Page 1

1

International School of Luxembourg  Upper School Library

Annual Report 2012­2013

What we achieved How we did it

Where we want to go 7,616 Materials checked out 1,088 Resources added to the collection


2

International School of Luxembourg Upper School Library Annual Report 2012/2013

page Foreword ……………………………………………………………………..

3

Mission Statement ..…………………………………………………………

4

Policy Development …………………………………………………….……

4

Achievements ………………………………………………………………..

4

Circulation Statistics …………………………………………………………

5

Collection Development …………………………………………………….

7

Online Databases ………………………………………...…………………

7

The Upper School Library Wiki: Amazing ………………………………..

9

Staffing & Professional Development ………………………………………

9

Library Events ………..………………………………………………………

10

Library and Information Literacy Skills …….……..………………………..

11

Plans for 2013­2014 …………………………………………………………

12

Looking outward …………………………………………………………….

12

Conclusion …………………………………………………………………...

12

Appendix : Collection Development Guidelines …………...…………….

13


3

Foreword This school year saw the Upper School Library in transition in many ways. A new Librarian, and a preparation for the expansion of the Libary into a space almost twice as big. This report aims to show how the Upper School Library is involved in many aspects of the school, and to enlighten and inform about the scale of the operations. It also offers an idea for discussion of future plans for the Library. The report shows how the Library has been used, the number of materials taken out, the events we have enjoyed organising, all with the goal of encouraging the tangible love of reading in our students and developing the keen curiosity displayed by all our students to explore, and learn to use the information available to them. Next year we look forward to continue to foster the endeavours to create life long learners and readers, and to – as always – do everything in our power to offer the best information services and information literacy skills teaching. Looking back at my first year at ISL, and at this report, I realise the achievements that have been made. I would like to thank all the Library staff, the subs, the teachers, students and parents and the senior management for their support in helping to make our Library what it is today. Marion van Engelen, Upper School Librarian

Note This document is completely produced in Google Docs, including all the images and tables. A link is available on the Library wiki at http://amazinglibrary.wikispaces.com


4

Mission Statement The following are essential to the development of literacy, teaching, learning and culture and are core school Library services. ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ●

Supporting and enhancing educational goals as outlined in the school’s mission and curriculum. Developing and sustaining in children the habit and enjoyment of reading and learning, and the use of Libraries throughout their lives. Offering opportunities for experiences in creating and using information for knowledge, understanding, imagination and enjoyment. Supporting all students in learning and practising skills for evaluating and using information, regardless of form, format or medium, including sensitivity to the modes of communication within the community. Providing access to local, regional, national and global resources and opportunities that expose learners to diverse ideas, experiences and opinions. Organising activities that encourage cultural and social awareness and sensitivity. Promoting reading and the resources and services of the school Library to the whole school community and beyond. Promoting ethical use of information and intellectual property through education and being an example of the value of academic honesty.

Policy Development A collection development policy and a handbook for the Upper School Library are both works in progress. The collection development policy will cover the critera for collection development and maintenance, as well as the procedure for ‘challenged materials’. This policy will be submitted to the management and Board for approval. See Appendix A for a draft. The handbook will be produced in the course of next school year. It provides a concise overview of all the tasks and procedures that are carried out in the Library. The staff handbook and the parent handbook both contain information for our users about the Library services. These publications are annually updated.

Achievements ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Improved access to the collection by weeding out superfluous volumes. Developed audio book, ebook and DVD collection. Active reading promotion. Taught Library & Information Literacy skills. Hosted visiting author and storyteller Marc Levitt. Designed a new lay­out and refurbishment for next year’s Library.


