx?id=15567

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Books visited Cornell Cinema in 2014 with Viola , inspired by Shakespeare’s character. The Sparks Brothers | 9 p.m., 9/30 Thursday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | How can one rock band be successful, underrated, hugely influential, and criminally overlooked all at the same time? The Eyes of Tammy Faye | 9/30 Thursday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | In the 1970s, Tammy Faye Bakker and her husband, Jim, rise from humble beginnings to create the world’s largest religious broadcasting network and theme park. Eyimofe (This is My Desire) | 7 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | A triumph at the 2020 Berlin International Film Festival, the revelatory debut feature from co-directors (and twin brothers) Arie and Chuko Esiri is a heartrending and hopeful portrait of The Grandmaster | 9:45 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Based on the life of martial arts wunderkind, Ip Man (Bruce Lee’s teacher), the film is part biography, part historical drama, tracing the legendary kungfu master’s rise to power. The Alpinist | 10/1 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | Marc-

André Leclerc climbs alone, far from the limelight. On remote alpine faces, the free-spirited 23-year-old Canadian makes some of the boldest solo ascents in history. Veteran filmmaker Peter Mortimer sets out to make a film about Leclerc but struggles to keep up with his elusive subject. The Nowhere Inn | 10/1 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | The metafictional account of two creative forces (Carrie Brownstein & Annie Clark) banding together to make a documentary about St. Vincent’s music, touring life, and onstage persona. Titane | 10/1 Friday | Cinemapolis, 120 E. Green Street. | Following a series of unexplained crimes, a father is reunited with the son who has been missing for 10 years. Titane : A metal highly resistant to heat and corrosion, with high tensile strength alloys. Farrebique, or the Four Seasons | 7 p.m., 10/4 Monday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | A portrait of the Rouquier family, cousins of the director, who lived in the farming community of Aveyron in South-central Franc, filmed over an entire year. Son of Monarchs w/post-screening panel discussion featuring filmmaker Alexis Gambis in person at Willard Straight Theatre | 7 p.m.,

10/5 Tuesday | Ithaca College, 201 Muller Center | Ithaca Premiere 2021 \> Mexico/USA \> Directed by Alexis Gambis With Tenoch Huerta, Paulina Gaitan After the death of his grandmother, a Mexican biologist living in New York returns to his Daisies | 7 p.m., 10/6 Wednesday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | An Eastern Bloc feminist farce about two bored teenage girls-Marie I and Marie II-who have anarchic fun in a series of loosely connected episodes.

Special Events Treleaven Trivia Night | 6:30 p.m., 9/29 Wednesday | Treleaven Wines, 658 Lake Road | Grab some friends and join us for our summer-long trivia league every Wednesday night in The Hangtime! Trivia begins promptly at 6:30 with happy hour prior from 4-6pm. Women’s Tennis at SUNY Cortland | 3 p.m., 9/30 Thursday | Women’s Tennis at SUNY Cortland https:// athletics.misericordia.edu/calendar. aspx?id=15641 Night Sky Cruise at Allen Treman State Park | 8:30 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Allan H. Treman Marina, 1000 Marina Drive | Hop on board the MV Teal to

see the stars over the lake! Night Sky Cruises are every Friday through September 9-10:30pm. Reserve at discovercayugalake.org | $35.00 $40.00 The Grandmaster | 9:45 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Cornell University, 144 East Ave | Based on the life of martial arts wunderkind, Ip Man (Bruce Lee’s teacher), the film is part biography, part historical drama, tracing the legendary kungfu master’s rise to power. Oktoberfest at Treleaven | 2 p.m., 10/2 Saturday | Treleaven Wines, 658 Lake Road | Come on out and raise a glass with us as we celebrate, German-style with live music from King Ferry’s own, The Steam Boiler Works polka band! Elmira College Elmira College Field Hockey vs Washington & Jefferson | 3 p.m., 10/2 Saturday | Elmira College Field Hockey vs Washington & Jefferson https://athletics.elmira. edu/calendar.aspx?id=12376 Sunset Saturday | 6:30 p.m., 10/2 Saturday | Boundary Breaks Vineyard, 1568 Porter Covert Road | Boundary Breaks is hosting our famous Sunset Saturdays on the first Saturday of every month starting from June 5th until October 2nd! | $10.00 - $20.00