5

➢ Improved data in the online library catalogue (Destiny), to facilitate better searching. ➢ Introduction of online databases and Turnitin ➢ Creation of a virtual Library space: Amazing Library wiki ➢ Provide access to online magazines and periodicals

Circulation Statistics “Reading books was found to be linked with a higher chance of students going to university. For 16­year­old children […], their chance of going to university went up from 24 per cent to 35 per cent for boys and from 20 per cent to 30 per cent for girls.” Oxford University, UK, Research on reading and professional careers, 2011 (http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/news_stories/2011/110804.html)

The tables below show the circulation of Upper School Library materials per homeroom as well as per material type. “Library materials” are defined as any materials that are allowed to be checked out, i.e. fiction, non­fiction, graphic novels, audio books and dvd’s. It does not include the circulation of library magazines. Also not included are professional materials, that are only checked out by our teaching staff and parents. Library Circulation ­ Upper School ­ by Homeroom September 2012 ­ May 2013

* Homerooms from Grade 9 and up are named by last­name­initials of the 2 or 4 advisors.


6

Library Circulation ­ Upper School ­ by Category (students, teachers, parents) September 2012 ­ May 2013

Total number of Library materials checked out in Upper School   7,616

September 2012 ­ May 2013:

(45% fiction)

 10,232 (41% fiction)

September 2011­ May 2012: September 2010 ­ May 2011:

.

12,300

(39% fiction) The numbers show a downward trend, with a rise in the checking out of Fiction. It is not totally clear why this is happening. We will publish the circulation numbers every year and monitor this. Possible reasons could be: ­ an increase in the use of online databases; ­ more books being used in the Library during projects, and therefore fewer checkouts; ­ fewer new books purchased last year due to overfull shelves (that problem will be fixed in 2013­2014!).


7

Collection Development The Library has acquired new books, e­books, audiobooks, and DVDs. The numbers below should be seen in the light of the purchase of several online databases, providing access to information and reading of all kinds.

No. of volumes in Upper School Library ­ June 2013 Total

No of titles 22,572

No of copies 24,358

 Growth of Upper School Library Collections Total Items

Items added in 2012­2013

Items added in 2011­2012

1088

2166

The Libraries are subscribed to a wide range of periodicals, for use by students, staff and parents. Titles support the curriculum, and provide for professional development of the teaching staff. In the future extra focus will be on the leisure reading needs of our community, and on appropriate titles for students. Recommendations have been published regarding the minimum number of books per students that a school Library should provide. These figures refer to state schools, and are a minimum recommendation, not an optimum. The numbers show that ISL is above the minimum.

Recommended mininum number of library books per student National Council of Teachers of English (www.ncte.org) :25 International Reading Association (www.reading.org): South Carolina Dept of Education: 20

20

Actual number of library books per student in Upper School:

46!!

Online Databases Access to online databases is essential for our school to be functioning as a 21st Century learning environment. The Library has invested in several subscriptions to online databases this year. The cost of these databases looks high, but when taking into account the number of books that would have to be bought to offer the same information, it is quite reasonable. It is important to make sure that the students and staff know how to access the


8

databases and that proper instruction is given not only in the use of the databases, but also in the evaluation and use of online information from the internet and other online sources. The Upper School Library Wiki (http://amazinglibrary.wikispaces.com/Online+Research) shows a comprehensive overview of all online resources the Library subscribes to. Below is an overview of the main databases used in the Upper School.

Main Subscriptions to Online Databases Name

Discovery/United Streaming Oxford Music Online TLS Historical Archive Oxford Art Online JSTOR  Questia School

Cost per year USD 2000

Part of London Library membership* Part of London Library membership* Part of London Library membership* USD 2,500 USD 2,000

Part of London Infotrac Custom Newspapers Library Times/Guardian/Observer/Ne membership*

w York Times

Turnitin

Euro 1,348

* The cost of London Library membership is GBP 800 per year.


9

The Upper School Library Wiki – Amazing! http://amazinglibrary.wikispaces.com

The Senior Library Wiki is the main tool of library communication in the Upper School. It contains a wealth of information about reading promotion, research tools, IB Diploma, and Library events in our school. The Wiki is updated on a daily basis.

Number of visitors to the Upper School Library Wiki in 2013

Staffing & Professional Development There will be some changes in the Upper School Library staffing. Sibylle Ritter, the part­time Library Assistant, will retire at the end of this school year. The position of Library Assistant will change. In August 2013, Sabine Fiedler will start as full­time Upper School Library Circulation Coordinator. Currently the following people are employed in the different Libraries: * Upper School Librarian ­ Marion van Engelen (full­time) * Library Assistant ­ Sibylle Ritter (part­time)

Professional Development 2012­2013 Date November 2012 February 2013 April 2013 April 2013

Event IASL Annual Conference IB Librarians Workshop iFollett workshop Frankfurt International School ­ professional visit

The Library has benefited tremendously from these PD opportunities.