Shining the Light: Journalism in Times of Tyranny | 7 p.m., 9/30 Thursday | Virtual | A Virtual Panel Discussion is in conjunction with National Banned Books Week. Register at tcpl. org Roger Hecht Poetry Workshop and Reading | 5 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Lodi Whittier Library, 8484 S. Main St. | Roger Hecht will read from his latest chapbook of poetry, Witness Report, and afterward will lead a workshop, “Poetry Lost and Found: making found poetry from forgotten texts”. | Free

Kids Tyke Tales Story Time | 6 p.m., 10/1 Friday | Please join us for stories read aloud on Zoom from the Lodi Whittier Library on Friday evenings at 6pm. Pay-What-You-Wish Weekend at Museum of the Earth | 10 a.m., 10/2 Saturday | Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth, 1259 Trumansburg Road (Route 96) | Join Museum of the Earth for Pay-What-You-Wish weekends, sponsored by BorgWarner,on the first weekend of each month. Moore Family Farm Fall Festival at Moore Family Farm | 10 a.m., 10/2 Saturday | Moore Family Farm is your new favorite fall destination!!

Chinese-English Storytime | 3 p.m., 10/2 Saturday | Tompkins County Public Library, 101 East Green Street | Children of all ages and their caregivers are invited join Librarian Kai for songs, rhymes, stories, and books! Masks for those aged 2 and up are required for this drop-in program. Toddler Story Time - Moovin’ & Groovin’ | 11:30 a.m., 10/6 Wednesday | Phillips Free Library, 37 South Main Street | Toddler story time is for birth to preschool age children and their parent/guardian. This weekly program includes stories, songs, fingerplays and more all around the theme for that week.

Notices Community Food System Event | 5 p.m., 9/29 Wednesday | Ithaca Farmers Market, 545 Third Street | County residents, municipal leaders, & food system stakeholders are invited to eat, offer feedback, and provide input on the development of a Food System Plan for Tompkins County. A light meal will be provided. Please let us know you will attend by visiting https://www.tompkinsfoodfuture. org/rsvp. | Free Community Sunset Cruise | 7:30 p.m., 9/29 Wednesday | Allan H. Treman Marina, 1000 Allen H. Treman Park Road | Engaging Conversations and Activities about our watershed aboard the MV Teal with rotating community members serving as hosts. | Free Trumansburg Farmers Market | 9/29 Wednesday | Trumansburg Farmers market, Corner of Route 227 & 96 | 9.29-The Grady Girls; 10.6-Brookton Bridge | Free Candor Farmers Market | 3:30 p.m., 9/30 Thursday | Candor Town Hall Pavilion, 101 Owego Road | 25 local vendors with a great assortment fresh produce, baked goods, cheese, maple products, crafts, soaps, baskets, pottery, brooms, kettle korn and a food truck! | Free Ithaca Farmers Market | 9 a.m., 10/2 Saturday | Saturdays are the star, but Sundays are no slouch. Our pavilion gets full during peak season and there are some vendors that you won’t find on Saturdays. Historic Southworth Homestead Tours | 10 a.m., 10/2 Saturday | Southworth Homestead, 14 North Street | | $10.00

CORNELL ORCHESTRAS

Cherry Artspace, 102 Cherry Street | The great Lilypad Puppet Theatre kicks off their new season at The Cherry. Check out this exciting show with clown and marionette monkeys! (photo: provided)

Bailey Hall, 230 Garden Ave, Cornell | The Cornell Symphony Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra will perform a free concert with works by Assad, Richter, Marquez, and Dvorak. (photo: provided)

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2ND AT 10:30 AM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3RD AT 3:00 PM

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320/Bulletin Board CLOTHING GIVEAWAY

Friday, 10/8; 9 am - 3pm: Clothing Giveaway at the Varna United Methodist Church; 965 Dryden Rd./Rte. 366. Our basement is still loaded with donations from generous folks who’ve cleaned out their closets. We have just about everything - especially men’s clothing. So, bring you shopping bags and MASKS ARE REQUIRED.