10

Library Events Marc Levitt ­ Story teller, November 2012 Mr Levitt entertained many of our students with his wonderful, inspiring stories. His focus is on Third Culture Kids and he had a good rapport and interesting discussions with our students about being an international student.

          

Grade 6 Read around the World, April 2013 All Grade 6 students read their way ‘around the world’ with their reading passports, where they collected stamps for reading books in different genres from different parts of the world. The most interesting journeys were chosen and this culminated in a pizza party for the best travellers (with many thanks to Mr Jack for allowing his room to be the party venue).

Meet & Greet our New Library Books As a general promotional Library activity to connect with our colleagues and to make sure that new resources do not disappear unseen on the library shelves, the Library organised Meet & Greet the New Books parties whenever new Library orders came in. Teachers had a chance to browse the new materials, and have a chat while enjoying a snack and a drink. This year the Meet & Greet parties were combined with ‘Appsitiser Apps’ events, where teachers had a chance to share their favourite apps. These parties have been very successful, and we hope to continue this lovely tradition in the next year.


11

     

                

The first Meet & Greet with Appsitisers party in December 2012.

Library and Information Skills Programs For the Librarian it has been a year of exploration and getting to know the curriculum, the way it is taught and getting to know the teachers. The Librarian teaches on a ‘flexible scheduling’ basis, where research skills are taught integrated into the subject rather than on a standalone basis. This approach ensures that library and information literacy skills are taught in a meaningful way. Several projects were taught in collaboration with the Library, i.e.Grade 9 Population Growth, Grade 7 Plague & Smallpox, and several Grade 7 French Social Studies projects. EAL students came in for reading on a regular basis and other classes learnt how to use DestinyQuest, our online library system. The IB students received training in how to do research for their Extended Essays and IA’s, as well as specific instruction in referencing and citation. Turnitin was purchased this year as well as several online databases and the IB students all received training in how to use these. It was wonderful to work with the teachers on these projects and make the Library an active and meaningful part of the teaching of the curriculum. The Librarian is currently working on a vertical and horizontal information literacy programme in collaboration with the Director of Curriculum and the Social Sciences Curriculum Committee. Grade 7 Roman Empire project Collaboration triangle: Teacher+ICT facilitator+Librarian)

­­>    Marie Roy abandons paper project in favour of Wiki’s and shared Google Docs.


12

Plans for 2013­2014 The Library is undergoing a dramatic change. It is planned to be almost twice the size as last school year. New furniture will be purchased and more shelving is to be in place. A full­time assistant will be employed. In 2013­2014 the Library will hopefully be used more intensively as a collaborative teaching place for information literacy skills. The development of the above­mentioned Library curriculum combined with the new, larger facilities will hopefully make this easier. Furthermore, the new Library aims to be a comfortable place for the students and staff to read and work, either in groups or individually.

Looking outward Collaboration and communication with other Librarians in our community and throughout the region and the world is vital for any international school. It is also important for Librarians to be able to network and communicate with other Librarians, as it is a peculiarity of our job that we do not have many colleague Librarians in the school. The Library is a member of the following professional organisations: ● ●

School Library Association UK (SLA) International Association of School Libraries (IASL), pending

The Librarian is an active member of the ECIS Librarians Forum, and a member of the IB Librarians VLE. This year ISL has connected and met with Librarians from St. George’s International School, the National Library and the City Library of Luxembourg. Next year ISL will host the Follett workshop, for Librarians from around Europe. I am very grateful for the available PD where, apart from the educational aspect, an important aim is to connect with other international school Librarians around the world.