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400/Employment

hometown electrical distributor Your one Stop Shop

Since 1984 802 W. Seneca St. Ithaca 607-272-1711 fax: 607-272-3102 www.fingerlakeselectric.com

SCHOOL NURSE

OCM BOCES Student Services Department has the need for a School Nurse in Cortland, NY. RN required. Send letter of application and resume to: OCM BOCES, Personnel/Recruitment Dept., PO Box 4754, Syracuse, NY 13221. Or, applications will be accepted online at olasjobs.org/central. For more information, visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

EMPLOYMENT Account Billing Manager

We are looking for a cheerful, professional, detail-oriented person to join our team serving Ithaca and the surrounding community at the Ithaca Times, Ithaca. com and the Finger Lakes community newspapers. Job Responsibilities:  Maintain account records  Monthly billing  Scheduling and administering legal, display and classified advertising  Process accounts receivable/payable and handle payroll in a timely manner  Entering financial transactions in databases & document transaction details  Produce work with a high level of accuracy and attention to detail Work Hours: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9- 5 Qualifications / Skills:  Accounting  Confidentiality  Attention to detail and accuracy  A knowledge and/or appreciation of newspapers and the media business  Able to multitask, prioritize, work under pressure and meet deadlines  Ability to communicate complex data clearly  Excellent data entry skills  Great interpersonal and customer service skills  Familiarity with a wide range of financial transactions including Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable  Experience with MS Office and Google Apps  Experience with spreadsheets and proprietary software  Professionalism and organization skills Education & Experience Requirements:  Proficient with office software  Previous bookkeeping experience preferred  Associates degree or at least one year of experience Job Type: Part Time Respond with Resume to: jbilinski@ithacatimes.com

Coordinator

Coordinator of Youth and Young Adult Ministries. The United Presbyterian Church of Cortland is seeking a person to coordinate the congregation’s programs. Part-time. 15-20 hours a week. Experience in working with youth and young adults will be an asset. Candidates should be of the Christian faith. Job description available upon request. Contact the United Presbyterian Church of Cortland, 25 Church Street, Cortland, NY 13045 or email info@unitedpresbyterian.net and put Coordinator in the subject line.

Delivery Driver

Driver with SUV-sized car and good driving record to deliver newspapers 9 a.m.3 p.m. Wednesdays year-round in and around Ithaca. Can start immediately. Call 607 277-7000 x 1214.

REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

REPLACEMENT A FULL LINE OF VINYL Ithaca WebsIte DesIgn Manufacture To InstallREPLACEMENT WINDOWS REPLACEMENT Do you have a business? WINDOWS We Do Call It forAll Free Estimate & WINDOWS

Professional Installation are you starting a business? A FULL LINE OF Custom VINYL made & manufactured AREPLACEMENT FULL LINE OF VINYL WINDOWS by… Let Us help You! REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Call for Free Estimate & Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation 3/54( We have been in business since 1980 specializing in streaming Professional Installation Custom made & manufactured Custom made & manufactured 3%.%#! audio and video. Our team of experts can build you a website by… by… with features such as search engine optimization, tracking 6).9, web site visitors, listing on Facebook. Check us out on Romulus, NY 3/54( 3/54( 315-585-6050 www.ithacawebsitedesign.com 3%.%#! 3%.%#! or Toll Free at Call us at 607-272-9175 we are open Monday to Friday 9am. 6).9, to answer your questions. 6).9, 866-585-6050

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www.SouthSenecaWindows.com Romulus, NY Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 315-585-6050 Toll Free at I t h a c a 866-585-6050 Tori m e sFree / Sate p t e m b e r Toll

866-585-6050

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EMPLOYMENT Special Ed Teacher Virtual Academy (K-12)

OCM BOCES is looking for a highly qualified, dynamic Special Education Teacher for a remote learning position supporting our K-12 Virtual Learning Academy students. Experience working with diverse students, implementing IEP’s and 504 plans, working with multiple grade levels and providing direct, indirect and resource services. Preferred experience teaching in a remote setting. Must be comfortable leveraging technology and a variety of tools to engage students in virtual learning environment. Certification in Special Education required. Interested applicants apply online at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For more information regarding this posting, please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

Teacher Aide(s)

F/T 10-month Teacher Aide opportunities available NOW working in the Exceptional Education Department at T-S-T BOCES, Ithaca New York. Provide support and supervision assistance to students with intellectual, emotional and special needs, work as an integral part of the team. Excellent benefits available. Detailed posting/qualifications: ww.tstboces.org Apply online at: www.tompkinscountyny. gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, (607) 257-1551, Fax: (607) 697-8273, Email: hr@tstboces.org

Teaching Assistant

OCM BOCES Special Education program has the need for a 96% Teaching Assistant at the Cortlandville Campus, Cortland. Successful candidate will provide support and individual programming to K-12th grade students in our center-based programs with a variety of special needs. NYS certification as a Teaching Assistant required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For information please visit our website at: www.ocmboces.org EOE

EMPLOYMENT Treasurer of BOCES

T-S-T BOCES seeks a Treasurer of the Board of Cooperative Educational Services. Position available 12/1/21. Qualifications: Bachelors of Science Degree in Accounting and two years of exp. in double entry bookkeeping. Salary range: $55,250-$65,000 depending on education/experience. Excellent benefits are available. Detailed posting: www. tstboces.org Apply by 10/31/21 to: www. tompkinscountyny.gov/personnel TST BOCES, 555 Warren Rd., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850, Phone (607) 257-1551, Fax: (607) 697-8273, Email: hr@tstboces.org

Your Ad ithaca.com/classifieds

DELIVERY Part-Time Route Driver needed for delivery of newspapers every Wednesday. Must be available 9am-1pm, have reliable transportation, and a good driving record.

Call 277-7000

Teaching Assistant

OCM BOCES Stellata program has the need for a 96% Teaching Assistant at the Cortlandville Campus, Cortland. Successful candidate will provide support and individual programming to K-12th grade students in our center-based programs with a variety of special needs. NYS certification as a Teaching Assistant required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs.org/central. For information please visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

PIANOS

• Rebuilt • Reconditioned • Bought• Sold • Moved • Tuned • Rented

Complete rebuilding services. No job too big or too small. Call us.

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders (607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd., Suite 26

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca, NY


EMPLOYMENT Water Technician

The Van Etten Water District is seeking candidates for a part-time Water Technician. The Water Technician performs a variety of jobs related to operation, maintenance, customer service, emergency service, construction and maintenance of the Van Etten Water District’s facilities and hydrant system. Applications and job description may be obtained at and applications should be sent to the Town Clerk’s Office, 6 Gee St., PO Box 177, Van Etten, NY 14889. Tuesday and Thursday 11 am – 4 pm and Wednesday 1pm – 6pm. Town of Van Etten is an EOE employer.

800/Services DIRECTV

Cable Price Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN)

HOME REPAIRS

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty Covers all Major Systems and Appliance. 30 Day Risk Free. $200 off and 2 months Free. 1-877-673-0511. (AAN CAN)

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

SERVICES TRAIN AT HOME TO DO MEDICAL BILLING!

Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-5436440. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) (NYSCAN)

805/Business Services

SERVICES

SERVICES

DISH TV

820/Computer

$64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo EXPIRES: 1/21/22, 1-888-609-9405 (NYSCAN)

GUTTER CLEANING

Get GotW3 with lighting fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888519-0171 (AAN CAN)

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-763-2379. (NYSCAN)

BANKRUPTCY

HOME WARRANTY

4G LTE Home Internet Now Available!