Conclusion The Library has played a part in the students’ reading development and in their acquisition of information skills this year. With the right approach and continued support from our teachers and leaders this role could be intensified and extended. Focus needs to stay on collection development (exploration of online resources, including audiovisual materials, and ebooks), plus development and implementation of a horizontal and vertical information literacy curriculum. The practical working spaces, our rich collections, combined with a pleasant welcoming atmosphere, and the dedication of our staff, create a fertile environment for effective teaching and learning combined with the instilling of a love of reading, thereby working towards creating a lifelong love of reading and learning in our students. ­0­0­0­0­0­0­0­0­0­0­0­


13

Appendix : Collection Development Guidelines International School of Luxembourg Upper School Library Collection Development Guidelines I. Objectives The primary objective of the school library is to implement, enrich and support the educational program of the school, in accordance with the school’s Philosophy & Objectives. In the area of materials selection, the library provides a wide range of materials on all levels, with consideration for diversity of appeal and different points of view. These materials include those found in the virtual library, i.e. via Internet and other online resources. Therefore, the library: ● Provides materials that will enrich and support the curriculum, taking into consideration the varied interests, abilities, learning needs, learning styles and maturity levels of the students served. ● Provides materials for teachers, students and parents that will encourage growth in knowledge, and that will help to develop literary, cultural and aesthetic appreciation and ethical standards. ● Provides materials which reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social, political, historical, and ethnic groups and their contribution to the local, national and world heritages and cultures, thereby enabling students to develop intellectual integrity in forming judgments. ● Provides a variety of electronic formats as well as print materials to support student learning needs. These electronic formats include resources found on the Internet and other online networks. ● Places principle above personal opinion and reason above prejudice in selection of materials of the highest quality in order to ensure a comprehensive collection appropriate for the users of the library instructional technology center. The secondary objective, not less important, is to create life long readers and instill a love of reading in the whole school community. The Library aims to satisfy the reading needs of this community. Therefore the Library provides a wide range of fiction and non­fiction, of interest to students at all age and interest levels, teachers and parents. II. Authority and Responsibility The Director of the school is legally responsible for all matters relating to the operation of ISL. The responsibility for the selection of instructional materials is delegated to the professionally trained Library personnel employed by the school. III. Criteria for Evaluation and Selection of Library Materials ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Educational significance Contribution the subject matter makes to the curriculum and to the interests of the students Favorable reviews found in standard selection sources Favorable recommendations based on preview and examination of materials by professional personnel Reputation and significance of the author, producer and publisher Validity, currency, and appropriateness of material Contribution the material makes to breadth of representative viewpoints on controversial


14

● ● ● ● ●

issues High degree of potential user appeal High artistic quality and/or literary style Quality and variety of format Value commensurate with cost and/or need Timeliness or permanence

Controversial subjects The material should be consonant with the purposes of the library, meet general criteria of quality, and relate to school program needs. Judgment should be based on the total effect of the material and not on the presence of words and phrases, or other visual and aural instances which in themselves might be objectionable. The school believes that students’ discussion of issues which generate opposing points of view shall be considered a normal part of the learning process in every area of the school program. The depth of the discussion shall be determined by the maturity of the students. Teachers shall refer students to resources reflecting all points of view. Discussions, including contributions made by the teacher or resource person, shall be maintained on an objective, factual basis. Stress shall be placed on learning how to make judgements based on facts. Gifts Gifts should be evaluated by applying the same criteria used for selection of purchased materials. Professional materials These materials need to reflect research and trends in education, as well as meet general selection criteria. IV. Selection tools The following sources are available to assist the librarian in the selection process; however, selection is not limited to the use of these tools. ● ● ● ●

Professional library journals, such as School Library Journal, The School Librarian, and Good Book Guide, as well as a variety of online professional librarians’ resources, e.g. www.lovereading4kids.org and www.fantasticfiction.co.uk . Follett Titlewave (www.titlewave.com) Browns Books online catalog Amazon Online Bookstore

V. Weeding Weeding takes place so that the collection remains current and useful to the unique clientele it is meant to serve. The American Library Association recommends that 3% ­ 5% of the collection (print and non­print) be weeded annually. Criteria for weeding are: 1.  worn­out volumes: * dirty, brittle, yellow pages; missing pages; tattered covers; etc. * badly bound volumes: soft, pulpy paper and/or shoddy binding * badly printed works * books of antiquated appearance which might discourage use * audio­visual materials with missing or broken pieces 2.  superfluous or duplicate volumes: * unneeded duplicate titles