Single Ch 7 Bankruptcy $750.00 Legal Fee. Call Mark “The Hammer” Gugino at 144 Bald Hill Road Spencer, NY at 607319-0766. We also do Chapter 13 12 11 Bankruptcy, Auto Accident Injury, Divorce and Real Estate Closings. Attorney Advertising Debt Relief.

BATH & SHOWER UPDATES

Updates in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices - No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior and Military Discounts available. Call: 1877-649-5043 (AAN CAN)

BEST SATELLITE TV

With 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 888-508-5313 (NYSCAN)

Call today for a FREE QUOTE from America’s Most Trusted Interstate Movers. Let us take the stress out of moving! Speak to a Relocation Specialist, call 855-947-2919 (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

SERVICES

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR!

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM!

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Now offering grants & scholarships for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! (844) 947-0192 (M-F 8AM-6PM ET) (NYSCAN)

We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

Your Ad ithaca.com/classifieds

855/Misc.

Real Estate Section

COMPLETE CARE

Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-866440-6501 (NYSCAN)

v6.39

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

HughesNet Satellite Internet

Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. m (AAN CAN)

WATERFRONT COLLECTION

IT & COMPUTER TRAINING PROGRAM

Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details: 1-855-5544616 (AAN CAN)

R1338448

Log Home with Acreage AND Lakefront!

Own this Vintage Year-Round Home

S1362550

SENECA LAKE

SKANEATELES LAKE

MEDICATION

Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

The Generac PWRcell

Teaching Assistant

OCM BOCES Stellata program has the need for a 96% Teaching Assistant at the Cortlandville Campus, Cortland. Successful candidate will provide support and individual programming to K-12th grade students in our centerbased programs with a variety of special needs. NYS certification as a Teaching Assistant required. Applications accepted online only. Register and apply at: www.olasjobs. org/central. For information please visit our website at: www.ocmboces. org EOE

a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-888-871-0194. (NYSCAN)

Starkey

$849,900

Scott

Wonderful home perched on 20+ acre wooded lot with 307’ of lakefront. Bright, 2104sf wi/3BRs, 2 full BAs, eat-in kit with sliderrs to upper deck/porch & open LR w/vaulted ceilings & gas frplce. in LL. TEXT: H581567 TO: VIDEOS

Teresa “Terri” Sutherland LIC. R.E. SALESPERSON

$399,000

Bordered by a babbling creek and nicely manicured lot, you’ll be dazzled by the rolling hills and breathtaking views of the lake. 2 open-air porches. A stone WBFP. Eat-in galley kit. 2 lg BRs & 2 BAs.

Jeanine Volpe

c/text: 585-750-6054

LIC. R.E. SALESPERSON

HOWARD HANNA LAKE GROUP • 229 LAKE ST, PENN YAN, NY 14527

c/text: 315-246-6181

KELLER WILLIAMS SYRACUSE • 5701 ENTERPRISE PKWY - E SYRACUSE, NY 13057

ESTATE SALE - LOG HOMES

PAY THE BALANCE OWED ONLY!!! AMERICAN LOG HOMES IS ASSISTING JUST RELEASED OF ESTATE & ACCOUNT SETTLEMENT ON HOUSES.

Prepare for power outages with a Generac home standby generator

4 Log Home kits selling for BALANCE OWED, FREE DELIVERY 1)Model # 101 Carolina $40,840…BALANCE OWED $17,000 2)Model # 203 Georgia $49,500...BALANCE OWED $19,950

REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

877-516-1160

3)Model # 305 Biloxi

$36,825...BALANCE OWED $14,500

4)Model # 403 Augusta $42,450...BALANCE OWED $16,500

FREE

Before Calling View House Plans at

www.americanloghomesandcabins.com

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value!

NEW - HOMES HAVE NOT BEEN MANUFACTURED

 Make any plan design changes you desire!  Comes with Complete Building Blueprints & Construction Manual  Windows, Doors, and Roofing not included BBB  NO TIME LIMIT FOR DELIVERY! A+ Rating

Limited Time Offer - Call for Details

Special Financing Available Subject to Credit Approval

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

S e p te m b e r

*OFFER NOT AVAILABLE TO AMERICAN LOG HOME DEALERS*

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I t h a c a T i m e s   35


BackPage

For rates and information contact Toni Crouch at toni@ithactimes.com

277-7000 p h o n e 277-1012 f a x

Looking to Boost your 2021 Business?

Call Larry at

MENT WINDOWS.

Find out about great advertising ad packages at

Call for Free Estimate & Professional Installation

A Vibrant, Active Community Center

“The Best Sub

For Learning, Activities, Social Groups

You’ve ever had!”

And More! For Adults 50+

$5.00 off any purchase at

Lifelong

DiBella’s Subs

Same Day Service Available

119 West Court St., Ithaca

with Community Cash Coupon

607-273-1511

222 Elmira Rd. Ithaca

John’s Tailor Shop

Men’s and Women’s Alterations for over 20 years Fur & Leather repair, zipper repair.

John Serferlis - Tailor

tclifelong.org Engaging, Inclusive Officiating...

AAM

... to create a unique, fulfilling and unforgettable

ALL ABOUT MACS

ceremony that is both a Farewell Gift to the one

Macintosh Consulting

who has passed on, and a Forever Gift to loved

http://www.allaboutmacs.com

ones and friends.

(607) 280-4729

REAL LIFE

Romulus, NY 315-585-6050 or 866-585-6050 www.SouthSenecaWindows.com

MINDFULNESS CLASSES for Stress Reduction

ACUPUNCTURE & CUPPING THERAPY Lotus Theory Acupuncture 821 Cliff St. Ithaca

Every life story deserves to be told, and told well.

Peaceful Spirit Acupuncture

Steve Lawrence, Celebrant

Anthony R. Fazio, L.Ac., D.A.O.M.(c)

607-564-7149

No Health Insurance? No Problem!

Free Medical and Holistic Care! Medicaid Enrollment & Medical Debt Advocacy

BOOK NOW ONLINE: www.lotustheory.com

Ithaca Free Clinic (607)330-1254

www.peacefulspiritacupuncture.com

521 West Seneca Street |www.ithacahealth.org

FREE BRAKE CHECK Brakes feeling spongy?

PIANOS

Stop in for a FREE Brake Check

Rebuilt, Reconditioned,

LAND & SEA

Bruces Pit-Stop

FingerLakesAnimalRights.org

334 Elmira Rd

Tuned, Rented

607-882-6816

Complete Rebuilding Services

Bought, Sold, Moved

No job too big or too small

CLEANING SERVICES

SOUTH SENECA VINYL

273-3192

nickboyar.com

*Acupuncture Works*

ANIMALS

Custom made & Manufactured by

102 The Commons

607-279-4769

CEREMONIES

607-272-0114

A FULL LINE OF VINYL REPLACE-

607-277-7000 ext: 1214 Ithaca.com & Ithaca Times

DiBella’s Subs

REDUCE YOUR HEATING BILL

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

ITHACA NEWS

Ithaca Piano Rebuilders

JANITORIAL* FLOOR * CARPET

Delivered to your inbox every day

INDEPENDENCE CLEANERS CORP

Ithaca Times Daily

(607) 272-6547 950 Danby Rd, Suite 26

607-227-3025 / 607-697-3294

Text ITHACA to 22828 to Sign up

South Hill Business Campus, Ithaca

Your Go-To Oil Change Stop Most Trusted Oil Change in Ithaca Oil & Filter Change Everyday low Price includes up to 5 gls conventional oil

Bruces Pit-Stop 334 Elmira Rd. 607-882-6816

Singing Notes and Slinging Jokes

Oct 2

7 pm It is a special evening when Ithaca’s best vocalist, SingTrece, and its funniest comedian, Kenneth McLaurin come together. International performing and recording artist, SingTrece and husband Kenneth McLaurin are coming to Liquid State. Singing Notes and Singing Jokes is a unique blend of music, song, storytelling, comedy, life, love, and laughter. See the show that is has everyone excited in Upstate NY. --> bit.ly/SNSJLiquidState 36  T

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Profile for Ithaca Times

September 29, 2021  

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