15

* older editions * highly specialised books (when the library holds more general or up­to­date volumes on the same subject) * books on subjects of little interest to the school community * books which no longer relate to the curriculum (if specialised) 3.  Poor content: * information is dated * information is inaccurate * stereotypes are present * book is poorly written 4.   Weeding According to Use * Nonfiction:  Book has not been checked out within last 10 years * Fiction:  Book has not been checked out within last 5 years (classics excluded) VI. Challenged Materials If objections are made to a selection, the principles of the freedom to read and professional responsibility of the staff should be defended. If a complaint is made, the procedures are as follows: a. Complainant needs to fill in Form A b. Inform the Librarian c. Upon receipt of written Form A, a Materials Evaluation Committee shall be formed, consisting of: ­ The Librarian ­ A Classroom Teacher familiar with the subject challenged ­ the Upper School Principal of the School

No material shall be removed from use until the Materials Evaluation Committee has made its final decision. Within 30 days the Materials Evaluation Committee Shall: a.  Examine challenged material in relation to the collection development guidelines. b.  Check general acceptance of the materials by reading reviews c.  Weigh values and faults and form opinion based on the materials as a whole d.  Meet and discuss and prepare a report to the Library Council (form B) e.  File a copy of the report with the administration office The patron may appeal the decision of the Materials Evaluation Committee to the School Leadership Team within 30 days of the date of the Materials Evaluation Committee’s decision. Within 30 days of the receipt of the appeal the School Leadership Team shall: a.  examine the findings of the Materials Evaluation Committee b.  weigh values and faults and form opinions based on the materials as a whole c.  meet to discuss and prepare a report of the decision to the patron, If a grievance persists, an appeal to the School Board may be made. The decision of the School Board is final.


16

Form A  ­  REQUEST FOR RECONSIDERATION OF WORK (Attach extra pages if needed to complete statements)

Author, compose, producer, artist, etc ________________________________________ Title___________________________________________________________________ Publisher (if known)_______________________________________________________ Request initiated by ______________________________________________________ Telephone __________________ Address ____________________________________ Complainant represents: himself Organisation (Name) ______________________________________________________ other group (Identify)______________________________________________________ 1. To what in the work do you object?  Please be specific, cite exact parts: _______________________________________________________________________    _ _____________________________________________________________________      __ _____________________________________________________________________ 2. What of value is there in this work? _________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________  _______________________________________________________________________ 3. What do you feel might be the result of reading, viewing, or listening to this work?  _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ 4. For what age group would you recommend this work? __________________________       5. Did you read, view, or listen to the entire work? _______________________________         If no, what pages or section did you read? _________________________________ 6. Are you aware of the judgment of this work by critics?__________________________ 7. Are you aware of the teacher’s purpose in using this work?_______________________ 8. What do you believe is the theme of purpose of this work?_______________________ 9. What would you prefer the school do about this work?         _____Do not assign or recommend it to my child.         _____Withdraw it from all students.         _____Send it back to the proper department grade level for re­evaluation. 10. In its place, what work of equal value would you recommend that would convey as valuable of picture and perspective of a society or set of values? _______________________________________________________________________   Signature of Complainant ______________________________  Date _______________


17

Form B    MATERIALS EVALUATION COMMITTEE REPORT (Attach extra pages if needed to complete statements) Physical description of challenged material:  (author, title, publisher, copyright, producer, etc.)___________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Justification for inclusion of material (include theme and purpose) ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Critics judgment of materials: (If possible include copies of reviews indicating the source)________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Materials Evaluation Committee’s decision and comments:  (include statements from majority and minority positions) ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Signatures of Committee Members ______________________________                                              ______________________________                                                     

______________________________

                                                   

______________________________

ISL Upper School Library Report 12-13  
ISL Upper School Library Report 12-13  

Annual report

Advertisement